Date   

Sara Lea NUSSBAUM WEINREB #general

Milton Koch
 

I have been able to locate some history about her brith and death, which occurred
in Israel, in 1986. She is buried in Holon.

My quest is to locate any living family members.

Sara Lea was born in Baranow, Galicia in 1898. Her mother was Chuan/Hanan (?)
My maternal grandfather, Gustav NUSSBAUM, was also born in Baranow, in 1869. His
parents were Abraham and Ruchel, however.

I wonder if they are not related by parentage siblings. I do not know of how
many NUSSBAUM families might have lived in Baranow at that time.

I would like to find any descendants of Sara Lea, in order to get more family
names, dates and history.

Thank you.
Milton Koch
Bethesda, MD, USA
NUSSBAUM-Baranow

MODERATOR NOTE: Please contact Milton directly via email if you have information
about Sara Lea NUSSBAUM WEINREB's family.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Sara Lea NUSSBAUM WEINREB #general

Milton Koch
 

I have been able to locate some history about her brith and death, which occurred
in Israel, in 1986. She is buried in Holon.

My quest is to locate any living family members.

Sara Lea was born in Baranow, Galicia in 1898. Her mother was Chuan/Hanan (?)
My maternal grandfather, Gustav NUSSBAUM, was also born in Baranow, in 1869. His
parents were Abraham and Ruchel, however.

I wonder if they are not related by parentage siblings. I do not know of how
many NUSSBAUM families might have lived in Baranow at that time.

I would like to find any descendants of Sara Lea, in order to get more family
names, dates and history.

Thank you.
Milton Koch
Bethesda, MD, USA
NUSSBAUM-Baranow

MODERATOR NOTE: Please contact Milton directly via email if you have information
about Sara Lea NUSSBAUM WEINREB's family.


Schloime/Shlomo #general

Sharon Korn <mssrkorn@...>
 

A relative who lived in Russia in the early twentieth century was referred to
as both Schloime and Shlomo. These appear to be the same name. Schloime is Yiddish.
Is Shlomo Hebrew or Yiddish?

Schloime later used the name Solomon, followed by the patronymic Zindelevich and
his surname. Would he have used the patronymic with his Yiddish name?

Thank you.

Sharon Korn
San Diego, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Schloime/Shlomo #general

Sharon Korn <mssrkorn@...>
 

A relative who lived in Russia in the early twentieth century was referred to
as both Schloime and Shlomo. These appear to be the same name. Schloime is Yiddish.
Is Shlomo Hebrew or Yiddish?

Schloime later used the name Solomon, followed by the patronymic Zindelevich and
his surname. Would he have used the patronymic with his Yiddish name?

Thank you.

Sharon Korn
San Diego, CA


Sara Lea Nussbaum Weinreb #galicia

Milton Koch
 

I have been able to locate some history about her birth and death,
which occurred in Israel, in 1986. She is buried in Holon. My quest is
to locate any living family members.

Sara Lea was born in Baranow, Galicia in 1898. Her mother was
Chuan/Hanan (?). My maternal grandfather, Gustav Nussbaum, was
also born in Baranow, in 1869. His parents were Abraham and Ruchel,
however. I wonder if they are not related by parentage siblings.

I do not know of how many Nussbaum families might have lived in
Baranow at that time. I would like to find any descendants of Sara
Lea, in order to get more family names, dates and history.

Thank you.

Milton Koch
Bethesda, MD, USA

NUSSBAUM - Baranow


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Sara Lea Nussbaum Weinreb #galicia

Milton Koch
 

I have been able to locate some history about her birth and death,
which occurred in Israel, in 1986. She is buried in Holon. My quest is
to locate any living family members.

Sara Lea was born in Baranow, Galicia in 1898. Her mother was
Chuan/Hanan (?). My maternal grandfather, Gustav Nussbaum, was
also born in Baranow, in 1869. His parents were Abraham and Ruchel,
however. I wonder if they are not related by parentage siblings.

