Date   

Ohave Shalom Mariampol Congregation/Anshe Shalom B'nai Israel #lithuania

H. Elliott Lipschultz <adoniram@...>
 

Anshe Shalom B'nai Israel's website is at <http://www.ashi.org>
There is an online Guide to Jewish Chicago at <http://www.vjc.org/guide.asp> And <http://www.spertus.edu> is the address for Spertus College of Judaic Studies, Chicago, click onto this site,
a second click will bring you to Chicago Jewish Archives, located in the
Spertus College building and open by appointment.

The archive is a repository for old synagogue records and should not be overlooked. The Asher Library at Spertus College is three floors of books with tables and chairs for researchers and readers. The e-mail of Asher Library is <asherlib@spertus.edu>
I have always found the librarians at Spertus College to be very helpful.

Respectfully Submitted,
H Elliott Lipschultz
History and Genealogy
visit www.taxhistoryfoundation.org


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Ohave Shalom Mariampol Congregation/Anshe Shalom B'nai Israel #lithuania

H. Elliott Lipschultz <adoniram@...>
 

Anshe Shalom B'nai Israel's website is at <http://www.ashi.org>
There is an online Guide to Jewish Chicago at <http://www.vjc.org/guide.asp> And <http://www.spertus.edu> is the address for Spertus College of Judaic Studies, Chicago, click onto this site,
a second click will bring you to Chicago Jewish Archives, located in the
Spertus College building and open by appointment.

The archive is a repository for old synagogue records and should not be overlooked. The Asher Library at Spertus College is three floors of books with tables and chairs for researchers and readers. The e-mail of Asher Library is <asherlib@spertus.edu>
I have always found the librarians at Spertus College to be very helpful.

Respectfully Submitted,
H Elliott Lipschultz
History and Genealogy
visit www.taxhistoryfoundation.org


Ukraine photos #general

Bobby Furst <bobby1st@...>
 

I have just returned >from a trip to Podolsk Gubernia, Ukraine
and have photos of the following towns:

I will send a zip file of JPEG images for any of these town to
anyone who requests it.


Volochisk (Volyn province) 49 31 N / 26 10 E
Slavuta (Volyn province, Zaslavsk district,) 50 17 N / 26 52 E
Krasilov (Podolsk province, Proskurov district) 49 38 N / 26 58 E
Cherni Ostrov (Podolsk province, Proskurov district) 49 30 N / 26 45 E
Sharovechka (Podolsk province, Proskurov district) 49 25 N / 26 55 E
Gorodok (Podolsk province, Kamenetsk district) 49 10 N / 26 34 E
Sharovka (Podolsk province, Proskurov district) 49 13 N / 26 58 E
Kuzmin (Podolsk province, Proskurov district) 49 15 N / 26 31 E
Veseltsa (Podolsk province, Proskurov district, Kuzmin volost) 49 19 N / 26 25 E
Kalytintsy (Podolsk province, Proskurov district, Kuzmin volost) 49 17 N / 26 28 E
Zhuravlintsy (Podolsk province, Proskurov district, Kuzmin volost) 49 17 N / 26 28 E
Minkovitz (Podolsk province, Dunayevtsy region, Kamenetsk district) 48 51 N/27 06 E
Kamemets - Podolskiy (Podolsk province, Kamenetsk district) 48 40 B / 26 34 E
Khotin (Podolsk province) 48 28 N / 26 30 E

Bobby Furst
Redondo Beach, CA
bobby1st@sprynet.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Ukraine photos #general

Bobby Furst <bobby1st@...>
 

I have just returned >from a trip to Podolsk Gubernia, Ukraine
and have photos of the following towns:

I will send a zip file of JPEG images for any of these town to
anyone who requests it.


