Date   

Re: Advice for short research trip #poland

antopolski <mantopolski1@...>
 

For competent answers to your questions you may want to contact Jewish
Historical Institute in Warsaw:

http://www.jhi.pl/en/institute

They have genealogical department which you may contact by email - or
telephone. Address/number can be found on their website.

Also note that December - January are very cold in Warsaw and sub-freezing
temperatures are normal. Lublin is a notch colder than Warsaw.

In Warsaw I recommend to visit recently opened museum :

http://www.polin.pl/en

Also this may be of interest to you:

http://www.polin.pl/en/the-poland-retreat-for-jewish-artists

M. Antopolski


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Advice for Short Research Trip
From: Robin Levine <robinllevine@gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 12 Oct 2016 04:34:04 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Good day,

I am currently applying for a modest Travel Grant through my graduate
school to spend 12 or 13 days in Poland to perform research, create
art, document ancestral sites, etc. However, some of the days would
fall on Christmas and New Years when most things are closed and
weather conditions could slow me down too. I am trying to figure out
how to maximize my time and money for an itinerary and budget list for
the grant proposal

The family I can trace are >from Chelm, Lublin - Blajer, Fridman,
Groman, Scheider or Scheiderman. I am looking for genealogy
information before 1912 and after 1912. The digital archives are
missing information >from 1912- late 1920-early 1930s (?) These are the
years when my grandmother and great uncles were born.

It seems as if I don't need to go to the National Archives in Warsaw.
I've read that all of the information for Chelm and Lublin
town #35 is at the Archiwum Panstwowe w Lublinie or the State Archives
in Lublin. Or will I have time to go back and forth between archives?
Also, how expensive and difficult is it to find a translator?
Especially since the newer items can't be photocopied.

While there I would like to have a tour of the Jewish section of
Lublin (Castle, Grodzka Gate, Square at Szeroka Street), visit the
Chelm Cemetery, and locate any addresses. I was originally planning to
arrive in Warsaw go to the archives (which may not be necessary), see
a museum, and try to make contacts with Polish artists (cafes). My
college emphases collaborative art with international artists. Then,
take a 522 bus and TLK MP to Chelm and then to Lublin. Maybe go to
Majdanek Camp just before leaving, so I am not upset the entire trip.
Is getting around difficult by bus and TLK MP? Recommendations for cafes.

Are there other things I should see in the area that are not far away,
or cost a lot of money? Any advice would be much appreciated. Thank
you kindly.

Robin Levine
robinllevine@gmail.com


JRI Poland #Poland RE: Advice for short research trip #poland

antopolski <mantopolski1@...>
 

For competent answers to your questions you may want to contact Jewish
Historical Institute in Warsaw:

http://www.jhi.pl/en/institute

They have genealogical department which you may contact by email - or
telephone. Address/number can be found on their website.

Also note that December - January are very cold in Warsaw and sub-freezing
temperatures are normal. Lublin is a notch colder than Warsaw.

In Warsaw I recommend to visit recently opened museum :

http://www.polin.pl/en

Also this may be of interest to you:

http://www.polin.pl/en/the-poland-retreat-for-jewish-artists

M. Antopolski


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Advice for Short Research Trip
From: Robin Levine <robinllevine@gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 12 Oct 2016 04:34:04 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Good day,

I am currently applying for a modest Travel Grant through my graduate
school to spend 12 or 13 days in Poland to perform research, create
art, document ancestral sites, etc. However, some of the days would
fall on Christmas and New Years when most things are closed and
weather conditions could slow me down too. I am trying to figure out
how to maximize my time and money for an itinerary and budget list for
the grant proposal

The family I can trace are >from Chelm, Lublin - Blajer, Fridman,
Groman, Scheider or Scheiderman. I am looking for genealogy
information before 1912 and after 1912. The digital archives are
missing information >from 1912- late 1920-early 1930s (?) These are the
years when my grandmother and great uncles were born.

It seems as if I don't need to go to the National Archives in Warsaw.
I've read that all of the information for Chelm and Lublin
town #35 is at the Archiwum Panstwowe w Lublinie or the State Archives
in Lublin. Or will I have time to go back and forth between archives?
Also, how expensive and difficult is it to find a translator?
Especially since the newer items can't be photocopied.