I do not know of how many Nussbaum families might have lived in
Baranow at that time. I would like to find any descendants of Sara
Lea, in order to get more family names, dates and history.

Thank you.

Milton Koch
Bethesda, MD, USA

NUSSBAUM - Baranow


(UK) Ancestry UK Offering Free Access to Their Military Collection Through November 13, 2017 #unitedkingdom

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Ancestry (UK) is offering free access to their UK and Ireland military
collection through November 13, 2017 23:59 BST in commemoration of
Remembrance Day.
To search the military collection go to:
http://www.ancestry.co.uk/cs/remembrance
To view the featured records in the collection go to:
https://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/group/uk_military_collections

You will be required to register with your name, email address and password.
No credit card information is required. Records may be saved to your
computer, downloaded or printed.

Note: When you place the name in the search box and the records appear, you
will be invited to start a free trial. That is not the free access being
offered for Remembrance Day, and this free trial requires you to provide a
credit card number.

If you access the records in the featured collection after the November 13
deadline you will be invited to subscribe. The same offer will occur if you
request records not included in the featured collections during the four-day
free access offer.

Some of the military records may direct you to Fold3.com which is another
genealogical site part of the Ancestry family of companies. The free access
for Remembrance Day is not offered through Fold3.com.

I have no affiliation with Ancestry.co.uk and am posting this solely for the
information of the reader.

Thank you to Hazel Boon, president, JGS of Hamilton for letting us know
about the offer >from Ancestry.co.uk

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom (UK) Ancestry UK Offering Free Access to Their Military Collection Through November 13, 2017 #unitedkingdom

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Ancestry (UK) is offering free access to their UK and Ireland military
collection through November 13, 2017 23:59 BST in commemoration of
Remembrance Day.
To search the military collection go to:
http://www.ancestry.co.uk/cs/remembrance
To view the featured records in the collection go to:
https://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/group/uk_military_collections

You will be required to register with your name, email address and password.
No credit card information is required. Records may be saved to your
computer, downloaded or printed.

Note: When you place the name in the search box and the records appear, you
will be invited to start a free trial. That is not the free access being
offered for Remembrance Day, and this free trial requires you to provide a
credit card number.

If you access the records in the featured collection after the November 13
deadline you will be invited to subscribe. The same offer will occur if you
request records not included in the featured collections during the four-day
free access offer.

Some of the military records may direct you to Fold3.com which is another
genealogical site part of the Ancestry family of companies. The free access
for Remembrance Day is not offered through Fold3.com.

I have no affiliation with Ancestry.co.uk and am posting this solely for the
information of the reader.

Thank you to Hazel Boon, president, JGS of Hamilton for letting us know
about the offer >from Ancestry.co.uk

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Suggestions for research strategy? #hungary

david@...
 

I am researching the FURST family >from Vas Megye. I am trying to find
the actual death record of one person in particular: Johanna GRUNBAUM
(nee FURST). According to the geni.com profile, she is buried in Kormend
cemetery. We know the date she died (February 18, 1916). However,
although I looked twice, I cannot find her death record in the
familysearch.org civil records for Kormend. I have also looked in
Szombathely and in little villages adjacent to Kormend (most of which
only have very recent records that do not go back to 1916.

It would appear she died outside Kormend, then her remains were returned
to Kormend to be buried near family. I assume she was in a larger city
for medical treatment in a good hospital, where she passed away, but I
also assume the cit had to be not far away. Initially, my assumption was
that the only city nearby that offered a decent hospital would be
Szombathely. Is that assumption incomplete? How far did people transport
the bodies of the deceased in those days to return them to family burial
grounds?

What I am wondering is this: How far afield should I be looking for her
death record? In 1916 is it conceivable that someone went, say, to
Vienna, for treatment, passed away there, then was returned back to
Kormend? Budapest?

Rather than look in every corner of Austro-Hungary, perhaps h-siggers
can weigh in on their suggestions for the best strategy/approach for
where to look?

