Date   

Name changes #hungary

Georges Graner
 

Thank you Andras for this very interesting website
Regards
Georges Graner


Subject: name changes
From: smartlines@...
Date: Tue, 31 Jan 2017 10:58:13 +0100
X-Message-Number: 1

You can find an almost complete database of name changes on the website of
The Hungarian Society for Family Research
(http://www.macse.hu/names/names.aspx).
Andras Hirschler
JGWG Co-ordinator


Subject: Name changes after 1893
From: georges.graner@...
Date: Sun, 29 Jan 2017 10:10:42 +0100
X-Message-Number: 2

Hello siggers,

I know that Radix has a database with all name changes in Hungary between
1800 and 1893.

But is there an address to find name changes after 1893 ?

Thank you for your answer.

Georges Graner


Hungary SIG #Hungary Name changes #hungary

Georges Graner
 

Thank you Andras for this very interesting website
Regards
Georges Graner


Subject: name changes
From: smartlines@...
Date: Tue, 31 Jan 2017 10:58:13 +0100
X-Message-Number: 1

You can find an almost complete database of name changes on the website of
The Hungarian Society for Family Research
(http://www.macse.hu/names/names.aspx).
Andras Hirschler
JGWG Co-ordinator


Subject: Name changes after 1893
From: georges.graner@...
Date: Sun, 29 Jan 2017 10:10:42 +0100
X-Message-Number: 2

Hello siggers,

I know that Radix has a database with all name changes in Hungary between
1800 and 1893.

But is there an address to find name changes after 1893 ?

Thank you for your answer.

Georges Graner


Re: Have you heard of Polanyu? #general

Jenny Schwartzberg
 

Also, has anyone suggested Polonnoye? See its Kehilalink:
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Polonnoye/index.html#BacgrndInfo

Yours,
Jenny Schwartzberg
Chicago, IL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Have you heard of Polanyu? #general

Jenny Schwartzberg
 

Also, has anyone suggested Polonnoye? See its Kehilalink:
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Polonnoye/index.html#BacgrndInfo

Yours,
Jenny Schwartzberg
Chicago, IL


Detroit cemetery lookup #general

Bruce Drake <BDrake@...>
 

For those with relatives/ancestors in the Detroit area, if you don't know if
this resource already, the site of the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan
Detroit has a burial lookup search engine. Registration is required.

http://cemeteries.jewishdetroit.org/index/search/

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, MD


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Detroit cemetery lookup #general

Bruce Drake <BDrake@...>
 

For those with relatives/ancestors in the Detroit area, if you don't know if
this resource already, the site of the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan
Detroit has a burial lookup search engine. Registration is required.

http://cemeteries.jewishdetroit.org/index/search/

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, MD


ViewMate translation - Russian - WYLAGA/WYLOGE #general

Stephanie Shushan <spshushan@...>
 

Hello:

I began looking into my family who lived in Warsaw in the late 1800s/early 1900s.
It seems like these documents might be related to my family. Any help with
translations would be appreciated.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM53180

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM53181

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM53179

Thanks,

Stephanie Shushan

MODERARTOR NOTE: Please respond via ViewMate or privately, via email.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation - Russian - WYLAGA/WYLOGE #general

Stephanie Shushan <spshushan@...>
 

Hello:

I began looking into my family who lived in Warsaw in the late 1800s/early 1900s.
It seems like these documents might be related to my family. Any help with
translations would be appreciated.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM53180

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM53181

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM53179

Thanks,

Stephanie Shushan

MODERARTOR NOTE: Please respond via ViewMate or privately, via email.


Re: Abraham and Benjamin SINGER, authors of "Ha-Madrik" #general

Vivian Kahn
 

I am connected to Abraham and Benjamin SINGER through my father's paternal and
maternal lines.

The brothers are my second cousins three times removed as descendants of
Yechezkel haLevi LOWY/ NICOLAUER, who was my 4G grandfather. Rabbi Yechzkel
Wolf SEGEL, author of "Toras Yechezkel," was leader of the Jewish community of
Hunfalva/Hunsdorf, Hungary (now Huncovce, Slovakia) >from 1818 to 1824 and
founded a yeshiva there. He was born in Liptoszentmiklos, Lipto, Hung.
(Liptovske Mikulas, Slov.) Chaye Feigele LOWY, daughter of Rabbi J. Samuel
(Aharon Joseph Samuel) LOWY, was his granddaughter and 1st cousin of my 2 G
grandmother Eleanora SPITZ POLACSEK.

