Date   

Search for Ship that Carried Grandfather to America #general

Lawrence Weintraub
 

Hello All:

After considerable effort, I obtained a copy of my grandfather's Alien
Registration Form >from 1940. It contains very interesting information
but the piece that excited me the most was that he arrived in New York
as a 22 year old >from Russia on a ship in 1903. This came as a
surprise because I had the family in the Boston area until 1931 when
he and his immediate family moved to New York. So far, my excitement
has been somewhat muted by my inability to find the ship, passenger
list, etc. His name was Sam EDELSTEIN though the form said he entered
the country under the name of Sam ADELSTEIN. He claimed to arrive in
NYC on February 22, 1903 aboard the S.S. Patricka. I can't find such
a ship though I was thinking the Patricia was a possibility. I am
requesting the help of the nautical mavens out there to help steer me
to the correct information.

Thank you.

Lawrence Weintraub
Hicksville, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Search for Ship that Carried Grandfather to America #general

Lawrence Weintraub
 

Hello All:

After considerable effort, I obtained a copy of my grandfather's Alien
Registration Form >from 1940. It contains very interesting information
but the piece that excited me the most was that he arrived in New York
as a 22 year old >from Russia on a ship in 1903. This came as a
surprise because I had the family in the Boston area until 1931 when
he and his immediate family moved to New York. So far, my excitement
has been somewhat muted by my inability to find the ship, passenger
list, etc. His name was Sam EDELSTEIN though the form said he entered
the country under the name of Sam ADELSTEIN. He claimed to arrive in
NYC on February 22, 1903 aboard the S.S. Patricka. I can't find such
a ship though I was thinking the Patricia was a possibility. I am
requesting the help of the nautical mavens out there to help steer me
to the correct information.

Thank you.

Lawrence Weintraub
Hicksville, New York


Vital Records: Warsaw #general

Marilyn Silva
 

Genners,

Has anyone had success in using Western Union to pay for records in
Warsaw Archive or any other for that matter.

Marilyn
Glendale, CA

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond directly to Marilyn


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Vital Records: Warsaw #general

Marilyn Silva
 

Genners,

Has anyone had success in using Western Union to pay for records in
Warsaw Archive or any other for that matter.

Marilyn
Glendale, CA

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond directly to Marilyn


Platz/Plac from Delyatyn #general

Shelley Mitchell
 

Dear friends -

I have hit a major brick wall. It seems I have an impossible task.
My great aunt Perl TERNER-MOLDAUER of Kolomea/Kolomyja married Isaac PLATZ of
Delyatyn in 1910. When the Soviets reported on the murders in Delyatyn
during the Holocaust, they listed Isaac PLAC and his brothers who owned a
hotel-spa. With Isaac, they listed three females. No names were given
for any females. I assume one was his wife, Perl. But they had 7 children,
including a son named Samuel, a dentist. If any of the others escaped,
they could have gone anyplace in the world and might not have known much
about their TERNER-KONIGSBERG connection in America at the time.
On the off chance that at least one child or their family escaped,
I'm asking you to contact me if you have any information about the
family of this couple.

Shelley Mitchell
Brooklyn, New York 11201


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Platz/Plac from Delyatyn #general

Shelley Mitchell
 

Dear friends -

I have hit a major brick wall. It seems I have an impossible task.
My great aunt Perl TERNER-MOLDAUER of Kolomea/Kolomyja married Isaac PLATZ of
Delyatyn in 1910. When the Soviets reported on the murders in Delyatyn
during the Holocaust, they listed Isaac PLAC and his brothers who owned a
hotel-spa. With Isaac, they listed three females. No names were given
for any females. I assume one was his wife, Perl. But they had 7 children,
including a son named Samuel, a dentist. If any of the others escaped,
they could have gone anyplace in the world and might not have known much
about their TERNER-KONIGSBERG connection in America at the time.
On the off chance that at least one child or their family escaped,
I'm asking you to contact me if you have any information about the
family of this couple.

Shelley Mitchell
Brooklyn, New York 11201


JewishGen Passover Companion #austria-czech

Groll, Avraham
 

Dear JewishGenners,

The first Passover celebration in history took place more than 3,300
years ago, marking the first anniversary of the rescue and redemption
of the Jewish people >from Egypt. Since that time, this holiday,
particularly the Seder ritual, has become a mainstay of the Jewish
people, and something that brings families together in unique ways.

