Date   

Slonim to Tashkent? #general

bernerfolk
 

Is there a historic reason for a family >from Slonim, Belarus to
migrate to Tashkent before emigrating to the US?

According to his naturalization, my GGF was born in 1876 in Slonim,
Belarus and his wife was buried in the Slonimer section.

I have a family photo I believe was taken just before he left for NY
via Hamburg in May 1904, his wife and two children followed him to NY
in October >from Antwerp. The photo was taken in Tashkent so now I'm
wondering why a tailor would have gone so far east before going West
to the US? Was there any particular impetus in the early part of the
20th century to go to Tashkent?

Sherri Venditti
The Berkshires, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Slonim to Tashkent? #general

bernerfolk
 

Is there a historic reason for a family >from Slonim, Belarus to
migrate to Tashkent before emigrating to the US?

According to his naturalization, my GGF was born in 1876 in Slonim,
Belarus and his wife was buried in the Slonimer section.

I have a family photo I believe was taken just before he left for NY
via Hamburg in May 1904, his wife and two children followed him to NY
in October >from Antwerp. The photo was taken in Tashkent so now I'm
wondering why a tailor would have gone so far east before going West
to the US? Was there any particular impetus in the early part of the
20th century to go to Tashkent?

Sherri Venditti
The Berkshires, USA


Literacy of Jewish women in the Old Country #general

Shelley Mitchell
 

The question is what you mean by illiterate. If she was married
before she arrived, it was unlikely. How would she shop for food or
get around alone if she couldn't read the signs or pay in money?
(She never would have received the right change or overpaid!) Once
she came to this country, she would have been required to speak and
read English. Ironically she came at a time when Jews were given
much more limited entry to the US so it is even more likely she was
literate. When my grandmother emigrated in 1920, she was able to
speak German, Polish and Yiddish, the languages of the people around
her. She and my grandfather learned English right away for their
citizenship and to fit in. Your aunt may have meant that she had no
formal education. Or your grandmother played down her knowledge for
whatever reason.

Shelley Mitchell
NYC


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Literacy of Jewish women in the Old Country #general

Shelley Mitchell
 

The question is what you mean by illiterate. If she was married
before she arrived, it was unlikely. How would she shop for food or
get around alone if she couldn't read the signs or pay in money?
(She never would have received the right change or overpaid!) Once
she came to this country, she would have been required to speak and
read English. Ironically she came at a time when Jews were given
much more limited entry to the US so it is even more likely she was
literate. When my grandmother emigrated in 1920, she was able to
speak German, Polish and Yiddish, the languages of the people around
her. She and my grandfather learned English right away for their
citizenship and to fit in. Your aunt may have meant that she had no
formal education. Or your grandmother played down her knowledge for
whatever reason.

Shelley Mitchell
NYC


Re: Literacy of Jewish women in the Old Country #general

Joel Weintraub
 

The post on literacy of eastern European Jewish women raised several
questions/points of information for me.
1. In 1917 after repeated tries and over the veto of President Wilson, the
Congress passed a law requiring all immigrants 16 and over to show literacy.
That is, the ability to read with comprehension. Immigrants were given
cards in their "native" language (and also in English) with either a section
of the Bible to interpret or instructions (e.g. turn card over and place on
table) to test for this skill. Because Jews were often not well versed in
their "native" country's language, the test could prove difficult. Jewish
Groups in the U.S. pressured Congress to include as an acceptable "native"
language Hebrew and Yiddish, and those were added to the list of languages.
2. Because of the 1917 law, the ship manifests were changed. Since the
poster's relative came in 1924, he should check the manifest under column 8
where you will find whether the person declares the ability to read or
write. Between those two subcolumns is "read what language (or if exemption
claimed, on what ground)". Joining a close relative would be grounds for an
exemption. Previous to 1917 the manifest did ask about being able to read
or write, but there was no legal penalty for answering "no".
3. The poster indicated the 1930 U.S. Census showed the person able to "read
or write" which raises a question as to what language. Instructions for
U.S. Census enumerators at https://usa.ipums.org/usa/voliii/inst1930.shtml
answers my question and states "who can read and write in any language,
whether English or some other".
4. Finally, my grandmother who came over in 1908 >from the Ukraine, barely 14
years of age travelling alone (she lied she was 16, the legal age for minors
to travel alone), and shows on the manifest she could read and write.
However, that didn't mean she went to a number of years of school in the
Ukraine or was proficient in either skill. A taped interview with her
revealed that school in her Ukraine city was mainly for boys. Thus at the
age of 61 she enrolled in NYC for a special evening program for adults who
did not have an elementary education, and graduated with "honors" for
"excellence in attendance". One of her proudest achievements.
Joel Weintraub
Dana Point, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Literacy of Jewish women in the Old Country #general

