Date   

Thank you! #bessarabia

Mabel Thedog <mabelthedog@...>
 

Dear all,


Firstly, I'm sorry for the lateness of this!! I just want to say a massive thank you >from my family and I
for the help you gave us to find the location of a town back in July.
A bit of background: on a family members naturalisation record, the place of birth in Bessarabia as
Rinavoots! After searching, I could not find the place,so asked on here.
I think have solved this now, and believe the place is actually GRINAUTS, and that what was written
down on the record must have been written down how it was pronounced.
So thank you for helping me to solve this long mystery (especially Yefim!)

Thank you,
Martha Hobby
Mabelthedog@yahoo.co.uk


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Thank you! #bessarabia

Mabel Thedog <mabelthedog@...>
 

Dear all,


Firstly, I'm sorry for the lateness of this!! I just want to say a massive thank you >from my family and I
for the help you gave us to find the location of a town back in July.
A bit of background: on a family members naturalisation record, the place of birth in Bessarabia as
Rinavoots! After searching, I could not find the place,so asked on here.
I think have solved this now, and believe the place is actually GRINAUTS, and that what was written
down on the record must have been written down how it was pronounced.
So thank you for helping me to solve this long mystery (especially Yefim!)

Thank you,
Martha Hobby
Mabelthedog@yahoo.co.uk


Jtest Ashkenazi Jewish DNA Signature in person of Greek Origin #dna

Ben Forman
 

Hi DNA Genners

In the course of my DNA research I have unexpectedly found that the
non-Jewish father of one of my cousins has 5.8% Ashkenazi Jewish DNA
according to the GedMatch Jtest results. As far as I know he's Greek,
he was tested originally by 23andMe.

- Is this unusual
- Can any extrapolation be made about when this ancestor might have lived.
-- 6% seems quite high given that my other "fully Jewish" family
members are around 30% Ashkenazi according to Jtest; does this mean it
was a relatively recent ancestor?

Thanks as always

Ben Forman

searching: BENSON: Hasenpoth/Courland;
BERNSTEIN/WEINER: Ylakiai;
CAHN/CAHEN/WOLF: Zuendorf/Bruhl/Lechenich/Ahrweiler;
FURMAN: Kaluszyn; GEVER: Daugavpils/Dvinsk;
STILLMAN:Pilica/Ogrodzienec SAWADY: Zavadi,Posen;


DNA Research #DNA Jtest Ashkenazi Jewish DNA Signature in person of Greek Origin #dna

Ben Forman
 

Hi DNA Genners

In the course of my DNA research I have unexpectedly found that the
non-Jewish father of one of my cousins has 5.8% Ashkenazi Jewish DNA
according to the GedMatch Jtest results. As far as I know he's Greek,
he was tested originally by 23andMe.

- Is this unusual
- Can any extrapolation be made about when this ancestor might have lived.
-- 6% seems quite high given that my other "fully Jewish" family
members are around 30% Ashkenazi according to Jtest; does this mean it
was a relatively recent ancestor?

Thanks as always

Ben Forman

searching: BENSON: Hasenpoth/Courland;
BERNSTEIN/WEINER: Ylakiai;
CAHN/CAHEN/WOLF: Zuendorf/Bruhl/Lechenich/Ahrweiler;
FURMAN: Kaluszyn; GEVER: Daugavpils/Dvinsk;
STILLMAN:Pilica/Ogrodzienec SAWADY: Zavadi,Posen;


Nagy Kapos #hungary

beechtreeimages@...
 

My grandfather, Benjamin Samuel Weber (sometimes known as Bert Weber) arrived in the Scranton, PA area around 1900 as did nine of his siblings. His parents were Nehemiah and Esther Weber nee Friedman. He told some relatives that he came >from Nagy Kapos (now Velky Kapusany in Slovakia) and on some U.S. documents he listed his birthplace as Ungvar (now Uzhhorod) which is 11 miles to the east and now in the Ukraine. I do not know if his ancestors resided in Nagy Kapos or elsewhere, but I have recently learned >from another JewishGen researcher the in 1820 Reisel Weber, daughter of Joseph and Leah Weber married Rabbi Lazar Samovicz in Nagy Kapos.

According to the Velky Kapusany chapter >from The Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities, Slovakia there were 34 Jews in the community during 1828, 81 in 1840 and 268 in 1869. Is there a reasonably straightforward way of getting a list of the names of the 268 Jews listed in the 1869 census?

