Date   

Shtetl Love Song (Journey into Litvakland) #southafrica

Saul Issroff
 

This is a reminder to anyone in the London area that the book launch of
Grigory Kanovich's shtetl Love Song is on 29 November, 2017.

SHTETL LOVE SONG
29 November 2017 at 19.00pm
Venue: Central Synagogue, 36 Hallam Street, London W1W 6NW

Noir Press, along with Spiro Ark and Central Synagogue are delighted
to invite you to the launch of Grigory Kanovich's award winning novel
SHTETL LOVE SONG. Join the son of the writer, Sergey Kanovich, plus
musicians who will bring a flavour of the Lithuanian 'Shtetl'.
Featuring Arjan Byron - Soprano, Stefan Byron - Piano, and Yoav Oved -
Tenor.

Shtetl Love Song is Grigory Kanovich's moving autobiographical novel
about growing up in a small Lithuanian town before the Second World
War.

Grigory Kanovich is Lithuania's most prominent writer, winner of the
Lithuanian National Prize for Culture and Arts. A play based on his
novels will be shown at London's Barbican Theatre, featuring an
all-star Russian cast.

The author's family will be attending and presenting memories >from the
Shtetl, plus readings >from the book and a concert of Yiddish songs and
a classical recital by Lukas Geniusas, silver medallist 2010 Chopin
Piano Competition and 2015 Tchaikovsky Competition.

Book Now: www.spiroark.org or 020 7794 4655: Tickets =C2=A310

The book can be ordered >from Noir Press (Lithuanian fiction in
translation), www.noirpress.co.uk/ or any bookseller

Saul Issroff
London

I have no commercial interest in this book.


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Shtetl Love Song (Journey into Litvakland) #southafrica

Saul Issroff
 

This is a reminder to anyone in the London area that the book launch of
Grigory Kanovich's shtetl Love Song is on 29 November, 2017.

SHTETL LOVE SONG
29 November 2017 at 19.00pm
Venue: Central Synagogue, 36 Hallam Street, London W1W 6NW

Noir Press, along with Spiro Ark and Central Synagogue are delighted
to invite you to the launch of Grigory Kanovich's award winning novel
SHTETL LOVE SONG. Join the son of the writer, Sergey Kanovich, plus
musicians who will bring a flavour of the Lithuanian 'Shtetl'.
Featuring Arjan Byron - Soprano, Stefan Byron - Piano, and Yoav Oved -
Tenor.

Shtetl Love Song is Grigory Kanovich's moving autobiographical novel
about growing up in a small Lithuanian town before the Second World
War.

Grigory Kanovich is Lithuania's most prominent writer, winner of the
Lithuanian National Prize for Culture and Arts. A play based on his
novels will be shown at London's Barbican Theatre, featuring an
all-star Russian cast.

The author's family will be attending and presenting memories >from the
Shtetl, plus readings >from the book and a concert of Yiddish songs and
a classical recital by Lukas Geniusas, silver medallist 2010 Chopin
Piano Competition and 2015 Tchaikovsky Competition.

Book Now: www.spiroark.org or 020 7794 4655: Tickets =C2=A310

The book can be ordered >from Noir Press (Lithuanian fiction in
translation), www.noirpress.co.uk/ or any bookseller

Saul Issroff
London

I have no commercial interest in this book.


Journey into Litvakland #southafrica

Olga Zabludoff
 

I have just finished reading a book which should be read by all
Litvaks who wish to experience life in a Lithuanian shtetl during the
19th-20th centuries.

Shtetl Love Song, an autobiographical novel by Grigory Kanovich, is a
masterpiece produced by a writer whose genius shines through every
page. For all Litvaks this book is a journey into their ancestral
homeland. The story ends as World War 2 breaks out on June 22, 1941,
providing a glimpse into the terrifying days as the Germans invade
Lithuania. Chilling images of the Lithuanian Activist Front (LAF) with
their white armbands are prelude to the collaboration of local
Lithuanians with the German Nazis in the almost total annihilation of
the Jewish population. In contrast, the reader is shown in earlier
pages of the book the close bonds that often exist between the Jews
and the Lithuanian gentiles in the shtetl of Jonava, in which the
story is set.