At its core, the Seder stresses the importance of family, and helps
preserve Jewish history for future generations - which is what
JewishGen is dedicated to doing each and every day.

With this in mind, we are pleased to share our "JewishGen Passover
Companion," which is a collection of historical and inspirational
vignettes about Passover that are contained throughout JewishGen.

We hope that anyone reading this material will gain a better, deeper
and more personal understanding of the lives our ancestors lived,
which will, in turn, help us ensure that our own children,
grandchildren, and great-grandchildren, will likewise feel connected
and inspired by the great history of their ancestors - the entirety
of the Jewish people.

There are two ways to read the JewishGen Passover Companion. You
can download it as a PDF by visiting:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/passovercompanion2016/PassoverCompanion2016.pdf
[http://tinyurl.com/zsvpu6j]

Or, it can be read online by visiting:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/passovercompanion2016/passover2016.html
[http://tinyurl.com/gsj6wox]

Wishing all a happy Passover, and a Chag Kosher V'Sameach.

The JewishGen Team


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech JewishGen Passover Companion #austria-czech

Groll, Avraham
 

Dear JewishGenners,

The first Passover celebration in history took place more than 3,300
years ago, marking the first anniversary of the rescue and redemption
of the Jewish people >from Egypt. Since that time, this holiday,
particularly the Seder ritual, has become a mainstay of the Jewish
people, and something that brings families together in unique ways.

At its core, the Seder stresses the importance of family, and helps
preserve Jewish history for future generations - which is what
JewishGen is dedicated to doing each and every day.

With this in mind, we are pleased to share our "JewishGen Passover
Companion," which is a collection of historical and inspirational
vignettes about Passover that are contained throughout JewishGen.

We hope that anyone reading this material will gain a better, deeper
and more personal understanding of the lives our ancestors lived,
which will, in turn, help us ensure that our own children,
grandchildren, and great-grandchildren, will likewise feel connected
and inspired by the great history of their ancestors - the entirety
of the Jewish people.

There are two ways to read the JewishGen Passover Companion. You
can download it as a PDF by visiting:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/passovercompanion2016/PassoverCompanion2016.pdf
[http://tinyurl.com/zsvpu6j]

Or, it can be read online by visiting:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/passovercompanion2016/passover2016.html
[http://tinyurl.com/gsj6wox]

Wishing all a happy Passover, and a Chag Kosher V'Sameach.

The JewishGen Team


JewishGen Passover Companion #courland #latvia

Groll, Avraham
 

Dear JewishGenners,

The first Passover celebration in history took place more than 3,300
years ago, marking the first anniversary of the rescue and redemption
of the Jewish people >from Egypt. Since that time, this holiday,
particularly the Seder ritual, has become a mainstay of the Jewish
people, and something that brings families together in unique ways.

At its core, the Seder stresses the importance of family, and helps
preserve Jewish history for future generations - which is what
JewishGen is dedicated to doing each and every day.

With this in mind, we are pleased to share our "JewishGen Passover
Companion," which is a collection of historical and inspirational
vignettes about Passover that are contained throughout JewishGen.

We hope that anyone reading this material will gain a better, deeper
and more personal understanding of the lives our ancestors lived,
which will, in turn, help us ensure that our own children,
grandchildren, and great-grandchildren, will likewise feel connected
and inspired by the great history of their ancestors - the entirety
of the Jewish people.

There are two ways to read the JewishGen Passover Companion. You
can download it as a PDF by visiting:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/passovercompanion2016/PassoverCompanion2016.pdf
[http://tinyurl.com/zsvpu6j]

Or, it can be read online by visiting:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/passovercompanion2016/passover2016.html
[http://tinyurl.com/gsj6wox]

Wishing all a happy Passover, and a Chag Kosher V'Sameach.

The JewishGen Team


JewishGen Passover Companion #southafrica

Groll, Avraham
 

Dear JewishGenners,

The first Passover celebration in history took place more than 3,300
years ago, marking the first anniversary of the rescue and redemption
of the Jewish people >from Egypt. Since that time, this holiday,
particularly the Seder ritual, has become a mainstay of the Jewish
people, and something that brings families together in unique ways.

At its core, the Seder stresses the importance of family, and helps
preserve Jewish history for future generations - which is what
JewishGen is dedicated to doing each and every day.