Joel Weber


correction #hungary

beechtreeimages@...
 

Reisel Weber was born in ca 1820.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Nagy Kapos #hungary

beechtreeimages@...
 

My grandfather, Benjamin Samuel Weber (sometimes known as Bert Weber) arrived in the Scranton, PA area around 1900 as did nine of his siblings. His parents were Nehemiah and Esther Weber nee Friedman. He told some relatives that he came >from Nagy Kapos (now Velky Kapusany in Slovakia) and on some U.S. documents he listed his birthplace as Ungvar (now Uzhhorod) which is 11 miles to the east and now in the Ukraine. I do not know if his ancestors resided in Nagy Kapos or elsewhere, but I have recently learned >from another JewishGen researcher the in 1820 Reisel Weber, daughter of Joseph and Leah Weber married Rabbi Lazar Samovicz in Nagy Kapos.

According to the Velky Kapusany chapter >from The Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities, Slovakia there were 34 Jews in the community during 1828, 81 in 1840 and 268 in 1869. Is there a reasonably straightforward way of getting a list of the names of the 268 Jews listed in the 1869 census?

Joel Weber


Hungary SIG #Hungary correction #hungary

beechtreeimages@...
 

Reisel Weber was born in ca 1820.


Re: Nyirbator Hungary after WW2 #hungary

HungarianRoots
 

Since I am a researcher of the Soviet forces in Hungary let me comment on
this:
- the people who killed them were most probably not Russians. The Soviet
army stationed in Hungary mainly consisted of Ukrainians, Belorussians and
many other minorities including Ukrainian Jews.
- if someone was murdered and died in Hungary, there has to be a death
record for the person in the town he or she was killed in!! So first, you
should look at the death records of the towns.

Russian archival documents are still classified for that period mostly.

Regards,

Karesz Vandor
genealogist/Historian/Private tour guide


Hungarian Roots
web: www.hungarianroots.com
e-mail: info@hungarianroots.com

----- Original Message -----
From: "Alex W Magocsi awmjr@magocsi.org" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Friday, November 11, 2016 10:03 AM
Subject: [h-sig] Nyirbator Hungary after WW2


I was told by my Grandmother that her sister, Hellena GROSZ, born April 1895
in Nyirbator, was murdered, along with her husband Martin KAUFMANN and 2
daughters, by the Russians after WW2. I assume that this took place in or
around Nyirbator.

How does one begin to research this topic? What sources may there be?

Thank you

Alex Magocsi
York Maine / Hamburg Germany

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
This SIG (h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org) is hosted by
JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy
Visit our home page at http://www.jewishgen.org
For more information on the Hungarian SIG
see our website at http://www.jewishgen.org/hungary/
and check out the fabulous Hungary Database at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary/
For back issues, search the H-SIG message archives at
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~sigs
Has JewishGen helped you connect with your family? We want to hear
your story! Please email us at info@JewishGen.org today
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Sign up now for value-added services!
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/ValueAdded.asp

To post a message, please address it to <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
----
You are currently subscribed to h-sig as: [info@hungarianroots.com]
To change the format of our mailings, to stop/resume delivery (vacation),
or to unsubscribe, please go to http://www.jewishgen.org/listserv



-----
A(z) uzenetben nem talalhato virus.
Ellenorizte: AVG - www.avg.com
Verzio: 2016.0.7859 / Virus adatbazis: 4664/13398 - Kiadas datuma:
2016.11.12.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Nyirbator Hungary after WW2 #hungary

HungarianRoots
 

Since I am a researcher of the Soviet forces in Hungary let me comment on
this:
- the people who killed them were most probably not Russians. The Soviet
army stationed in Hungary mainly consisted of Ukrainians, Belorussians and
many other minorities including Ukrainian Jews.
- if someone was murdered and died in Hungary, there has to be a death
record for the person in the town he or she was killed in!! So first, you
should look at the death records of the towns.

Russian archival documents are still classified for that period mostly.

Regards,

Karesz Vandor
genealogist/Historian/Private tour guide


Hungarian Roots
web: www.hungarianroots.com
e-mail: info@hungarianroots.com

----- Original Message -----
From: "Alex W Magocsi awmjr@magocsi.org" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Friday, November 11, 2016 10:03 AM
Subject: [h-sig] Nyirbator Hungary after WW2


I was told by my Grandmother that her sister, Hellena GROSZ, born April 1895
in Nyirbator, was murdered, along with her husband Martin KAUFMANN and 2
daughters, by the Russians after WW2. I assume that this took place in or
around Nyirbator.