I began this inquiry with Ben Schoenbrun, who made the following
comments: "I would find the towns in the surrounding area and see which
ones were in the same rabbinate as Kormend. Check the 1877 Gazetteer or
the pre-1895 records and look at the death records for the towns where
they record burials in Kormend."

So I will begin to look in the pre-1895 records, as he suggests. But I
also wanted to run the problem by all of you and see if any of you had
any other suggestions. Perhaps somewhere there is a Kormend Rabbinate
document that lists all the communities served which could guide me? But
this would not solve the problem if she died in a big(ger) city hospital
and had her remains brought back to Kormend after death.

Regards,

David

Moderator: Please respond off-list unless you have info on resources or research
techniques that may be of general interest.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Suggestions for research strategy? #hungary

david@...
 

I am researching the FURST family >from Vas Megye. I am trying to find
the actual death record of one person in particular: Johanna GRUNBAUM
(nee FURST). According to the geni.com profile, she is buried in Kormend
cemetery. We know the date she died (February 18, 1916). However,
although I looked twice, I cannot find her death record in the
familysearch.org civil records for Kormend. I have also looked in
Szombathely and in little villages adjacent to Kormend (most of which
only have very recent records that do not go back to 1916.

It would appear she died outside Kormend, then her remains were returned
to Kormend to be buried near family. I assume she was in a larger city
for medical treatment in a good hospital, where she passed away, but I
also assume the cit had to be not far away. Initially, my assumption was
that the only city nearby that offered a decent hospital would be
Szombathely. Is that assumption incomplete? How far did people transport
the bodies of the deceased in those days to return them to family burial
grounds?

What I am wondering is this: How far afield should I be looking for her
death record? In 1916 is it conceivable that someone went, say, to
Vienna, for treatment, passed away there, then was returned back to
Kormend? Budapest?

Rather than look in every corner of Austro-Hungary, perhaps h-siggers
can weigh in on their suggestions for the best strategy/approach for
where to look?

I began this inquiry with Ben Schoenbrun, who made the following
comments: "I would find the towns in the surrounding area and see which
ones were in the same rabbinate as Kormend. Check the 1877 Gazetteer or
the pre-1895 records and look at the death records for the towns where
they record burials in Kormend."

So I will begin to look in the pre-1895 records, as he suggests. But I
also wanted to run the problem by all of you and see if any of you had
any other suggestions. Perhaps somewhere there is a Kormend Rabbinate
document that lists all the communities served which could guide me? But
this would not solve the problem if she died in a big(ger) city hospital
and had her remains brought back to Kormend after death.

Regards,

David

Moderator: Please respond off-list unless you have info on resources or research
techniques that may be of general interest.


JGS of Maryland November 19 program announcement #general

Susan Steeble
 

Speaker: Professor Tyler Anbinder
Title: "Jewish Immigrants in New York's Lower East Side"
Date and Time: Sunday, November 19, 2017, 1:30 p.m.
Location: Pikesville Library's meeting room, 1301 Reisterstown Rd,
Pikesville, MD

Please join us on Sunday, November 19, 2017, at 1:30 p.m. at the
Pikesville Library's meeting room, 1301 Reisterstown Road, Pikesville,
for our next program: "Jewish Immigrants in New York's Lower East
Side," presented by Professor Tyler Anbinder. The Lower East Side of
New York was the first American home for several million Jewish
immigrants who arrived in the United States in the late 19th and early
20th centuries. This lecture, taken >from Professor Anbinder's 2016
book City of Dreams, will recount why immigrant Jews made the Lower
East Side their home, what life was like there, and how and why Jews
eventually left the area to live elsewhere. Prof. Anbinder will also
explain why he decided to make his own immigrant ancestors part of the
book's narrative and the role genealogists played in helping him
uncover their stories.

