Date   

ViewMate translations Russian to English #general

Lynne Kaffko
 

I have submitted 3 death records for the following people: Daniel Jusk Kawke, Sora
Kawkiewicz and Jenta Kejzer. All the records appear to be in Russian. If at all
possible I would like a complete translation of the documents. Any help will be
greatly appreciated.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM49396
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM49397
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM49398

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you so very much for your help.

Lynne Kaffko

Researching the surnames: KAWKIEWICZ, KAWKE, KAFKA, KEIZER, CYZAR, KEJZER,
GALCHINSKY, KALEKA, KALINSKY all >from the Lomza, Bialystok area.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translations Russian to English #general

Lynne Kaffko
 

I have submitted 3 death records for the following people: Daniel Jusk Kawke, Sora
Kawkiewicz and Jenta Kejzer. All the records appear to be in Russian. If at all
possible I would like a complete translation of the documents. Any help will be
greatly appreciated.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM49396
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM49397
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM49398

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you so very much for your help.

Lynne Kaffko

Researching the surnames: KAWKIEWICZ, KAWKE, KAFKA, KEIZER, CYZAR, KEJZER,
GALCHINSKY, KALEKA, KALINSKY all >from the Lomza, Bialystok area.


Re: Yiddish names to American names in U.S. records #general

Rochelle Gershenow
 

Shari Kantrow wrote "My great-grandmother's sister Hinda KARPET (b. abt
1870)in Kamenets-Podolskiy was married to someone named Chaskel (Wiener ?). They
lived in Brooklyn, NY on President St. until the 1960s. I am unaware if they had
any children. My mother has no idea what their American names were, so finding them
in Brooklyn has been a bit tricky."

A wonderful source for finding the American name >from the Yiddish name is
the Given Names Database, which can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/. The search page is located
at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/search.htm

You do need to play with the countries a bit. For example, I plugged Hinde
into the search box and first used Belarus as the country. It did not show
any U.S. names. But when I used Ukraine as the country it brought up Annie
/ Hannah / Hinda / Ida as possibilities for the U.S. name. I also plugged
in Chaskel for a few countries with no result. When I plugged in Poland as
the country it brought up Chaskel (Khaskel) as the Yiddish nickname for the
Hebrew name of Yechezkeyl, and the U.S. name of Charles.

Rochelle Gershenow
Oxford, Connecticut

Searching: AGINSKY (Belarus); CHAIKIN (Homyel, Belarus; Priluki, Ukraine);
GERIS/GERRISH (Vitebsk GuberyniaBelarus/Latvia); GERSHONOWITZ (Lithuania;
USA); LANGDORF (Galicia); MERRIN (Belarus); PURINSON/PURINZON
(Priluki,Ukraine; Argentina; Brazil; Israel; USA); SLONIMSKY/SLONIM (Minsk,
Belarus; USA); SONDEK/SUNDOCK/SUNDACK (Janavole, Borkhovo, Rezekne, and
Ludza, Latvia; USA); SOKOLOVSKY (Priluki, Ukraine)


Roz Chast #general

Judy Floam
 

There is a lovely piece in this week's New Yorker by Roz Chast, about
finding relatives graves in Mt. Lebanon Cemetery in Queens. Someone who
read her book about her parents used FindAGrave and then sent her
information about how to find these relatives.

Judy Floam
Baltimore


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Yiddish names to American names in U.S. records #general

Rochelle Gershenow
 

Shari Kantrow wrote "My great-grandmother's sister Hinda KARPET (b. abt
1870)in Kamenets-Podolskiy was married to someone named Chaskel (Wiener ?). They
lived in Brooklyn, NY on President St. until the 1960s. I am unaware if they had
any children. My mother has no idea what their American names were, so finding them
in Brooklyn has been a bit tricky."

A wonderful source for finding the American name >from the Yiddish name is
the Given Names Database, which can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/. The search page is located
at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/search.htm

You do need to play with the countries a bit. For example, I plugged Hinde
into the search box and first used Belarus as the country. It did not show
any U.S. names. But when I used Ukraine as the country it brought up Annie
/ Hannah / Hinda / Ida as possibilities for the U.S. name. I also plugged
in Chaskel for a few countries with no result. When I plugged in Poland as
the country it brought up Chaskel (Khaskel) as the Yiddish nickname for the
Hebrew name of Yechezkeyl, and the U.S. name of Charles.