How does one begin to research this topic? What sources may there be?

Thank you

Alex Magocsi
York Maine / Hamburg Germany

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
This SIG (h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org) is hosted by
JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy
Visit our home page at http://www.jewishgen.org
For more information on the Hungarian SIG
see our website at http://www.jewishgen.org/hungary/
and check out the fabulous Hungary Database at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary/
For back issues, search the H-SIG message archives at
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~sigs
Has JewishGen helped you connect with your family? We want to hear
your story! Please email us at info@JewishGen.org today
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Sign up now for value-added services!
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/ValueAdded.asp

To post a message, please address it to <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
----
You are currently subscribed to h-sig as: [info@hungarianroots.com]
To change the format of our mailings, to stop/resume delivery (vacation),
or to unsubscribe, please go to http://www.jewishgen.org/listserv



-----
A(z) uzenetben nem talalhato virus.
Ellenorizte: AVG - www.avg.com
Verzio: 2016.0.7859 / Virus adatbazis: 4664/13398 - Kiadas datuma:
2016.11.12.


Court archivist to speak to Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois on Nov. 20 #general

events@...
 

Philip J. Costello, archivist with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Cook County,
will describe the court's archival holdings at the Sunday, Nov. 20, 2016, meeting
of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois. His presentation will begin at 2
p.m. at Temple Beth-El, 3610 Dundee Road, Northbrook, Ill. This event is free and
open to the public.

The JGSI meeting facilities at Temple Beth-El will open at 12:30 p.m. to
accommodate those who want to use or borrow genealogy library materials, get help
with genealogy websites or ask genealogical questions before the main program
begins at 2 p.m. For more information, visit
http://jgsi.org/event-2207901 or phone 312-666-0100.

The Clerk of the Circuit Court of Cook County is statutorily charged with being the
keeper of the record in legal proceedings filed with the Circuit Court in Cook
County, Illinois. Although the pleadings filed by parties and orders entered by
judges are created primarily to litigate cases, they may sometimes possess
unintended secondary value of interest to historians and genealogists. Records such
as naturalizations, divorces, and probate case files hold a virtual gold
mine of historical information.

This session will touch upon some of the unique and interesting
historical records found in the collections of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Cook County Archives, located in the Richard J. Daley Center in
Chicago. Philip J. Costello has served in the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Cook County Archives since its inception in 1992.

Submitted by:
Martin Fischer
Vice President-Publicity
Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois


JGS NY Meeting Sunday November 20 #general

Harriet Mayer
 

Jewish Genealogical Society - New York - Meeting Sunday, November 20 at 2 PM
at the Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th St. New York

Program: "Family Secrets, Jewish-Christian Relations and the Holocaust"

Speakers: Professor Katharina von Kellenbach and Pastor Heidi Neumark

Professor von Kellenbach and Pastor Neumark are Lutheran theologians whose families
carefully disguised their connections to Jews and Judaism. Both families tried to
rebuild lives by disassociating and denying the trauma and guilt of the Holocaust.
Neumark accidentally discovered that she was descended >from a prominent Jewish
German family and that her grandfather had been murdered in a concentration camp.
Von Kellenbach became inadvertently aware that her uncle belonged to the SS and was
tried for the mass murder of the Jews in Pinsk, Belarus. These revelations
compelled our speakers to go on a journey of discovery that led them through
archives across several countries and into Jewish-Christian and Jewish-German
dialogue. Uncovering their family secrets challenged them personally and
theologically, as they confronted Lutheran anti-Judaism and German antisemitism.

Heidi Neumark is a graduate of Brown University and Lutheran Theological Seminary
in Philadelphia. She is the pastor of the multicultural, bilingual Trinity Lutheran
Church on Manhattan's Upper West Side. Her fist book, "Breathing Space: A Spiritual
Journey in the South Bronx", tells of her strong passion for social justice, which
led her to serving congregations in the South Bronx for twenty years. In her book
"Hidden Inheritance: Family Secrets, Memory and Faith," Neumark tell of her
discovery of her previously unknown German-Jewish ancestry and successive family
loss and trauma through the Holocaust, as well as antisemitism in the Evangelical
Lutheran Church.