Tyler Anbinder is a professor of history at George Washington
University, where since 1994 he has taught the history of American
immigration and the U.S. Civil War. He is the author of three
award-winning books: Nativism and Slavery: The Northern Know Nothings
and the Politics of the 1850s (1992); Five Points: The
Nineteenth-Century New York Neighborhood that Invented Tap Dance,
Stole Elections, and Became the World's Most Notorious Slum (2001),
and City of Dreams: The 400-Year Epic History of Immigrant New York
(2016). He has won fellowships and grants >from the National Endowment
for the Humanities and held the Fulbright Commission's Thomas
Jefferson Distinguished Chair in American History at the University of
Utrecht. His research has won awards >from the Organization of American
Historians, the Columbia University School of Journalism, the editors
of Civil War History, and the New York Society Library.

The program is free for paid members and $5 for non-members (applied
to membership fee when a visitor joins JGSMD) after their first
meeting. Refreshments will be available. Please check our web site at
www.jgsmd.org for late updates and for the time, location, and program
of future meetings.

Susan Steeble
JGSMD Public Relations


JGS NY Meeting #general

Harriet Mayer
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society (NY) Meeting Sunday November 19

Time: 2:00 PM
Place: Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16 St., New York

Program: "Sleuthing in Yiddish: The Yiddish Forward as a Source for Family
History Information"

Speaker: Samuel Norich

In this presentation, Samuel Norich, president of the Forward Association, the
not-for-profit publisher of the Forward and the Forverts, will provide an
overview of the role the Yiddish Forward has played for American Jews for the
past 120 years. He will examine the features and innovations that made it the
most widely read Jewish publication in the world for the first six decades of
the 20th century, and now make it a resource for historians and others delving
into the Jewish communities of America and Europe of those times.

Samuel Norich has distinguished himself as an analyst of American Jewry's
communal structures. He is the author of "What Will Bind Us Now? a report on
the institutional ties between Israel and American Jewry." He was vice-president
of the World Jewish Congress >from 1975 to 1981. >from 1980 to 1992, he was
executive director of the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. During his
two-decade tenure as chief executive of the Forward Association,its publications
broadened their reach, raised their already acclaimed journalistic quality, and
took the lead among American Jewish publications in meeting the challenges and
capitalizing on the opportunities of digital media.

Born in a Displaced Persons camp in Germany in 1947, the son of Polish Jews, he
emigrated to the U.S. with his family in 1957. He was educated at Columbia
University, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and University of Wisconsin.

This program is co-sponsored by YIVO.
The Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at CJH will be open starting at
11 AM.

Free for members of JGS and YIVO; guests welcome, $5 at the door.

More information available at our website- www.jgsny.org - or on our Facebook
page.

Submitted by
Harriet Mayer
JGS NY VP Communications
New York NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of Maryland November 19 program announcement #general

Susan Steeble
 

Speaker: Professor Tyler Anbinder
Title: "Jewish Immigrants in New York's Lower East Side"
Date and Time: Sunday, November 19, 2017, 1:30 p.m.
Location: Pikesville Library's meeting room, 1301 Reisterstown Rd,
Pikesville, MD

Please join us on Sunday, November 19, 2017, at 1:30 p.m. at the
Pikesville Library's meeting room, 1301 Reisterstown Road, Pikesville,
for our next program: "Jewish Immigrants in New York's Lower East
Side," presented by Professor Tyler Anbinder. The Lower East Side of
New York was the first American home for several million Jewish
immigrants who arrived in the United States in the late 19th and early
20th centuries. This lecture, taken >from Professor Anbinder's 2016
book City of Dreams, will recount why immigrant Jews made the Lower
East Side their home, what life was like there, and how and why Jews
eventually left the area to live elsewhere. Prof. Anbinder will also
explain why he decided to make his own immigrant ancestors part of the
book's narrative and the role genealogists played in helping him
uncover their stories.

