Date   

Jewish Experiences During WWI - Second Call for Papers #galicia

Gesher Galicia SIG
 

The Galitzianer, Gesher Galicia's quarterly research journal, plans to
publish a series of articles related to Jewish experiences during
World War I (WWI). Their unifying theme will be Galicia during WWI
(1914-1918) and in the immediate period after the war.

We invite members and non-members of Gesher Galicia to share their
family stories, short scholarly reviews and other accounts of the war.
Topics could include: Jewish military service; civilian life during
the war; the experiences of refugees; deportations to Russia; the
military campaigns across Galicia.

Prior to submission, prospective authors are encouraged to contact
Joshua Grayson at <serieseditor@geshergalicia.org>, with a brief
description of their proposal. All accepted articles will undergo
editorial review and revisions to conform to the style of the journal.

For information regarding the Galitzianer, including general
instructions for authors, please see:
<https://www.geshergalicia.org/the-galitzianer/>.


Andrew Zalewski
Editor, the Galitzianer
The Quarterly Research Journal of Gesher Galicia
www.geshergalicia.org


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Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Jewish Experiences During WWI - Second Call for Papers #galicia

Gesher Galicia SIG
 

The Galitzianer, Gesher Galicia's quarterly research journal, plans to
publish a series of articles related to Jewish experiences during
World War I (WWI). Their unifying theme will be Galicia during WWI
(1914-1918) and in the immediate period after the war.

We invite members and non-members of Gesher Galicia to share their
family stories, short scholarly reviews and other accounts of the war.
Topics could include: Jewish military service; civilian life during
the war; the experiences of refugees; deportations to Russia; the
military campaigns across Galicia.

Prior to submission, prospective authors are encouraged to contact
Joshua Grayson at <serieseditor@geshergalicia.org>, with a brief
description of their proposal. All accepted articles will undergo
editorial review and revisions to conform to the style of the journal.

For information regarding the Galitzianer, including general
instructions for authors, please see:
<https://www.geshergalicia.org/the-galitzianer/>.


Andrew Zalewski
Editor, the Galitzianer
The Quarterly Research Journal of Gesher Galicia
www.geshergalicia.org


---
PLEASE DO NOT REPLY TO THIS EMAIL ADDRESS.
Send all inquiries to info@geshergalicia.org
---


Re: Polish grammar question #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Marty Meyers wrote:

I'm looking at pre-1826 Polish marriage records and have a question that most
likely lies in the grammar.

If a witness is listed at the stryj, I know he is the paternal uncle. Brata is
similarly the brother.

How do I tell if he is the paternal uncle (or brother) of the bride or groom? Is
it the way stryj is conjugated (M or F) or is there an adjacent word that
specifies who the relationship is with? My browsing the internet and Shea and
Hoffman have come up empty.
Marty,

Polish Family Realationship terms are indeed sophisticated.

Go to Jewish Records Indexing - Poland (JRI-P) site at:

http://jri-poland.org/jriplweb.htm
Select >from the header "Learn"
When windows opens, select "Additional Resources and help Tips", and finally
under "Language Resources" click on "Polish Family Relationship Terms".

Best

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Polish grammar question #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Marty Meyers wrote:

I'm looking at pre-1826 Polish marriage records and have a question that most
likely lies in the grammar.

If a witness is listed at the stryj, I know he is the paternal uncle. Brata is
similarly the brother.

How do I tell if he is the paternal uncle (or brother) of the bride or groom? Is
it the way stryj is conjugated (M or F) or is there an adjacent word that
specifies who the relationship is with? My browsing the internet and Shea and
Hoffman have come up empty.
Marty,

Polish Family Realationship terms are indeed sophisticated.

Go to Jewish Records Indexing - Poland (JRI-P) site at:

http://jri-poland.org/jriplweb.htm
Select >from the header "Learn"
When windows opens, select "Additional Resources and help Tips", and finally
under "Language Resources" click on "Polish Family Relationship Terms".

Best

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor


Re: Question on Married Women's Surnames (and Children's) #galicia

Suzan Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

Linda,

What a good question! Mark's response is excellent but I'd like to add
a couple of thoughts. After WWI officially ended, there continued to
be a civil war between Poles and Ukrainians for some time and so the
area was unsettled and chaotic. This likely contributed to the fact that,
after Galicia came under Polish rule, the former territory of Galicia
tended to operate much as it had before for quite a while. Even the
forms that captured vital events looked much like they did pre-war.
While I don't know what Polish law in the 1920s had to say about the
topic, I have to assume that people who had official Austrian papers
were obligated to use the form of name that appeared on those papers.
And, then, of course, pre-war birth records would have noted whether
or not the parents had a recognized marriage.