With this in mind, we are pleased to share our "JewishGen Passover
Companion," which is a collection of historical and inspirational
vignettes about Passover that are contained throughout JewishGen.

We hope that anyone reading this material will gain a better, deeper
and more personal understanding of the lives our ancestors lived,
which will, in turn, help us ensure that our own children,
grandchildren, and great-grandchildren, will likewise feel connected
and inspired by the great history of their ancestors - the entirety
of the Jewish people.

There are two ways to read the JewishGen Passover Companion. You
can download it as a PDF by visiting:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/passovercompanion2016/PassoverCompanion2016.pdf
[http://tinyurl.com/zsvpu6j]

Or, it can be read online by visiting:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/passovercompanion2016/passover2016.html
[http://tinyurl.com/gsj6wox]

Wishing all a happy Passover, and a Chag Kosher V'Sameach.

The JewishGen Team


Courland SIG #Courland #Latvia JewishGen Passover Companion #courland #latvia

Groll, Avraham
 

Dear JewishGenners,

The first Passover celebration in history took place more than 3,300
years ago, marking the first anniversary of the rescue and redemption
of the Jewish people >from Egypt. Since that time, this holiday,
particularly the Seder ritual, has become a mainstay of the Jewish
people, and something that brings families together in unique ways.

At its core, the Seder stresses the importance of family, and helps
preserve Jewish history for future generations - which is what
JewishGen is dedicated to doing each and every day.

With this in mind, we are pleased to share our "JewishGen Passover
Companion," which is a collection of historical and inspirational
vignettes about Passover that are contained throughout JewishGen.

We hope that anyone reading this material will gain a better, deeper
and more personal understanding of the lives our ancestors lived,
which will, in turn, help us ensure that our own children,
grandchildren, and great-grandchildren, will likewise feel connected
and inspired by the great history of their ancestors - the entirety
of the Jewish people.

There are two ways to read the JewishGen Passover Companion. You
can download it as a PDF by visiting:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/passovercompanion2016/PassoverCompanion2016.pdf
[http://tinyurl.com/zsvpu6j]

Or, it can be read online by visiting:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/passovercompanion2016/passover2016.html
[http://tinyurl.com/gsj6wox]

Wishing all a happy Passover, and a Chag Kosher V'Sameach.

The JewishGen Team


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica JewishGen Passover Companion #southafrica

Groll, Avraham
 

Dear JewishGenners,

The first Passover celebration in history took place more than 3,300
years ago, marking the first anniversary of the rescue and redemption
of the Jewish people >from Egypt. Since that time, this holiday,
particularly the Seder ritual, has become a mainstay of the Jewish
people, and something that brings families together in unique ways.

At its core, the Seder stresses the importance of family, and helps
preserve Jewish history for future generations - which is what
JewishGen is dedicated to doing each and every day.

With this in mind, we are pleased to share our "JewishGen Passover
Companion," which is a collection of historical and inspirational
vignettes about Passover that are contained throughout JewishGen.

We hope that anyone reading this material will gain a better, deeper
and more personal understanding of the lives our ancestors lived,
which will, in turn, help us ensure that our own children,
grandchildren, and great-grandchildren, will likewise feel connected
and inspired by the great history of their ancestors - the entirety
of the Jewish people.

There are two ways to read the JewishGen Passover Companion. You
can download it as a PDF by visiting:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/passovercompanion2016/PassoverCompanion2016.pdf
[http://tinyurl.com/zsvpu6j]

Or, it can be read online by visiting:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/passovercompanion2016/passover2016.html
[http://tinyurl.com/gsj6wox]

Wishing all a happy Passover, and a Chag Kosher V'Sameach.

The JewishGen Team


JewishGen Passover Companion #hungary

bounce-3134030-772961@...
 

Dear JewishGenners,

The first Passover celebration in history took place more than 3,300
years ago, marking the first anniversary of the rescue and redemption
of the Jewish people >from Egypt. Since that time, this holiday,
particularly the Seder ritual, has become a mainstay of the Jewish
people, and something that brings families together in unique ways.

At its core, the Seder stresses the importance of family, and helps
preserve Jewish history for future generations - which is what
JewishGen is dedicated to doing each and every day.

With this in mind, we are pleased to share our "JewishGen Passover
Companion," which is a collection of historical and inspirational
vignettes about Passover that are contained throughout JewishGen.