Tyler Anbinder is a professor of history at George Washington
University, where since 1994 he has taught the history of American
immigration and the U.S. Civil War. He is the author of three
award-winning books: Nativism and Slavery: The Northern Know Nothings
and the Politics of the 1850s (1992); Five Points: The
Nineteenth-Century New York Neighborhood that Invented Tap Dance,
Stole Elections, and Became the World's Most Notorious Slum (2001),
and City of Dreams: The 400-Year Epic History of Immigrant New York
(2016). He has won fellowships and grants >from the National Endowment
for the Humanities and held the Fulbright Commission's Thomas
Jefferson Distinguished Chair in American History at the University of
Utrecht. His research has won awards >from the Organization of American
Historians, the Columbia University School of Journalism, the editors
of Civil War History, and the New York Society Library.

The program is free for paid members and $5 for non-members (applied
to membership fee when a visitor joins JGSMD) after their first
meeting. Refreshments will be available. Please check our web site at
www.jgsmd.org for late updates and for the time, location, and program
of future meetings.

Susan Steeble
JGSMD Public Relations


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS NY Meeting #general

Harriet Mayer
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society (NY) Meeting Sunday November 19

Time: 2:00 PM
Place: Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16 St., New York

Program: "Sleuthing in Yiddish: The Yiddish Forward as a Source for Family
History Information"

Speaker: Samuel Norich

In this presentation, Samuel Norich, president of the Forward Association, the
not-for-profit publisher of the Forward and the Forverts, will provide an
overview of the role the Yiddish Forward has played for American Jews for the
past 120 years. He will examine the features and innovations that made it the
most widely read Jewish publication in the world for the first six decades of
the 20th century, and now make it a resource for historians and others delving
into the Jewish communities of America and Europe of those times.

Samuel Norich has distinguished himself as an analyst of American Jewry's
communal structures. He is the author of "What Will Bind Us Now? a report on
the institutional ties between Israel and American Jewry." He was vice-president
of the World Jewish Congress >from 1975 to 1981. >from 1980 to 1992, he was
executive director of the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. During his
two-decade tenure as chief executive of the Forward Association,its publications
broadened their reach, raised their already acclaimed journalistic quality, and
took the lead among American Jewish publications in meeting the challenges and
capitalizing on the opportunities of digital media.

Born in a Displaced Persons camp in Germany in 1947, the son of Polish Jews, he
emigrated to the U.S. with his family in 1957. He was educated at Columbia
University, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and University of Wisconsin.

This program is co-sponsored by YIVO.
The Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at CJH will be open starting at
11 AM.

Free for members of JGS and YIVO; guests welcome, $5 at the door.

More information available at our website- www.jgsny.org - or on our Facebook
page.

Submitted by
Harriet Mayer
JGS NY VP Communications
New York NY


Information requested? #ukraine

Steve Pitnick <cfmgpm@...>
 

Requesting any information possible about the town in Eastern Europe now Ukraine called medvin. During the years 1880-1925 when my relatives migrated to the USA.

Their surname at the time was at the pyategerski not sure of the spelling?
Steve Pitnick
cfmgpm@aol.com

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please sign all posts with your name and location. Check the JewishGen FamilyFinder (www.jewishgen.org/JGFF) and see if there is information there.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Information requested? #ukraine

Steve Pitnick <cfmgpm@...>
 

Requesting any information possible about the town in Eastern Europe now Ukraine called medvin. During the years 1880-1925 when my relatives migrated to the USA.

Their surname at the time was at the pyategerski not sure of the spelling?
Steve Pitnick
cfmgpm@aol.com

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please sign all posts with your name and location. Check the JewishGen FamilyFinder (www.jewishgen.org/JGFF) and see if there is information there.


Translation request - Polish. Thanks! #general

Dan Miodownik
 

Dear friends,

I've posted a vital record in Polish for which I need a translation. It

is on ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM61280

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM61281

Please respond via the form provided in ViewMate.

I am very grateful for what help anyone can provide.

Thank you very much.

Dan Miodownik


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Translation request - Polish. Thanks! #general

Dan Miodownik
 

Dear friends,

I've posted a vital record in Polish for which I need a translation. It

is on ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM61280

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM61281

Please respond via the form provided in ViewMate.