Suzan Wynne

===

Mark Halpern <mark@halpern.com> wrote:

My understanding of the regulations relating to the naming of children
is as follows.

If the couple had a ritual/religious marriage which was not recognized
by the civil authorities, the child was to bear his/her mother's surname.

If the couple had a civil marriage, either before having the child or
even later, the child was to bear the father's surname.

The problem you raise is that towns and even different registrars in
these registration towns were inconsistent in applying the rules. I do
not know why, but I have seen a number of examples. In my father's
registration town of Kozlow, I looked at births over a 5 or 6 year
period in the 1880s. There were three different registrars, identified
by their handwriting, who handled this issue of illegitimate births (no
civil marriage) completely differently. And some of the registrars
handled the situation differently within the same year when they were
the only registrar. And, in the majority of entries in many towns, there
are no surname listed for a child in his or her birth record.

===

Linda Beth Chism <chism.linda@gmail.com> wrote:

Hello, a question on surnames of Jewish married women in 1900 era.
In the Galicia Jewish communities, it seems many women in the
Records did not take their husbands surname. In the families I am
researching, Feldhorn and Margulies, (Tarnopol and Lwow) in one
family some of the sons were Feldhorn and some Margulies in the
various Records, but all had the same two parents.

I can understand the split between religious and civil marriage
causing different legal surnames in the parents, but I would welcome
help to understand the custom of children's surnames, and also to
understand the custom of married women's surnames and how they
referred to themselves in daily life. Thank you!


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Question on Married Women's Surnames (and Children's) #galicia

Suzan Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

Linda,

What a good question! Mark's response is excellent but I'd like to add
a couple of thoughts. After WWI officially ended, there continued to
be a civil war between Poles and Ukrainians for some time and so the
area was unsettled and chaotic. This likely contributed to the fact that,
after Galicia came under Polish rule, the former territory of Galicia
tended to operate much as it had before for quite a while. Even the
forms that captured vital events looked much like they did pre-war.
While I don't know what Polish law in the 1920s had to say about the
topic, I have to assume that people who had official Austrian papers
were obligated to use the form of name that appeared on those papers.
And, then, of course, pre-war birth records would have noted whether
or not the parents had a recognized marriage.

Suzan Wynne

===

Mark Halpern <mark@halpern.com> wrote:

My understanding of the regulations relating to the naming of children
is as follows.

If the couple had a ritual/religious marriage which was not recognized
by the civil authorities, the child was to bear his/her mother's surname.

If the couple had a civil marriage, either before having the child or
even later, the child was to bear the father's surname.

The problem you raise is that towns and even different registrars in
these registration towns were inconsistent in applying the rules. I do
not know why, but I have seen a number of examples. In my father's
registration town of Kozlow, I looked at births over a 5 or 6 year
period in the 1880s. There were three different registrars, identified
by their handwriting, who handled this issue of illegitimate births (no
civil marriage) completely differently. And some of the registrars
handled the situation differently within the same year when they were
the only registrar. And, in the majority of entries in many towns, there
are no surname listed for a child in his or her birth record.

===

Linda Beth Chism <chism.linda@gmail.com> wrote:

Hello, a question on surnames of Jewish married women in 1900 era.
In the Galicia Jewish communities, it seems many women in the
Records did not take their husbands surname. In the families I am
researching, Feldhorn and Margulies, (Tarnopol and Lwow) in one
family some of the sons were Feldhorn and some Margulies in the
various Records, but all had the same two parents.

I can understand the split between religious and civil marriage
causing different legal surnames in the parents, but I would welcome
help to understand the custom of children's surnames, and also to
understand the custom of married women's surnames and how they
referred to themselves in daily life. Thank you!


Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) Webinar Schedule #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Board for Certification of Genealogist (BCG) is again offering a series
of webinars which are free. They are available through Legacy Family Tree
Webinars which is now part of the MyHeritage family of companies. BCG's
webinars are held on the third Tuesday of each month at 8 p.m. Eastern Time
Zone. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing
information about joining the webinar. The webinars on Legacy Family Tree
are free at the time of the webinar and for 7 days thereafter. Following
the free access period there is a minor charge (~$10.00 USD +shipping) for
accessing the webinar.

The Board for Certification of Genealogists mantra says they promote public
confidence in genealogy by supporting uniform standards of competence and
strives to provide educational opportunities to family historians of all
levels of experience.