We hope that anyone reading this material will gain a better, deeper
and more personal understanding of the lives our ancestors lived,
which will, in turn, help us ensure that our own children,
grandchildren, and great-grandchildren, will likewise feel connected
and inspired by the great history of their ancestors - the entirety
of the Jewish people.

There are two ways to read the JewishGen Passover Companion. You
can download it as a PDF by visiting:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/passovercompanion2016/PassoverCompanion2016.pdf
[http://tinyurl.com/zsvpu6j]

Or, it can be read online by visiting:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/passovercompanion2016/passover2016.html
[http://tinyurl.com/gsj6wox]

Wishing all a happy Passover, and a Chag Kosher V'Sameach.

The JewishGen Team


Hungary SIG #Hungary JewishGen Passover Companion #hungary

bounce-3134030-772961@...
 

Dear JewishGenners,

The first Passover celebration in history took place more than 3,300
years ago, marking the first anniversary of the rescue and redemption
of the Jewish people >from Egypt. Since that time, this holiday,
particularly the Seder ritual, has become a mainstay of the Jewish
people, and something that brings families together in unique ways.

At its core, the Seder stresses the importance of family, and helps
preserve Jewish history for future generations - which is what
JewishGen is dedicated to doing each and every day.

With this in mind, we are pleased to share our "JewishGen Passover
Companion," which is a collection of historical and inspirational
vignettes about Passover that are contained throughout JewishGen.

We hope that anyone reading this material will gain a better, deeper
and more personal understanding of the lives our ancestors lived,
which will, in turn, help us ensure that our own children,
grandchildren, and great-grandchildren, will likewise feel connected
and inspired by the great history of their ancestors - the entirety
of the Jewish people.

There are two ways to read the JewishGen Passover Companion. You
can download it as a PDF by visiting:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/passovercompanion2016/PassoverCompanion2016.pdf
[http://tinyurl.com/zsvpu6j]

Or, it can be read online by visiting:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/passovercompanion2016/passover2016.html
[http://tinyurl.com/gsj6wox]

Wishing all a happy Passover, and a Chag Kosher V'Sameach.

The JewishGen Team


posting snippets of documents on ViewMate #ukraine

judithcomfort@...
 

Hello friends,
I find that trying to solve the mystery of a few
illegible words or phrases >from a boat manifest or other document is
best done in context to the whole page. I need to compare the
letters/wprds to other letters/words in order to understand the
eccentricities of the handwriting. Often there are repetitions on the
page as people travelled with family and friends.
A link to the whole document would be useful.

Thank you,

Judith Comfort in BC, Canada


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine posting snippets of documents on ViewMate #ukraine

judithcomfort@...
 

Hello friends,
I find that trying to solve the mystery of a few
illegible words or phrases >from a boat manifest or other document is
best done in context to the whole page. I need to compare the
letters/wprds to other letters/words in order to understand the
eccentricities of the handwriting. Often there are repetitions on the
page as people travelled with family and friends.
A link to the whole document would be useful.

Thank you,

Judith Comfort in BC, Canada


ViewMate translation request - Polish #poland

Colin Cohn <cohn_jgen@...>
 

Hi all,

I've posted the 1909 marriage record of my relative Mordche FUCHS to
Henie FRIEDLER on ViewMate for which I need a few specific details
translated >from Polish.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM46289

Please reply on the ViewMate form.

Chag Sameach,
Colin Cohn
Sydney, Australia
Researching: Skole: EICHENSTEIN, FUCHS, FRIEDLER


JRI Poland #Poland ViewMate translation request - Polish #poland

Colin Cohn <cohn_jgen@...>
 

Hi all,

I've posted the 1909 marriage record of my relative Mordche FUCHS to
Henie FRIEDLER on ViewMate for which I need a few specific details
translated >from Polish.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM46289

Please reply on the ViewMate form.

Chag Sameach,
Colin Cohn
Sydney, Australia
Researching: Skole: EICHENSTEIN, FUCHS, FRIEDLER


Lots of old census-like records, mostly from Galician towns, scanned and online at the Ossolineum library website #poland

Asparagirl <asparagirl@...>
 

A big thank you to Logan Kleinwaks for alerting us all to the
existence of the Ossolineum library's website. It looks like they
have scanned the contents of their library shelves and have many files
now available on their website.