I am very grateful for what help anyone can provide.

Thank you very much.

Dan Miodownik


Call for Papers (Abstract Proposal System) #courland #latvia

Dan Oren <iajgs2018@...>
 

The IAJGS 2018 Warsaw Conference is delighted to announce that the
Call-for-Papers (Abstract Proposal System) will be open for submittals
from 15 Nov 2017 through 31 Dec 2017. We will issue a formal
announcement when the actual opening occurs, but here is a brief
description of the types of presentations that we will be looking for:
1) Presentations: A one-hour timeslot dedicated to about 45
minutes of lecture with about 15 minutes of question & answers, with
PowerPoint, film or other illustrative component.
2) Short Presentations: A 30-minute timeslot dedicated to a
20-minute presentation on a novel genealogy research project that you
are working on that could benefit others: a slide show of your visit
to a shtetl; or the explanation of how you accomplished a genealogy
special find (like how you found your grandparents' marriage record
when everyone said it couldn't be done).
Note: It may be preferable for a BOF (Birds of a Feather Group) to
forgo having a BOF meeting this summer and instead use this 30-minute
format for a meeting of Landsleit to share a previous or prepare for
an upcoming shtetl trip.
3) Computer Workshop: A 2-hour program dedicated to a guided
tour of and training on how to use a website, function or software
application on a computer.
4) Panel Discussion: A one-hour timeslot dedicated to combining
several people or topics in an interactive format between panelists,
such as a discussion among experts in a related field.
This conference will take place in Warsaw; however, the presentations
most sought after might be focused on Resources, Empires, Jewish
Culture/History and Keepers of Jewish Communal Memory or Historic
Sites in Central and Eastern Europe.
The Program Committee will accept approximately 120 one-hour
lectures/panels and approximately 50 short presentations. The Abstract
Proposal System will be linked to the Conference home page
when the time comes. Stay tuned!

Dan Oren
Listserv Communications liaison for the IAJGS August 5-10, 2018 Warsaw
Conference Program Committee


Courland SIG #Courland #Latvia Call for Papers (Abstract Proposal System) #courland #latvia

Dan Oren <iajgs2018@...>
 

The IAJGS 2018 Warsaw Conference is delighted to announce that the
Call-for-Papers (Abstract Proposal System) will be open for submittals
from 15 Nov 2017 through 31 Dec 2017. We will issue a formal
announcement when the actual opening occurs, but here is a brief
description of the types of presentations that we will be looking for:
1) Presentations: A one-hour timeslot dedicated to about 45
minutes of lecture with about 15 minutes of question & answers, with
PowerPoint, film or other illustrative component.
2) Short Presentations: A 30-minute timeslot dedicated to a
20-minute presentation on a novel genealogy research project that you
are working on that could benefit others: a slide show of your visit
to a shtetl; or the explanation of how you accomplished a genealogy
special find (like how you found your grandparents' marriage record
when everyone said it couldn't be done).
Note: It may be preferable for a BOF (Birds of a Feather Group) to
forgo having a BOF meeting this summer and instead use this 30-minute
format for a meeting of Landsleit to share a previous or prepare for
an upcoming shtetl trip.
3) Computer Workshop: A 2-hour program dedicated to a guided
tour of and training on how to use a website, function or software
application on a computer.
4) Panel Discussion: A one-hour timeslot dedicated to combining
several people or topics in an interactive format between panelists,
such as a discussion among experts in a related field.
This conference will take place in Warsaw; however, the presentations
most sought after might be focused on Resources, Empires, Jewish
Culture/History and Keepers of Jewish Communal Memory or Historic
Sites in Central and Eastern Europe.
The Program Committee will accept approximately 120 one-hour
lectures/panels and approximately 50 short presentations. The Abstract
Proposal System will be linked to the Conference home page
when the time comes. Stay tuned!

Dan Oren
Listserv Communications liaison for the IAJGS August 5-10, 2018 Warsaw
Conference Program Committee

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