While there I would like to have a tour of the Jewish section of
Lublin (Castle, Grodzka Gate, Square at Szeroka Street), visit the
Chelm Cemetery, and locate any addresses. I was originally planning to
arrive in Warsaw go to the archives (which may not be necessary), see
a museum, and try to make contacts with Polish artists (cafes). My
college emphases collaborative art with international artists. Then,
take a 522 bus and TLK MP to Chelm and then to Lublin. Maybe go to
Majdanek Camp just before leaving, so I am not upset the entire trip.
Is getting around difficult by bus and TLK MP? Recommendations for cafes.

Are there other things I should see in the area that are not far away,
or cost a lot of money? Any advice would be much appreciated. Thank
you kindly.

Robin Levine
robinllevine@gmail.com


Exciting New Extracts for Opatow Researchers #poland

Judy Golan <judygolan@...>
 

Exciting New Extracts for Opatow Researchers


JRI-Poland has recently scanned various non-vital records collections
in the Sandomierz Archive relevant to Jews of Opatow. These include
the Opatow Books of Residents (BOR) with a house-by-house census by
street.


1931-1939 Books of Residents
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Eleven Polish volumes comprising the 1931-1939 BOR have now been fully
extracted and provide details for some 6,000 Jewish residents by their
last known street/house residence in Opatow. For some individuals, the
details include date/place of birth; date/place of death during this
period; parents' names; date/place of marriage; and population
movement, covering date/place of movement out of Opatow, including
immigration to other countries. The information in the individual
volumes was combined with the details in the index to create the
fullest possible picture. Sincere thanks goes to the team of
volunteers Sheldon Richmond, Carol Ackermann, Alison Greengard and
Magda Skowron who contributed to the index extract.


1890-1930 Books of Residents
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The index volume to the Cyrillic volumes comprising the 1890-1930 BOR
has been extracted by a professional and lists 13,000 Jews who resided
in Opatow over that 40-year period. Entries include individuals born
prior to 1835 (the earliest surviving year of Opatow birth
registrations). Additional funding is required to hire
Russian-speaking professionals to fully extract all the information
for each individual in these volumes.


Holocaust-related Census
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Thanks goes to Madeleine Sann who meticulously extracted the surviving
pages of the Opatow September 15, 1939 Census and November 1, 1940
Census. The entries in the surviving books represent some 35% of the
total Jewish population remaining in 1940.

By combining this data with previously extracted birth, marriage and
death records, JRI-Poland is now able to provide researchers with an
exceptionally full picture of families residing in Opatow over a
100-year period.


A minimum qualifying contribution entitles Opatow researchers to
obtain record extracts relating to their direct family surnames. Data
from these new sources will be searchable online after all costs are
fully covered.

Please contact me for additional details.

Judy Golan
JRI-Poland Opatow Team Leader


JRI Poland #Poland Exciting New Extracts for Opatow Researchers #poland

Judy Golan <judygolan@...>
 

Exciting New Extracts for Opatow Researchers


JRI-Poland has recently scanned various non-vital records collections
in the Sandomierz Archive relevant to Jews of Opatow. These include
the Opatow Books of Residents (BOR) with a house-by-house census by
street.


1931-1939 Books of Residents
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Eleven Polish volumes comprising the 1931-1939 BOR have now been fully
extracted and provide details for some 6,000 Jewish residents by their
last known street/house residence in Opatow. For some individuals, the
details include date/place of birth; date/place of death during this
period; parents' names; date/place of marriage; and population
movement, covering date/place of movement out of Opatow, including
immigration to other countries. The information in the individual
volumes was combined with the details in the index to create the
fullest possible picture. Sincere thanks goes to the team of
volunteers Sheldon Richmond, Carol Ackermann, Alison Greengard and
Magda Skowron who contributed to the index extract.


1890-1930 Books of Residents
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The index volume to the Cyrillic volumes comprising the 1890-1930 BOR
has been extracted by a professional and lists 13,000 Jews who resided
in Opatow over that 40-year period. Entries include individuals born
prior to 1835 (the earliest surviving year of Opatow birth
registrations). Additional funding is required to hire
Russian-speaking professionals to fully extract all the information
for each individual in these volumes.