To see the list of webinars go to: https://familytreewebinars.com/BCG

I have no affiliation with the BCG, Legacy Family Tree Webinars nor
MyHeritage and am posting this solely for the information of the user.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) Webinar Schedule #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Board for Certification of Genealogist (BCG) is again offering a series
of webinars which are free. They are available through Legacy Family Tree
Webinars which is now part of the MyHeritage family of companies. BCG's
webinars are held on the third Tuesday of each month at 8 p.m. Eastern Time
Zone. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing
information about joining the webinar. The webinars on Legacy Family Tree
are free at the time of the webinar and for 7 days thereafter. Following
the free access period there is a minor charge (~$10.00 USD +shipping) for
accessing the webinar.

The Board for Certification of Genealogists mantra says they promote public
confidence in genealogy by supporting uniform standards of competence and
strives to provide educational opportunities to family historians of all
levels of experience.

To see the list of webinars go to: https://familytreewebinars.com/BCG

I have no affiliation with the BCG, Legacy Family Tree Webinars nor
MyHeritage and am posting this solely for the information of the user.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


(US) Ancestor Hunt Updates Its Jewish Newspaper Collection #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Ancestor Hunt has many newspaper collections which I have posted about
previously, including Jewish Newspapers. They recently updated their
Jewish-American newspaper collection which may be found at:
http://www.theancestorhunt.com/blog/historic-jewish-american-newspapers-online#Wl0nI3lG2Uk
[MOD. NOTE: shortened URL - https://goo.gl/xHRfQ9 ]

Most are free but a few do require a paid subscription or a login >from a
university library. Some are indexed, and some are not. The newspapers that
are listed are all available online. There are many Jewish newspapers that
have not been digitized.

I would also recommend looking at their digitized collection of newspapers
by state at: http://www.theancestorhunt.com/newspaper-research-links.html

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (US) Ancestor Hunt Updates Its Jewish Newspaper Collection #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Ancestor Hunt has many newspaper collections which I have posted about
previously, including Jewish Newspapers. They recently updated their
Jewish-American newspaper collection which may be found at:
http://www.theancestorhunt.com/blog/historic-jewish-american-newspapers-online#Wl0nI3lG2Uk
[MOD. NOTE: shortened URL - https://goo.gl/xHRfQ9 ]

Most are free but a few do require a paid subscription or a login >from a
university library. Some are indexed, and some are not. The newspapers that
are listed are all available online. There are many Jewish newspapers that
have not been digitized.

I would also recommend looking at their digitized collection of newspapers
by state at: http://www.theancestorhunt.com/newspaper-research-links.html

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Re: Mount Sinai Cemetery - Is that Machpelah and, if so, how do you find a grave? #general

David Oseas <doseas{nospam}@...>
 

On 1/14/2018 11:11 AM, Allan Jordan aejordan@aol.com wrote:

Does anyone have any experience with Machpelah if I am correct that they are
the same. I believe it is abandon, so how do you locate graves?
Unfortunately, according to a post on Interment.net
http://www.interment.net/data/us/ny/queens/machpelah-cemetery.htm ,
there doesn't appear to be any way to obtain records >from Machpelah.

Regards,
David Oseas

Researching:
HYMAN/HEYMAN/HEIMOWITS/CHAJMOVITS: Zemplen-Dobra, Hungary > New York
KLEIN: Satoraljaujhely (Ujhely), Hungary > New York > Los Angeles
OSEAS/OSIAS/OSIASI/OZIAS: Iasi, Romania > Chicago > Milwaukee > Los Angeles
SCHECHTER/SCHACHTER: Odessa, Ukraine > New York
SHERMAN: Iasi, Romania > New York > Los Angeles; STECKER: New York > Florida
WICHMAN: Syczkowo (Bobruisk), Belarus > Milwaukee > Los Angeles


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Mount Sinai Cemetery - Is that Machpelah and, if so, how do you find a grave? #general

David Oseas <doseas{nospam}@...>
 

On 1/14/2018 11:11 AM, Allan Jordan aejordan@aol.com wrote:

Does anyone have any experience with Machpelah if I am correct that they are
the same. I believe it is abandon, so how do you locate graves?
Unfortunately, according to a post on Interment.net
http://www.interment.net/data/us/ny/queens/machpelah-cemetery.htm ,
there doesn't appear to be any way to obtain records >from Machpelah.