Volochisk (Volyn province) 49 31 N / 26 10 E
Slavuta (Volyn province, Zaslavsk district,) 50 17 N / 26 52 E
Krasilov (Podolsk province, Proskurov district) 49 38 N / 26 58 E
Cherni Ostrov (Podolsk province, Proskurov district) 49 30 N / 26 45 E
Sharovechka (Podolsk province, Proskurov district) 49 25 N / 26 55 E
Gorodok (Podolsk province, Kamenetsk district) 49 10 N / 26 34 E
Sharovka (Podolsk province, Proskurov district) 49 13 N / 26 58 E
Kuzmin (Podolsk province, Proskurov district) 49 15 N / 26 31 E
Veseltsa (Podolsk province, Proskurov district, Kuzmin volost) 49 19 N / 26 25 E
Kalytintsy (Podolsk province, Proskurov district, Kuzmin volost) 49 17 N / 26 28 E
Zhuravlintsy (Podolsk province, Proskurov district, Kuzmin volost) 49 17 N / 26 28 E
Minkovitz (Podolsk province, Dunayevtsy region, Kamenetsk district) 48 51 N/27 06 E
Kamemets - Podolskiy (Podolsk province, Kamenetsk district) 48 40 B / 26 34 E
Khotin (Podolsk province) 48 28 N / 26 30 E

Bobby Furst
Redondo Beach, CA
bobby1st@sprynet.com


Full text of Beider's Dictionary on-line #general

Susan&David
 

To All:

I don't know if this has been mentioned before.

Ancestry.com has placed Alexander Beider's " A Dictionary of Jewish
Surnames >from the Russian Empire" published by Avotaynu in 1993
on-line. It looks like the 550 page Dictionary of Names section II of
the book is presented in the form of a searchable data base. The
dictionary may be searched for free at :

http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/inddbs/3173.htm

David Rosen
Boston, MA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Full text of Beider's Dictionary on-line #general

Susan&David
 

To All:

I don't know if this has been mentioned before.

Ancestry.com has placed Alexander Beider's " A Dictionary of Jewish
Surnames >from the Russian Empire" published by Avotaynu in 1993
on-line. It looks like the 550 page Dictionary of Names section II of
the book is presented in the form of a searchable data base. The
dictionary may be searched for free at :

http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/inddbs/3173.htm

David Rosen
Boston, MA


Re: Bohemian language #general

Paul Pfalzner <paxpfax@...>
 

lorraine <aksee@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
news:39B83CF3.B87F03BB@worldnet.att.net...
Is the Bohemian language still an active language? What language was
spoken in Bohemia? Was there Yiddish in Bohemia? What language did the
Jewish population speak in Bohemia?
=20
Hi Lorraine,
Bohemian is no language. But in German, the words Boehme and Boehmisch
refer to Czechs and their language, also called Czech. And Boehmen, the
German word for a part of the Czech lands is translated into English as
Bohemia. There is also quite a distinct different meaning of the word
"Bohemian"!

Czech is spoken in the Czech Republic by several million people.

And Jews in Bohemia-Moravia no doubt knew Yiddish as well as German and
often Czech, too.

P.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Bohemian language #general

Paul Pfalzner <paxpfax@...>
 

lorraine <aksee@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
news:39B83CF3.B87F03BB@worldnet.att.net...
Is the Bohemian language still an active language? What language was
spoken in Bohemia? Was there Yiddish in Bohemia? What language did the
Jewish population speak in Bohemia?
=20
Hi Lorraine,
Bohemian is no language. But in German, the words Boehme and Boehmisch
refer to Czechs and their language, also called Czech. And Boehmen, the
German word for a part of the Czech lands is translated into English as
Bohemia. There is also quite a distinct different meaning of the word
"Bohemian"!

Czech is spoken in the Czech Republic by several million people.

And Jews in Bohemia-Moravia no doubt knew Yiddish as well as German and
often Czech, too.

P.


Re Young Marriages #general

Mike and Elynn Boss <mboss@...>
 

In my research of my deceased 1st husband and my current husband, I
found it very common for the ages of the females to be 16. However, I
have found a number of 12, 13 and 14 year olds. Remember, back then
almost all a female could do was get married. And the sooner the
parents married her off, the better.