Chaye Feigele LOWY was probably born in Trencsen, Hung. / Trencin, Slovakia,
where her Rabbi LOWY and his wife Juditha lived until their deaths in 1882 and
1876 respectively. Benjamin Wolf was born in Varpalota, Veszprem, Hung. in 1855.
He married Margit Mindel MOSKOVITS b. Sarospatak, Hung., whose father Ignatz/
Izsak MOSKOVITS was a brother of my paternal great-grandfather Markusz. Benjamin
and Margit had four children I know of Ernest Jeremiah, Adele, Fani and Irma.

Biographical information about the SINGER family can be found in Abraham
Singer's Torat Yehezkel, published in Pecs, 1899.

Michael Rony and I are both researching the SINGER/SANGER family >from
Liptoszentmiklos.

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, California

Researching families including:
BAL/BERKOVICS/BERKOWITZ/ROTH/GROSZ. Avas Ujvaros, Hung./Orasu Nou, Rom. KAHAN/
JOSIPOVITS/DUB, Sziget, Kabolacsarda, Nagyvarad, Hung./Sighet, Ciarda, Oradea,
Rom. KOHN/Zbegnyo/ Zbehnov, Tarnoka/Trnavka, Slov.; Cleveland LEFKOVITS/Kolbasa/
Brezina, Slov. MOSKOVITS/Honkocz, Szobranc, Osztro, Kassa, Hung./Chonkovce,
Sobrance, Ostrov, Kosice, Slov., Nyiregyhaza, Hung. ELOVITS/Hornya/Horna, Slov.
NEUMANN/Szeretva, Kereszt, Hung./Sobrance, Kristy, Stretavka, Michalovce, Slov.

[MODERATOR NOTE: Surname list runcated at 6 lines in accordance with JewishGen
Discussion Group rules.]

On Feb 1, 2017, Simon Srebrny <srebrny@...> wrote"

Judith Singer asked about the father of Abraham and Benjamin Singer.

He was Rabbi Pesach aka Fulop Singer (umlaut over the u in Fulop), b. in 1816
in Uhersky Brod (now in the Czech Republic), d. 1898, buried in Spisske
Podhradie (now in Slovakia).

He was rabbi of rabbi of Varpalota (1847-187?) then Kirchdorf aka Szepesujfalu
aka Zips.

His wife was Chaye Feigele Halevy Loewy. Her grandfather was Benjamin Wolf Loew.
So Abraham and Benjamin were the latter's great-grandsons.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Abraham and Benjamin SINGER, authors of "Ha-Madrik" #general

Vivian Kahn
 

I am connected to Abraham and Benjamin SINGER through my father's paternal and
maternal lines.

The brothers are my second cousins three times removed as descendants of
Yechezkel haLevi LOWY/ NICOLAUER, who was my 4G grandfather. Rabbi Yechzkel
Wolf SEGEL, author of "Toras Yechezkel," was leader of the Jewish community of
Hunfalva/Hunsdorf, Hungary (now Huncovce, Slovakia) >from 1818 to 1824 and
founded a yeshiva there. He was born in Liptoszentmiklos, Lipto, Hung.
(Liptovske Mikulas, Slov.) Chaye Feigele LOWY, daughter of Rabbi J. Samuel
(Aharon Joseph Samuel) LOWY, was his granddaughter and 1st cousin of my 2 G
grandmother Eleanora SPITZ POLACSEK.

Chaye Feigele LOWY was probably born in Trencsen, Hung. / Trencin, Slovakia,
where her Rabbi LOWY and his wife Juditha lived until their deaths in 1882 and
1876 respectively. Benjamin Wolf was born in Varpalota, Veszprem, Hung. in 1855.
He married Margit Mindel MOSKOVITS b. Sarospatak, Hung., whose father Ignatz/
Izsak MOSKOVITS was a brother of my paternal great-grandfather Markusz. Benjamin
and Margit had four children I know of Ernest Jeremiah, Adele, Fani and Irma.

Biographical information about the SINGER family can be found in Abraham
Singer's Torat Yehezkel, published in Pecs, 1899.

Michael Rony and I are both researching the SINGER/SANGER family >from
Liptoszentmiklos.

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, California

Researching families including:
BAL/BERKOVICS/BERKOWITZ/ROTH/GROSZ. Avas Ujvaros, Hung./Orasu Nou, Rom. KAHAN/
JOSIPOVITS/DUB, Sziget, Kabolacsarda, Nagyvarad, Hung./Sighet, Ciarda, Oradea,
Rom. KOHN/Zbegnyo/ Zbehnov, Tarnoka/Trnavka, Slov.; Cleveland LEFKOVITS/Kolbasa/
Brezina, Slov. MOSKOVITS/Honkocz, Szobranc, Osztro, Kassa, Hung./Chonkovce,
Sobrance, Ostrov, Kosice, Slov., Nyiregyhaza, Hung. ELOVITS/Hornya/Horna, Slov.
NEUMANN/Szeretva, Kereszt, Hung./Sobrance, Kristy, Stretavka, Michalovce, Slov.

