Date   

Rosh Hashanah 2016 edition of Jewish Affairs is now available #southafrica

Roy Ogus
 

The Rosh Hashanah 2016 special edition of the South African publication, Jewish
Affairs, is now available. The edition can be found at the following link:

http://www.jewishsa.co.za/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Jewish-Affairs-Rosh-Hashanah-2016.pdf

The Editor of the newspaper, David Saks, provides the following message:

"2016 marks 175 years since the founding in Cape Town of South Africa's first
Jewish religious congregation, an event that in turn marks the formal birth of the
South African Jewish community. To mark this milestone, this Rosh Hashanah
special issue of Jewish Affairs is devoted to looking back on, and celebrating
this heritage. This year Jewish Affairs has achieved a milestone of its own,
namely 75 years of continuous publication since the appearance, in June 1941, of
the first issue of the journal. With the support of our loyal subscribers and
advertisers, we hope to continue in this proud tradition.

This issue begins with an introductory section comprising this editors own
reflections and a year-by-year photographic portrait of how the story of SA Jewry
has unfolded. It is followed by a section looking at some of the main regions
where Jewish life developed, viz. Cape Town, Eastern Cape, Johannesburg and the
rural areas and smaller country towns. The concluding section looks at specific
areas of Jewish endeavor - politics, the rabbinate, law and the arts. A book
reviews look at some recent publications of Jewish interest.

We would like to thank in particular our advertisers, who made it possible for us
to bring out this special extended issue, which we hope will itself come to be
regarded as one of the milestone publications brought out by Jewish Affairs over
the decades.

On behalf of the Editorial Board, I wish everyone a Shana Tova Umetuka.

David Saks, Editor"


Roy Ogus
Palo Alto, California
r_ogus at hotmail.com


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Rosh Hashanah 2016 edition of Jewish Affairs is now available #southafrica

Roy Ogus
 

The Rosh Hashanah 2016 special edition of the South African publication, Jewish
Affairs, is now available. The edition can be found at the following link:

http://www.jewishsa.co.za/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Jewish-Affairs-Rosh-Hashanah-2016.pdf

The Editor of the newspaper, David Saks, provides the following message:

"2016 marks 175 years since the founding in Cape Town of South Africa's first
Jewish religious congregation, an event that in turn marks the formal birth of the
South African Jewish community. To mark this milestone, this Rosh Hashanah
special issue of Jewish Affairs is devoted to looking back on, and celebrating
this heritage. This year Jewish Affairs has achieved a milestone of its own,
namely 75 years of continuous publication since the appearance, in June 1941, of
the first issue of the journal. With the support of our loyal subscribers and
advertisers, we hope to continue in this proud tradition.

This issue begins with an introductory section comprising this editors own
reflections and a year-by-year photographic portrait of how the story of SA Jewry
has unfolded. It is followed by a section looking at some of the main regions
where Jewish life developed, viz. Cape Town, Eastern Cape, Johannesburg and the
rural areas and smaller country towns. The concluding section looks at specific
areas of Jewish endeavor - politics, the rabbinate, law and the arts. A book
reviews look at some recent publications of Jewish interest.

We would like to thank in particular our advertisers, who made it possible for us
to bring out this special extended issue, which we hope will itself come to be
regarded as one of the milestone publications brought out by Jewish Affairs over
the decades.

On behalf of the Editorial Board, I wish everyone a Shana Tova Umetuka.

David Saks, Editor"


Roy Ogus
Palo Alto, California
r_ogus at hotmail.com


This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #general

Bruce Drake <BDrake@...>
 

The High Holidays begin next week, so I've chosen a short excerpt >from the Yizkor
book of Strzyzow (the 1969 edition) in which Itzhok Berglass writes about the
anticipation and celebration of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur
(http://bit.ly/2czIVwu). Strzyzow is about 100 miles east of Krakow in the south of
Poland, and had formerly been part of Galicia in the Austrian-Hungarian Empire. In
1921, the Jewish population was about 1,000. There is also a KehilalLinks page for
the town (http://bit.ly/2czIVwu).

Link: https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/1178187905536696:0
Short URL: http://bit.ly/2cQwGJW

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #general

Bruce Drake <BDrake@...>
 

The High Holidays begin next week, so I've chosen a short excerpt >from the Yizkor
book of Strzyzow (the 1969 edition) in which Itzhok Berglass writes about the
anticipation and celebration of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur
(http://bit.ly/2czIVwu). Strzyzow is about 100 miles east of Krakow in the south of
Poland, and had formerly been part of Galicia in the Austrian-Hungarian Empire. In
1921, the Jewish population was about 1,000. There is also a KehilalLinks page for
the town (http://bit.ly/2czIVwu).