Holocaust-related Census
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Thanks goes to Madeleine Sann who meticulously extracted the surviving
pages of the Opatow September 15, 1939 Census and November 1, 1940
Census. The entries in the surviving books represent some 35% of the
total Jewish population remaining in 1940.

By combining this data with previously extracted birth, marriage and
death records, JRI-Poland is now able to provide researchers with an
exceptionally full picture of families residing in Opatow over a
100-year period.


A minimum qualifying contribution entitles Opatow researchers to
obtain record extracts relating to their direct family surnames. Data
from these new sources will be searchable online after all costs are
fully covered.

Please contact me for additional details.

Judy Golan
JRI-Poland Opatow Team Leader


Subcarpathian Document Acquisition #hungary

Lara Diamond
 

Fellow Subcarpathian Researchers,

I'm happy to inform you that the Subcarpathian SIG is currently in the
process of acquiring records >from the area. We already have copies of
all Jewish records >from over 75 record books (with more coming in the
next few weeks). The books we have so far cover births, marriages and
deaths in 13 Subcarpathian towns >from 1895 through the late
1920s/early 1930s (depending on the town). These include many late
registrations were made for births as far back as the 1840s and
marriages >from the 1860s and 1870s, so these books contain records
spanning nearly 200 years.

Thanks to generous donations made at the IAJGS conference this summer,
we have been able to acquire these as well as others which are
currently in the process of being photographed. However, with the
sheer number of available books (and after finishing working on the
post-1895 books, I hope to move into some available pre-1895 Jewish
vital record books as well as census records for the area), we will
need additional donations to continue this effort. Donations can be
made via JewishGen at the following link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=50
to the SubCarpathia SIG General Fund.

I've already transcribed some of these books, and those transcriptions
will be sent to JewishGen to allow others to search. But I'll need
help with transcribing all of the books we already have and the ones
we hope to get shortly. If you can read English, you can transcribe
these records. Records until WWI are in Hungarian; post-WWI they are
in Czech. Both use the Latin alphabet, so you'll be able to read
names and towns. I do not speak Hungarian or Czech but have been able
to fully transcribe these books.

(Note that the exception is a short time period generally in the late
1920s/early 1930s where records are written in Cyrillic characters.
If you can read Russian and can help with transcribing these records,
please let me know.)

Those who either donate at least $100 or transcribe at least 500
records will qualify to get copies of transcriptions (in Excel format)
as they are completed. All transcriptions will eventually be placed
on JewishGen for people to search freely as well, >from JewishGen's
Hungary and Ukraine databases.

We're collaborating with H-SIG, who has been generous enough to share
materials such as their transcription guide.

Lara Diamond (Subcarpathian SIG Leader)
Baltimore, MD USA


Hungary SIG #Hungary Subcarpathian Document Acquisition #hungary

Lara Diamond
 

Fellow Subcarpathian Researchers,

I'm happy to inform you that the Subcarpathian SIG is currently in the
process of acquiring records >from the area. We already have copies of
all Jewish records >from over 75 record books (with more coming in the
next few weeks). The books we have so far cover births, marriages and
deaths in 13 Subcarpathian towns >from 1895 through the late
1920s/early 1930s (depending on the town). These include many late
registrations were made for births as far back as the 1840s and
marriages >from the 1860s and 1870s, so these books contain records
spanning nearly 200 years.

Thanks to generous donations made at the IAJGS conference this summer,
we have been able to acquire these as well as others which are
currently in the process of being photographed. However, with the
sheer number of available books (and after finishing working on the
post-1895 books, I hope to move into some available pre-1895 Jewish
vital record books as well as census records for the area), we will
need additional donations to continue this effort. Donations can be
made via JewishGen at the following link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=50
to the SubCarpathia SIG General Fund.

I've already transcribed some of these books, and those transcriptions
will be sent to JewishGen to allow others to search. But I'll need
help with transcribing all of the books we already have and the ones
we hope to get shortly. If you can read English, you can transcribe
these records. Records until WWI are in Hungarian; post-WWI they are
in Czech. Both use the Latin alphabet, so you'll be able to read
names and towns. I do not speak Hungarian or Czech but have been able
to fully transcribe these books.