Kanovich is a brilliant storyteller, a creator of characters whose
impressions live on in one's memory, and a philosopher whose
observations, via the dialogue of his characters, are like rare jewels
in simple language. The prose is seasoned with satirical humor,
expressed at times through the reversal of roles, wherein the
itinerant beggar of the shtetl may utter words that are wiser than
those of the rabbi.

Kanovich, who now lives in Israel, is one of Lithuania's most
prominent writers -- the recipient of the Lithuanian National Prize
for Culture and Arts in 2014. Shtetl Love Song, published originally
in Russian, is available on-line.

(I have no commercial interest in the book; just want to share my pleasure.)

Olga Zabludoff


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Journey into Litvakland #southafrica

Olga Zabludoff
 

I have just finished reading a book which should be read by all
Litvaks who wish to experience life in a Lithuanian shtetl during the
19th-20th centuries.

Shtetl Love Song, an autobiographical novel by Grigory Kanovich, is a
masterpiece produced by a writer whose genius shines through every
page. For all Litvaks this book is a journey into their ancestral
homeland. The story ends as World War 2 breaks out on June 22, 1941,
providing a glimpse into the terrifying days as the Germans invade
Lithuania. Chilling images of the Lithuanian Activist Front (LAF) with
their white armbands are prelude to the collaboration of local
Lithuanians with the German Nazis in the almost total annihilation of
the Jewish population. In contrast, the reader is shown in earlier
pages of the book the close bonds that often exist between the Jews
and the Lithuanian gentiles in the shtetl of Jonava, in which the
story is set.

Kanovich is a brilliant storyteller, a creator of characters whose
impressions live on in one's memory, and a philosopher whose
observations, via the dialogue of his characters, are like rare jewels
in simple language. The prose is seasoned with satirical humor,
expressed at times through the reversal of roles, wherein the
itinerant beggar of the shtetl may utter words that are wiser than
those of the rabbi.

Kanovich, who now lives in Israel, is one of Lithuania's most
prominent writers -- the recipient of the Lithuanian National Prize
for Culture and Arts in 2014. Shtetl Love Song, published originally
in Russian, is available on-line.

(I have no commercial interest in the book; just want to share my pleasure.)

Olga Zabludoff


Re: Myszyniec, Poland #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Joel Ives wrote:
Looking for vital records for Myszyniec, Poland. (Mishenitz - Yiddish)
Does anyone know if these records exist and where they can be accessed?


Joel,

Myszyniec Jewish community records didn't survive. You may review 197 records,
mostly grooms or brides that have been born in Myszyniec, and listed within nearby
Lomza, Nowogrod, Rajgrod, Ostrow Mazowiecka and Ostroleka records. In JRI-P
database please conduct search by town name (Myszyniec).

In addition, please review names of Jewish business people listed in 1929
Poland business directory, the direct link:
http://data.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/1929/loadtop.htm?0140

Not only records didn't survive: Jewish cemetery, synagogue, and Hassidic
shibel have been also destroyed.

Only a plaque that was erected in 2016 is a memory of one vibrant Jewish community.
https://sztetl.org.pl/sites/default/files/styles/photo-hires/public/image_115556.jpg?itok=ZNBk1hRO
(MODERATOR: https://tinyurl.com/ybl9hco9 )

Contrary to official Polish claims that synagogues and cemetery were destroyed by
Germans during WWII, it appears that locals were involvrd in destruction of
cemetery and synagogue in Myszyniec, and in the nearby towns.

In 2001 article in on-line Polish language "Zwoje", about Shtetls in northern part
of Masovia (Mazowsze) region, there few photographs related to cemetery and
synagogues in the region

http://www.zwoje-scrolls.com/zwoje31/text10p.htm

The last remaining matseva was located in the local resident backyard:

In the Jewish cemeteries website, the entry for Myszyniec says that in the
60ies the were numerous matsewot located in the cemetery but they were
removed by local for their construction projects. Tombs were dug and bones have
been scattered in search for gold teeth and jewellery.

http://www.kirkuty.xip.pl/myszyniec.htm

Best,

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Myszyniec, Poland #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Joel Ives wrote:
Looking for vital records for Myszyniec, Poland. (Mishenitz - Yiddish)
Does anyone know if these records exist and where they can be accessed?