Katharina von Kellenbach is Professor of Religious Studies at St. Mary's College of
Maryland, the Honors College of the State of Maryland. She studied Protestant
evangelical theology in Berlin and Goettingen (Germany) and received her PhD at
Temple University. Her areas of expertise include Holocaust Studies,
Jewish-Christian relations, feminist theology and interreligious dialogue. She is
the author of biographical articles about the life and work of Rabbi Regina Jonas
(1902-1944), who was ordained in 1935 and worked in Berlin until her deportation
to Theresienstadt in 1942 and subsequently to Auschwitz in 1944. Her recent book,
"The Mark of Cain: Guilt and Denial in the Lives of Nazi Perpetrators"(Oxford U.
Press, 2013), uses the archival documents of prison chaplains to examine Christian
discourses of forgiveness and Nazi perpetrators' moral self-reflection in post-war
West Germany.

Free for members: guests welcome, $5 at the door.

More information at our website www.jgsny.org and on our Facebook page.

Submitted by
Harriet Mayer
JGS NY VP Communications
New York NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Court archivist to speak to Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois on Nov. 20 #general

events@...
 

Philip J. Costello, archivist with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Cook County,
will describe the court's archival holdings at the Sunday, Nov. 20, 2016, meeting
of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois. His presentation will begin at 2
p.m. at Temple Beth-El, 3610 Dundee Road, Northbrook, Ill. This event is free and
open to the public.

The JGSI meeting facilities at Temple Beth-El will open at 12:30 p.m. to
accommodate those who want to use or borrow genealogy library materials, get help
with genealogy websites or ask genealogical questions before the main program
begins at 2 p.m. For more information, visit
http://jgsi.org/event-2207901 or phone 312-666-0100.

The Clerk of the Circuit Court of Cook County is statutorily charged with being the
keeper of the record in legal proceedings filed with the Circuit Court in Cook
County, Illinois. Although the pleadings filed by parties and orders entered by
judges are created primarily to litigate cases, they may sometimes possess
unintended secondary value of interest to historians and genealogists. Records such
as naturalizations, divorces, and probate case files hold a virtual gold
mine of historical information.

This session will touch upon some of the unique and interesting
historical records found in the collections of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Cook County Archives, located in the Richard J. Daley Center in
Chicago. Philip J. Costello has served in the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Cook County Archives since its inception in 1992.

Submitted by:
Martin Fischer
Vice President-Publicity
Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS NY Meeting Sunday November 20 #general

Harriet Mayer
 

Jewish Genealogical Society - New York - Meeting Sunday, November 20 at 2 PM
at the Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th St. New York

Program: "Family Secrets, Jewish-Christian Relations and the Holocaust"

Speakers: Professor Katharina von Kellenbach and Pastor Heidi Neumark

Professor von Kellenbach and Pastor Neumark are Lutheran theologians whose families
carefully disguised their connections to Jews and Judaism. Both families tried to
rebuild lives by disassociating and denying the trauma and guilt of the Holocaust.
Neumark accidentally discovered that she was descended >from a prominent Jewish
German family and that her grandfather had been murdered in a concentration camp.
Von Kellenbach became inadvertently aware that her uncle belonged to the SS and was
tried for the mass murder of the Jews in Pinsk, Belarus. These revelations
compelled our speakers to go on a journey of discovery that led them through
archives across several countries and into Jewish-Christian and Jewish-German
dialogue. Uncovering their family secrets challenged them personally and
theologically, as they confronted Lutheran anti-Judaism and German antisemitism.

Heidi Neumark is a graduate of Brown University and Lutheran Theological Seminary
in Philadelphia. She is the pastor of the multicultural, bilingual Trinity Lutheran
Church on Manhattan's Upper West Side. Her fist book, "Breathing Space: A Spiritual
Journey in the South Bronx", tells of her strong passion for social justice, which
led her to serving congregations in the South Bronx for twenty years. In her book
"Hidden Inheritance: Family Secrets, Memory and Faith," Neumark tell of her
discovery of her previously unknown German-Jewish ancestry and successive family
loss and trauma through the Holocaust, as well as antisemitism in the Evangelical
Lutheran Church.