[MODERATOR NOTE: Surname list runcated at 6 lines in accordance with JewishGen
Discussion Group rules.]

On Feb 1, 2017, Simon Srebrny <srebrny@...> wrote"

Judith Singer asked about the father of Abraham and Benjamin Singer.

He was Rabbi Pesach aka Fulop Singer (umlaut over the u in Fulop), b. in 1816
in Uhersky Brod (now in the Czech Republic), d. 1898, buried in Spisske
Podhradie (now in Slovakia).

He was rabbi of rabbi of Varpalota (1847-187?) then Kirchdorf aka Szepesujfalu
aka Zips.

His wife was Chaye Feigele Halevy Loewy. Her grandfather was Benjamin Wolf Loew.
So Abraham and Benjamin were the latter's great-grandsons.


(Poland) Poland Places Names of Auschwitz Database of Prison Guards Online #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The British Broadcasting System (BBC) posted that Poland has put online the
names of the Nazi SS commanders and guards at Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp
in German occupied Poland. The database includes names, place and date of
birth, nationality, military service and where possible a photograph. If the
person stood trial, judicial documents are also included.

Information was gathered by Poland, Germany, Austria and the United States.
This was put online by the Polish Institute of National Remembrance (INR).
This includes about 9,000 names almost all German. It is Poland's their hope
that posting the names to prove that referring to Auschwitz as a Polish-run
camp in incorrect. The database was gradually extended to include the
information concerning the personnel of other German concentration camps,
finally reaching the number of 25,000 records, of which 9,686 were related
to the Auschwitz concentration camp personnel.

The new database is being made accessible in five languages

To read more see: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-38797727

Thanks to Yvonne Stern, Brazil, IAJGS Records access Alert reader who was
able to learn >from Centrum Judaicum-Berlin, , one has to know the persons'
last name. You need to enter one or more letters of the person's last name
into the search mechanism. If you know the person's last name or the letter
with which it begins you can click on the letter and it will display all the
prison guards for that letter. To search go to:
http://pamiec.pl/pa/form/60,Zaloga-SS-KL-Auschwitz.html?page=2

The items on the search page are in three languages: Polish, German and
English. Scroll to the end of the page where you will find the input
"form". The term "wybierz" means "select" The top left box is for the
family name and the right box for the given name.
Filtruj means filter and "usun filtry" means remove filter. If you need
help with translating any part of the website please go to
https://translate.google.com. There are 8,502 entries. If you scroll below
the form, the "chart with the alphabet" click on any letter and those in the
database whose name begins with that letter appears. Click on the person's
name-for all information the INR has in the file. If there is a photograph
in the file it will show an image.

The database is available for free.

If you place the url given above for searching into the Chrome browser it
will translate the entire page.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (Poland) Poland Places Names of Auschwitz Database of Prison Guards Online #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The British Broadcasting System (BBC) posted that Poland has put online the
names of the Nazi SS commanders and guards at Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp
in German occupied Poland. The database includes names, place and date of
birth, nationality, military service and where possible a photograph. If the
person stood trial, judicial documents are also included.

Information was gathered by Poland, Germany, Austria and the United States.
This was put online by the Polish Institute of National Remembrance (INR).
This includes about 9,000 names almost all German. It is Poland's their hope
that posting the names to prove that referring to Auschwitz as a Polish-run
camp in incorrect. The database was gradually extended to include the
information concerning the personnel of other German concentration camps,
finally reaching the number of 25,000 records, of which 9,686 were related
to the Auschwitz concentration camp personnel.

The new database is being made accessible in five languages

To read more see: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-38797727

Thanks to Yvonne Stern, Brazil, IAJGS Records access Alert reader who was
able to learn >from Centrum Judaicum-Berlin, , one has to know the persons'
last name. You need to enter one or more letters of the person's last name
into the search mechanism. If you know the person's last name or the letter
with which it begins you can click on the letter and it will display all the
prison guards for that letter. To search go to:
http://pamiec.pl/pa/form/60,Zaloga-SS-KL-Auschwitz.html?page=2

The items on the search page are in three languages: Polish, German and
English. Scroll to the end of the page where you will find the input
"form". The term "wybierz" means "select" The top left box is for the
family name and the right box for the given name.
Filtruj means filter and "usun filtry" means remove filter. If you need
help with translating any part of the website please go to
https://translate.google.com. There are 8,502 entries. If you scroll below
the form, the "chart with the alphabet" click on any letter and those in the
database whose name begins with that letter appears. Click on the person's
name-for all information the INR has in the file. If there is a photograph
in the file it will show an image.