Joel,

Myszyniec Jewish community records didn't survive. You may review 197 records,
mostly grooms or brides that have been born in Myszyniec, and listed within nearby
Lomza, Nowogrod, Rajgrod, Ostrow Mazowiecka and Ostroleka records. In JRI-P
database please conduct search by town name (Myszyniec).

In addition, please review names of Jewish business people listed in 1929
Poland business directory, the direct link:
http://data.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/1929/loadtop.htm?0140

Not only records didn't survive: Jewish cemetery, synagogue, and Hassidic
shibel have been also destroyed.

Only a plaque that was erected in 2016 is a memory of one vibrant Jewish community.
https://sztetl.org.pl/sites/default/files/styles/photo-hires/public/image_115556.jpg?itok=ZNBk1hRO
(MODERATOR: https://tinyurl.com/ybl9hco9 )

Contrary to official Polish claims that synagogues and cemetery were destroyed by
Germans during WWII, it appears that locals were involvrd in destruction of
cemetery and synagogue in Myszyniec, and in the nearby towns.

In 2001 article in on-line Polish language "Zwoje", about Shtetls in northern part
of Masovia (Mazowsze) region, there few photographs related to cemetery and
synagogues in the region

http://www.zwoje-scrolls.com/zwoje31/text10p.htm

The last remaining matseva was located in the local resident backyard:

In the Jewish cemeteries website, the entry for Myszyniec says that in the
60ies the were numerous matsewot located in the cemetery but they were
removed by local for their construction projects. Tombs were dug and bones have
been scattered in search for gold teeth and jewellery.

http://www.kirkuty.xip.pl/myszyniec.htm

Best,

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


Re: town of Breslavik? #general

Phyllis Kramer
 

Micah Salb posted:
"I am researching family who reportedly came >from "Breslavik, Poland".
Does anyone know of that town?"

Micah, sounds like you may have seen the town name in a document or heard it >from
family. I'm not sure if I've located the right town...but I found 3 possibilities.

I began the search with our JewishGen Community pages...these are towns with Jewish
presence circa 1900

First Breslaw, now in Belarus, was in Kovno Russian-Poland, then Wilno Poland
between the wars, now in Belarus. the Yiddish pronounciation was Breslev. I would
look at the links for this town on JewishGen's town page...follow the links,
especially look at the other genners registerred on JGFF. Also there is a
kehilalinks page. Breslaw has nothing on JRIP but Routes to Roots
(RTRfoundation.org) has a number of different records (census, holocaust, tax
lists); be sure to query in RTR using the soundex...

Second possibiity is Wroclaw, Poland aka Breslau, which was in Prussia, now in
Poland...this town had a very large Jewish population. There are a number of
records indexed on Jewish Records Indexing (JRI-Poland)...and on RTR, and over one
thousand registerred genners are researching this town.

The third possibility is Voroshylivka, known by the Jews as Varshilevke (B and V
sound alike);this town was in the Podalia Province in the Russian empire, today in
the Ukraine. It was never in Poland.

What i would begin with is the census...what did these folks say their birth
country was in 1910? 1920, 1930? This would differentiate the towns by their
governmental history. Next look for manifests and naturalizations, passports and
visas, drafts and other key documents to pinpoint the family and the town. And
then, once you find the town, add your surname and town to our JGFF so that others
can find you!

hope this helps
Phyllis Kramer, New York City, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
V.P.Education, JewishGen Inc: https://www.JewishGen.org/education
Researching (all Galicia) ...KRAMER, BEIM >from Jasienica Rosielna
...SCHEINER, KANDEL >from Strzyzow & Dubiecko
...LINDNER, EICHEL >from Rohatyn, Burstyn
...STECHER, TRACHMAN >from Nowy Zmigrod, Dukla
family web site: https://KehilaLinks.JewishGe


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: town of Breslavik? #general

Phyllis Kramer
 

Micah Salb posted:
"I am researching family who reportedly came >from "Breslavik, Poland".
Does anyone know of that town?"