(Note that the exception is a short time period generally in the late
1920s/early 1930s where records are written in Cyrillic characters.
If you can read Russian and can help with transcribing these records,
please let me know.)

Those who either donate at least $100 or transcribe at least 500
records will qualify to get copies of transcriptions (in Excel format)
as they are completed. All transcriptions will eventually be placed
on JewishGen for people to search freely as well, >from JewishGen's
Hungary and Ukraine databases.

We're collaborating with H-SIG, who has been generous enough to share
materials such as their transcription guide.

Lara Diamond (Subcarpathian SIG Leader)
Baltimore, MD USA


Guide for towns near frankfurt #germany

caroline f gries <cfgries@...>
 

I need some help locating a guide who speaks German/ English and
can read Hebrew.
The Towns are; Niedernberg, Breindenbach, Unslben, Schopfloch,
Feuchtwagen, Storndorf Angenrod and I believe they are all near
Frankfurt. Also someone who can help with research
and perhaps knows the town history.

Caroline Gries, Aurora Colorado cfgries@comcast.net

Moderator Notes: Off-list replies only.
This is the second and final message on this topic.


German SIG #Germany Guide for towns near frankfurt #germany

caroline f gries <cfgries@...>
 

I need some help locating a guide who speaks German/ English and
can read Hebrew.
The Towns are; Niedernberg, Breindenbach, Unslben, Schopfloch,
Feuchtwagen, Storndorf Angenrod and I believe they are all near
Frankfurt. Also someone who can help with research
and perhaps knows the town history.

Caroline Gries, Aurora Colorado cfgries@comcast.net

Moderator Notes: Off-list replies only.
This is the second and final message on this topic.


Johanna NEUFELD born RHEIN - Dortmund #germany

Mike Redel <redel.mike@...>
 

Dear gersigs,

I am searching for Johanna NEUFELD born RHEIN. She was born 08.09.1908
in Dortmund. 1938 She married Paul NEUFELD born 22.10.1901 in
Froendenberg. Johanna was deported to Zamosc 30.04.1942.

I wish to know more about her parents. Who are they? There is a stone
in Dortmund Wambel. The inscription remembers to Johanna RHEIN born
Falk. Johanna Falk was born in Braunsbach 09.07.1887. She could not be
the mother because she married 1919 the widower Hermann RHEIN from
Dortmund.

Is Hermann her father - but who was his first wife?

Regards, Mike Redel, Unna - Germany redel.mike@gmail.com

Moderator Note:
If you wish to temporarily stop GerSIG Email, go to List Manager
and change your GerSIG subscription to "no mail".

Please note the following information about how to
change your GerSIG Email subscription. This appears at the bottom of
every GerSIG list Email message.

"To change the format in which you receive this mailing list
To change your email address or to un-subscribe go to:
Mailing List Management Center: http://lyris.jewishgen.org/ListManager "


German SIG #Germany Johanna NEUFELD born RHEIN - Dortmund #germany

Mike Redel <redel.mike@...>
 

Dear gersigs,

I am searching for Johanna NEUFELD born RHEIN. She was born 08.09.1908
in Dortmund. 1938 She married Paul NEUFELD born 22.10.1901 in
Froendenberg. Johanna was deported to Zamosc 30.04.1942.

I wish to know more about her parents. Who are they? There is a stone
in Dortmund Wambel. The inscription remembers to Johanna RHEIN born
Falk. Johanna Falk was born in Braunsbach 09.07.1887. She could not be
the mother because she married 1919 the widower Hermann RHEIN from
Dortmund.

Is Hermann her father - but who was his first wife?

Regards, Mike Redel, Unna - Germany redel.mike@gmail.com

Moderator Note:
If you wish to temporarily stop GerSIG Email, go to List Manager
and change your GerSIG subscription to "no mail".

Please note the following information about how to
change your GerSIG Email subscription. This appears at the bottom of
every GerSIG list Email message.