The youngest I found was 12, and 6 months later at age 13, she gave
birth to her first child. Pre-marital sex was alive and well back then
too.

Elynn Boss


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re Young Marriages #general

Mike and Elynn Boss <mboss@...>
 

In my research of my deceased 1st husband and my current husband, I
found it very common for the ages of the females to be 16. However, I
have found a number of 12, 13 and 14 year olds. Remember, back then
almost all a female could do was get married. And the sooner the
parents married her off, the better.

The youngest I found was 12, and 6 months later at age 13, she gave
birth to her first child. Pre-marital sex was alive and well back then
too.

Elynn Boss


women's naturalization #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Being new to this pursuit I noticed when I was reviewing Naturalization
records
from the 19 th century in NYC that every one - with no exceptions - was male.
Didn't women become naturalized?

Joseph Rothenberg
Aha! We women realize that we've "come a long way, baby!" when someone
asks questions like this. Until recently, a woman automatically acquired
her husband's nationality upon marriage to him; this was a more or less
universal rule of international law -- certainly in European societies and
those derived >from them. This applied also to naturalization. I don't
know whether the rule was still operative when I married an Austrian
citizen in 1956; I certainly did not lose my British nationality by so
doing, but for all I know I may have automatically acquired Austrian
citizenship at that time. Interestingly, when we did decide to emigrate
from England to USA, we were allowed in under my British quota which was
far more favorable than his Austrian one!

When I recently researched my Zayde's application for naturalization in
England in 1914, it never even entered my head to search for a separate
application for my Bubbe! His wife along with my Polish-born father were
included in his application, and she is not listed separately in the
register of applications for naturalization. >from what you say here, the
situation was the same in USA

Also the husband's nationality, rather than the wife's, was the one that
passed automatically to the children. It so happens that my husband (then
an Austrian citizen) was an exchange visitor in the USA during my first two
pregnancies, and at that time we had no intention to emigrate permanently
to USA. So I twice had to go to the trouble of returning to London to
give birth, in order that the children would be born with British
nationality rather than Austrian!

Judith Romney Wegner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen women's naturalization #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Being new to this pursuit I noticed when I was reviewing Naturalization
records
from the 19 th century in NYC that every one - with no exceptions - was male.
Didn't women become naturalized?

Joseph Rothenberg
Aha! We women realize that we've "come a long way, baby!" when someone
asks questions like this. Until recently, a woman automatically acquired
her husband's nationality upon marriage to him; this was a more or less
universal rule of international law -- certainly in European societies and
those derived >from them. This applied also to naturalization. I don't
know whether the rule was still operative when I married an Austrian
citizen in 1956; I certainly did not lose my British nationality by so
doing, but for all I know I may have automatically acquired Austrian
citizenship at that time. Interestingly, when we did decide to emigrate
from England to USA, we were allowed in under my British quota which was
far more favorable than his Austrian one!

When I recently researched my Zayde's application for naturalization in
England in 1914, it never even entered my head to search for a separate
application for my Bubbe! His wife along with my Polish-born father were
included in his application, and she is not listed separately in the
register of applications for naturalization. >from what you say here, the
situation was the same in USA

Also the husband's nationality, rather than the wife's, was the one that
passed automatically to the children. It so happens that my husband (then
an Austrian citizen) was an exchange visitor in the USA during my first two
pregnancies, and at that time we had no intention to emigrate permanently
to USA. So I twice had to go to the trouble of returning to London to
give birth, in order that the children would be born with British
nationality rather than Austrian!

Judith Romney Wegner


Re: Naturalization Records #france

The Kendrick's <kendrickkreation@...>
 

Hi!

Maybe you are thinking of the following?
The "Cable Act" of 1922 allows women over 21 independent citizenship and
"Derivative Citizenship' is discontinued
(42 Statue. 1022 ss4).