Regards,
David Oseas

Researching:
HYMAN/HEYMAN/HEIMOWITS/CHAJMOVITS: Zemplen-Dobra, Hungary > New York
KLEIN: Satoraljaujhely (Ujhely), Hungary > New York > Los Angeles
OSEAS/OSIAS/OSIASI/OZIAS: Iasi, Romania > Chicago > Milwaukee > Los Angeles
SCHECHTER/SCHACHTER: Odessa, Ukraine > New York
SHERMAN: Iasi, Romania > New York > Los Angeles; STECKER: New York > Florida
WICHMAN: Syczkowo (Bobruisk), Belarus > Milwaukee > Los Angeles


Subj: ViewMate translation request - German #germany

Jeffrey Herrmann
 

I've posted a short book excerpt in German for which I need a full
translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM63652

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
< ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ >
Please thank those who help you and support ViewMate, JewishGen
and GerSIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/Honors/
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/honors.asp

Thank you very much. Jeffrey Herrmann


German SIG #Germany Subj: ViewMate translation request - German #germany

Jeffrey Herrmann
 

I've posted a short book excerpt in German for which I need a full
translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM63652

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
< ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ >
Please thank those who help you and support ViewMate, JewishGen
and GerSIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/Honors/
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/honors.asp

Thank you very much. Jeffrey Herrmann


Trying to find the GITTERMAN's from Leova. #bessarabia

David Dubin <ddubin@...>
 

My paternal grandfather's mother, my father's grandmother [my great grandmother]'s was named
Fannie DUBIN. Her maiden (nee) name was either GUITTERMAN or GITTERMAN.

The below source material is through http://www.MyHeritage.com and http://www.geni.com, which
is through http//www.ancestry.com which is through the: Cook County, Illinois, United States of
America Marriages Index 1871-1920; Northern District of Illinois Naturalization Index 1926-1979;
Illinois Federal Naturalization Index 1856-1991; United States of America Naturalization Records
Index 1791-1992 through the Indexed in World Archives Project; United States of America World
War I (The Great War) Draft Registration Cards 1917-1918; and several United States Censuses.

Fannie was born on March 8, 1889, and according to Form N-406 (Old 2204 L-B) U.S. DEPARTMENT
OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE (Edition of 1-13-41) 16-19460 No.
260570 220 UNITED STATES OF AMERICA PETITION FOR NATURALIZATION [Of a Married Person,
under Sec. 310(a) of the Nationality Act of 1940 (54 Stat. 1144-1145)]. Fannie came >from Leova,
Russia, which today is called Leova, Moldova. I don't know if she came >from the city or village of
Leova itself or the Leova, District. She left Rotterdam, Holland, Netherlands as Feige GITTERMAN
on the SS Nieuw Amsterdam and arrived in New York, New York, United States of America on
July 10, 1911, and eventually ended up in Chicago, where I live.

Fannie was married to Lukim (in Yiddish) Morris (Americanized English name) thus, my paternal
grandfather's father, my father's grandfather [my great grandfather] born on July 10, 1892, Leova,
Russia, which is today Leova, Moldova. They were married on October 21, 1911, in Chicago, Cook
County, Illinois, United States of America.

According to another document, her name was Fegia could have been born on March 8, 1887. Her
parents, thus my paternal grandfather's grandmother, my father's great-grandmother
[my great-great- grandmother]'s was named Rachel GITTERMAN and her husband is my paternal
grandfather's grandfather, my father's great-grandfather [my great-great-grandfather]'s was named
Chyail GITTERMAN. Fannie had a sister named Tina maiden (nee) GITTERMAN married to Sam
GROOBMAN (Senior or the First [I]) and an unknown brother GITTERMAN. After Lukim (in Yiddish)
Morris (Americanized English name) passed away, Fannie married Abe ZEIDENBERG, thus becoming
Fannie Zeidenberg or Fannie DUBIN ZEIDENBERG.

I am trying to find out how Fannie went >from Leova to Rotterdam as well as and if I could go back even
further. It seems the records stop with Rachel and Chyail.

Thank you all in advance for your help,

David DUBIN >from Chicago, Illinois

P.S. I did send a similar email to arhivosp@gmail.com, arhiva.national@gmail.com,
serviciul.arhiva@gmail.com, and servicedestat@arhiva.gov.md

MODERATOR NOTE - Please reply directly to sender unless your comments may be relevant
to others in our SIG


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Trying to find the GITTERMAN's from Leova. #bessarabia

David Dubin <ddubin@...>
 

My paternal grandfather's mother, my father's grandmother [my great grandmother]'s was named
Fannie DUBIN. Her maiden (nee) name was either GUITTERMAN or GITTERMAN.