Joel Weintraub
 

The post on literacy of eastern European Jewish women raised several
questions/points of information for me.
1. In 1917 after repeated tries and over the veto of President Wilson, the
Congress passed a law requiring all immigrants 16 and over to show literacy.
That is, the ability to read with comprehension. Immigrants were given
cards in their "native" language (and also in English) with either a section
of the Bible to interpret or instructions (e.g. turn card over and place on
table) to test for this skill. Because Jews were often not well versed in
their "native" country's language, the test could prove difficult. Jewish
Groups in the U.S. pressured Congress to include as an acceptable "native"
language Hebrew and Yiddish, and those were added to the list of languages.
2. Because of the 1917 law, the ship manifests were changed. Since the
poster's relative came in 1924, he should check the manifest under column 8
where you will find whether the person declares the ability to read or
write. Between those two subcolumns is "read what language (or if exemption
claimed, on what ground)". Joining a close relative would be grounds for an
exemption. Previous to 1917 the manifest did ask about being able to read
or write, but there was no legal penalty for answering "no".
3. The poster indicated the 1930 U.S. Census showed the person able to "read
or write" which raises a question as to what language. Instructions for
U.S. Census enumerators at https://usa.ipums.org/usa/voliii/inst1930.shtml
answers my question and states "who can read and write in any language,
whether English or some other".
4. Finally, my grandmother who came over in 1908 >from the Ukraine, barely 14
years of age travelling alone (she lied she was 16, the legal age for minors
to travel alone), and shows on the manifest she could read and write.
However, that didn't mean she went to a number of years of school in the
Ukraine or was proficient in either skill. A taped interview with her
revealed that school in her Ukraine city was mainly for boys. Thus at the
age of 61 she enrolled in NYC for a special evening program for adults who
did not have an elementary education, and graduated with "honors" for
"excellence in attendance". One of her proudest achievements.
Joel Weintraub
Dana Point, CA


New and Updated Databases on IGRA's Website #general

Elena Bazes
 

The Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA) has just released new
and updated databases on its website. These span the years between
1922 and 1956. We have a preview of those databases being released and
encourage you to look at it. There are now close to 940,000 records in
310 databases on the IGRA website.

New Databases

HaShomer HaTzair Members in Poland 1947-1948

A collection of lists including 964 names of members. The information
is in Polish and includes surnames, other names, date of record, birth
year, gender and comments. The lists are >from HaShomer HaTzair
Archives at Yad Yaari (images available).

Tel Aviv Census 1922

This census was done in Hebrew and the first conducted by the British
in Palestine. It contains 13, 261 people who were asked their name,
age, relation to head of household, how long they stayed at the
current location, profession, address, and comments. The census was
found at the Historical Municipal Archives of Tel-Aviv - Yaffo
(images available).

Kefar Warburg Founders, 1939

A list of the 82 founders as displayed in the settlement. The data
contains name, names of parents, gender and birth date (no images
available).

Illegal Immigrants, 1941

This database is >from pages of the Palestine Police Force, Criminal
Investigation Department, Government of Palestine. It is composed of
"prohibited immigrants" lists found in files in the Israel State
Archives. This database, in English, includes surnames, other names,
sex, age, nationality and remarks (images available).

Matriculation Results as listed in the Palestine Gazette 1942-44

The matriculation exam results were published in the Palestine
Gazette. The lists were published between June 1942 and June 1944 and
contain 767 students' names. The data includes surnames, other name=
s
and the name of the school. The material is >from the David J. Light
Law Library, TAU (images available).

Refugees in Teheran

This database includes a list of 447 civilians, adults and children,
who accompanied Anders' Army on its travels >from the USSR to the
Middle East during World War II. The data includes surnames, other
names, birth year and town of origin. The database is in English. The
list is >from the Central Zionist Archives (no images available).

Habonim Dror Members in England

This database includes various listings >from Habonim Dror in England
which includes 816 names >from various activities. The information is
in English. The data could have the following: surname, other names,
father's name, address, school and affiliation among others. The lists
are >from the archives at Yad Tabenkin (images available)

Updated Database

Palestine Marriage/Divorce Certificates, 1921-48

This is an addition to the certificates previously released and
available on the IGRA website These certificates were issued upon
request and are not the same as the ledgers >from the Rabanut,. Some
certificates for marriages were issued 3-20 years after the marriages
took place. These are >from the Israel State Archives. (images
available).

Medical Practitioners 1938

This is a list of licensed doctors, pharmacists, dentists and midwives
and published by the Department of Health. The booklets were found in
the National Library of Israel. (images available).

Operation on Eagles' Wings (Magic Carpet) Yemenite Airlift - Phase 3

This is a database of the third phase of the airlift of Yemenite Jews
after the Imam of Yemen agreed to allow more than 45,000 members of
the remaining Jewish community to leave. The list includes names, sex,
birth year, weight, and family status. This database is done in
cooperation with the JDC (no images available).

Name Changes 1955-56

The lists >from which this database of name changes was built were
published in Yalkut HaPirsumim (the official publication of the
government of Israel). The information is in Hebrew and contains prior
surname, prior other names, new surname, new other names, date of
record, locality, ID number. The information is located at the David
J. Light Law Library, TAU (images available).

Before viewing the databases, please register for free on the IGRA website:

http://genealogy.org.il/

Please note, images can be seen only by IGRA members. If you are not
an IGRA member, you will be able to see the transcriptions only.

To view the databases, go to
http://genealogy.org.il/AID/index.php

Our many thanks to all of our dedicated volunteers.

Elena Biegel Bazes
IGRA Publicity Chairperson


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New and Updated Databases on IGRA's Website #general

Elena Bazes
 

The Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA) has just released new
and updated databases on its website. These span the years between
1922 and 1956. We have a preview of those databases being released and
encourage you to look at it. There are now close to 940,000 records in
310 databases on the IGRA website.

New Databases

HaShomer HaTzair Members in Poland 1947-1948

A collection of lists including 964 names of members. The information
is in Polish and includes surnames, other names, date of record, birth
year, gender and comments. The lists are >from HaShomer HaTzair
Archives at Yad Yaari (images available).

Tel Aviv Census 1922

This census was done in Hebrew and the first conducted by the British
in Palestine. It contains 13, 261 people who were asked their name,
age, relation to head of household, how long they stayed at the
current location, profession, address, and comments. The census was
found at the Historical Municipal Archives of Tel-Aviv - Yaffo
(images available).

Kefar Warburg Founders, 1939

A list of the 82 founders as displayed in the settlement. The data
contains name, names of parents, gender and birth date (no images
available).

Illegal Immigrants, 1941

This database is >from pages of the Palestine Police Force, Criminal
Investigation Department, Government of Palestine. It is composed of
"prohibited immigrants" lists found in files in the Israel State
Archives. This database, in English, includes surnames, other names,
sex, age, nationality and remarks (images available).

Matriculation Results as listed in the Palestine Gazette 1942-44

The matriculation exam results were published in the Palestine
Gazette. The lists were published between June 1942 and June 1944 and
contain 767 students' names. The data includes surnames, other name=
s
and the name of the school. The material is >from the David J. Light
Law Library, TAU (images available).

Refugees in Teheran

This database includes a list of 447 civilians, adults and children,
who accompanied Anders' Army on its travels >from the USSR to the
Middle East during World War II. The data includes surnames, other
names, birth year and town of origin. The database is in English. The
list is >from the Central Zionist Archives (no images available).

Habonim Dror Members in England

This database includes various listings >from Habonim Dror in England
which includes 816 names >from various activities. The information is
in English. The data could have the following: surname, other names,
father's name, address, school and affiliation among others. The lists
are >from the archives at Yad Tabenkin (images available)

Updated Database

Palestine Marriage/Divorce Certificates, 1921-48

This is an addition to the certificates previously released and
available on the IGRA website These certificates were issued upon
request and are not the same as the ledgers >from the Rabanut,. Some
certificates for marriages were issued 3-20 years after the marriages
took place. These are >from the Israel State Archives. (images
available).

Medical Practitioners 1938

This is a list of licensed doctors, pharmacists, dentists and midwives
and published by the Department of Health. The booklets were found in
the National Library of Israel. (images available).

Operation on Eagles' Wings (Magic Carpet) Yemenite Airlift - Phase 3

This is a database of the third phase of the airlift of Yemenite Jews
after the Imam of Yemen agreed to allow more than 45,000 members of
the remaining Jewish community to leave. The list includes names, sex,
birth year, weight, and family status. This database is done in
cooperation with the JDC (no images available).

Name Changes 1955-56

The lists >from which this database of name changes was built were
published in Yalkut HaPirsumim (the official publication of the
government of Israel). The information is in Hebrew and contains prior
surname, prior other names, new surname, new other names, date of
record, locality, ID number. The information is located at the David
J. Light Law Library, TAU (images available).

Before viewing the databases, please register for free on the IGRA website:

http://genealogy.org.il/

Please note, images can be seen only by IGRA members. If you are not
an IGRA member, you will be able to see the transcriptions only.

To view the databases, go to
http://genealogy.org.il/AID/index.php

Our many thanks to all of our dedicated volunteers.

Elena Biegel Bazes
IGRA Publicity Chairperson


New and Updated Databases on IGRA Website #unitedkingdom

Elena Bazes
 

The Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA) has just released new
and updated databases on its website. These span the years between
1922 and 1956. We have a preview of those databases being released and
encourage you to look at it. There are now close to 940,000 records in
310 databases on the IGRA website.


New Databases

Habonim Dror Members in England

This database includes various listings >from Habonim Dror in England
which includes 816 names >from various activities. The information is
in English. The data could have the following: surname, other names,
father=E2=80=99s name, address, school and affiliation among others. The li=
sts
are >from the archives at Yad Tabenkin (images available)

HaShomer HaTzair Members in Poland 1947-1948

A collection of lists including 964 names of members. The information
is in Polish and includes surnames, other names, date of record, birth
year, gender and comments. The lists are >from HaShomer HaTzair
Archives at Yad Yaari (images available).

Tel Aviv Census 1922

This census was done in Hebrew and the first conducted by the British
in Palestine. It contains 13, 261 people who were asked their name,
age, relation to head of household, how long they stayed at the
current location, profession, address, and comments. The census was
found at the Historical Municipal Archives of Tel-Aviv =E2=80=93 Yaffo
(images available).

Kefar Warburg Founders, 1939

A list of the 82 founders as displayed in the settlement. The data
contains name, names of parents, gender and birth date (no images
available).

Illegal Immigrants, 1941

This database is >from pages of the Palestine Police Force, Criminal
Investigation Department, Government of Palestine. It is composed of
=E2=80=9Cprohibited immigrants=E2=80=9D lists found in files in the Israel =
State
Archives. This database, in English, includes surnames, other names,
sex, age, nationality and remarks (images available).

Matriculation Results as listed in the Palestine Gazette 1942-44

The matriculation exam results were published in the Palestine
Gazette. The lists were published between June 1942 and June 1944 and
contain 767 students=E2=80=99 names. The data includes surnames, other name=
s
and the name of the school. The material is >from the David J. Light
Law Library, TAU (images available).

Refugees in Teheran

This database includes a list of 447 civilians, adults and children,
who accompanied Anders=E2=80=99 Army on its travels >from the USSR to the
Middle East during World War II. The data includes surnames, other
names, birth year and town of origin. The database is in English. The
list is >from the Central Zionist Archives (no images available).

Updated Database

Palestine Marriage/Divorce Certificates, 1921-48

This is an addition to the certificates previously released and
available on the IGRA website These certificates were issued upon
request and are not the same as the ledgers >from the Rabanut,. Some
certificates for marriages were issued 3-20 years after the marriages
took place. These are >from the Israel State Archives. (images
available).

Medical Practitioners 1938

This is a list of licensed doctors, pharmacists, dentists and midwives
and published by the Department of Health. The booklets were found in
the National Library of Israel. (images available).

Operation on Eagles=E2=80=99 Wings (Magic Carpet) Yemenite Airlift =E2=80=
=93 Phase 3

This is a database of the third phase of the airlift of Yemenite Jews
after the Imam of Yemen agreed to allow more than 45,000 members of
the remaining Jewish community to leave. The list includes names, sex,
birth year, weight, and family status. This database is done in
cooperation with the JDC (no images available).

Name Changes 1955-56

The lists >from which this database of name changes was built were
published in Yalkut HaPirsumim (the official publication of the
government of Israel). The information is in Hebrew and contains prior
surname, prior other names, new surname, new other names, date of
record, locality, ID number. The information is located at the David
J. Light Law Library, TAU (images available).


Before viewing the databases, please register for free on the IGRA website:

http://genealogy.org.il/

Please note, images can be seen only by IGRA members. If you are not
an IGRA member, you will be able to see the transcriptions only.

To view the databases, go to http://genealogy.org.il/AID/index.php

Our many thanks to all of our dedicated volunteers.

Elena Biegel Bazes

IGRA Publicity Chairperson


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom New and Updated Databases on IGRA Website #unitedkingdom

Elena Bazes
 

The Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA) has just released new
and updated databases on its website. These span the years between
1922 and 1956. We have a preview of those databases being released and
encourage you to look at it. There are now close to 940,000 records in
310 databases on the IGRA website.


New Databases

Habonim Dror Members in England

This database includes various listings >from Habonim Dror in England
which includes 816 names >from various activities. The information is
in English. The data could have the following: surname, other names,
father=E2=80=99s name, address, school and affiliation among others. The li=
sts
are >from the archives at Yad Tabenkin (images available)

HaShomer HaTzair Members in Poland 1947-1948

A collection of lists including 964 names of members. The information
is in Polish and includes surnames, other names, date of record, birth
year, gender and comments. The lists are >from HaShomer HaTzair
Archives at Yad Yaari (images available).

Tel Aviv Census 1922

This census was done in Hebrew and the first conducted by the British
in Palestine. It contains 13, 261 people who were asked their name,
age, relation to head of household, how long they stayed at the
current location, profession, address, and comments. The census was
found at the Historical Municipal Archives of Tel-Aviv =E2=80=93 Yaffo
(images available).

Kefar Warburg Founders, 1939

A list of the 82 founders as displayed in the settlement. The data
contains name, names of parents, gender and birth date (no images
available).

Illegal Immigrants, 1941

This database is >from pages of the Palestine Police Force, Criminal
Investigation Department, Government of Palestine. It is composed of
=E2=80=9Cprohibited immigrants=E2=80=9D lists found in files in the Israel =
State
Archives. This database, in English, includes surnames, other names,
sex, age, nationality and remarks (images available).

Matriculation Results as listed in the Palestine Gazette 1942-44

The matriculation exam results were published in the Palestine
Gazette. The lists were published between June 1942 and June 1944 and
contain 767 students=E2=80=99 names. The data includes surnames, other name=
s
and the name of the school. The material is >from the David J. Light
Law Library, TAU (images available).

Refugees in Teheran

This database includes a list of 447 civilians, adults and children,
who accompanied Anders=E2=80=99 Army on its travels >from the USSR to the
Middle East during World War II. The data includes surnames, other
names, birth year and town of origin. The database is in English. The
list is >from the Central Zionist Archives (no images available).

Updated Database

Palestine Marriage/Divorce Certificates, 1921-48

This is an addition to the certificates previously released and
available on the IGRA website These certificates were issued upon
request and are not the same as the ledgers >from the Rabanut,. Some
certificates for marriages were issued 3-20 years after the marriages
took place. These are >from the Israel State Archives. (images
available).

Medical Practitioners 1938

This is a list of licensed doctors, pharmacists, dentists and midwives
and published by the Department of Health. The booklets were found in
the National Library of Israel. (images available).

Operation on Eagles=E2=80=99 Wings (Magic Carpet) Yemenite Airlift =E2=80=
=93 Phase 3

This is a database of the third phase of the airlift of Yemenite Jews
after the Imam of Yemen agreed to allow more than 45,000 members of
the remaining Jewish community to leave. The list includes names, sex,
birth year, weight, and family status. This database is done in
cooperation with the JDC (no images available).

Name Changes 1955-56

The lists >from which this database of name changes was built were
published in Yalkut HaPirsumim (the official publication of the
government of Israel). The information is in Hebrew and contains prior
surname, prior other names, new surname, new other names, date of
record, locality, ID number. The information is located at the David
J. Light Law Library, TAU (images available).


Before viewing the databases, please register for free on the IGRA website:

http://genealogy.org.il/

Please note, images can be seen only by IGRA members. If you are not
an IGRA member, you will be able to see the transcriptions only.

To view the databases, go to http://genealogy.org.il/AID/index.php

Our many thanks to all of our dedicated volunteers.

Elena Biegel Bazes

IGRA Publicity Chairperson


REICHSELIGMAN - Switzerland #general

Angie Elfassi
 

Hi,

Some very kind people in Switzerland have helped me recently regarding my family
REICHSELIGMAN in the Zurich Cemetery. They sent me a photo of teh couples
tombstone.

I am now trying to find to find further information regarding my family, Michael
and his wife Elisabeth.

On Michael's tombstone it says: s/o Yosef. My grandfather's father was also
Yosef and I want to find further information hoping that Michael and my
grandfather were siblings ..... or cousins. It is such an unusual surname.

Any suggestions where I can find further information would be much appreciated.

Regards,

Angie Elfassi
Israel
Searching:
RAYKH-ZELIGMAN/RICHMAN, Stakliskes, Lithuania/Leeds
COHEN, Sakiai, Lithuania/Leeds
MAGIDOWITZ, Jurbarkas, Lithuania/Leeds
KASSIMOFF, Rezekne, Latvia/Leeds


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen REICHSELIGMAN - Switzerland #general

Angie Elfassi
 

Hi,

Some very kind people in Switzerland have helped me recently regarding my family
REICHSELIGMAN in the Zurich Cemetery. They sent me a photo of teh couples
tombstone.

I am now trying to find to find further information regarding my family, Michael
and his wife Elisabeth.

On Michael's tombstone it says: s/o Yosef. My grandfather's father was also
Yosef and I want to find further information hoping that Michael and my
grandfather were siblings ..... or cousins. It is such an unusual surname.

Any suggestions where I can find further information would be much appreciated.

Regards,

Angie Elfassi
Israel
Searching:
RAYKH-ZELIGMAN/RICHMAN, Stakliskes, Lithuania/Leeds
COHEN, Sakiai, Lithuania/Leeds
MAGIDOWITZ, Jurbarkas, Lithuania/Leeds
KASSIMOFF, Rezekne, Latvia/Leeds


Re: Ukraine confusion - Novorossiisk? Poltava? #general

Alan Shuchat
 

Dottie,

There is a Russian-language website

http://fototikon.blogspot.com/2016/05/Poltava-gubernia-photoatelier-1861-1917.html

that lists the photography studio of Gdal' Leyvovich Varshavskiy in Poltava. >from
1889-1903 it was located on Kobelyakskaya Street in the Gritskevich house (or
building). In 1903-1904 it was on Aleksandrovskaya Street in the Varshavskiy house
(or building).

It doesn't mention Novorossisk, but can you scan the Russian original and post it
to Viewmate or email it to me?

The site http://fototikon.blogspot.com has many examples of photographs and lists
of photographers >from throughout the Russian empire. The site is mostly in
Russian, but your browser or Google Translate can give you rough translations.

Alan Shuchat
Newton, MA

SHUKHAT (Talnoe, Simferopol, Sevastopol, Odessa, Balta (Abazovka),
Tavrig, Pogrebishche)
VINOKUR (Talnoe), KURIS (Mogilev-Podolskiy, Ataki, Berdichev)
ZILBERMAN (Soroki, Kremenets), BIRNBAUM (Kamenets-Podolskiy)
KITAIGORODSKI (Zvenigorodka)

From: "Dottie J. Miller" <dottiem@samcrc.com>

My great grandmother, Dora BOGASLAVSKY, has been known to her family as having
been born 04-06-1864 somewhere in Ukraine. A photo of her has just come to
light that is framed with a border and backing that says, in Russian, "the
photography >from Novorossiisk of Grigory Varshavskii at Poltava, house of
Gritskevitch" (translated >from Russian into French, then into English). The
picture had to have been taken prior to 1889, at which time she gave birth to my
grandmother in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Can someone help get maximum sense >from these few words? Isn't Poltava a city 16
hours by car >from Novorossiisk? Does the phrase mean that the photographer >from
Poltava took the picture at Novorossiisk? Or that the photography business was
located in the Region of Poltava, city of Novorossiisk? I don't find online that
Novorossiisk was ever a part of the Poltava Oblast.


Re: Ukraine confusion - Novorossisk or Potlava? #general

Dottie Miller
 

Asking my Ukrainian/French translator for more specificity, I can now clarify:
The name of the portrait business was Photography of Novorossisk, in the city
of Potlava, on Kolebiatskaya Street, now Europeiskaya Street.

Thanks to all for the good suggestions!

Dottie Miller


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Ukraine confusion - Novorossiisk? Poltava? #general

Alan Shuchat
 

Dottie,

There is a Russian-language website

http://fototikon.blogspot.com/2016/05/Poltava-gubernia-photoatelier-1861-1917.html

that lists the photography studio of Gdal' Leyvovich Varshavskiy in Poltava. >from
1889-1903 it was located on Kobelyakskaya Street in the Gritskevich house (or
building). In 1903-1904 it was on Aleksandrovskaya Street in the Varshavskiy house
(or building).

It doesn't mention Novorossisk, but can you scan the Russian original and post it
to Viewmate or email it to me?

The site http://fototikon.blogspot.com has many examples of photographs and lists
of photographers >from throughout the Russian empire. The site is mostly in
Russian, but your browser or Google Translate can give you rough translations.

Alan Shuchat
Newton, MA

SHUKHAT (Talnoe, Simferopol, Sevastopol, Odessa, Balta (Abazovka),
Tavrig, Pogrebishche)
VINOKUR (Talnoe), KURIS (Mogilev-Podolskiy, Ataki, Berdichev)
ZILBERMAN (Soroki, Kremenets), BIRNBAUM (Kamenets-Podolskiy)
KITAIGORODSKI (Zvenigorodka)

From: "Dottie J. Miller" <dottiem@samcrc.com>

My great grandmother, Dora BOGASLAVSKY, has been known to her family as having
been born 04-06-1864 somewhere in Ukraine. A photo of her has just come to
light that is framed with a border and backing that says, in Russian, "the
photography >from Novorossiisk of Grigory Varshavskii at Poltava, house of
Gritskevitch" (translated >from Russian into French, then into English). The
picture had to have been taken prior to 1889, at which time she gave birth to my
grandmother in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Can someone help get maximum sense >from these few words? Isn't Poltava a city 16
hours by car >from Novorossiisk? Does the phrase mean that the photographer >from
Poltava took the picture at Novorossiisk? Or that the photography business was
located in the Region of Poltava, city of Novorossiisk? I don't find online that
Novorossiisk was ever a part of the Poltava Oblast.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Ukraine confusion - Novorossisk or Potlava? #general

Dottie Miller
 

Asking my Ukrainian/French translator for more specificity, I can now clarify:
The name of the portrait business was Photography of Novorossisk, in the city
of Potlava, on Kolebiatskaya Street, now Europeiskaya Street.

Thanks to all for the good suggestions!

Dottie Miller


Literacy of Jewish women in the Old Country #general

David Laskin
 

Hello Genners,
I recently interviewed an elderly aunt who revealed, to my surprise,
that her mother -- my paternal grandmother -- was illiterate. My GM
was born in what is now Poland around 1890 and immigrated to the US in
1924. I found her on the 1930 census, which indicates that she could
read, so I am somewhat dubious about my aunt's assertion. I know that
Jewish girls in the Russian Pale did not receive as much education as
boys, but I had always assumed most (especially those >from middle
class families like my grandmother) were literate. I'd like to hear
what others have to say on this.

Thanks!

David Laskin, Seattle, WA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Literacy of Jewish women in the Old Country #general

David Laskin
 

Hello Genners,
I recently interviewed an elderly aunt who revealed, to my surprise,
that her mother -- my paternal grandmother -- was illiterate. My GM
was born in what is now Poland around 1890 and immigrated to the US in
1924. I found her on the 1930 census, which indicates that she could
read, so I am somewhat dubious about my aunt's assertion. I know that
Jewish girls in the Russian Pale did not receive as much education as
boys, but I had always assumed most (especially those >from middle
class families like my grandmother) were literate. I'd like to hear
what others have to say on this.

Thanks!

David Laskin, Seattle, WA


Viewmate documents #germany

Lin <lin2@...>
 

Dear GerSIGers,
Below are some documents >from my REINHEIMER family all >from Hesse which
I recently found. The documents are in German.The details are on the the
page along with the documents. I'd like a complete translation
with all the details. I'm so glad to have found these documents.
Thanking you in advance for your help.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM53988
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM53987
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM53982
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM53975
Sincerely, Lin Herz, Palm Bay, Florida
< ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ >
Please thank those who help you and support ViewMate, JewishGen
and GerSIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/Honors/
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/honors.asp


German SIG #Germany Viewmate documents #germany

Lin <lin2@...>
 

Dear GerSIGers,
Below are some documents >from my REINHEIMER family all >from Hesse which
I recently found. The documents are in German.The details are on the the
page along with the documents. I'd like a complete translation
with all the details. I'm so glad to have found these documents.
Thanking you in advance for your help.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM53988
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM53987
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM53982
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM53975
Sincerely, Lin Herz, Palm Bay, Florida
< ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ >
Please thank those who help you and support ViewMate, JewishGen
and GerSIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/Honors/
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/honors.asp

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