Rochelle Gershenow
Oxford, Connecticut

Searching: AGINSKY (Belarus); CHAIKIN (Homyel, Belarus; Priluki, Ukraine);
GERIS/GERRISH (Vitebsk GuberyniaBelarus/Latvia); GERSHONOWITZ (Lithuania;
USA); LANGDORF (Galicia); MERRIN (Belarus); PURINSON/PURINZON
(Priluki,Ukraine; Argentina; Brazil; Israel; USA); SLONIMSKY/SLONIM (Minsk,
Belarus; USA); SONDEK/SUNDOCK/SUNDACK (Janavole, Borkhovo, Rezekne, and
Ludza, Latvia; USA); SOKOLOVSKY (Priluki, Ukraine)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Roz Chast #general

Judy Floam
 

There is a lovely piece in this week's New Yorker by Roz Chast, about
finding relatives graves in Mt. Lebanon Cemetery in Queens. Someone who
read her book about her parents used FindAGrave and then sent her
information about how to find these relatives.

Judy Floam
Baltimore


Sing Sing Execution Ongoing Mystery! Hyman OSTRANSKY #general

Marilyn Robinson
 

In response to Ann Rabinowitz's comment,In some cases, prisoners may have been
buried in an unmarked or pauper's grave. According to my conversation with Mt.
Carmel Cemetery, even if graves are unmarked, for whatever reason, records
related to the buried individual would still have to have been processed & should
be available in their database. So, in the case of my cousin's grandfather,
Hyman/Hymie/Herman OSTRANSKY, his information would have to be in the cemetery's
records---even if no one has found them---yet!

Marilyn Robinson
Florida


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Sing Sing Execution Ongoing Mystery! Hyman OSTRANSKY #general

Marilyn Robinson
 

In response to Ann Rabinowitz's comment,In some cases, prisoners may have been
buried in an unmarked or pauper's grave. According to my conversation with Mt.
Carmel Cemetery, even if graves are unmarked, for whatever reason, records
related to the buried individual would still have to have been processed & should
be available in their database. So, in the case of my cousin's grandfather,
Hyman/Hymie/Herman OSTRANSKY, his information would have to be in the cemetery's
records---even if no one has found them---yet!

Marilyn Robinson
Florida


Re: Yiddish Names to American Names in U.S. Records #general

Judith Singer
 

By far the best on-line resource for determining the American version
of Yiddish names is JewishGen's Given Names Database. You type in the
European country, the Yiddish name, and it will provide you with a
list of other versions of the name used in the home country as well as
the names most likely to be used in the U.S.

Unfortunately, the GNDB, although it contains a multitude of
alternatives for each Yiddish name, does not have a "sounds like"
feature and so the spelling must be exact. It took me months to
realize that though it would not recognize Iosel and Iudel, it did
have data for Yosel and Yudel. The user sometimes has to experiment
creatively with Yiddish spellings to get a result.

Or you'd have to know that Chaskel is also spelled Khatskel, Haskl and
several other ways in Yiddish records The most frequent American
version of the name is Charles, followed by Ezekiel / Harry / Haskel /
Henry / Hyman.. (Ezekiel? you may be asking yourself. Yes, Khatskel is
a form of Yechezkeyl.)

Hinda is in the GNDB for Lithuania and its most frequent Americanized
versions were Anna, Hanna, Helen, Hilda, Ida and Irma.

JewishGen provides a wealth of information; it's just very difficult
to find sometimes. Good hunting!

Judith Singer
researching CHARNY and variations in Lithuania, SORTMAN / SORTAN /
SARTON in Lithuania, SINGER in Galicia.

From: Shari Kantrow <sjoysk@yahoo.com>
Perhaps someone can help me.My great-grandmother's sister Hinda KARPET (b. abt
1870)in Kamenets-Podolskiy was married to someone named Chaskel (Wiener ?). They
lived in Brooklyn, NY on President St. until the 1960s. I am unaware if they had
any children. My mother has no idea what their American names were


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Yiddish Names to American Names in U.S. Records #general

Judith Singer
 

By far the best on-line resource for determining the American version
of Yiddish names is JewishGen's Given Names Database. You type in the
European country, the Yiddish name, and it will provide you with a
list of other versions of the name used in the home country as well as
the names most likely to be used in the U.S.

Unfortunately, the GNDB, although it contains a multitude of
alternatives for each Yiddish name, does not have a "sounds like"
feature and so the spelling must be exact. It took me months to
realize that though it would not recognize Iosel and Iudel, it did
have data for Yosel and Yudel. The user sometimes has to experiment
creatively with Yiddish spellings to get a result.