In addition, the following might assist:

In 1907 a woman who was a U.S. citizen and married an alien
automatically lost her U.S. citizenship. Once married she was a
citizen of whatever country her husband was from. This is better
known as the Expatriation Act of 1907 - 34 Statue. 1228 ss 3.
The government repealed the act around 1922. Unfortunately,
many women didn't regain their U.S. citizenship until 1936 or after.

The U.S. government put limitations and restrictions on women entering
the U.S. in 1917. These limitations and restrictions were known
as the "Federal Immigration Act." In short, any unmarried women and
her kids constantly excluded >from entry into America for fear of
moral turpitude. The U.S. government felt unmarried women would
become a burden to the welfare system. Single females were allowed
to enter only if they had a sponsor in this country, and a male
sponsor (relative)was preferred. The alien had to submit proof in
writing they had a sponsor. The female, to include children
would be detained until a sponsor claimed them. If they weren't
claimed they would be deported. Women meeting prospective and/or
future spouses often had the marriage ceremony performed at Castle
Garden or Ellis Island to prove they weren't being brought to America
for prostitution purposes.

Nancy Ring-Kendrick
Daytona Beach, FL
mailto:kendrickkreation@mindspring.com
Herb wrote:


I believe at that time wives became citizens automatically when their
husband were granted citizenship. I am not sure when the law was
changed, but it was after 1900.

Herb Meyers
Boulder, Colorado

JRothen318 wrote in message
<20000908090731.23384.00000017@ng-fw1.aol.com>...
Being new to this pursuit I noticed when I was reviewing Naturalization
records
from the 19 th century in NYC that every one - with no exceptions - was
male.
Didn't women become naturalized?

Joseph Rothenberg


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Naturalization Records #general

The Kendrick's <kendrickkreation@...>
 

Hi!

Maybe you are thinking of the following?
The "Cable Act" of 1922 allows women over 21 independent citizenship and
"Derivative Citizenship' is discontinued
(42 Statue. 1022 ss4).

In addition, the following might assist:

In 1907 a woman who was a U.S. citizen and married an alien
automatically lost her U.S. citizenship. Once married she was a
citizen of whatever country her husband was from. This is better
known as the Expatriation Act of 1907 - 34 Statue. 1228 ss 3.
The government repealed the act around 1922. Unfortunately,
many women didn't regain their U.S. citizenship until 1936 or after.

The U.S. government put limitations and restrictions on women entering
the U.S. in 1917. These limitations and restrictions were known
as the "Federal Immigration Act." In short, any unmarried women and
her kids constantly excluded >from entry into America for fear of
moral turpitude. The U.S. government felt unmarried women would
become a burden to the welfare system. Single females were allowed
to enter only if they had a sponsor in this country, and a male
sponsor (relative)was preferred. The alien had to submit proof in
writing they had a sponsor. The female, to include children
would be detained until a sponsor claimed them. If they weren't
claimed they would be deported. Women meeting prospective and/or
future spouses often had the marriage ceremony performed at Castle
Garden or Ellis Island to prove they weren't being brought to America
for prostitution purposes.

Nancy Ring-Kendrick
Daytona Beach, FL
mailto:kendrickkreation@mindspring.com
Herb wrote:


I believe at that time wives became citizens automatically when their
husband were granted citizenship. I am not sure when the law was
changed, but it was after 1900.

Herb Meyers
Boulder, Colorado

JRothen318 wrote in message
<20000908090731.23384.00000017@ng-fw1.aol.com>...
Being new to this pursuit I noticed when I was reviewing Naturalization
records
from the 19 th century in NYC that every one - with no exceptions - was
male.
Didn't women become naturalized?

Joseph Rothenberg


SCHWARZ, STIASSNY and KOENIG in Vienna #general

Niko Hofinger <nikolaus.hofinger@...>
 

On September 6th, an exhibition called

inventARISIERT - The Looting of furniture >from Jewish households

will open in Vienna, Austria.