"To change the format in which you receive this mailing list
To change your email address or to un-subscribe go to:
Mailing List Management Center: http://lyris.jewishgen.org/ListManager "


INTRO- Seek family of Bertha PELTZ *12.9.1863 Neumarkt, near Breslau #germany

Felix Baier <felixbaier@...>
 

Hello everyone!
I joined the group already a couple of weeks ago and wanted to introduce
myself now. I have been doing genealogy research since December 2015,
and I consider myself a beginner in
German Jewish genealogy research. I live in Cambridge, MA. My native
language is German. I consider myself an intermediate user of computers,
and my experience with the internet is extensive.

I have identified the name and birth date of my great-great-grandmother,
Bertha PELTZ *12.9.1863 Neumarkt, near Breslau. My primary research goal
is now to identify the husband of Bertha's (half?) sister Ida.
Ida's full name is either Ida PELTZ, or (more likely) Ida SACHS, after
their mother's maiden name.

Ida's and Bertha's mother Johanne Pauline SACHS was born in
1827/1828, she was married to Bertha's father in 1861, and I suspect
that Ida was born prior to 1861 to a different father. I thus suspect
that Ida got married sometime between ~1870-1895 in Lower Silesia
(Breslau?, Liegnitz? Any comments are greatly appreciated!

Regards, Felix Baier, Cambridge/Mass. felixbaier@yahoo.de


German SIG #Germany INTRO- Seek family of Bertha PELTZ *12.9.1863 Neumarkt, near Breslau #germany

Felix Baier <felixbaier@...>
 

Hello everyone!
I joined the group already a couple of weeks ago and wanted to introduce
myself now. I have been doing genealogy research since December 2015,
and I consider myself a beginner in
German Jewish genealogy research. I live in Cambridge, MA. My native
language is German. I consider myself an intermediate user of computers,
and my experience with the internet is extensive.

I have identified the name and birth date of my great-great-grandmother,
Bertha PELTZ *12.9.1863 Neumarkt, near Breslau. My primary research goal
is now to identify the husband of Bertha's (half?) sister Ida.
Ida's full name is either Ida PELTZ, or (more likely) Ida SACHS, after
their mother's maiden name.

Ida's and Bertha's mother Johanne Pauline SACHS was born in
1827/1828, she was married to Bertha's father in 1861, and I suspect
that Ida was born prior to 1861 to a different father. I thus suspect
that Ida got married sometime between ~1870-1895 in Lower Silesia
(Breslau?, Liegnitz? Any comments are greatly appreciated!

Regards, Felix Baier, Cambridge/Mass. felixbaier@yahoo.de


Free IGRA Webinar-Waves of Immigration to Israel #general

Elena Bazes
 

In honor of Aliyah Day, IGRA (Israel Genealogy Research Association)
will be holding a free webinar on Sunday, November 6 at 1 p.m. EST, 8
p.m. IST, entitled "Waves of Immigration to Israel".

Garri Regev, past president of IGRA, will present an overview of the
records available on IGRA's website of those who attempted to or were
successful in making Aliyah (immigrating) to Israel.

Pre-registration is required as there are a limited number of seats.
To register go to

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7649539167252112643

Elena Biegel Bazes
IGRA Publicity Chairperson


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Free IGRA Webinar-Waves of Immigration to Israel #general

Elena Bazes
 

In honor of Aliyah Day, IGRA (Israel Genealogy Research Association)
will be holding a free webinar on Sunday, November 6 at 1 p.m. EST, 8
p.m. IST, entitled "Waves of Immigration to Israel".

Garri Regev, past president of IGRA, will present an overview of the
records available on IGRA's website of those who attempted to or were
successful in making Aliyah (immigrating) to Israel.

Pre-registration is required as there are a limited number of seats.
To register go to

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7649539167252112643

Elena Biegel Bazes
IGRA Publicity Chairperson


JGSGB presents full day of exciting activities Sunday October 16 #general

Ellie Goldberg
 

On Sunday, October 16, 2016 the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater
Boston presents a full day of exciting activities. All programs take
place at Temple Emanuel, 385 Ward Street, Newton, MA. www.jgsgb.org

Beginners Workshop in Jewish Genealogy, 10:00 am - noon. $10 for
members, $15 for non-members (includes visitor fee for 1:30 pm
program). http://jgsgb.org/event/beginners-workshop-jewish-genealogy/

Carol Clingan and Debbie Lerner, who together have more than 30 years
of genealogy research experience, will present a workshop tailored for
beginners on the process of researching your family tree. They will
describe in detail the sources and records that are most helpful to
beginners and present a case study demonstrating a successful search.
Their core message is that you CAN research your family tree. You will
be off to a great start after you attend this workshop.