Katharina von Kellenbach is Professor of Religious Studies at St. Mary's College of
Maryland, the Honors College of the State of Maryland. She studied Protestant
evangelical theology in Berlin and Goettingen (Germany) and received her PhD at
Temple University. Her areas of expertise include Holocaust Studies,
Jewish-Christian relations, feminist theology and interreligious dialogue. She is
the author of biographical articles about the life and work of Rabbi Regina Jonas
(1902-1944), who was ordained in 1935 and worked in Berlin until her deportation
to Theresienstadt in 1942 and subsequently to Auschwitz in 1944. Her recent book,
"The Mark of Cain: Guilt and Denial in the Lives of Nazi Perpetrators"(Oxford U.
Press, 2013), uses the archival documents of prison chaplains to examine Christian
discourses of forgiveness and Nazi perpetrators' moral self-reflection in post-war
West Germany.

Free for members: guests welcome, $5 at the door.

More information at our website www.jgsny.org and on our Facebook page.

Submitted by
Harriet Mayer
JGS NY VP Communications
New York NY


JGS North Jersey Meeting #general

Susan Kobren <president@...>
 

When: Thursday, Nov. 17, 2016
Time: 7:30
Where: YMCA of Wayne, 1 Pike Drive, Wayne, NJ 07470

Society members who attended the summer conference will share their new knowledge
and experiences >from Seattle. We will follow with a sharing session. This is your
chance for telling your story or asking your questions. All are welcome.
Refreshments are served.

Susan Kobren
President, JGS of North Jersey
www.jgsnj.org


JGS of Greater Philadelphia November 2016 Meeting #general

Lois Sernoff
 

JGS of Greater Philadelphia November 2016 Meeting
Date: Sunday, Nov. 20, 2016
Time: 1:30 PM
Place: Reform Congregation Keneseth Israel 8300 Old York Road Elkins Park, PA 19026

Speaker: Harry Boonin, Author, Founding Member and first President of JGSGP
Topic: Jewish Boxing in Philadelphia a Century Ago


Harry was born and raised in Philadelphia and became involved in Jewish
genealogy in 1977. He has written a number of articles for Avotaynu, The
International Review of Jewish Genealogy. Harry has co-authored a book about
his family with his cousin David J. Goldberg (The Davidows: The Experiences
of an Immigrant Family, 1995). It contains a little of the Jewish history of
the city of Elizavetgrad (today, in Ukraine, Kirovohrad). He has written and
published The Jewish Quarter of Philadelphia: A History and Guide 1881-1930,
which was awarded the Ben Franklin Award of Excellence for Educational
Books/Directories by Neographics, Graphic Arts Association of Pennsylvania,
New Jersey and Delaware. Harry's next book was The Life and Times of
Congregation Kesher Israel: The Story of the Synagogue at 4th & Lombard
Streets, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and the Surrounding Neighborhood. This
book contains the story of the beginnings of Zionism in Philadelphia.

Genealogical charts are fine, and we all love them, and love to add new
members to the charts. But we must realize that the years our Russian Jewish
ancestors settled here, say >from 1881 to 1924, was one of the most
tumultuous periods in American Jewish history. The movies began, newspapers
flourished, humans flew in the sky and died in the carnage of WWI,
electricity flowed into private homes, the wireless (radio) brought news
through the air, Zionism was born, Tin-Pan Alley was a boulevard of dreams,
and wonder of wonders, in 1928 there were more Jewish boxers nationally than
there were >from any other ethnic group in the country, including the Irish
and African Americans. These background stories are what made our ancestors
lives meaningful. I will talk about four Jewish boxers >from Philly, how I
researched their lives, and the role Jewish boxers played in immigrant
America.

His latest book, Never Tell A Boy Not To Fight, is a collective biography of
four Jewish boxers >from Philadelphia who fought a century ago, and includes
the first full account of the Benny Leonard vs. Lew Tendler lightweight
championship fight in Yankee Stadium, attended by over 58,000 fans, in 1923.
It is the most famous fight involving two Jews.

Mentors will be available >from 1-1:30 PM to help with your research efforts.

JGSGP website http://www.jgsgp.org is now available with latest news,
upcoming meeting notices, and links to Philadelphia resources.

We can also be found on Facebook.

Please note that JGSGP has a Speaker's Bureau which is available
to local groups on the various subjects concerning genealogy.

Lois Sernoff [JGS GreaterPhiladelphia]
<JGLois@verizon.net>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS North Jersey Meeting #general

Susan Kobren <president@...>
 

When: Thursday, Nov. 17, 2016
Time: 7:30
Where: YMCA of Wayne, 1 Pike Drive, Wayne, NJ 07470

Society members who attended the summer conference will share their new knowledge
and experiences >from Seattle. We will follow with a sharing session. This is your
chance for telling your story or asking your questions. All are welcome.
Refreshments are served.