Link: https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/1178187905536696:0
Short URL: http://bit.ly/2cQwGJW

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


JGS Cleveland October meeting on The Flip Side of Genealogy #general

Sylvia Abrams <sylvia.abrams@...>
 

Learn about the Flip Side of Genealogy

How often have you regretted your failure to engage the elder generations of your
family for information about their memories? David Kendall, author of When
Descendants Become Ancestors, the featured speaker at the Wednesday, October 5th
meeting of the Jewish Genealogy Society of Cleveland, will share how our own life
experiences are genealogical sources to record and preserve for future use. In his
book, Dr. Kendall notes: "As we research our own ancestors and mourn the lack of
information available to us, we forget that we are the future ancestors of our
descendants. And if we don't leave to them the kinds of information about our lives
that we crave to know about our own forefathers, then we are merely perpetuating
the problem."

David Kendall, Ph.D. was raised in a small tourist village of less than 2000
inhabitants on the Canadian border in northern New York State where he has returned
in retirement. Dr. Kendall is a graduate of Cornell University with a major in
government and a specialization in international relations. Following ten years as
a high school teacher and school counselor, he obtained his doctorate >from the
University of Pittsburgh and spent the next thirty years as a professor in the
graduate school Department of Counselor Education at the State University of New
York at Brockport (near Rochester), complementing his teaching with a part-time
private practice in personal and family counseling.

When Descendants Become Ancestors: The Flip Side of Genealogy is his first book the
inspiration for which came >from his great-grandmother's 1865 diary. Dr. Kendal's
book will be available at the meeting.

The Jewish Genealogy Society of Cleveland meets on the first Wednesday evening of
the month starting at 7:30 PM in the Miller Board Room at Menorah Park, 27100 Cedar
Road, Beachwood. Board members are available >from 7:00 PM to assist with
individual research questions. Guests are welcome. RSVP to
Programming@ClevelandJGS.org.

Sylvia Abrams
1st Vice-president for Programming
Jewish Genealogy Society of Cleveland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS Cleveland October meeting on The Flip Side of Genealogy #general

Sylvia Abrams <sylvia.abrams@...>
 

Learn about the Flip Side of Genealogy

How often have you regretted your failure to engage the elder generations of your
family for information about their memories? David Kendall, author of When
Descendants Become Ancestors, the featured speaker at the Wednesday, October 5th
meeting of the Jewish Genealogy Society of Cleveland, will share how our own life
experiences are genealogical sources to record and preserve for future use. In his
book, Dr. Kendall notes: "As we research our own ancestors and mourn the lack of
information available to us, we forget that we are the future ancestors of our
descendants. And if we don't leave to them the kinds of information about our lives
that we crave to know about our own forefathers, then we are merely perpetuating
the problem."

David Kendall, Ph.D. was raised in a small tourist village of less than 2000
inhabitants on the Canadian border in northern New York State where he has returned
in retirement. Dr. Kendall is a graduate of Cornell University with a major in
government and a specialization in international relations. Following ten years as
a high school teacher and school counselor, he obtained his doctorate >from the
University of Pittsburgh and spent the next thirty years as a professor in the
graduate school Department of Counselor Education at the State University of New
York at Brockport (near Rochester), complementing his teaching with a part-time
private practice in personal and family counseling.

When Descendants Become Ancestors: The Flip Side of Genealogy is his first book the
inspiration for which came >from his great-grandmother's 1865 diary. Dr. Kendal's
book will be available at the meeting.

The Jewish Genealogy Society of Cleveland meets on the first Wednesday evening of
the month starting at 7:30 PM in the Miller Board Room at Menorah Park, 27100 Cedar
Road, Beachwood. Board members are available >from 7:00 PM to assist with
individual research questions. Guests are welcome. RSVP to
Programming@ClevelandJGS.org.

Sylvia Abrams
1st Vice-president for Programming
Jewish Genealogy Society of Cleveland


Re: death records of stillborns #general

Shelley Mitchell
 

Paula Blank asked about birth/death records for stillborns and babies who died
soon after birth.

I think a lot would depend on whether the child was buried in a cemetery. I know
of stillborns and young babies buried in cemeteries in the NYC area. In the 20th
century (thank you, Allan), I would assume they had to have a death certificate to
be buried in a cemetery. As for years earlier, you would have to ask a large, old
cemetery what was acceptable documentation.

Shelley Mitchell
New York City


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: death records of stillborns #general

Shelley Mitchell
 

Paula Blank asked about birth/death records for stillborns and babies who died
soon after birth.