The database is available for free.

If you place the url given above for searching into the Chrome browser it
will translate the entire page.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Translation from Yiddish to Hebrew or English #general

Hanna Shvo
 

I have posted 3 parts of a letters(?) in Yiddish to which I need translation to
Hebrew or English

1: http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM42353

2: http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM42356

3: http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM42355

No 3 begins in polish and continues in Yiddish.
If you can translate both parts - it will be fantastic!
But if you can translate just the Yiddish - It will be also fine.

Please reply using the ViewMate response form.
Thanks for the effort
Hanna

Dr Hanna Shvo
hannashvo@...
hshvo@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Translation from Yiddish to Hebrew or English #general

Hanna Shvo
 

I have posted 3 parts of a letters(?) in Yiddish to which I need translation to
Hebrew or English

1: http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM42353

2: http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM42356

3: http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM42355

No 3 begins in polish and continues in Yiddish.
If you can translate both parts - it will be fantastic!
But if you can translate just the Yiddish - It will be also fine.

Please reply using the ViewMate response form.
Thanks for the effort
Hanna

Dr Hanna Shvo
hannashvo@...
hshvo@...


Shtetl vs. Dorf #general

Paul Berman
 

Messages to this discussion group often use the term "shtetl" when
apparently referring to villages rather than towns in Eastern Europe.

The author Irving Stone addressed this term in his introduction to his
magnificent history of the Jewish socialist movement in early
twentieth century in New York City, "The World of Our Fathers",
published in the 1950's. He wrote that the term "shtetl" was (and
still is) commonly used erroneously for smallish villages when the
correct term was "dorf". The word "shtetl" properly referred to larger
communities such as towns.

Irene Berman
Israel

Researching: EPSTEIN (LEVITES) Kossov Poleski and Slonim; STOLLER,
FINKEL (FRANKLIN) Kossov Poleski, New York and Ellington in
Connecticut, U.S.A.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Shtetl vs. Dorf #general

Paul Berman
 

Messages to this discussion group often use the term "shtetl" when
apparently referring to villages rather than towns in Eastern Europe.

The author Irving Stone addressed this term in his introduction to his
magnificent history of the Jewish socialist movement in early
twentieth century in New York City, "The World of Our Fathers",
published in the 1950's. He wrote that the term "shtetl" was (and
still is) commonly used erroneously for smallish villages when the
correct term was "dorf". The word "shtetl" properly referred to larger
communities such as towns.

Irene Berman
Israel

Researching: EPSTEIN (LEVITES) Kossov Poleski and Slonim; STOLLER,
FINKEL (FRANKLIN) Kossov Poleski, New York and Ellington in
Connecticut, U.S.A.


Re: Have you heard of Polanyu? #general

tom
 

Just one small correction: the term "dayan" means judge, almost certainly a
rabbi and member of a beth din (rabbinic court). And as a surname, it indicates
only that they are descended >from one, as the job is not considered hereditary
(even though sons often did follow in their father's footsteps).

A Kohen (priestly caste descended >from Aaron, who served in the temple in
Jerusalem) is not allowed to enter a cemetery, but there is no such restriction
on rabbis (otherwise they wouldn't be able to officiate at funerals). You will
probably also find that their Hebrew name includes "haKohen" at the end.

Entering a cemetery has nothing to do with being a "dayan".

....... tom klein, toronto

<Susan Gordon> Sjgwed@... wrote:
Thanks to members' input and replies, I have reluctantly concluded that
"Polanyu" refers, simply, to Poland, and nothing more specific. In addition,
the family's "original" last name, "Dayan," is also very broad. In a letter
to one of his cousins, he did recall being a small boy waiting with his
father *outside the gates of a cemetery* in NYC, during a family funeral
because they could not enter. This makes sense, if they were "dayans."


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Have you heard of Polanyu? #general

tom
 

Just one small correction: the term "dayan" means judge, almost certainly a
rabbi and member of a beth din (rabbinic court). And as a surname, it indicates
only that they are descended >from one, as the job is not considered hereditary
(even though sons often did follow in their father's footsteps).

A Kohen (priestly caste descended >from Aaron, who served in the temple in
Jerusalem) is not allowed to enter a cemetery, but there is no such restriction
on rabbis (otherwise they wouldn't be able to officiate at funerals). You will
probably also find that their Hebrew name includes "haKohen" at the end.