Or you'd have to know that Chaskel is also spelled Khatskel, Haskl and
several other ways in Yiddish records The most frequent American
version of the name is Charles, followed by Ezekiel / Harry / Haskel /
Henry / Hyman.. (Ezekiel? you may be asking yourself. Yes, Khatskel is
a form of Yechezkeyl.)

Hinda is in the GNDB for Lithuania and its most frequent Americanized
versions were Anna, Hanna, Helen, Hilda, Ida and Irma.

JewishGen provides a wealth of information; it's just very difficult
to find sometimes. Good hunting!

Judith Singer
researching CHARNY and variations in Lithuania, SORTMAN / SORTAN /
SARTON in Lithuania, SINGER in Galicia.

From: Shari Kantrow <sjoysk@yahoo.com>
Perhaps someone can help me.My great-grandmother's sister Hinda KARPET (b. abt
1870)in Kamenets-Podolskiy was married to someone named Chaskel (Wiener ?). They
lived in Brooklyn, NY on President St. until the 1960s. I am unaware if they had
any children. My mother has no idea what their American names were


Conference Time Coming Soon! #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

Szia!

I'm looking forward to seeing many of you at the Conference in Seattle coming up in just over two weeks.

Here are some of the Hungarian highlights:

Tuesday, August 09
3:00 PM - 4:15 PM
Tues-115 Northwest Passage: Hungarian Jewish Migration >from Moravia, Bohemia, and Austria
Willow A

Wednesday, August 10
7:30 AM
Weds 119 Carpathian Puzzle
Willow B

9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Weds-121 Jewish Family Research in Pre-Trianon Maramaros: Resources, Techniques, and Travel Tips
Juniper

10:30 AM-11:45 AM
Weds-149 H-SIG Meeting Cedar B

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM
Weds-139 $$$ H-SIG Luncheon: Hungarian Jews in the Great War: Stories >from Both Sides
Aspen

1:30 PM -2:45 pm
Weds- Sources for Genealogical Research in Zala and Vas

4:30 PM - 5:45 PM
Weds-107 Lost treasure?? The Guide to Elusive Hungarian Jewish Records


5 PM to 5:30 PM
Weds-177 Film: Budapest: An American Quest
Diamond AB

Thursday, August 11
9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Thurs-114 Hungarian for Family Researchers
Cedar B

1:30 PM - 2:45 PM
Thurs-106 >from Mano Kaminer to Mihaly KertÊsz â?? Impacts of Assimilation on Hungarian Jewish Naming Traditions
Hungarian Roots
Cedar A

H-SIG will be articipating in the SIG Fair on Sunday afternoon where you can meet
other H-SIGrs and participate in the first-ever Hungarian SIG raffle! Support the H-SIG general
fund and take a chance on winning Auslander's Genealogical Gazetteer of the Kingdom of Hungary,
Talma's 1914 Atlas of Hungary, and other prizes.

Please contact me off-list if you have any questions. General questions about the conference need to be directed to the conference organizers at Janette Silverman <cochairs@iajgs2016.org>

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, California
JewishGen Hungarian SIG Coordinator
<vkahn@kmort.com>=


Hungary SIG #Hungary Conference Time Coming Soon! #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

Szia!

I'm looking forward to seeing many of you at the Conference in Seattle coming up in just over two weeks.

Here are some of the Hungarian highlights:

Tuesday, August 09
3:00 PM - 4:15 PM
Tues-115 Northwest Passage: Hungarian Jewish Migration >from Moravia, Bohemia, and Austria
Willow A

Wednesday, August 10
7:30 AM
Weds 119 Carpathian Puzzle
Willow B

9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Weds-121 Jewish Family Research in Pre-Trianon Maramaros: Resources, Techniques, and Travel Tips
Juniper

10:30 AM-11:45 AM
Weds-149 H-SIG Meeting Cedar B

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM
Weds-139 $$$ H-SIG Luncheon: Hungarian Jews in the Great War: Stories >from Both Sides
Aspen

1:30 PM -2:45 pm
Weds- Sources for Genealogical Research in Zala and Vas

4:30 PM - 5:45 PM
Weds-107 Lost treasure?? The Guide to Elusive Hungarian Jewish Records


5 PM to 5:30 PM
Weds-177 Film: Budapest: An American Quest
Diamond AB

Thursday, August 11
9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Thurs-114 Hungarian for Family Researchers
Cedar B

1:30 PM - 2:45 PM
Thurs-106 >from Mano Kaminer to Mihaly KertÊsz â?? Impacts of Assimilation on Hungarian Jewish Naming Traditions
Hungarian Roots
Cedar A

H-SIG will be articipating in the SIG Fair on Sunday afternoon where you can meet
other H-SIGrs and participate in the first-ever Hungarian SIG raffle! Support the H-SIG general
fund and take a chance on winning Auslander's Genealogical Gazetteer of the Kingdom of Hungary,
Talma's 1914 Atlas of Hungary, and other prizes.