The Genealogical Value of Jewish Burial Records, Speaker: Nolan Altman,
1:30 pm. Free for members, $5 for non-members.
http://jgsgb.org/event/nolan-altman-genealogical-value-jewish-burial-record=s/

Jewish headstone inscriptions and burial records can provide crucial
information to family historians. Hebrew name inscriptions that are
based on patronymics can link together two generations of Hebrew names
unlike any other source document. This can be especially helpful when
trying to connect first generation American ancestors with their
European families. Using photographs and case studies, Nolan Altman
will explain the symbols and details found on headstones and describe
how this information can provide important data and context for your
family research. He will also direct you to the major websites that
can help you locate the burial sites of your ancestors.

Nolan Altman coordinates the JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial
Registry (JOWBR) and is Vice President for Data Acquisition at
JewishGen. He was bitten by the "genealogy bug" in 1996 when he wrote
his family history in memory of his mother. After volunteering on
several projects, he became the Coordinator for JewishGen's Holocaust
Database and for JOWBR. He makes regular presentations at international
conferences and has written articles for Avotaynu, Dorot and other genealogy
publications. He is a former President of the Jewish Genealogical Society of
Long Island.

Research help - Special Interest Groups
Before lecture: 12:30 pm. Belarus SIG and Litvak-Baltic SIG
After lecture: approx. 3:00 pm. Poland SIG and Ukraine SIG

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston is dedicated to
helping people discover and research their Jewish family history. We
offer monthly speakers, special interest groups, individual help with
research and acomprehensive beginner=E2=80=99s course. We have an extensive
collection of research materials and publish an award-winning journal,
Mass-Pocha. www.jgsgb.org

Ellie Goldberg
Newton, MA
info@jgsgb.org
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/groups/jgsgboston/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSGB presents full day of exciting activities Sunday October 16 #general

Ellie Goldberg
 

On Sunday, October 16, 2016 the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater
Boston presents a full day of exciting activities. All programs take
place at Temple Emanuel, 385 Ward Street, Newton, MA. www.jgsgb.org

Beginners Workshop in Jewish Genealogy, 10:00 am - noon. $10 for
members, $15 for non-members (includes visitor fee for 1:30 pm
program). http://jgsgb.org/event/beginners-workshop-jewish-genealogy/

Carol Clingan and Debbie Lerner, who together have more than 30 years
of genealogy research experience, will present a workshop tailored for
beginners on the process of researching your family tree. They will
describe in detail the sources and records that are most helpful to
beginners and present a case study demonstrating a successful search.
Their core message is that you CAN research your family tree. You will
be off to a great start after you attend this workshop.

The Genealogical Value of Jewish Burial Records, Speaker: Nolan Altman,
1:30 pm. Free for members, $5 for non-members.
http://jgsgb.org/event/nolan-altman-genealogical-value-jewish-burial-record=s/

Jewish headstone inscriptions and burial records can provide crucial
information to family historians. Hebrew name inscriptions that are
based on patronymics can link together two generations of Hebrew names
unlike any other source document. This can be especially helpful when
trying to connect first generation American ancestors with their
European families. Using photographs and case studies, Nolan Altman
will explain the symbols and details found on headstones and describe
how this information can provide important data and context for your
family research. He will also direct you to the major websites that
can help you locate the burial sites of your ancestors.

Nolan Altman coordinates the JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial
Registry (JOWBR) and is Vice President for Data Acquisition at
JewishGen. He was bitten by the "genealogy bug" in 1996 when he wrote
his family history in memory of his mother. After volunteering on
several projects, he became the Coordinator for JewishGen's Holocaust
Database and for JOWBR. He makes regular presentations at international
conferences and has written articles for Avotaynu, Dorot and other genealogy
publications. He is a former President of the Jewish Genealogical Society of
Long Island.