Entering a cemetery has nothing to do with being a "dayan".

....... tom klein, toronto

<Susan Gordon> Sjgwed@... wrote:
Thanks to members' input and replies, I have reluctantly concluded that
"Polanyu" refers, simply, to Poland, and nothing more specific. In addition,
the family's "original" last name, "Dayan," is also very broad. In a letter
to one of his cousins, he did recall being a small boy waiting with his
father *outside the gates of a cemetery* in NYC, during a family funeral
because they could not enter. This makes sense, if they were "dayans."


Yad Vashem New Online Exhibit: Last Letters From the Holocaust:1941 #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Yad Vashem has placed thousands of personal letters >from their archives
-some viewable for the first time-on their website. This is the first in a
series of exhibits featuring last letters. The exhibit presents 9 letters
written by children and adults written in 1941 to their loved ones during
the Holocaust. The letters are >from Poland, Latvia, France, Austria,
Ukraine, Yugoslavia and Romania. They were written while in their homes,
ghettos, in hiding or fleeing. There are photos of the people in the
exhibit 9 letters. To view the exhibit see:

http://www.yadvashem.org/yv/en/exhibitions/last-letters/1941/index.asp#/overview

To search the archives for the 1,000 plus personal letters go to:
http://collections1.yadvashem.org/search.asp?lang=ENG&rsvr=8

This is the online catalogue of the Yad Vashem archive. It only includes 20
percent of the archival collection. (You can also access this area of the
website >from the Yad Vashem home page by clicking on "Documents Archive"
under Digital Collections.)
This will open a search page. For "Search Profile" make certain it lists
"Documents Archive" If that is not what appears, then go to the drop down
box and select "Documents Archive".
Where it says "Search for" type in o.75. The first character is the letter
"o" not the number zero.
Under fields to search check off Record Group or title-the most important
thing is to have o.75 in the "search for" block.
Click on "search"
Be patient it takes a brief while for the website to respond - it may be due
to website traffic or my computer when I tried it out.
In the search results, a list of over 1,000 titles/links come up. Click on
the hypertext link you want to see, and then that particular post card and
letter information will come up. If that document has been scanned an icon
will appear to click below the narrative which is the scanned file. Click
on the icon. When that opens and if there are multiple pages there will be
arrows on the upper right to click to advance to the next document. Not all
of the documents are scanned as yet.

Thank you to Zvi Bernhardt, Yad Vashem for providing the instructions on how
to find the documents. The article mentioned above focused solely on the 9
documents in the exhibit , which are well worth visiting, but if one wants
to search the remaining documents, we needed the additional information.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yad Vashem New Online Exhibit: Last Letters From the Holocaust:1941 #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Yad Vashem has placed thousands of personal letters >from their archives
-some viewable for the first time-on their website. This is the first in a
series of exhibits featuring last letters. The exhibit presents 9 letters
written by children and adults written in 1941 to their loved ones during
the Holocaust. The letters are >from Poland, Latvia, France, Austria,
Ukraine, Yugoslavia and Romania. They were written while in their homes,
ghettos, in hiding or fleeing. There are photos of the people in the
exhibit 9 letters. To view the exhibit see:

http://www.yadvashem.org/yv/en/exhibitions/last-letters/1941/index.asp#/overview

To search the archives for the 1,000 plus personal letters go to:
http://collections1.yadvashem.org/search.asp?lang=ENG&rsvr=8

This is the online catalogue of the Yad Vashem archive. It only includes 20
percent of the archival collection. (You can also access this area of the
website >from the Yad Vashem home page by clicking on "Documents Archive"
under Digital Collections.)
This will open a search page. For "Search Profile" make certain it lists
"Documents Archive" If that is not what appears, then go to the drop down
box and select "Documents Archive".
Where it says "Search for" type in o.75. The first character is the letter
"o" not the number zero.
Under fields to search check off Record Group or title-the most important
thing is to have o.75 in the "search for" block.
Click on "search"
Be patient it takes a brief while for the website to respond - it may be due
to website traffic or my computer when I tried it out.
In the search results, a list of over 1,000 titles/links come up. Click on
the hypertext link you want to see, and then that particular post card and
letter information will come up. If that document has been scanned an icon
will appear to click below the narrative which is the scanned file. Click
on the icon. When that opens and if there are multiple pages there will be
arrows on the upper right to click to advance to the next document. Not all
of the documents are scanned as yet.

Thank you to Zvi Bernhardt, Yad Vashem for providing the instructions on how
to find the documents. The article mentioned above focused solely on the 9
documents in the exhibit , which are well worth visiting, but if one wants
to search the remaining documents, we needed the additional information.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee