Date   

Re: 1941 Deportations from Sub-Carpathia #subcarpathia

Stan Dub <stan.dub@...>
 

On Mon, Sep 18, 2017 at 2:04 AM, Sub-Carpathia SIG digest
<subcarpathia@lyris.jewishgen.org> wrote:

The JewishGen Sub-Carpathia SIG now has 449 members.

Visit our JewishGen Sub-Carpathia SIG web site:
< http://www.jewishgen.org/Sub-Carpathia/ >

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Support the work of YOUR JewishGen Sub-Carpathia SIG with a
contribution to the JewishGen Sub-Carpathia SIG General Fund
HELP US - - TO HELP YOU
< http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=50 >

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
SUBCARPATHIA Digest for Sunday, September 17, 2017.

1. Re: 1941 Deportations >from Sub-Carpathia

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: 1941 Deportations >from Sub-Carpathia
From: Todd Edelman <edelman@greenidea.eu>
Date: Thu, 14 Sep 2017 11:52:35 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

Hi,

It is my understanding that these 25k or included Jews >from within
pre-1940 Hungary - so also including Kosice, Lucenec etc, or from
pre-1938 "Trianon Hungary" - who didn't have papers. I read that e.g.
Jews who'd moved at the end or right after the end of WWI >from what
became northwest Romania to the west into Trianon Hungary were never
able to get naturalized even though they had lived there >from 1919
onwards...

- T
////////////////

Todd:

I am sure some of the 25,000 were refugees >from other places, but most
were long time residents of Subcarpathia. In many cases they didn't
have "papers" because the area had been part of Czechoslovakia from
1917-1938, and then part of a different transition
Ukranian-ethnic-government, and Hungary did not actually make its
presence known as the local authority until around 1940. When the
requirement for Hungarian papers was announced, any papers that the
Subcarpathian Jews had that referenced their Czech citizenship were
not sufficient. The Yizkor book for my mother's small town (Vonihovo
-- Vajnag in Hungarian, Vonigovo in Ukranian) lists the names of three
Jewish residents of the town in 1877, one of whom was my mother's
grandfather. He died around 1925 and is buried in the town cemetery.
Somehow that did not matter. Thirty of his descendants were included
in the group of about 150 that were deported >from the town.

Stan Dub

///////////////////

On 09/14/2017 07:57 AM, Stanley Dub stan.dub@gmail.com wrote:
In summer of 1941, the Hungarian occupiers deported about 25,000
Subcarpathian Jews to German-occupied eastern Poland after labeling
them "aliens". They had announced that anyone living in the area had
to obtain residency papers >from Hungarian authorities, and these
required proof the family had lived in Hungarian lands since 1860.
Even in some cases when local Jews submitted the paperwork, Hungarian
clerks allowed them to pile up without processing until after the
deportations were carried out. Families whose husbands had previously
been conscripted for Hungarian labor gangs were exempted, and some
others fled into the woods to avoid deportation.

My mother's family (GROSMAN) was deported >from Vonihovo (Yiddish =
Vinif) on August 1, 1941 along with about half her town's Jews. They
were eventually trucked into Poland and abandoned there. Most of the
deportees ended up at Kaminets Podolsk, where they were promptly
massacred by German einzatzgruppen over a few days. My mother's group
did not reach the massacre site but instead were left to fend for
themselves in Poland. Of my mother's group of 13 immediate family
members in the deportations, only my mother survived.

Once these 1941 deportations were carried out, the Hungarians did not
make any other mass deportations >from Sub-Carpathia until the
transports to Auschwitz in 1944.

I've read dozens of memoirs, but have never heard of anyone else
besides my mother who was involved in these 1941 deportations and
survived in Poland until liberation. (I have heard that a few of
these deportees ran away on the deportation journey, or managed to
return quickly after being abandoned in Poland.) Does anyone know of
any others who survived after being included in these 1941
deportations >from Sub-Carpathia?

Thanks,

Stanley Dub
Cleveland, OH

--
Todd Edelman
Davis, CA, USA
Geni Profile: http://bit.ly/2ie6dWm
or real url https://www.geni.com/people/Todd-Edelman/6000000018603767649
Researching: KUNSZTLER in Perechyn/Perecseny in Ung county and in Bereg county.




---

END OF DIGEST

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Subcarpathia SIG #Subcarpathia Re: 1941 Deportations from Sub-Carpathia #subcarpathia

Stan Dub <stan.dub@...>
 

On Mon, Sep 18, 2017 at 2:04 AM, Sub-Carpathia SIG digest
<subcarpathia@lyris.jewishgen.org> wrote:

The JewishGen Sub-Carpathia SIG now has 449 members.

Visit our JewishGen Sub-Carpathia SIG web site:
< http://www.jewishgen.org/Sub-Carpathia/ >

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Support the work of YOUR JewishGen Sub-Carpathia SIG with a
contribution to the JewishGen Sub-Carpathia SIG General Fund
HELP US - - TO HELP YOU
< http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=50 >

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
SUBCARPATHIA Digest for Sunday, September 17, 2017.

1. Re: 1941 Deportations >from Sub-Carpathia

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: 1941 Deportations >from Sub-Carpathia
From: Todd Edelman <edelman@greenidea.eu>
Date: Thu, 14 Sep 2017 11:52:35 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

Hi,

It is my understanding that these 25k or included Jews >from within
pre-1940 Hungary - so also including Kosice, Lucenec etc, or from
pre-1938 "Trianon Hungary" - who didn't have papers. I read that e.g.
Jews who'd moved at the end or right after the end of WWI >from what
became northwest Romania to the west into Trianon Hungary were never
able to get naturalized even though they had lived there >from 1919
onwards...

- T
////////////////

Todd:

I am sure some of the 25,000 were refugees >from other places, but most
were long time residents of Subcarpathia. In many cases they didn't
have "papers" because the area had been part of Czechoslovakia from
1917-1938, and then part of a different transition
Ukranian-ethnic-government, and Hungary did not actually make its
presence known as the local authority until around 1940. When the
requirement for Hungarian papers was announced, any papers that the
Subcarpathian Jews had that referenced their Czech citizenship were
not sufficient. The Yizkor book for my mother's small town (Vonihovo
-- Vajnag in Hungarian, Vonigovo in Ukranian) lists the names of three
Jewish residents of the town in 1877, one of whom was my mother's
grandfather. He died around 1925 and is buried in the town cemetery.
Somehow that did not matter. Thirty of his descendants were included
in the group of about 150 that were deported >from the town.

Stan Dub

///////////////////

On 09/14/2017 07:57 AM, Stanley Dub stan.dub@gmail.com wrote:
In summer of 1941, the Hungarian occupiers deported about 25,000
Subcarpathian Jews to German-occupied eastern Poland after labeling
them "aliens". They had announced that anyone living in the area had
to obtain residency papers >from Hungarian authorities, and these
required proof the family had lived in Hungarian lands since 1860.
Even in some cases when local Jews submitted the paperwork, Hungarian
clerks allowed them to pile up without processing until after the
deportations were carried out. Families whose husbands had previously
been conscripted for Hungarian labor gangs were exempted, and some
others fled into the woods to avoid deportation.

My mother's family (GROSMAN) was deported >from Vonihovo (Yiddish =
Vinif) on August 1, 1941 along with about half her town's Jews. They
were eventually trucked into Poland and abandoned there. Most of the
deportees ended up at Kaminets Podolsk, where they were promptly
massacred by German einzatzgruppen over a few days. My mother's group
did not reach the massacre site but instead were left to fend for
themselves in Poland. Of my mother's group of 13 immediate family
members in the deportations, only my mother survived.

Once these 1941 deportations were carried out, the Hungarians did not
make any other mass deportations >from Sub-Carpathia until the
transports to Auschwitz in 1944.

I've read dozens of memoirs, but have never heard of anyone else
besides my mother who was involved in these 1941 deportations and
survived in Poland until liberation. (I have heard that a few of
these deportees ran away on the deportation journey, or managed to
return quickly after being abandoned in Poland.) Does anyone know of
any others who survived after being included in these 1941
deportations >from Sub-Carpathia?

Thanks,

Stanley Dub
Cleveland, OH

--
Todd Edelman
Davis, CA, USA
Geni Profile: http://bit.ly/2ie6dWm
or real url https://www.geni.com/people/Todd-Edelman/6000000018603767649
Researching: KUNSZTLER in Perechyn/Perecseny in Ung county and in Bereg county.




---

END OF DIGEST

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
To post to a message, send your PLAIN TEXT message to:
<subcarpathia@lyris.jewishgen.org> and sign with your
full name and location.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
You are currently subscribed to subcarpathia as: [stan.dub@gmail.com]
To change the format of our mailings, to stop/resume delivery (vacation),
or to unsubscribe, please go to http://lyris.jewishgen.org/ListManager


Unwed mother's Jewish son - mother converts, marries Lutheran father & younger full siblings all Lutheran #general

Alice Josephs
 

Hi,

How usual would this scenario be in the second half of the 19th century in
Germany?

A young Jewish woman becomes pregnant by a non Jewish man in the same town.
She gives birth to a son.

She apparently converts to the Lutheran Church and marries the father. She
has more children, all baptised, the oldest seven years younger than the
first child. However the eldest son by the same father, conceived and born
outside marriage, remains Jewish. I do not know if he was brought up
elsewhere. However the father is named on his marriage certificate, so
everyone including the Jewish son's Jewish bride is aware of the situation,
although it's a moot point whether the Jewish couple's children knew about
this.

Is anyone aware of similar situations?

As far as I can tell, the non Jewish man was >from a family which did not
have Jewish ancestry.

As you may have guessed this is not hypothetical.

It did remind me of interesting threads on Baden Wuerttemberg mailing lists
I saw some years ago, for example, about single mothers in general, not
exactly the same situation, eg at http://bit.ly/2x9frib The Jewish/Lutheran
situation of course has implications and complications especially bearing in
mind what happened in the next century, although the man and the woman were
not to know that.

I'd be very interested to know if this was common or rare and if anyone has
any more information on such situations.

I am subscribed to digest, so would appreciate if those responding on the
list could send a copy to my personal email address. If anyone has a similar
situation in their family and wants to discuss with me off list, please feel
free to email me on my personal email address.

Alice Josephs
Near London, UK
genealice@josephsonline.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Unwed mother's Jewish son - mother converts, marries Lutheran father & younger full siblings all Lutheran #general

Alice Josephs
 

Hi,

How usual would this scenario be in the second half of the 19th century in
Germany?

A young Jewish woman becomes pregnant by a non Jewish man in the same town.
She gives birth to a son.

She apparently converts to the Lutheran Church and marries the father. She
has more children, all baptised, the oldest seven years younger than the
first child. However the eldest son by the same father, conceived and born
outside marriage, remains Jewish. I do not know if he was brought up
elsewhere. However the father is named on his marriage certificate, so
everyone including the Jewish son's Jewish bride is aware of the situation,
although it's a moot point whether the Jewish couple's children knew about
this.

Is anyone aware of similar situations?

As far as I can tell, the non Jewish man was >from a family which did not
have Jewish ancestry.

As you may have guessed this is not hypothetical.

It did remind me of interesting threads on Baden Wuerttemberg mailing lists
I saw some years ago, for example, about single mothers in general, not
exactly the same situation, eg at http://bit.ly/2x9frib The Jewish/Lutheran
situation of course has implications and complications especially bearing in
mind what happened in the next century, although the man and the woman were
not to know that.

I'd be very interested to know if this was common or rare and if anyone has
any more information on such situations.

I am subscribed to digest, so would appreciate if those responding on the
list could send a copy to my personal email address. If anyone has a similar
situation in their family and wants to discuss with me off list, please feel
free to email me on my personal email address.

Alice Josephs
Near London, UK
genealice@josephsonline.net


New Jersey Archive request #general

bernerfolk
 

I've found an index record (with year and file number) for what may be the
third marriage of my GGF, but the name is pretty far off so I'm not certain. Is
anyone going to the NJ State Archive who might be able to get a look at it and
copy or photo the file if it's the right person?

Sherri Venditti
The Berkshires, USA

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply directly to Sherri.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New Jersey Archive request #general

bernerfolk
 

I've found an index record (with year and file number) for what may be the
third marriage of my GGF, but the name is pretty far off so I'm not certain. Is
anyone going to the NJ State Archive who might be able to get a look at it and
copy or photo the file if it's the right person?

Sherri Venditti
The Berkshires, USA

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply directly to Sherri.


Meir WUNDER #general

Lauren Shulsky Orenstein
 

Dear All,

I wonder if someone might know how to reach Meir Wunder, author of Meori
Galicia as well as several other volumes related to rabbinic genealogy. I am
working on a project and, while his published material is terrific, I need to
understand his sources, etc. to complete this research.

Please reply privately with any contact information. If anyone has additional
information about his work, specifically on the Margolis lines, please contact
me directly. I have already reviewed his book, Elef Margoliot.

Best,
Lauren

Lauren Shulsky Orenstein
New York, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Meir WUNDER #general

Lauren Shulsky Orenstein
 

Dear All,

I wonder if someone might know how to reach Meir Wunder, author of Meori
Galicia as well as several other volumes related to rabbinic genealogy. I am
working on a project and, while his published material is terrific, I need to
understand his sources, etc. to complete this research.

Please reply privately with any contact information. If anyone has additional
information about his work, specifically on the Margolis lines, please contact
me directly. I have already reviewed his book, Elef Margoliot.

Best,
Lauren

Lauren Shulsky Orenstein
New York, NY


Thank you! #latinamerica

Amy B Cohen
 

I want to thank all of those who so quickly and helpfully responded to
my inquiry about Eva Baumann Dorfman and Margot Baumann Leventhal. I
now am in touch with three of their descendants, thanks to the help I
received today!

I still am looking for death records for the deceased in the family.
And I still have no information about Rose Abraham Zechermann, who
lived in Chile.

But I am already so much further along than I was just 24 hours ago!

Thank you,

Amy


Latin America #LatinAmerica Thank you! #latinamerica

Amy B Cohen
 

I want to thank all of those who so quickly and helpfully responded to
my inquiry about Eva Baumann Dorfman and Margot Baumann Leventhal. I
now am in touch with three of their descendants, thanks to the help I
received today!

I still am looking for death records for the deceased in the family.
And I still have no information about Rose Abraham Zechermann, who
lived in Chile.

But I am already so much further along than I was just 24 hours ago!

Thank you,

Amy


Re: DNA response protocol #dna

Michael Good
 

People do DNA tests for different reasons, so they tend to reply to what
meets their needs, not yours. I don't think there's any way to change that.

Family Tree DNA greatly overestimates Jewish cousin relationships, so most
of those predicted 2nd-4th cousin relationships are actually far more
distant. I wouldn't bother contacting anyone where the longest match isn't
at least 20 cM, and 30 cM is better. I think your experiences illustrate
part of why Ancestry.DNA is much better for Jewish genealogy than Family
Tree DNA. First, Ancestry's database is about 8 times larger. Second,
their estimation of close cousin relationships is far more accurate than
at Family Tree DNA. You will still have thousands of matches due to
endogamy, but anyone who shows up as a 3rd-4th cousin match or closer on
Ancestry tends to be worth exploring. I've been able to match most of the
people in the upper half of that range. Third, lots more people have family
trees on Ancestry than on Family Tree DNA. Fourth, you can transfer your
Ancestry results to Family Tree DNA for free, but not the other way around.

Alas, I believe Ancestry.DNA is not yet available in Israel. You would have
to go through somebody in a country where Ancestry sells the tests. It is
available in the UK though, and I have had a lot of success with matches to
the UK branches of my family.

For genealogy it's best to test everywhere. For most people Ancestry is far
and away the best choice for your first test, if it is available where you
live.

Michael Good
Los Altos, California, USA


DNA Research #DNA Re: DNA response protocol #dna

Michael Good
 

People do DNA tests for different reasons, so they tend to reply to what
meets their needs, not yours. I don't think there's any way to change that.

Family Tree DNA greatly overestimates Jewish cousin relationships, so most
of those predicted 2nd-4th cousin relationships are actually far more
distant. I wouldn't bother contacting anyone where the longest match isn't
at least 20 cM, and 30 cM is better. I think your experiences illustrate
part of why Ancestry.DNA is much better for Jewish genealogy than Family
Tree DNA. First, Ancestry's database is about 8 times larger. Second,
their estimation of close cousin relationships is far more accurate than
at Family Tree DNA. You will still have thousands of matches due to
endogamy, but anyone who shows up as a 3rd-4th cousin match or closer on
Ancestry tends to be worth exploring. I've been able to match most of the
people in the upper half of that range. Third, lots more people have family
trees on Ancestry than on Family Tree DNA. Fourth, you can transfer your
Ancestry results to Family Tree DNA for free, but not the other way around.

Alas, I believe Ancestry.DNA is not yet available in Israel. You would have
to go through somebody in a country where Ancestry sells the tests. It is
available in the UK though, and I have had a lot of success with matches to
the UK branches of my family.

For genealogy it's best to test everywhere. For most people Ancestry is far
and away the best choice for your first test, if it is available where you
live.

Michael Good
Los Altos, California, USA


ViewMate translation requests/photo ID #warsaw #poland

alexandralsilver@...
 

Hello,

I'm hoping someone can decipher the writing and translate four vital
records for ZIMELMANs/ZYMELMANs, and potentially help me determine
whether or not they refer to my 2x and 3x-great grandparents. I've
posted the records on ViewMate, along with a photograph:

1) http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM60344

2) http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM60345

3) http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM60346

4) http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM60347

5) http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM60348

Thank you for reading and for any guidance you can offer!

Gratefully,
Alexandra Silver


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland ViewMate translation requests/photo ID #warsaw #poland

alexandralsilver@...
 

Hello,

I'm hoping someone can decipher the writing and translate four vital
records for ZIMELMANs/ZYMELMANs, and potentially help me determine
whether or not they refer to my 2x and 3x-great grandparents. I've
posted the records on ViewMate, along with a photograph:

1) http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM60344

2) http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM60345

3) http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM60346

4) http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM60347

5) http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM60348

Thank you for reading and for any guidance you can offer!

Gratefully,
Alexandra Silver


Family Research - Xanmob (Ha-ee-mov / Haimov) #ukraine

Harvey Chimoff <hchimoff@...>
 

Hello. I'm looking for any information about my paternal grandfather's
family, specifically what happened to them before/during/after World
War II.

The Russian surname was Xanmob, with a phonetic pronunciation of
Ha-ee-mov. (We use Haimov as the English version of the Russian
surname in our family history.)

The family was >from the Ukrainian province of Chernigov, in the old
Russian Empire. My grandfather Morris (Moishe) was born in Starodub
and then moved to Pochep. Today, Starodub and Pochep are in the
Russian Federation.

Morris was born approximately 1887 and arrived in the United States in
1908. His parents were David Haimov and Ida Minnie Wilkov.

Morris' siblings were Samuel (Russian pronunciation of Sa-mu-ee'-l),
Myerch (Myer), Sarah, and Rachul (Rose - Russian pronunciation of
Ra-h-ee'-l -- with last letter 'L' being soft. There may have been two
other brothers.

Morris apparently had a nephew named Bernard Chaimov. Cile Chaimov was
either Bernard's sister or wife.

Some of the extended family may have been part of the Soviet
evacuation to Tashkent (Uzbekistan) in February 1942, including
Morris' brother Myerch (Myer) Haimov, and possibly women and
children.

Thanks very much!

--
Harvey Chimoff
hchimoff@gmail.com


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Family Research - Xanmob (Ha-ee-mov / Haimov) #ukraine

Harvey Chimoff <hchimoff@...>
 

Hello. I'm looking for any information about my paternal grandfather's
family, specifically what happened to them before/during/after World
War II.

The Russian surname was Xanmob, with a phonetic pronunciation of
Ha-ee-mov. (We use Haimov as the English version of the Russian
surname in our family history.)

The family was >from the Ukrainian province of Chernigov, in the old
Russian Empire. My grandfather Morris (Moishe) was born in Starodub
and then moved to Pochep. Today, Starodub and Pochep are in the
Russian Federation.

Morris was born approximately 1887 and arrived in the United States in
1908. His parents were David Haimov and Ida Minnie Wilkov.

Morris' siblings were Samuel (Russian pronunciation of Sa-mu-ee'-l),
Myerch (Myer), Sarah, and Rachul (Rose - Russian pronunciation of
Ra-h-ee'-l -- with last letter 'L' being soft. There may have been two
other brothers.

Morris apparently had a nephew named Bernard Chaimov. Cile Chaimov was
either Bernard's sister or wife.

Some of the extended family may have been part of the Soviet
evacuation to Tashkent (Uzbekistan) in February 1942, including
Morris' brother Myerch (Myer) Haimov, and possibly women and
children.

Thanks very much!

--
Harvey Chimoff
hchimoff@gmail.com


Sources for district XIII in Budapest, 1895-1925 #hungary

ngaupakyip@...
 

I recently discovered that a branch of my FRIEDMAN family >from Ugocsa
megye migrated to Budapest. Specifically, >from a family letter dated
1913, I have an address for Adolf Friedman at 68 Vaci Ut. He had a
grocery store at this address and lived there as well. He and his
wife had five children, and he also had two children >from his first
wife. Except for Adolf, I know no names. Based on the letter, my
guess is that the younger children were born around 1895-1905.

It seems that 68 Vaci Ut is in District XIII. On FamilySearch, the
only civil records for this district are deaths and marriages from
1938 onwards. I would be grateful for pointers to sources (civil
records, business directories, anything) for District XIII for
1895-1925.

Michael Gordy
Takoma Park, Maryland, USA


ViewMate translation request - Hungarian #hungary

Andy Monat
 

I've posted a census record in Hungarian for which I need a
translation. It is on ViewMate at
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM60322

This is a record >from the 1869 census for the BERKOVITS family from
the town of Natafalva, which is now Nacina Ves, Slovakia.

I am especially curious about: the name of the town the parents were
born in; the notes in the last column for the people (on lines 3 and
4) who seem to have been away including where they were if listed;
"offices" and occupations; and whether the last person listed was a
non-Jewish servant (I think that's what her "office" says).

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much,
Andy Monat
Massachusetts, USA


Hungary SIG #Hungary Sources for district XIII in Budapest, 1895-1925 #hungary

ngaupakyip@...
 

I recently discovered that a branch of my FRIEDMAN family >from Ugocsa
megye migrated to Budapest. Specifically, >from a family letter dated
1913, I have an address for Adolf Friedman at 68 Vaci Ut. He had a
grocery store at this address and lived there as well. He and his
wife had five children, and he also had two children >from his first
wife. Except for Adolf, I know no names. Based on the letter, my
guess is that the younger children were born around 1895-1905.

It seems that 68 Vaci Ut is in District XIII. On FamilySearch, the
only civil records for this district are deaths and marriages from
1938 onwards. I would be grateful for pointers to sources (civil
records, business directories, anything) for District XIII for
1895-1925.

Michael Gordy
Takoma Park, Maryland, USA


Hungary SIG #Hungary ViewMate translation request - Hungarian #hungary

Andy Monat
 

I've posted a census record in Hungarian for which I need a
translation. It is on ViewMate at
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM60322

This is a record >from the 1869 census for the BERKOVITS family from
the town of Natafalva, which is now Nacina Ves, Slovakia.

I am especially curious about: the name of the town the parents were
born in; the notes in the last column for the people (on lines 3 and
4) who seem to have been away including where they were if listed;
"offices" and occupations; and whether the last person listed was a
non-Jewish servant (I think that's what her "office" says).

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much,
Andy Monat
Massachusetts, USA

51881 - 51900 of 660677