The exhibit in the "Imperial Court Depot of Movables" deals with the
"aryanisation" of eight Jewish households whose confiscated furnishings
were stored in the state "Depot of Movables". In mounting this
exhibition, the institution is focusing on two issues: its involvement
in the national socialists' racist policy of expropriation some 60 years
ago, and how it dealt with this confiscated property in the decades
following 1945.

Now, 60 years later, the institution wants to give back the furniture to
the owners.
For three of the eight families robbed by the Austrian Nazis, no heirs
could be found yet. Please check if you have Schwarz, Stiassny or Koenig
relatives in Vienna; you can find the exact data on the webpages.

The URL is
http://www.iff.ac.at/inventarisiert/

Any kind of feedback is highly appreciated.
For the exhibition team,

Niko Hofinger,
Innsbruck, Austria


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen SCHWARZ, STIASSNY and KOENIG in Vienna #general

Niko Hofinger <nikolaus.hofinger@...>
 

On September 6th, an exhibition called

inventARISIERT - The Looting of furniture >from Jewish households

will open in Vienna, Austria.

The exhibit in the "Imperial Court Depot of Movables" deals with the
"aryanisation" of eight Jewish households whose confiscated furnishings
were stored in the state "Depot of Movables". In mounting this
exhibition, the institution is focusing on two issues: its involvement
in the national socialists' racist policy of expropriation some 60 years
ago, and how it dealt with this confiscated property in the decades
following 1945.

Now, 60 years later, the institution wants to give back the furniture to
the owners.
For three of the eight families robbed by the Austrian Nazis, no heirs
could be found yet. Please check if you have Schwarz, Stiassny or Koenig
relatives in Vienna; you can find the exact data on the webpages.

The URL is
http://www.iff.ac.at/inventarisiert/

Any kind of feedback is highly appreciated.
For the exhibition team,

Niko Hofinger,
Innsbruck, Austria


Re: Drohobycz #galicia

Peter Jassem <jassep@...>
 

Jonathan Eisenberg, Minnetonka, MN, JEisenbrg@aol.com writes:

A friend in Europe advises me there is a new book on Drogobych by Henryk
Grynberg called Drogobych:

The book is a well written series of essays, one of which is titled (in
Polish version) "Drohobycz Drohobycz" and relates to the Jews of Drohobycz.
The whole book was named after this essey. Other stories do not relate
to the town but are worth reading anyway.

Peter Jassem
jassep@tdbank.ca
Toronto, Ontario


Kazimierz #galicia

Peter Jassem <jassep@...>
 

To add to the story of Kazimierz Wielki (Casimir the Great) who invited
Jews to Poland it should be noted that historical sources document his love
affair with Esterka (Polish diminutive of Esther), a beautiful daughter of
a wealthy Jewish merchant in Krakow.

Peter Jassem
jassep@tdbank.ca
Toronto, Ontario


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Drohobycz #galicia

Peter Jassem <jassep@...>
 

Jonathan Eisenberg, Minnetonka, MN, JEisenbrg@aol.com writes:

A friend in Europe advises me there is a new book on Drogobych by Henryk
Grynberg called Drogobych:

The book is a well written series of essays, one of which is titled (in
Polish version) "Drohobycz Drohobycz" and relates to the Jews of Drohobycz.
The whole book was named after this essey. Other stories do not relate
to the town but are worth reading anyway.

Peter Jassem
jassep@tdbank.ca
Toronto, Ontario


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Kazimierz #galicia

Peter Jassem <jassep@...>
 

To add to the story of Kazimierz Wielki (Casimir the Great) who invited
Jews to Poland it should be noted that historical sources document his love
affair with Esterka (Polish diminutive of Esther), a beautiful daughter of
a wealthy Jewish merchant in Krakow.

Peter Jassem
jassep@tdbank.ca
Toronto, Ontario