Micah, sounds like you may have seen the town name in a document or heard it >from
family. I'm not sure if I've located the right town...but I found 3 possibilities.

I began the search with our JewishGen Community pages...these are towns with Jewish
presence circa 1900

First Breslaw, now in Belarus, was in Kovno Russian-Poland, then Wilno Poland
between the wars, now in Belarus. the Yiddish pronounciation was Breslev. I would
look at the links for this town on JewishGen's town page...follow the links,
especially look at the other genners registerred on JGFF. Also there is a
kehilalinks page. Breslaw has nothing on JRIP but Routes to Roots
(RTRfoundation.org) has a number of different records (census, holocaust, tax
lists); be sure to query in RTR using the soundex...

Second possibiity is Wroclaw, Poland aka Breslau, which was in Prussia, now in
Poland...this town had a very large Jewish population. There are a number of
records indexed on Jewish Records Indexing (JRI-Poland)...and on RTR, and over one
thousand registerred genners are researching this town.

The third possibility is Voroshylivka, known by the Jews as Varshilevke (B and V
sound alike);this town was in the Podalia Province in the Russian empire, today in
the Ukraine. It was never in Poland.

What i would begin with is the census...what did these folks say their birth
country was in 1910? 1920, 1930? This would differentiate the towns by their
governmental history. Next look for manifests and naturalizations, passports and
visas, drafts and other key documents to pinpoint the family and the town. And
then, once you find the town, add your surname and town to our JGFF so that others
can find you!

hope this helps
Phyllis Kramer, New York City, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
V.P.Education, JewishGen Inc: https://www.JewishGen.org/education
Researching (all Galicia) ...KRAMER, BEIM >from Jasienica Rosielna
...SCHEINER, KANDEL >from Strzyzow & Dubiecko
...LINDNER, EICHEL >from Rohatyn, Burstyn
...STECHER, TRACHMAN >from Nowy Zmigrod, Dukla
family web site: https://KehilaLinks.JewishGe


Re: Finding a person with in a census ad/ed? #general

A. E. Jordan
 

I had asked any of the search tools let you specify a census AD/ED and search for
people within that area?

A lot of people suggested the tools on the Morse One Step page but that only lets
you find the AD/ED if you already know the address. Often it gives you multiple
AD/ED to look at and sometimes misses entirely. Morse does not have a tool that
combines the AD ED and the name.

It's a little complicated multi-step process but someone figured out the missing
piece and as it turns out it is simple. If you know the Assembly District if you
type of example "Bronx Assembly District 1" just like that with the quotes in the
keyword search it works on Ancestry.

So how do you use that?

I had an address for a person as a witness on a naturalization >from 1920 but a
search for the person using the name on Ancestry with the borough was not turning
him up. I did not have his age or his wife or anything like that since all I have
was the witness name but he was the brother of the person being naturalized.

I used the Morse One Step tool to find the Assembly District but it was giving me
several targets based on the cross streets I supplied and the Census when I tried
to scan the pages was very scatter. The street numbers did not seem to be in order
even when they were recorded the street in question and they kept moving >from that
street to another, etc. and to make matters worse I was looking for a common name
GOLDSTEIN.

So here's my suggested search step.

Use the address in question and the tools of the maps or the Morse One Step and get
the target Assembly District.

On Ancestry I filled in the last name, put the place the person lived as Brooklyn
to which it suggests Brooklyn, Kings County, NY which I accepted. And in the
keyword field I put in the "Assembly District X" information and the search brings
the person right up as the second result in question. By looking at the census I
could confirm he was living at the same address he gave on his witness statement
for the naturalization.

Now I have his wife's name, children's name, age, etc.

I am sure it will not always work but I am going to remember this as another
search trick for hard to find people.

Thanks to everyone who messaged me.