Please contact me off-list if you have any questions. General questions about the conference need to be directed to the conference organizers at Janette Silverman <cochairs@iajgs2016.org>

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, California
JewishGen Hungarian SIG Coordinator
<vkahn@kmort.com>=


Re: Does anyone know of the town of Rilsk,Russia? #belarus

R. S. <rlsavin@...>
 

I believe that the town could have been Brisk, which was the Yiddish
name for Brest Litovsk.









1. Does anyone know of the town of Rilsk,Russia?


I have found two references to the town of R I l s k , Russia in
Declarations of Intent by two brothers of my Grandmother Eve Rosen. My
Grandmother Eva Rosen married my Grandfather Lieb Kopoloff who was living in
Vetka( near Gomel ) Belarus around 1900. I believe the Rosen family could
not have lived that far away, but can find no reference to this town.
Anyone have any idea about this town.
Sincerely,
Ari Kopolow


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Does anyone know of the town of Rilsk,Russia? #belarus

R. S. <rlsavin@...>
 

I believe that the town could have been Brisk, which was the Yiddish
name for Brest Litovsk.









1. Does anyone know of the town of Rilsk,Russia?


I have found two references to the town of R I l s k , Russia in
Declarations of Intent by two brothers of my Grandmother Eve Rosen. My
Grandmother Eva Rosen married my Grandfather Lieb Kopoloff who was living in
Vetka( near Gomel ) Belarus around 1900. I believe the Rosen family could
not have lived that far away, but can find no reference to this town.
Anyone have any idea about this town.
Sincerely,
Ari Kopolow


37 Lublin Area Towns Records Now Updated in the JRI-Poland Database #poland

RobinnM@...
 

JRI-Poland is delighted to announce the following additions and updates to
37 towns in the Lublin area in the JRI-Poland database.

The towns listed have been linked to online images provided by the Lublin
branch of the Polish State Archives and many of these data sets now include
additional years never before indexed. Furthermore, we have significantly
updated the data sets, providing corrections, additional records
missed in the LDS microfilming.

Annopol
Bobrowniki
Janow Podlaski
Janowiec,
Jeziorzany (Lysobyki)
Kamionka
Miedzyrzec Podlaski
Opole Lubelskie
Piszczac
Radzyn Podlaski
Sarnaki
Siedliszcze
Wieniawa
Wohyn
Wojslawice
Zaklikow

These towns join the following 21 Zamosc area towns whose update was
recently announced:

Bilgoraj, Frampol, Gorzkow, Grabowiec, Horodlo, Hrubieszow,
Izbica/Tarnogora, Jarczow, Jozefow (Jozefow Ordynacki), Komarow Osada,
Krasnobrod, Krylow, Laszczow, Szczebrzeszyn, Tarnogrod, Turobin, Tyszowce,
Wysokie, and the City of Zamosc

Special thanks to the following people who collaborated in this very large
project. Apologies to anyone accidentally left off the list!

Ruth Silver, Max Wald, Smadar Gilboa, David Dubin, Jim Feldman, Norm Katz,
Sharon Zane, Robert Pullman, Mady Land, Shelley Pollero, Howard Fink,
Hadassah Lipsius, David Price, Michael Tobias and Stanley Diamond. Thank you
all! Your help is greatly appreciated!

Robinn Magid
Berkeley,California
Lublin Archives Project Coordinator
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
RobinnM@aol.com


JRI Poland #Poland 37 Lublin Area Towns Records Now Updated in the JRI-Poland Database #poland

RobinnM@...
 

JRI-Poland is delighted to announce the following additions and updates to
37 towns in the Lublin area in the JRI-Poland database.

The towns listed have been linked to online images provided by the Lublin
branch of the Polish State Archives and many of these data sets now include
additional years never before indexed. Furthermore, we have significantly
updated the data sets, providing corrections, additional records
missed in the LDS microfilming.

Annopol
Bobrowniki
Janow Podlaski
Janowiec,
Jeziorzany (Lysobyki)
Kamionka
Miedzyrzec Podlaski
Opole Lubelskie
Piszczac
Radzyn Podlaski
Sarnaki
Siedliszcze
Wieniawa
Wohyn
Wojslawice
Zaklikow

These towns join the following 21 Zamosc area towns whose update was
recently announced:

Bilgoraj, Frampol, Gorzkow, Grabowiec, Horodlo, Hrubieszow,
Izbica/Tarnogora, Jarczow, Jozefow (Jozefow Ordynacki), Komarow Osada,
Krasnobrod, Krylow, Laszczow, Szczebrzeszyn, Tarnogrod, Turobin, Tyszowce,
Wysokie, and the City of Zamosc

Special thanks to the following people who collaborated in this very large
project. Apologies to anyone accidentally left off the list!

Ruth Silver, Max Wald, Smadar Gilboa, David Dubin, Jim Feldman, Norm Katz,
Sharon Zane, Robert Pullman, Mady Land, Shelley Pollero, Howard Fink,
Hadassah Lipsius, David Price, Michael Tobias and Stanley Diamond. Thank you
all! Your help is greatly appreciated!

Robinn Magid
Berkeley,California
Lublin Archives Project Coordinator
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
RobinnM@aol.com


How to attend the IAJGS conference when you can't get to Seattle #romania

Janette Silverman <cochairs@...>
 

My Co-Chairs and I know >from the emails we get, that there are so many
people who want to attend the upcoming conference in Seattle, Aug 7-12,
but who just can't fit the conference into their calendar or their
budget. Although virtually attending the conference isn't as fabulous
as being there, it does provide access to about 90% of all of the
conference sessions. We also know that many of the attendees are
frustrated at not being to attend every session, and since there are
over 235 sessions, that's obviously physically impossible, so we have
solutions for you.

There are two ways to hear/see what's happening at the conference, and
they work well together. I'll briefly describe each of them, since
their titles may not be descriptive enough. The first is LIVE! This
provides live streaming of sessions by some of our most popular
speakers. This means that if you have the time, you can watch (and
hear) the sessions as they are being presented, as if you were there!
The conference is in Seattle, Washington, so the time of each session is
listed in Pacific Daylight Time (UTC/GMT -7 hours). If you don't have
time to tune in while the session is streaming, no worries. After the
conference is over, you 90 days to access the session "on demand".

The other way to hear the sessions is to purchase the audio/slides
recording. Almost all of the sessions at the conference are being
recording (voice only) with the slides the presenter is using. Some
presenters do not have their slides being recorded, in which case, the
recording of that session is only audio. If you purchase this, you will
receive the whole package a few weeks after the conference is over and
be able to listen to the presentation and see the slides as your
leisure. Not all presentations that are on LIVE! are having audio
recordings made.

To purchase LIVE! and/or the audio and slides, go to the IAJGS 2016
website (http://www.iajgs2016.org/) then, under the registration tab,
Select New Registration;
Click "Go to Registration Form (for starting out)" near the bottom;
Click the gray New Registration button;
Enter your personal information and click Continue;
Select 5. Full LIVE! only (not attending in Seattle) or
7. Full LIVE! & Full Audio/slides (not attending in Seattle) and
continue to the end.

Of course, if you are attending the conference and want to purchase the
packages, there are options on the menu above to do that as well.

Looking forward to seeing many of you in Seattle!

Janette Silverman, Chuck Weinstein and Phyllis Grossman
Conference Co-Chairs


Romania SIG #Romania How to attend the IAJGS conference when you can't get to Seattle #romania

Janette Silverman <cochairs@...>
 

My Co-Chairs and I know >from the emails we get, that there are so many
people who want to attend the upcoming conference in Seattle, Aug 7-12,
but who just can't fit the conference into their calendar or their
budget. Although virtually attending the conference isn't as fabulous
as being there, it does provide access to about 90% of all of the
conference sessions. We also know that many of the attendees are
frustrated at not being to attend every session, and since there are
over 235 sessions, that's obviously physically impossible, so we have
solutions for you.

There are two ways to hear/see what's happening at the conference, and
they work well together. I'll briefly describe each of them, since
their titles may not be descriptive enough. The first is LIVE! This
provides live streaming of sessions by some of our most popular
speakers. This means that if you have the time, you can watch (and
hear) the sessions as they are being presented, as if you were there!
The conference is in Seattle, Washington, so the time of each session is
listed in Pacific Daylight Time (UTC/GMT -7 hours). If you don't have
time to tune in while the session is streaming, no worries. After the
conference is over, you 90 days to access the session "on demand".

The other way to hear the sessions is to purchase the audio/slides
recording. Almost all of the sessions at the conference are being
recording (voice only) with the slides the presenter is using. Some
presenters do not have their slides being recorded, in which case, the
recording of that session is only audio. If you purchase this, you will
receive the whole package a few weeks after the conference is over and
be able to listen to the presentation and see the slides as your
leisure. Not all presentations that are on LIVE! are having audio
recordings made.

To purchase LIVE! and/or the audio and slides, go to the IAJGS 2016
website (http://www.iajgs2016.org/) then, under the registration tab,
Select New Registration;
Click "Go to Registration Form (for starting out)" near the bottom;
Click the gray New Registration button;
Enter your personal information and click Continue;
Select 5. Full LIVE! only (not attending in Seattle) or
7. Full LIVE! & Full Audio/slides (not attending in Seattle) and
continue to the end.

Of course, if you are attending the conference and want to purchase the
packages, there are options on the menu above to do that as well.

Looking forward to seeing many of you in Seattle!

Janette Silverman, Chuck Weinstein and Phyllis Grossman
Conference Co-Chairs


July 31 Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois program #general

events@...
 

Specifics of Hungarian Jewish Genealogy: Historical Background and a Practical
Guide will be the topic of a presentation by Hungarian researcher and tour leader
Karesz Vandor at the Sunday, July 31, 2016, meeting of the Jewish Genealogical
Society of Illinois. His presentation will begin at 2 p.m. at Temple Beth-El, 3610
Dundee Road, Northbrook, Ill.

The JGSI meeting facilities at Temple Beth-El will open at 12:30 p.m. to
accommodate those who want to use or borrow genealogy library materials,
get help with genealogy websites or ask genealogical questions before
the main program begins at 2 p.m. For more information, see jgsi.org or
phone 312-666-0100. This event is free and open to the public.

Hungarian genealogy covers the old territories of Greater Hungary,
including all of Slovakia, and small parts of Austria, Slovenia,
Croatia, Serbia, Romania and Ukraine.

Karesz Vandor is a Budapest-based Hungarian Jewish genealogist and
military historian. He has been active in working on various family
trees since 2004 and has helped descendants of Shoah survivors find
previously unknown relatives living in Hungary.

At each regular JGSI monthly meeting, its help desk will operated >from
12:30 to 1:45 p.m. Member volunteers will access online databases and
answer genealogical questions one-on-one for members and visitors as time allows.
The JGSI library has more than 800 volumes of interest to Jewish family
historians. Many are available for borrowing by JGSI members for a
limited time. All are available for perusing >from 12:30 to 1:45 p.m. at
each regular monthly meeting.

Submitted by:
Martin Fischer
Vice President-Publicity
Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen July 31 Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois program #general

events@...
 

Specifics of Hungarian Jewish Genealogy: Historical Background and a Practical
Guide will be the topic of a presentation by Hungarian researcher and tour leader
Karesz Vandor at the Sunday, July 31, 2016, meeting of the Jewish Genealogical
Society of Illinois. His presentation will begin at 2 p.m. at Temple Beth-El, 3610
Dundee Road, Northbrook, Ill.

The JGSI meeting facilities at Temple Beth-El will open at 12:30 p.m. to
accommodate those who want to use or borrow genealogy library materials,
get help with genealogy websites or ask genealogical questions before
the main program begins at 2 p.m. For more information, see jgsi.org or
phone 312-666-0100. This event is free and open to the public.

Hungarian genealogy covers the old territories of Greater Hungary,
including all of Slovakia, and small parts of Austria, Slovenia,
Croatia, Serbia, Romania and Ukraine.

Karesz Vandor is a Budapest-based Hungarian Jewish genealogist and
military historian. He has been active in working on various family
trees since 2004 and has helped descendants of Shoah survivors find
previously unknown relatives living in Hungary.

At each regular JGSI monthly meeting, its help desk will operated >from
12:30 to 1:45 p.m. Member volunteers will access online databases and
answer genealogical questions one-on-one for members and visitors as time allows.
The JGSI library has more than 800 volumes of interest to Jewish family
historians. Many are available for borrowing by JGSI members for a
limited time. All are available for perusing >from 12:30 to 1:45 p.m. at
each regular monthly meeting.

Submitted by:
Martin Fischer
Vice President-Publicity
Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois

71401 - 71420 of 662164