Susan Kobren
President, JGS of North Jersey
www.jgsnj.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of Greater Philadelphia November 2016 Meeting #general

Lois Sernoff
 

JGS of Greater Philadelphia November 2016 Meeting
Date: Sunday, Nov. 20, 2016
Time: 1:30 PM
Place: Reform Congregation Keneseth Israel 8300 Old York Road Elkins Park, PA 19026

Speaker: Harry Boonin, Author, Founding Member and first President of JGSGP
Topic: Jewish Boxing in Philadelphia a Century Ago


Harry was born and raised in Philadelphia and became involved in Jewish
genealogy in 1977. He has written a number of articles for Avotaynu, The
International Review of Jewish Genealogy. Harry has co-authored a book about
his family with his cousin David J. Goldberg (The Davidows: The Experiences
of an Immigrant Family, 1995). It contains a little of the Jewish history of
the city of Elizavetgrad (today, in Ukraine, Kirovohrad). He has written and
published The Jewish Quarter of Philadelphia: A History and Guide 1881-1930,
which was awarded the Ben Franklin Award of Excellence for Educational
Books/Directories by Neographics, Graphic Arts Association of Pennsylvania,
New Jersey and Delaware. Harry's next book was The Life and Times of
Congregation Kesher Israel: The Story of the Synagogue at 4th & Lombard
Streets, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and the Surrounding Neighborhood. This
book contains the story of the beginnings of Zionism in Philadelphia.

Genealogical charts are fine, and we all love them, and love to add new
members to the charts. But we must realize that the years our Russian Jewish
ancestors settled here, say >from 1881 to 1924, was one of the most
tumultuous periods in American Jewish history. The movies began, newspapers
flourished, humans flew in the sky and died in the carnage of WWI,
electricity flowed into private homes, the wireless (radio) brought news
through the air, Zionism was born, Tin-Pan Alley was a boulevard of dreams,
and wonder of wonders, in 1928 there were more Jewish boxers nationally than
there were >from any other ethnic group in the country, including the Irish
and African Americans. These background stories are what made our ancestors
lives meaningful. I will talk about four Jewish boxers >from Philly, how I
researched their lives, and the role Jewish boxers played in immigrant
America.

His latest book, Never Tell A Boy Not To Fight, is a collective biography of
four Jewish boxers >from Philadelphia who fought a century ago, and includes
the first full account of the Benny Leonard vs. Lew Tendler lightweight
championship fight in Yankee Stadium, attended by over 58,000 fans, in 1923.
It is the most famous fight involving two Jews.

Mentors will be available >from 1-1:30 PM to help with your research efforts.

JGSGP website http://www.jgsgp.org is now available with latest news,
upcoming meeting notices, and links to Philadelphia resources.

We can also be found on Facebook.

Please note that JGSGP has a Speaker's Bureau which is available
to local groups on the various subjects concerning genealogy.

Lois Sernoff [JGS GreaterPhiladelphia]
<JGLois@verizon.net>


Viewmate German translation requested #austria-czech

rickglaser@...
 

I have posted three birth records on viewmate;


http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM50622

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM50646

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM50647


These are various birth records >from the town of Kolleschowitz in CZ.

More specifically, they are probably all >from Dereisen (Zderaz) and somehow related to my STEIN family.

I would appreciate transcriptions and translations.


Thanks in advance,


Rick Glaser, Owings Mills MD


Searching: STEIN, Zderaz (Dereisen), GLASER, Hodinin, NALOS, Sollan and Trebivlice, GANS and SCHILLER, Lovosice


Getting a photo of a monument in Vienna #austria-czech

marc.mangel@...
 

Dear colleagues

I would like to get a photo of the monument of my grandparents in the
Central Jewish Cemetary in Vienna. Any hints on how this might be
done?

Thank you in advance

Marc Mangel

--
Marc Mangel Web Pages/Twitter
http://marcmangel.net (Personal)
http://www.soe.ucsc.edu/~msmangel (Professional)
http://bio.uib.no/te/index.php (Professional)
http://www.fishwise.org (Professional)
Twitter: @MarcMangel1
_______________________________________________________________

70121 - 70140 of 665647