The below source material is through http://www.MyHeritage.com and http://www.geni.com, which
is through http//www.ancestry.com which is through the: Cook County, Illinois, United States of
America Marriages Index 1871-1920; Northern District of Illinois Naturalization Index 1926-1979;
Illinois Federal Naturalization Index 1856-1991; United States of America Naturalization Records
Index 1791-1992 through the Indexed in World Archives Project; United States of America World
War I (The Great War) Draft Registration Cards 1917-1918; and several United States Censuses.

Fannie was born on March 8, 1889, and according to Form N-406 (Old 2204 L-B) U.S. DEPARTMENT
OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE (Edition of 1-13-41) 16-19460 No.
260570 220 UNITED STATES OF AMERICA PETITION FOR NATURALIZATION [Of a Married Person,
under Sec. 310(a) of the Nationality Act of 1940 (54 Stat. 1144-1145)]. Fannie came >from Leova,
Russia, which today is called Leova, Moldova. I don't know if she came >from the city or village of
Leova itself or the Leova, District. She left Rotterdam, Holland, Netherlands as Feige GITTERMAN
on the SS Nieuw Amsterdam and arrived in New York, New York, United States of America on
July 10, 1911, and eventually ended up in Chicago, where I live.

Fannie was married to Lukim (in Yiddish) Morris (Americanized English name) thus, my paternal
grandfather's father, my father's grandfather [my great grandfather] born on July 10, 1892, Leova,
Russia, which is today Leova, Moldova. They were married on October 21, 1911, in Chicago, Cook
County, Illinois, United States of America.

According to another document, her name was Fegia could have been born on March 8, 1887. Her
parents, thus my paternal grandfather's grandmother, my father's great-grandmother
[my great-great- grandmother]'s was named Rachel GITTERMAN and her husband is my paternal
grandfather's grandfather, my father's great-grandfather [my great-great-grandfather]'s was named
Chyail GITTERMAN. Fannie had a sister named Tina maiden (nee) GITTERMAN married to Sam
GROOBMAN (Senior or the First [I]) and an unknown brother GITTERMAN. After Lukim (in Yiddish)
Morris (Americanized English name) passed away, Fannie married Abe ZEIDENBERG, thus becoming
Fannie Zeidenberg or Fannie DUBIN ZEIDENBERG.

I am trying to find out how Fannie went >from Leova to Rotterdam as well as and if I could go back even
further. It seems the records stop with Rachel and Chyail.

Thank you all in advance for your help,

David DUBIN >from Chicago, Illinois

P.S. I did send a similar email to arhivosp@gmail.com, arhiva.national@gmail.com,
serviciul.arhiva@gmail.com, and servicedestat@arhiva.gov.md

MODERATOR NOTE - Please reply directly to sender unless your comments may be relevant
to others in our SIG


Slovakia #austria-czech

yvonnesaba@...
 

Hi I am looking for records >from Slovakia families taken by Nazis. Is there any website?

Thank you

Yvonne


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Slovakia #austria-czech

yvonnesaba@...
 

Hi I am looking for records >from Slovakia families taken by Nazis. Is there any website?

Thank you

Yvonne


death index Deutschkreutz #austria-czech

Traude Triebel
 

The Oesterreichische Juedische Museum www.ojm.at has on his site the death
index for Deutschkreutz (former West Hungary, Sopronkeresztur,
Nemetkeresztur) for the years May 1833 to July 1895 online, 1 237 entries
It is the first publication!
http://www.ojm.at/blog/indizes/sterbeindex-deutschkreutz-1833-1895/
the index is searchable not only by name, but by all headers and in
different combinations!!
Please think about the different spellings through the years, e.g. Sinai,
Siney,..Schwarz, Schwartz, Schvartz,.. Guensberg(er), Ginsberg,...
The years 1853, 1855, 1856, 1857, 1858, 1859 und 1869 do not exist

Thanks to Johannes Reiss and his staff

Traude Triebel
Austria


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech death index Deutschkreutz #austria-czech

Traude Triebel
 

The Oesterreichische Juedische Museum www.ojm.at has on his site the death
index for Deutschkreutz (former West Hungary, Sopronkeresztur,
Nemetkeresztur) for the years May 1833 to July 1895 online, 1 237 entries
It is the first publication!
http://www.ojm.at/blog/indizes/sterbeindex-deutschkreutz-1833-1895/
the index is searchable not only by name, but by all headers and in
different combinations!!
Please think about the different spellings through the years, e.g. Sinai,
Siney,..Schwarz, Schwartz, Schvartz,.. Guensberg(er), Ginsberg,...
The years 1853, 1855, 1856, 1857, 1858, 1859 und 1869 do not exist

Thanks to Johannes Reiss and his staff

Traude Triebel
Austria

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