Allan Jordan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Finding a person with in a census ad/ed? #general

A. E. Jordan
 

I had asked any of the search tools let you specify a census AD/ED and search for
people within that area?

A lot of people suggested the tools on the Morse One Step page but that only lets
you find the AD/ED if you already know the address. Often it gives you multiple
AD/ED to look at and sometimes misses entirely. Morse does not have a tool that
combines the AD ED and the name.

It's a little complicated multi-step process but someone figured out the missing
piece and as it turns out it is simple. If you know the Assembly District if you
type of example "Bronx Assembly District 1" just like that with the quotes in the
keyword search it works on Ancestry.

So how do you use that?

I had an address for a person as a witness on a naturalization >from 1920 but a
search for the person using the name on Ancestry with the borough was not turning
him up. I did not have his age or his wife or anything like that since all I have
was the witness name but he was the brother of the person being naturalized.

I used the Morse One Step tool to find the Assembly District but it was giving me
several targets based on the cross streets I supplied and the Census when I tried
to scan the pages was very scatter. The street numbers did not seem to be in order
even when they were recorded the street in question and they kept moving >from that
street to another, etc. and to make matters worse I was looking for a common name
GOLDSTEIN.

So here's my suggested search step.

Use the address in question and the tools of the maps or the Morse One Step and get
the target Assembly District.

On Ancestry I filled in the last name, put the place the person lived as Brooklyn
to which it suggests Brooklyn, Kings County, NY which I accepted. And in the
keyword field I put in the "Assembly District X" information and the search brings
the person right up as the second result in question. By looking at the census I
could confirm he was living at the same address he gave on his witness statement
for the naturalization.

Now I have his wife's name, children's name, age, etc.

I am sure it will not always work but I am going to remember this as another
search trick for hard to find people.

Thanks to everyone who messaged me.

Allan Jordan


Post Trip to Ancestral Places in Moldova and Transnistra #bessarabia

Lily Bogash Kohn <fergiecat@...>
 

Adrienne,

On the Conference Facebook page there is a spreadsheet with people looking to take post and/or pre
conference trips, and where, with contact info. Personally I am planning on going to Moldova so please
check the spreadsheet and let's connect.

Lily BOGASH KOHN
Seattle, Washington

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: 2018 IAJGS International Conference in Warsaw-Feasibility of Pre or Post Trip to Ancestral Places in Moldova and Transnistra
From: "Yefim Kogan" <yefimk@verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 18 Nov 2017 19:58:13 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

Adrienne,

That would be a great trip, but I am not sure that I can be of much help.  I
am going to be in Warsaw, but not planning trip to Moldova.

You probably know people who organized trips of some of our members.  There
is an article at Travel Section of our Bessarabia SIG website with names of
people who may help.

I would suggest you to take some leadership position and ask at Bessarabia
SIG discussion group and also at Facebook who may want to go, and that would
be a good start.

Let me know if I can be of any help.

I wish you all the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator

-----Original Message-----
From: Bessarabia SIG [mailto:bessarabia@lyris.jewishgen.org]
Sent: Saturday, August 5, 2017 4:19 PM
To: Bessarabia SIG <bessarabia@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Subject: 2018 IAJGS International Conference in Warsaw-Feasibility of Pre or
Post Trip to Ancestral Places in Moldova and Transnistra

How feasible would it be to have a group trip organized for those of us who
would like to visit our ancestors' homes in Moldova and possibly
Transnistra?

If feasible, how would you recommend we do it? A preferred tour
organization? Through IAJGS? Other?

Thanks.

Adrienne  Escoe


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Post Trip to Ancestral Places in Moldova and Transnistra #bessarabia

Lily Bogash Kohn <fergiecat@...>
 

Adrienne,

On the Conference Facebook page there is a spreadsheet with people looking to take post and/or pre
conference trips, and where, with contact info. Personally I am planning on going to Moldova so please
check the spreadsheet and let's connect.