Research help - Special Interest Groups
Before lecture: 12:30 pm. Belarus SIG and Litvak-Baltic SIG
After lecture: approx. 3:00 pm. Poland SIG and Ukraine SIG

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston is dedicated to
helping people discover and research their Jewish family history. We
offer monthly speakers, special interest groups, individual help with
research and acomprehensive beginner=E2=80=99s course. We have an extensive
collection of research materials and publish an award-winning journal,
Mass-Pocha. www.jgsgb.org

Ellie Goldberg
Newton, MA
info@jgsgb.org
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/groups/jgsgboston/


announcing Zolotonosha 1835 Revision List submission #general

Gary Pokrassa <GAPokrassa@...>
 

I am announcing the submission of the Zolotonosha 1835 Revision List to the Ukraine
SIG coordinator as the first submission for the Zolotonosha Vital Records Project

It may be 12-36 months before the information appears on the JewishGen databases
for searching. Qualified donors of over $100 to the Zolotonosha Vital Records
Project can receive unedited copies of the spreadsheets and I have just sent out
an unedited copy to our existing qualified donors

We are soliciting contributions for this important project - please use the
JewishGen-erosity - Ukraine SIG Projects page and find the line for Zolotonosha
Vital Records Project. Here is the URL for convenience:

http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=22

Thank you
Gary Pokrassa - JG Town Leader - Zolotonosha
JGID 70858

Researching POKRASSA, DREISHPOON, BOGO, BOGUSLAVSKY, KIANSKY, FEINBERG, FAY=
NBERG, POLER, EISENBERG, BERG, ROSENGARTEN, SHRON, SOLOVEITCHIK, MESH, GOTT=
ESFELD, HYAMS, BLOOM, BLUMENKRANTZ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen announcing Zolotonosha 1835 Revision List submission #general

Gary Pokrassa <GAPokrassa@...>
 

I am announcing the submission of the Zolotonosha 1835 Revision List to the Ukraine
SIG coordinator as the first submission for the Zolotonosha Vital Records Project

It may be 12-36 months before the information appears on the JewishGen databases
for searching. Qualified donors of over $100 to the Zolotonosha Vital Records
Project can receive unedited copies of the spreadsheets and I have just sent out
an unedited copy to our existing qualified donors

We are soliciting contributions for this important project - please use the
JewishGen-erosity - Ukraine SIG Projects page and find the line for Zolotonosha
Vital Records Project. Here is the URL for convenience:

http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=22

Thank you
Gary Pokrassa - JG Town Leader - Zolotonosha
JGID 70858

Researching POKRASSA, DREISHPOON, BOGO, BOGUSLAVSKY, KIANSKY, FEINBERG, FAY=
NBERG, POLER, EISENBERG, BERG, ROSENGARTEN, SHRON, SOLOVEITCHIK, MESH, GOTT=
ESFELD, HYAMS, BLOOM, BLUMENKRANTZ


Dispute over site of former Great Synagogue in Vilnius #lithuania

Gary Mokotoff
 

The Lithuanian Jewish Community has reiterated opposition to possible plans
to reconstruct the destroyed Great Synagogue in Vilnius and expressed
concern over recent project proposals that advocate for partially
reconstructing the building and developing the site as a commercial venture.

The complete story can be fund at http://tinyurl.com/VilniusSynagogue.

Gary Mokotoff

MODERATOR'S NOTE: While this is not strictly within the scope of
this list, we're including it as an informational message. It will
not be the beginning of a thread.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Dispute over site of former Great Synagogue in Vilnius #lithuania

Gary Mokotoff
 

The Lithuanian Jewish Community has reiterated opposition to possible plans
to reconstruct the destroyed Great Synagogue in Vilnius and expressed
concern over recent project proposals that advocate for partially
reconstructing the building and developing the site as a commercial venture.

The complete story can be fund at http://tinyurl.com/VilniusSynagogue.

Gary Mokotoff

MODERATOR'S NOTE: While this is not strictly within the scope of
this list, we're including it as an informational message. It will
not be the beginning of a thread.

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