Only a few of these publications are probably useful for genealogical
purposes; a lot of them are old records relating to taxable goods such
as cattle or wine, for example. But there are quite a number of
census-like lists of (usually adult male) inhabitants >from many towns
from Galicia and nearby, many >from the late eighteenth century and
very early nineteenth century. Some interesting ones I've found so
far:

- Nadworna (now Nadvirna, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine)
A list of people (landowners? heads of households?) for 1787. Lots of
Jewish names, but practically every one of them is a patronymic (i.e.
Davidowitz, Ickowitz, Chaimowitz, etc.) rather than a typical surname.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-002764

- Delyatin (now Delatyn, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine)
Another list of people for 1787. Only a few Jews here, helpfully
segregated to a section starting on page 54, and a few have surnames,
not just patronymics, but might be occupational or toponymics,
including DOBROTOWSKI, MIKULCZANSKI, SZAFARZ, RZEZNIK, STARY,
PANTELUK, LANCZINSKI, SZINCHARZ / SZINOHARZ, and OZIMEK.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-002765

- Brody (now in Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
A list of Jewish merchants in the town, sometimes grouped with their
family members (including wives and children) census-style, >from 1784.
Some of them have patronymics but some of them have recognizable
surnames, including BYK, PERLER/BERLER, EBER, BALABAN, ZELNITZ,
ABELES, LIEBERMAN, MARGOSCHER, GEFSER/GESSER, OLESKER, LOFER, FRENTZ,
and others.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003948

- Lwow and Lwow area (now Lviv, Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
List of materials relating to anti-Jewish pogroms, 1918-1919
This document contains a mixture of typewritten reports (mostly in
Polish, but at least one in French), handwritten reports, newspaper
clippings, and lists of people who were hurt or killed in the pogroms
(surname, given name, age, address, location where attacked, etc.).
Some of the lists of people are comprised solely of Jews, most of them
middle-aged, but a few of the lists include a number of people who are
identified as Roman Catholics, i.e. likely ethnic Poles who were also
targeted by the attackers.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-008486

- Stanislau/Stanislawow (now Ivano-Frankivsk, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine)
Inventory of the city and all its ethnic groups, >from 1770. Basically
a census, listing heads of households and the number (though not
names) of other people in their families, i.e. 1 man, 1 woman, 2
girls, 3 boys. Many Jews listed, but almost all only have patronymics
or occupational words. Some non-patronymics seen include
PASTERNAK/PASZTERNAK, HOROCHOWSKI, WINNIK, RYBAK, etc. But some of
the "surnames" may actually just be occupational names or toponyms
indicating where the person was from, i.e. HORODENSKI means from
Horodenka. Includes several pages related to the Stanislawow
synagogue(s).
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-000515

- Zloczow (now Zolochiv, Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
Google Translate says it's a "circulars to dominion, municipalities
and kahals office". Written in book format, not tabular, so it's hard
to read, but I did notice a few Jews with patronymics and at least one
LANDAU.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003732

- Czortkow (now Chortkiv, Ternopil oblast, Ukraine)
list >from 1783 of all heads of household. It has a whole section on
people affiliated with the Czortkow synagogue, but all their surnames
seem to be patronymics, toponymics, or occupational (i.e. KRAWIEC or
SZNYDER, which are Polish and German/Yiddish words for a tailor).
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003109

- Rawa (now Rava-Ruska, Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
Census-like list >from 1812 of the inhabitants (landowners? heads of
households?), with Jewish names starting on page 17. And at last,
it's a list with real surnames!
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003298

There are many, many other files on this website that look like
they're probably of interest to someone, but I didn't examine all of
them. Just a sampling of a few more:

- Oleska (now Olesko, Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
document >from 1823
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-002956

- Bialego Kamienia (Bialy Kamien, now Belyy Kamen/Bily Kamien/Bilyi
Kamin, Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
document >from 1807
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003047

- Dzwinogrod (now Dzvenyhorod, Ternopil oblast, Ukraine)
document >from 1808
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003113

- Snyatyn and its suburbs (now Sniatyn, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine)
Two documents seen, one for 1752, with inhabitants broken down by
religious/ethnic group (Ukrainians, Poles, Armenians, Jews) and then
broken into sub-groups by city or town. Almost all the Jewish surnames
are actually patronymics, toponyms, or occupational names.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-000513
And the other document, >from some time in the 19th century, in book
format and harder to read:
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003879

- Uhnow (now Uhniv, Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
document >from 1786/1835 (updated in 1835?). Jews clustered together at
end of the list, almost all the Jewish surnames are actually
patronymics, toponyms, or occupational names.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003414

- Lysiec (now in Poland)
document >from 1843
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003206

- Kosow (now Kosiv, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine)
document >from 1710 (!) Almost all the Jewish surnames are
patronymics, with a few occupational names.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003495

The main Ossolineum library search page is here:
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/index2.php

Search tips:

- The library website is pretty slow, especially for downloading big
PDF's. Their search engine for their holdings is not the most
comprehensive or flexible, and there's basically no help text. Oh,
and it's all in Polish, but if you use Google Chrome for your web
browser, it will attempt to translate the text for you
automatically...but not very well.

- Make sure you use the exact Polish spelling of any towns, including
any Polish letters like the L with a slash, or the Z with a dot, or
any accented characters. Searching for the simplified transliteration
usually won't find what you want.

- Also, remember to search for other versions of town names, because
Polish words change their form when they're in different places in the
sentence. For example, searching for "Brodach" vs. "Brody" gives
different results. Use the Google Translate website and see how your
town's name would change in Polish if it were listed as ">from [Town]"
vs. "in [Town]" vs. "of [Town]" vs. "for [Town]", etc.

- And try to check for misspelled town names. I found a listing for a
"Szuszczyn" for 1836 -- perhaps it is really Szczuczyn, Grajewo
county, Podlaskie voivodeship, Poland?

- These records don't strictly cover just Galicia -- I did see a few
items listed for 16th-17th century Kamenets-Podolskyy, for example.
And some of the towns with inventory/census lists I saw in the search
results seem to be in modern-day Slovakia, near the Polish border,
which is why I am cross-posting this message to the H-SIG list too.

Good luck!

- Brooke Schreier Ganz
Mill Valley, California


JRI Poland #Poland Lots of old census-like records, mostly from Galician towns, scanned and online at the Ossolineum library website #poland

Asparagirl <asparagirl@...>
 

A big thank you to Logan Kleinwaks for alerting us all to the
existence of the Ossolineum library's website. It looks like they
have scanned the contents of their library shelves and have many files
now available on their website.

Only a few of these publications are probably useful for genealogical
purposes; a lot of them are old records relating to taxable goods such
as cattle or wine, for example. But there are quite a number of
census-like lists of (usually adult male) inhabitants >from many towns
from Galicia and nearby, many >from the late eighteenth century and
very early nineteenth century. Some interesting ones I've found so
far:

- Nadworna (now Nadvirna, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine)
A list of people (landowners? heads of households?) for 1787. Lots of
Jewish names, but practically every one of them is a patronymic (i.e.
Davidowitz, Ickowitz, Chaimowitz, etc.) rather than a typical surname.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-002764

- Delyatin (now Delatyn, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine)
Another list of people for 1787. Only a few Jews here, helpfully
segregated to a section starting on page 54, and a few have surnames,
not just patronymics, but might be occupational or toponymics,
including DOBROTOWSKI, MIKULCZANSKI, SZAFARZ, RZEZNIK, STARY,
PANTELUK, LANCZINSKI, SZINCHARZ / SZINOHARZ, and OZIMEK.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-002765

- Brody (now in Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
A list of Jewish merchants in the town, sometimes grouped with their
family members (including wives and children) census-style, >from 1784.
Some of them have patronymics but some of them have recognizable
surnames, including BYK, PERLER/BERLER, EBER, BALABAN, ZELNITZ,
ABELES, LIEBERMAN, MARGOSCHER, GEFSER/GESSER, OLESKER, LOFER, FRENTZ,
and others.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003948

- Lwow and Lwow area (now Lviv, Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
List of materials relating to anti-Jewish pogroms, 1918-1919
This document contains a mixture of typewritten reports (mostly in
Polish, but at least one in French), handwritten reports, newspaper
clippings, and lists of people who were hurt or killed in the pogroms
(surname, given name, age, address, location where attacked, etc.).
Some of the lists of people are comprised solely of Jews, most of them
middle-aged, but a few of the lists include a number of people who are
identified as Roman Catholics, i.e. likely ethnic Poles who were also
targeted by the attackers.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-008486

- Stanislau/Stanislawow (now Ivano-Frankivsk, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine)
Inventory of the city and all its ethnic groups, >from 1770. Basically
a census, listing heads of households and the number (though not
names) of other people in their families, i.e. 1 man, 1 woman, 2
girls, 3 boys. Many Jews listed, but almost all only have patronymics
or occupational words. Some non-patronymics seen include
PASTERNAK/PASZTERNAK, HOROCHOWSKI, WINNIK, RYBAK, etc. But some of
the "surnames" may actually just be occupational names or toponyms
indicating where the person was from, i.e. HORODENSKI means from
Horodenka. Includes several pages related to the Stanislawow
synagogue(s).
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-000515

- Zloczow (now Zolochiv, Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
Google Translate says it's a "circulars to dominion, municipalities
and kahals office". Written in book format, not tabular, so it's hard
to read, but I did notice a few Jews with patronymics and at least one
LANDAU.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003732

- Czortkow (now Chortkiv, Ternopil oblast, Ukraine)
list >from 1783 of all heads of household. It has a whole section on
people affiliated with the Czortkow synagogue, but all their surnames
seem to be patronymics, toponymics, or occupational (i.e. KRAWIEC or
SZNYDER, which are Polish and German/Yiddish words for a tailor).
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003109

- Rawa (now Rava-Ruska, Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
Census-like list >from 1812 of the inhabitants (landowners? heads of
households?), with Jewish names starting on page 17. And at last,
it's a list with real surnames!
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003298

There are many, many other files on this website that look like
they're probably of interest to someone, but I didn't examine all of
them. Just a sampling of a few more:

- Oleska (now Olesko, Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
document >from 1823
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-002956

- Bialego Kamienia (Bialy Kamien, now Belyy Kamen/Bily Kamien/Bilyi
Kamin, Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
document >from 1807
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003047

- Dzwinogrod (now Dzvenyhorod, Ternopil oblast, Ukraine)
document >from 1808
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003113

- Snyatyn and its suburbs (now Sniatyn, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine)
Two documents seen, one for 1752, with inhabitants broken down by
religious/ethnic group (Ukrainians, Poles, Armenians, Jews) and then
broken into sub-groups by city or town. Almost all the Jewish surnames
are actually patronymics, toponyms, or occupational names.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-000513
And the other document, >from some time in the 19th century, in book
format and harder to read:
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003879

- Uhnow (now Uhniv, Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
document >from 1786/1835 (updated in 1835?). Jews clustered together at
end of the list, almost all the Jewish surnames are actually
patronymics, toponyms, or occupational names.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003414

- Lysiec (now in Poland)
document >from 1843
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003206

- Kosow (now Kosiv, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine)
document >from 1710 (!) Almost all the Jewish surnames are
patronymics, with a few occupational names.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003495

The main Ossolineum library search page is here:
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/index2.php

Search tips:

- The library website is pretty slow, especially for downloading big
PDF's. Their search engine for their holdings is not the most
comprehensive or flexible, and there's basically no help text. Oh,
and it's all in Polish, but if you use Google Chrome for your web
browser, it will attempt to translate the text for you
automatically...but not very well.

- Make sure you use the exact Polish spelling of any towns, including
any Polish letters like the L with a slash, or the Z with a dot, or
any accented characters. Searching for the simplified transliteration
usually won't find what you want.

- Also, remember to search for other versions of town names, because
Polish words change their form when they're in different places in the
sentence. For example, searching for "Brodach" vs. "Brody" gives
different results. Use the Google Translate website and see how your
town's name would change in Polish if it were listed as ">from [Town]"
vs. "in [Town]" vs. "of [Town]" vs. "for [Town]", etc.

- And try to check for misspelled town names. I found a listing for a
"Szuszczyn" for 1836 -- perhaps it is really Szczuczyn, Grajewo
county, Podlaskie voivodeship, Poland?

- These records don't strictly cover just Galicia -- I did see a few
items listed for 16th-17th century Kamenets-Podolskyy, for example.
And some of the towns with inventory/census lists I saw in the search
results seem to be in modern-day Slovakia, near the Polish border,
which is why I am cross-posting this message to the H-SIG list too.

Good luck!

- Brooke Schreier Ganz
Mill Valley, California

75921 - 75940 of 661989