Lily BOGASH KOHN
Seattle, Washington

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: 2018 IAJGS International Conference in Warsaw-Feasibility of Pre or Post Trip to Ancestral Places in Moldova and Transnistra
From: "Yefim Kogan" <yefimk@verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 18 Nov 2017 19:58:13 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

Adrienne,

That would be a great trip, but I am not sure that I can be of much help.  I
am going to be in Warsaw, but not planning trip to Moldova.

You probably know people who organized trips of some of our members.  There
is an article at Travel Section of our Bessarabia SIG website with names of
people who may help.

I would suggest you to take some leadership position and ask at Bessarabia
SIG discussion group and also at Facebook who may want to go, and that would
be a good start.

Let me know if I can be of any help.

I wish you all the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator

-----Original Message-----
From: Bessarabia SIG [mailto:bessarabia@lyris.jewishgen.org]
Sent: Saturday, August 5, 2017 4:19 PM
To: Bessarabia SIG <bessarabia@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Subject: 2018 IAJGS International Conference in Warsaw-Feasibility of Pre or
Post Trip to Ancestral Places in Moldova and Transnistra

How feasible would it be to have a group trip organized for those of us who
would like to visit our ancestors' homes in Moldova and possibly
Transnistra?

If feasible, how would you recommend we do it? A preferred tour
organization? Through IAJGS? Other?

Thanks.

Adrienne  Escoe


Re: Rozenberg's from Karczew/Lodz #general

charles goldenzon
 

Looking for grandchildren or ggrandchildren of Icek ROZENBERG (b 1864, G ra
Kalwaria, Mazowieckie, Poland / d 1919 Karczew, Poland ) and Maryjem Jochwet SZTEIN
(b 1873, G ra Kalwaria, Mazowieckie, Poland). In 1919, following Icek's death in
Karczew, Maryjem Jochwet and the children moved to Lodz.

Apart >from Sara Malka who came to Brazil in the 1930's,their other children were:
Hersz Majer Rozenberg (b 1901, Karczew), Szulim Berek Rozenberg (b 1904), Golda
Rozenberg (b 1912, Karczew) and another girl whose name is yet unknown to me. I
would like to know if any of these other 4 children survived the war and made it
elsewhere.

Please respond privately with any contact information.

Regards,

Charles Goldenzon
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Rozenberg's from Karczew/Lodz #general

charles goldenzon
 

Looking for grandchildren or ggrandchildren of Icek ROZENBERG (b 1864, G ra
Kalwaria, Mazowieckie, Poland / d 1919 Karczew, Poland ) and Maryjem Jochwet SZTEIN
(b 1873, G ra Kalwaria, Mazowieckie, Poland). In 1919, following Icek's death in
Karczew, Maryjem Jochwet and the children moved to Lodz.

Apart >from Sara Malka who came to Brazil in the 1930's,their other children were:
Hersz Majer Rozenberg (b 1901, Karczew), Szulim Berek Rozenberg (b 1904), Golda
Rozenberg (b 1912, Karczew) and another girl whose name is yet unknown to me. I
would like to know if any of these other 4 children survived the war and made it
elsewhere.

Please respond privately with any contact information.

Regards,

Charles Goldenzon
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil


Published genealogy source - Rabbi Getz #rabbinic

Macbook Air <mehadrin@...>
 

Rabbi Elyakim Getz served as rabbi in Hildesheim and died in 1705, he
published a book titled Rapduni Betapuchim [literally Heal me with
Apples] (this title was later used in an Englishe version by a New
York Times food critic) and a responsa work titled Avnei Hashoham. His
works were reprinted by a descendant Rabbi Pinchas Zelig Glicksman in
Lodz in 1937 with a lengthy family tree.

The book is available to anyone with access to the Otzar online library,
Rabbi Glicksman also wrote a biography of Rabbi Getz which he published
in 1936. It is available on hebrewbooks.org and is full of genealogical
information. I found Rabbi Glicksman to be an extremely careful
genealogist who evaluates each source before deciding which tradition to
accept.

Hillel Maggid-Steinschneider in his book Ir Vilna (which is also full of
genealogical footnotes) theorizes that Rabbi Elyakum Getz was the father-
in-law of Rabbi Raphael Spitz of Vilna (formerly of Vienna), a brother of
an ancestor of mine. If this is so there would be a familial connection.

