Date   

Name Index for Online Danzig Records, 1846-1927 #gdansk #germany #poland #danzig

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

The finding aid to online Danzig records for 1846-1927
(http://www.jewishgen.org/danzig/findingaidpsa1497.php) has been
updated to include, at the bottom, a name index based on transcription
of the handwritten indices included with many volumes of the records.
This name index currently covers volumes 0002-0004 and will be updated
frequently until complete. The index tells you which page numbers in
the volume to consult for the actual record (which can contain much
more information), but see the description at the top of the finding
aid regarding page numbering. Note that this name index has not been
proofread, so it might contain errors. When the actual records are
indexed and incorporated into our searchable database, the name index
will become obsolete, but full indexing will take much longer.

If you want to volunteer to grow this name index by transcribing the
handwritten indices, or if you want to index the actual records,
please email me.

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland Name Index for Online Danzig Records, 1846-1927 #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

The finding aid to online Danzig records for 1846-1927
(http://www.jewishgen.org/danzig/findingaidpsa1497.php) has been
updated to include, at the bottom, a name index based on transcription
of the handwritten indices included with many volumes of the records.
This name index currently covers volumes 0002-0004 and will be updated
frequently until complete. The index tells you which page numbers in
the volume to consult for the actual record (which can contain much
more information), but see the description at the top of the finding
aid regarding page numbering. Note that this name index has not been
proofread, so it might contain errors. When the actual records are
indexed and incorporated into our searchable database, the name index
will become obsolete, but full indexing will take much longer.

If you want to volunteer to grow this name index by transcribing the
handwritten indices, or if you want to index the actual records,
please email me.

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


Re: Online Danzig Records, 1846-1927 (mostly 1846-1879) #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Barbara Algaze
 

Many, many thanks to Logan for all he does for all of us.
I am constantly amazed at how much information he provides for us to find
our relatives.

Barbara Algaze, Los Angeles, California


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland Re: Online Danzig Records, 1846-1927 (mostly 1846-1879) #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Barbara Algaze
 

Many, many thanks to Logan for all he does for all of us.
I am constantly amazed at how much information he provides for us to find
our relatives.

Barbara Algaze, Los Angeles, California


BERLINSKY - Jerusalem and USA #general

Jules Feldman
 

In Jerusalem on the 24th of April 1906, Yakov, son of Moshe BERLINSKY, an
American, married Rachel Nesha, daughter of Asher RIVLIN. She was 20 years
old or younger; he was much older. Soon after the wedding he took her back
to the USA with him. They subsequently had two sons Asher and Moshe.
Yakov had been married previously.

I will be grateful for any further information on this family.
Thanks,
Jules Feldman
Kibbutz Yizreel

MODERATOR NOTE: Please contact Jules privately with further information.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen BERLINSKY - Jerusalem and USA #general

Jules Feldman
 

In Jerusalem on the 24th of April 1906, Yakov, son of Moshe BERLINSKY, an
American, married Rachel Nesha, daughter of Asher RIVLIN. She was 20 years
old or younger; he was much older. Soon after the wedding he took her back
to the USA with him. They subsequently had two sons Asher and Moshe.
Yakov had been married previously.

I will be grateful for any further information on this family.
Thanks,
Jules Feldman
Kibbutz Yizreel

MODERATOR NOTE: Please contact Jules privately with further information.


Szerman in Cemeterio de Liniers Buenos Aires. Photo request #general

Rosalind
 

Dear Friends,
Shabbat Shalom very soon and Gmar Chatima Tova.

Is it possible for someone to give me some information or a cemetery photo
for Iudel Szerman row 35 Plot 17 at the Cemetero Comunitero de Liniers Buenos
Aires Argentina.

It's a shot in the dark that he might be the one I am searching for. Most
importantly I need his father's name. Anything else would be icing on the
cake.

Thank you
Ros Romem
Jerusalem

MODERATOR NOTE: To avoid duplication of effort, please contact Ros Romem
privately before heading to the cemetery.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Szerman in Cemeterio de Liniers Buenos Aires. Photo request #general

Rosalind
 

Dear Friends,
Shabbat Shalom very soon and Gmar Chatima Tova.

Is it possible for someone to give me some information or a cemetery photo
for Iudel Szerman row 35 Plot 17 at the Cemetero Comunitero de Liniers Buenos
Aires Argentina.

It's a shot in the dark that he might be the one I am searching for. Most
importantly I need his father's name. Anything else would be icing on the
cake.

Thank you
Ros Romem
Jerusalem

MODERATOR NOTE: To avoid duplication of effort, please contact Ros Romem
privately before heading to the cemetery.


This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #general

Bruce Drake <BDrake@...>
 

The death of Shimon Peres sent me looking for the small village of Vishniewa,
Poland (Wiszniew) where he was born in 1923. Located about 56 miles northwest
of Minsk near the Lithuanian border, it was part of the Second Polish
Republic >from 1921 to 1939, Vishniewa's Jewish population about the time
Peres was born had fallen >from 1,463 in 1897 to just over 900. That
population was wiped out in 1942 by the German. This week's excerpt is >from
the Yizkor book of Wiszniew. In this account, Ziska Podbersky writes of the
revenge that 300 Vishnevan partisans exacted on those who carried out and
sympathized with the work of the Germans. There is also a KehilaLinks site
that can be found here: http://bit.ly/2dvNNSD

[MOD. NOTE: full URL - http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/vishnevo/vishnevo.html ]

Link to excerpt: https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/1193730990649054:0
Short URL: http://bit.ly/2dxZYjB

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #general

Bruce Drake <BDrake@...>
 

The death of Shimon Peres sent me looking for the small village of Vishniewa,
Poland (Wiszniew) where he was born in 1923. Located about 56 miles northwest
of Minsk near the Lithuanian border, it was part of the Second Polish
Republic >from 1921 to 1939, Vishniewa's Jewish population about the time
Peres was born had fallen >from 1,463 in 1897 to just over 900. That
population was wiped out in 1942 by the German. This week's excerpt is >from
the Yizkor book of Wiszniew. In this account, Ziska Podbersky writes of the
revenge that 300 Vishnevan partisans exacted on those who carried out and
sympathized with the work of the Germans. There is also a KehilaLinks site
that can be found here: http://bit.ly/2dvNNSD

[MOD. NOTE: full URL - http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/vishnevo/vishnevo.html ]

Link to excerpt: https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/1193730990649054:0
Short URL: http://bit.ly/2dxZYjB

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


Bessarabia SIG, Update for September 2016 #general

Yefim Kogan
 

Hi everybody,

Please see the What's New Section of the details.

We have completed indexing and sent to JOWBR information on **two** more Jewish
cemeteries in Bessarabia/Moldova:

- Jewish Cemetery of Leovo. It used to a very large cemetery. We have sent 353
burial records (we could read surname, first name or father's name at least)
with 289 photos. We also put a section of Unknown graves for Leovo cemetery
with 343 photos at Bessarabia SIG website (cemetery section).

I should tell you that it took two trips to Leovo to do the photographing, and
were promised some donations for Leovo, but did not get them! We need your
donations for the Leovo Cemetery!
The work for Leovo cemetery is done yet. There is a section at the cemetery,
with no access to the graves. There is going to be a Reconstruction project at
Leovo cemetery, hopefully started in spring of 2017 to clean up the cemetery
and fix the fence. See more details about it at the Leovo Cemetery report.

- Jewish Cemetery of Dubossary, Old Section. 149 burial records with 149 photos
submitted to JewishGen/JOWBR, and also 46 photos sent to Unknown Section for
Dubossary, Old.
That cemetery has graves dating to the end of 18 century - 200+ years old. Some
of the monuments have a terrific engravings and inscriptions. See more at the
Dubossary Jewish Cemetery, old section Report.
I was very much interested to see the result of this work - my great great
grandfather Erukhim Kohen most likely was buried at that cemetery in late 19 c,
but no, I was not lucky at this time.

- You also can see the updated list of Jewish Cemeteries in Bessarabia/Moldova
with latest information on the work we are doing.

- The Bessarabia SIG Website was updated, especially Research Project section.
The cemetery projects were moved to Cemetery section, and I encourage you to
browse the Research Project and other section.

Please let us know if you have any questions, ideas of how to make our
Bessarabia SIG and the website better.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Bessarabia SIG, Update for September 2016 #general

Yefim Kogan
 

Hi everybody,

Please see the What's New Section of the details.

We have completed indexing and sent to JOWBR information on **two** more Jewish
cemeteries in Bessarabia/Moldova:

- Jewish Cemetery of Leovo. It used to a very large cemetery. We have sent 353
burial records (we could read surname, first name or father's name at least)
with 289 photos. We also put a section of Unknown graves for Leovo cemetery
with 343 photos at Bessarabia SIG website (cemetery section).

I should tell you that it took two trips to Leovo to do the photographing, and
were promised some donations for Leovo, but did not get them! We need your
donations for the Leovo Cemetery!
The work for Leovo cemetery is done yet. There is a section at the cemetery,
with no access to the graves. There is going to be a Reconstruction project at
Leovo cemetery, hopefully started in spring of 2017 to clean up the cemetery
and fix the fence. See more details about it at the Leovo Cemetery report.

- Jewish Cemetery of Dubossary, Old Section. 149 burial records with 149 photos
submitted to JewishGen/JOWBR, and also 46 photos sent to Unknown Section for
Dubossary, Old.
That cemetery has graves dating to the end of 18 century - 200+ years old. Some
of the monuments have a terrific engravings and inscriptions. See more at the
Dubossary Jewish Cemetery, old section Report.
I was very much interested to see the result of this work - my great great
grandfather Erukhim Kohen most likely was buried at that cemetery in late 19 c,
but no, I was not lucky at this time.

- You also can see the updated list of Jewish Cemeteries in Bessarabia/Moldova
with latest information on the work we are doing.

- The Bessarabia SIG Website was updated, especially Research Project section.
The cemetery projects were moved to Cemetery section, and I encourage you to
browse the Research Project and other section.

Please let us know if you have any questions, ideas of how to make our
Bessarabia SIG and the website better.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai


Szczerzec/Shcherets #general

Eli Brauner
 

Dear friends,
I'm looking for colleagues who are interested in Szczerzec, Ukraine.
Just recently I have discovered that my SCHRENZEL ancestors came to Lemberg
from Szczerzec.
I was told that someone took care on Szczerzec cemetery.
Do you know who carried out the project?
Shana Tova,

Eli Brauner
Israel

MODERATOR NOTE: There is a kehilalink webpage for this town
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Shchirets/
and 32 researchers registered with the JewishGen Family Finder. Perhaps those would be
the best places to start.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Szczerzec/Shcherets #general

Eli Brauner
 

Dear friends,
I'm looking for colleagues who are interested in Szczerzec, Ukraine.
Just recently I have discovered that my SCHRENZEL ancestors came to Lemberg
from Szczerzec.
I was told that someone took care on Szczerzec cemetery.
Do you know who carried out the project?
Shana Tova,

Eli Brauner
Israel

MODERATOR NOTE: There is a kehilalink webpage for this town
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Shchirets/
and 32 researchers registered with the JewishGen Family Finder. Perhaps those would be
the best places to start.


Re: FamilySearch Adds Vienna Vital Records Films #general

kelwel@...
 

I stand corrected. The records until 1938 are available on line, as indicated
by Michael Moritz.

Henry Wellisch
Toronto

Henry Wellisch wrote:

The birth, marriage and death records of the Jewish community of Vienna have
been available >from the LDS library on microfilm since 1997. As indicated
these records are also available on line on the Familysearch website. The
only difference is that the registers on the website stop at the year 1911,
while the microfilms continue to 1938.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: FamilySearch Adds Vienna Vital Records Films #general

kelwel@...
 

I stand corrected. The records until 1938 are available on line, as indicated
by Michael Moritz.

Henry Wellisch
Toronto

Henry Wellisch wrote:

The birth, marriage and death records of the Jewish community of Vienna have
been available >from the LDS library on microfilm since 1997. As indicated
these records are also available on line on the Familysearch website. The
only difference is that the registers on the website stop at the year 1911,
while the microfilms continue to 1938.


Issue 127 of Genealo-J has just be published #general

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 127, Fall 2016

Patrick Blond describes the short and brilliant life of Mademoiselle
Rachel (1821-1858), a famous tragedian who can be considered as the
first star of the French stage. Rachel Felix was born Elisa Felix in
Mumpf (Switzerland). Her father, Jacob Felix, was a poor peddler who
went >from places to places in Germany, Switzeland, and France so that
his eight children were born in eight different cities. When they were 6
or 7, Rachel and her older sister were sent in the streets to sing and
beg. At the age of 17, she made her stage debut at the Comedie Francaise
and was soon the queen of the Parisian society. She toured all over
Europe, including Russia, and finally the United States in 1855. She
died in 1858 >from tuberculosis. Her lovers were numerous including the
later Emperor Napoleon III. Patrick Blond also details the theatrical
careers of her siblings and the fate of her children.

In the preceding issue of our Journal, Martine Berthelot Puig-Moreno
dealt with the 251 Jews >from Spain converted to Catholicism in the
diocese of Barcelona between 1847 and 1947 but mainly around 1940. In
the second part of this paper, we find in a synoptic form the names of
these people. The chart also shows the date of their baptism, the date
and place of birth of each person and when data are available the names
of the parents and paternal and maternal grandparents, together with the
cities or countries where they were born.

Claude Studievic publishes a paper titled "Traces and memories of
Polish Studniewicz, Lindner, Sztatman, Weinsztejn families." This work
is part of a research in the history and chronicle of a family
emigration >from Poland to France, Belgium and England >from 1913-14 to
1933. The present means of communication, the progressive scanning of
data and their relatively easy access, and the support found within the
Cercle de Genealogie Juive, have helped to fill some of the gaps and
identify ancestors since the 18th century. The extermination of the
members of the family remained in Poland was total while those who were
in Western Europe escaped the disaster with two exceptions. This paper
is dedicated to them.

During World War I, the Ottoman Empire was allied to the German and
Austrian empires. Therefore all subjects of the Ottoman Empire living in
France were strictly controlled and needed official permissions to move
in the country. A team of eight members of our society has been given
the task to analyze, scan and digitalize all the files of the French
diplomatic archives relative to these ottoman subjects. This mean 6,000
files, each for a family. Although Armenians, christian Greeks and other
nationalities are found in these files, 50 to 58% of the total are Jews
and our team focused on them. In many cases, the files allowed us to
build family trees. Our database contains 20,000 pictures of all the
documents. Michele Feldman, the author of this paper, details two
interesting families : that of Maurice Moese Beruhiel, a wealthy
businessman born in Istanbul and that of Joseph Saltiel, a poor man,
born in Salonique, who was in danger of being interned.

Georges Graner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Issue 127 of Genealo-J has just be published #general

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 127, Fall 2016

Patrick Blond describes the short and brilliant life of Mademoiselle
Rachel (1821-1858), a famous tragedian who can be considered as the
first star of the French stage. Rachel Felix was born Elisa Felix in
Mumpf (Switzerland). Her father, Jacob Felix, was a poor peddler who
went >from places to places in Germany, Switzeland, and France so that
his eight children were born in eight different cities. When they were 6
or 7, Rachel and her older sister were sent in the streets to sing and
beg. At the age of 17, she made her stage debut at the Comedie Francaise
and was soon the queen of the Parisian society. She toured all over
Europe, including Russia, and finally the United States in 1855. She
died in 1858 >from tuberculosis. Her lovers were numerous including the
later Emperor Napoleon III. Patrick Blond also details the theatrical
careers of her siblings and the fate of her children.

In the preceding issue of our Journal, Martine Berthelot Puig-Moreno
dealt with the 251 Jews >from Spain converted to Catholicism in the
diocese of Barcelona between 1847 and 1947 but mainly around 1940. In
the second part of this paper, we find in a synoptic form the names of
these people. The chart also shows the date of their baptism, the date
and place of birth of each person and when data are available the names
of the parents and paternal and maternal grandparents, together with the
cities or countries where they were born.

Claude Studievic publishes a paper titled "Traces and memories of
Polish Studniewicz, Lindner, Sztatman, Weinsztejn families." This work
is part of a research in the history and chronicle of a family
emigration >from Poland to France, Belgium and England >from 1913-14 to
1933. The present means of communication, the progressive scanning of
data and their relatively easy access, and the support found within the
Cercle de Genealogie Juive, have helped to fill some of the gaps and
identify ancestors since the 18th century. The extermination of the
members of the family remained in Poland was total while those who were
in Western Europe escaped the disaster with two exceptions. This paper
is dedicated to them.

During World War I, the Ottoman Empire was allied to the German and
Austrian empires. Therefore all subjects of the Ottoman Empire living in
France were strictly controlled and needed official permissions to move
in the country. A team of eight members of our society has been given
the task to analyze, scan and digitalize all the files of the French
diplomatic archives relative to these ottoman subjects. This mean 6,000
files, each for a family. Although Armenians, christian Greeks and other
nationalities are found in these files, 50 to 58% of the total are Jews
and our team focused on them. In many cases, the files allowed us to
build family trees. Our database contains 20,000 pictures of all the
documents. Michele Feldman, the author of this paper, details two
interesting families : that of Maurice Moese Beruhiel, a wealthy
businessman born in Istanbul and that of Joseph Saltiel, a poor man,
born in Salonique, who was in danger of being interned.

Georges Graner


Nagykanizsa Community Ledger, Hungary. 1818- 1846 #hungary

omri@...
 

Dear Group,

Is anyone planning to go to the Yeshiva University Library in New York any
time soon?

Searching for information about Nagykanizsa, Hungary, I came across an
auction site which sold the Nagykanizsa Community Ledger
(http://www.dmag.co.il/pub/jj/jjac/files/assets/basic-html/page135.html).
This book has immense importance for anyone interested in this town.
According to the description in the site the ledger spans the years 1818-
1846 and contains 314 pages, divided into two sections. The larger section
features 219 pages with details about each community member >from 1828
through 1846. It includes a summary of hundreds of letters regarding
communal affairs, that were sent >from the community. Copies of
authorizations and confirmations made by the community, community decisions
and more. The ledger was written by the community notary. The second section
features 19 leaves written on both sides, with a list of donors for the
construction of the new community synagogue >from 1818 through 1832. It also
includes hundreds of letters that the community sent to other Hungarian
communities.

Searching libraries I found this book in the Yeshiva University Library. If
anyone is planning to visit this library please contact me. I would like to
get a photo of a few pages >from this book.

Thank you,
Omri Arnon
Israel

Moderator: Please contact Omri off-list if you have information.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Nagykanizsa Community Ledger, Hungary. 1818- 1846 #hungary

omri@...
 

Dear Group,

Is anyone planning to go to the Yeshiva University Library in New York any
time soon?

Searching for information about Nagykanizsa, Hungary, I came across an
auction site which sold the Nagykanizsa Community Ledger
(http://www.dmag.co.il/pub/jj/jjac/files/assets/basic-html/page135.html).
This book has immense importance for anyone interested in this town.
According to the description in the site the ledger spans the years 1818-
1846 and contains 314 pages, divided into two sections. The larger section
features 219 pages with details about each community member >from 1828
through 1846. It includes a summary of hundreds of letters regarding
communal affairs, that were sent >from the community. Copies of
authorizations and confirmations made by the community, community decisions
and more. The ledger was written by the community notary. The second section
features 19 leaves written on both sides, with a list of donors for the
construction of the new community synagogue >from 1818 through 1832. It also
includes hundreds of letters that the community sent to other Hungarian
communities.

Searching libraries I found this book in the Yeshiva University Library. If
anyone is planning to visit this library please contact me. I would like to
get a photo of a few pages >from this book.

Thank you,
Omri Arnon
Israel

Moderator: Please contact Omri off-list if you have information.

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