I think a lot would depend on whether the child was buried in a cemetery. I know
of stillborns and young babies buried in cemeteries in the NYC area. In the 20th
century (thank you, Allan), I would assume they had to have a death certificate to
be buried in a cemetery. As for years earlier, you would have to ask a large, old
cemetery what was acceptable documentation.

Shelley Mitchell
New York City


(US-NYC) FamilySearch Releases 1890 New York City Police Census #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Those with New York City roots will enjoy the recently released index of the
1890 New York City Policy Census on FamilySearch. The release includes 87
percent of the people recorded in the census. The index covers the 894 of
the original 1008 volumes as 114 volumes have been lost. It includes
1,479,855 names in the census. This is especially important as the 1890
Federal Census was destroyed and this can be used for genealogical research
in place of the destroyed census-albeit with less information.

It is called the "Police Census" as the police acted as enumerators. New
York City government did not believe that all of the city's inhabitants had
been enumerated in the 1890 federal census. The census capture an
additional 13 percent of New York City residents. What is included are name,
gender, age, assembly district, and election district.

To search the index go to:
https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2381996. There are no images of
the actual records. To see the actual census you will need to go to a
library or Family History Center that has the collection. The information
on the FamilySearch index includes the Family History Library microfilm number.

FamilySearch wiki has helpful information on how to search and what you will
find on this new digitized collection. See;
https://familysearch.org/wiki/en/New_York,_New_York_City,_Police_Census,_1890_(FamilySearch_Historical_Records)
(MODERATOR: https://tinyurl.com/zcl486m )
Access to the index and all records on FamilySearch are free.

Remember that New York City was not consolidated until 1898. Therefore, not
all 5 boroughs as we know them today are included in the 1890 census. In
1890 it was Manhattan and most of the Bronx as we know it today. In 1898 the
east Bronx, Kings County (Brooklyn), Queens and Richmond (Staten Island)
consolidated with Manhattan and the Bronx to form The City of New York.
(See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/City_of_Greater_New_York)

Thank you to the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society Blog for
informing us of this new digitized resource

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (US-NYC) FamilySearch Releases 1890 New York City Police Census #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Those with New York City roots will enjoy the recently released index of the
1890 New York City Policy Census on FamilySearch. The release includes 87
percent of the people recorded in the census. The index covers the 894 of
the original 1008 volumes as 114 volumes have been lost. It includes
1,479,855 names in the census. This is especially important as the 1890
Federal Census was destroyed and this can be used for genealogical research
in place of the destroyed census-albeit with less information.

It is called the "Police Census" as the police acted as enumerators. New
York City government did not believe that all of the city's inhabitants had
been enumerated in the 1890 federal census. The census capture an
additional 13 percent of New York City residents. What is included are name,
gender, age, assembly district, and election district.

To search the index go to:
https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2381996. There are no images of
the actual records. To see the actual census you will need to go to a
library or Family History Center that has the collection. The information
on the FamilySearch index includes the Family History Library microfilm number.

FamilySearch wiki has helpful information on how to search and what you will
find on this new digitized collection. See;
https://familysearch.org/wiki/en/New_York,_New_York_City,_Police_Census,_1890_(FamilySearch_Historical_Records)
(MODERATOR: https://tinyurl.com/zcl486m )
Access to the index and all records on FamilySearch are free.

Remember that New York City was not consolidated until 1898. Therefore, not
all 5 boroughs as we know them today are included in the 1890 census. In
1890 it was Manhattan and most of the Bronx as we know it today. In 1898 the
east Bronx, Kings County (Brooklyn), Queens and Richmond (Staten Island)
consolidated with Manhattan and the Bronx to form The City of New York.
(See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/City_of_Greater_New_York)

Thank you to the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society Blog for
informing us of this new digitized resource

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Request to take photos in Wellwood Cemetery #general

hymiereich
 

I am looking for someone who is willing to photograph two tombstones in the
Wellwood Cemetery in
Pinelawn NY. Please contact me privately and I will supply the details.
Hymie Reichstein
Ottawa, Ontario


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Request to take photos in Wellwood Cemetery #general

hymiereich
 

I am looking for someone who is willing to photograph two tombstones in the
Wellwood Cemetery in
Pinelawn NY. Please contact me privately and I will supply the details.
Hymie Reichstein
Ottawa, Ontario


Re: Death records for Stillborns 1890 - 1900 NYC #general

Barbara <bj1friends@...>
 

Ira Leviton said: "Certificates of stillbirths were started in the
1930s (I believe the year was 1938, but it may have been a little earlier)."

My cousin found the burial certificate for my aunt who was stillborn in 1916 in
Manhattan. She was listed as "baby Slatas."

Though I was unable to find a copy of the record just now, I believe it was >from
the cemetery. She was buried at Mt. Richmond Cemetery by a landsmannschaft.

Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Death records for Stillborns 1890 - 1900 NYC #general

Barbara <bj1friends@...>
 

Ira Leviton said: "Certificates of stillbirths were started in the
1930s (I believe the year was 1938, but it may have been a little earlier)."

My cousin found the burial certificate for my aunt who was stillborn in 1916 in
Manhattan. She was listed as "baby Slatas."

Though I was unable to find a copy of the record just now, I believe it was >from
the cemetery. She was buried at Mt. Richmond Cemetery by a landsmannschaft.

Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC


Could BROD and BROTMAN be the same name? #general

Amy B Cohen
 

I am hoping someone can help me sort this one out. I have been researching my
great-grandparents and their families. My great-grandfather, Joseph BROTMAN, and
my great-grandmother Bessie came >from Tarnobrzeg, Poland, to the US in 1889 and
1891, respectively. After researching them for years, I've found no records at all
from Tarnobrzeg. All I have are US records and ship manifests. Family lore says
that Bessie was Joseph's cousin and that the family pushed her to marry after his
first wife died and left him with four children. All of those children plus the
five that Joseph and Bessie had together all ended up in the US. The US records
sometimes use the name BROD and sometimes BROTMAN for Bessie's birth name . I
recently discovered a relative who is probably Bessie's sister Sarah. Her US
records also sometimes say her birth name was BROD and sometimes say BROTMAN.

The ship manifest that I believe lists my great-grandfather Joseph BROTMAN has his
name as Yossel BROD, so even he may have been using both names. So could BROD and
BROTMAN be the same name? Or were the records in the US just based on family
members confusing the two surnames?

Thanks for any insights you might be able to offer.

Amy Cohen
East Longmeadow, MA, USA

Researching BROD, BROTMAN, GOLDFARB, >from Tarnobrzeg, Dzikow, and Grebow, Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Could BROD and BROTMAN be the same name? #general

Amy B Cohen
 

I am hoping someone can help me sort this one out. I have been researching my
great-grandparents and their families. My great-grandfather, Joseph BROTMAN, and
my great-grandmother Bessie came >from Tarnobrzeg, Poland, to the US in 1889 and
1891, respectively. After researching them for years, I've found no records at all
from Tarnobrzeg. All I have are US records and ship manifests. Family lore says
that Bessie was Joseph's cousin and that the family pushed her to marry after his
first wife died and left him with four children. All of those children plus the
five that Joseph and Bessie had together all ended up in the US. The US records
sometimes use the name BROD and sometimes BROTMAN for Bessie's birth name . I
recently discovered a relative who is probably Bessie's sister Sarah. Her US
records also sometimes say her birth name was BROD and sometimes say BROTMAN.

The ship manifest that I believe lists my great-grandfather Joseph BROTMAN has his
name as Yossel BROD, so even he may have been using both names. So could BROD and
BROTMAN be the same name? Or were the records in the US just based on family
members confusing the two surnames?

Thanks for any insights you might be able to offer.

Amy Cohen
East Longmeadow, MA, USA

Researching BROD, BROTMAN, GOLDFARB, >from Tarnobrzeg, Dzikow, and Grebow, Poland


From Reclaim the Records Facebook: NYC Marriage Index, 1950-1995 #general

Mark London <mrl@...>
 

The NYC marriage index >from 1950-1995 is now online. - Mark

https://www.facebook.com/ReclaimTheRecords/

THE NYC MARRIAGE INDEX, 1950-1995
http://www.nycmarriageindex.com/

Mark London


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen From Reclaim the Records Facebook: NYC Marriage Index, 1950-1995 #general

Mark London <mrl@...>
 

The NYC marriage index >from 1950-1995 is now online. - Mark

https://www.facebook.com/ReclaimTheRecords/

THE NYC MARRIAGE INDEX, 1950-1995
http://www.nycmarriageindex.com/

Mark London


L'Shanah Tovah! #romania

Rosanne Leeson
 

Dear Fellow Rom-SIGgers,

As Rosh Hashonah is growing near we wish you all a sweet, happy,
healthy, and genealogically successful New Year!

L'Shanah Tovah!
Rosanne Leeson
Coordinator
Barbara Hershey
Research Coordinator
Matthew Rottman
Coordinator-in-Training


Romania SIG #Romania L'Shanah Tovah! #romania

Rosanne Leeson
 

Dear Fellow Rom-SIGgers,

As Rosh Hashonah is growing near we wish you all a sweet, happy,
healthy, and genealogically successful New Year!

L'Shanah Tovah!
Rosanne Leeson
Coordinator
Barbara Hershey
Research Coordinator
Matthew Rottman
Coordinator-in-Training

68401 - 68420 of 662156