The famed chassidic Rebbe, Rabbi Yeshaye of Przedborz, a leading disciple
of the Seer of Lublin was a grandson of Rabbi Getz.

Maybe this is useful to some rabbinical researchers.

Avrohom Marmorstein NYC
searching more ancestral families than I can list


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Published genealogy source - Rabbi Getz #rabbinic

Macbook Air <mehadrin@...>
 

Rabbi Elyakim Getz served as rabbi in Hildesheim and died in 1705, he
published a book titled Rapduni Betapuchim [literally Heal me with
Apples] (this title was later used in an Englishe version by a New
York Times food critic) and a responsa work titled Avnei Hashoham. His
works were reprinted by a descendant Rabbi Pinchas Zelig Glicksman in
Lodz in 1937 with a lengthy family tree.

The book is available to anyone with access to the Otzar online library,
Rabbi Glicksman also wrote a biography of Rabbi Getz which he published
in 1936. It is available on hebrewbooks.org and is full of genealogical
information. I found Rabbi Glicksman to be an extremely careful
genealogist who evaluates each source before deciding which tradition to
accept.

Hillel Maggid-Steinschneider in his book Ir Vilna (which is also full of
genealogical footnotes) theorizes that Rabbi Elyakum Getz was the father-
in-law of Rabbi Raphael Spitz of Vilna (formerly of Vienna), a brother of
an ancestor of mine. If this is so there would be a familial connection.

The famed chassidic Rebbe, Rabbi Yeshaye of Przedborz, a leading disciple
of the Seer of Lublin was a grandson of Rabbi Getz.

Maybe this is useful to some rabbinical researchers.

Avrohom Marmorstein NYC
searching more ancestral families than I can list


Anyone visiting East Ham Cemetery? #unitedkingdom

Beverley Davis
 

I would be extremely grateful if someone could kindly take photographs
of the circa1940s graves of my uncle and his wife at the East Ham Jewish
cemetery for me. I have the exact locations, but do not know if either of
them have an existing gravestone (but I'm hoping that they do!)

Please reply privately to avoid duplication of effort, and so that I can
provide the details.

Beverley Davis
Melbourne, Australia


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Anyone visiting East Ham Cemetery? #unitedkingdom

Beverley Davis
 

I would be extremely grateful if someone could kindly take photographs
of the circa1940s graves of my uncle and his wife at the East Ham Jewish
cemetery for me. I have the exact locations, but do not know if either of
them have an existing gravestone (but I'm hoping that they do!)

Please reply privately to avoid duplication of effort, and so that I can
provide the details.

Beverley Davis
Melbourne, Australia


Finding a person with in a census ad/ed? #general

A. E. Jordan
 

This might be odd, but do any of the search tools let you specify a census AD/ED
and search for people within that area?

I have the name of the person and the address they were living at on a 1920
naturalization paper. They are the witness not the person naturalizing. The
address is one of those lovely street names that shows in multiple parts of New
York City but no longer exists today.

Through some detective work and subterfuge I have the AD/ED but I am looking for a
fairly common name and I do not see it or the actual address on a first scan of the
1920 Census.

What I am hoping is that one of the search tools lets me specify the AD/ED to
search and then I can play with it to see if they are in fact living in that area.

Any thoughts?

Thank you

Allan Jordan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Finding a person with in a census ad/ed? #general

A. E. Jordan
 

This might be odd, but do any of the search tools let you specify a census AD/ED
and search for people within that area?

I have the name of the person and the address they were living at on a 1920
naturalization paper. They are the witness not the person naturalizing. The
address is one of those lovely street names that shows in multiple parts of New
York City but no longer exists today.

Through some detective work and subterfuge I have the AD/ED but I am looking for a
fairly common name and I do not see it or the actual address on a first scan of the
1920 Census.

What I am hoping is that one of the search tools lets me specify the AD/ED to
search and then I can play with it to see if they are in fact living in that area.

Any thoughts?

Thank you

Allan Jordan

52641 - 52660 of 663816