Date   

Re: Is there a Jewish DNA data base for searches? #dna

The Gateway Team <gateway808@...>
 

Hello.
I have just discovered that I  am at least part Jewish. I never knew and
the surprise is still settling in. It began with a DNA test that found I
was ten percent Ashkenazi Jew. That's not much, but it is a total surprise
and a very happy discovery.

I uploaded my DNA results to Ged Match and the overwhelming amount of 3rd,
4th, 5th cousins located in the New York Metropolitan area- with a large
dash of rabbis in the mix.

This led me to seeking out the history of my great grandparents, but almost
nothing is known of them. Great grandfather was a Bartz >from Russia whose
land was taken during the Deportation of Germans circa 1914. His wife,
Annie (Anna?) Luks came >from Poland. Other than that, there seems no way to
trace them further back. We have no names of their fathers or mothers, nor
even the villages they came from.

However, through the DNA comparisons on GedMatch, I may be able to find
closer matches, and they may know more.  This has been such a proud moment
for our entire family.  And very surprising.

Is there a DNA data base specifically for Jewish searches?  
Hello everyone... nice to meet you here!
Suzanne Olsson
Jacksonville, Florida


DNA Research #DNA Re: Is there a Jewish DNA data base for searches? #dna

The Gateway Team <gateway808@...>
 

Hello.
I have just discovered that I  am at least part Jewish. I never knew and
the surprise is still settling in. It began with a DNA test that found I
was ten percent Ashkenazi Jew. That's not much, but it is a total surprise
and a very happy discovery.

I uploaded my DNA results to Ged Match and the overwhelming amount of 3rd,
4th, 5th cousins located in the New York Metropolitan area- with a large
dash of rabbis in the mix.

This led me to seeking out the history of my great grandparents, but almost
nothing is known of them. Great grandfather was a Bartz >from Russia whose
land was taken during the Deportation of Germans circa 1914. His wife,
Annie (Anna?) Luks came >from Poland. Other than that, there seems no way to
trace them further back. We have no names of their fathers or mothers, nor
even the villages they came from.

However, through the DNA comparisons on GedMatch, I may be able to find
closer matches, and they may know more.  This has been such a proud moment
for our entire family.  And very surprising.

Is there a DNA data base specifically for Jewish searches?  
Hello everyone... nice to meet you here!
Suzanne Olsson
Jacksonville, Florida


Benny MERDLER in New York #general

Ella Welther
 

Hi,
I am looking for any information about Benny ( probably Berl ) MERDLER
born about 1873 to Marcus Merdler and Fanny Wasserman.
Benny married July 1913 in New York Clara Segale.
According to Campulung Birth Records Merdler (Moerdler) Marcus aka
Hendzel or Hedzel and Fanny aka Feige Wassermann had also following
children:
Silke born 1870
first name unknown born 1873
Moses born 1874
Melech born 1877
My guess is that Silke, unknown, Moses and Melech are Benny's siblings.
I would like to find out if there are descendants of any of them.
Sincerely,
Hannelore Condiescu
France


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Benny MERDLER in New York #general

Ella Welther
 

Hi,
I am looking for any information about Benny ( probably Berl ) MERDLER
born about 1873 to Marcus Merdler and Fanny Wasserman.
Benny married July 1913 in New York Clara Segale.
According to Campulung Birth Records Merdler (Moerdler) Marcus aka
Hendzel or Hedzel and Fanny aka Feige Wassermann had also following
children:
Silke born 1870
first name unknown born 1873
Moses born 1874
Melech born 1877
My guess is that Silke, unknown, Moses and Melech are Benny's siblings.
I would like to find out if there are descendants of any of them.
Sincerely,
Hannelore Condiescu
France


STEVENS RIVLIN #general

Jules Feldman
 

I will be grateful for information on and/or contact with a Mr D. J.
STEVENS, or his family, who probably live in the UK.
His mother was Florence Ann nee RIVLIN, known as "Florry", born in 1910 in
Wales and passed away in 1996.
Thanks,
Jules Feldman,
Kibbutz Yizreel

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


Marriage Between First Cousins #ukraine

David Jacobs <djacobs@...>
 

On April 30, N. Ried asked about marriage between first cousins


My maternal grandparents were first cousins; their mothers were
sisters. They were married in the US shortly after my grandfather
sent enough money for my grandmother to come. I wondered why they
didn't marry in Russia, but the probable explanation is that my
grandfather had to leave Russia in a hurry to avoid serving in the
Russo-Japanese war.
I asked a rabbi whether first cousin marriage was ok under Jewish law.
She said it is ok. Then recently I read a biography of Zeev Jabotinsky.
It said his parents could not marry in Russia because it was illegal
in Czarist Russia. If cousins in Odessa did marry perhaps the rabbi
had no problems with it, and the civil authorities were not informed.
Interestingly, according to Wikipedia, first cousin marriage is
illegal in some states in the US. My grandparents were married in
Philadelphia and first cousin marriage is illegal in Pennsylvania.
In Indiana where I grew up and my grandparents lived first cousin
marriages are void. Maybe the laws in the early 20th century were
different or probably when they arrived in the US around 1905
they never asked.

David Jacobs
Framingham, Massachusetts
Forman and Rader, Cherkassy and Kremenchug

Subject: marriages between first cousins
From: njried@...
Date: Mon, 30 Apr 2018 11:24:01 +0200
X-Message-Number: 1

Shalom,

In my tree, I have two examples of first cousins marrying each other,
both in Odessa
First people born respectively in 1856 and 1856, >from a bourgeois,
rather assimilated background, and later two of their children, born
in 1888 and 1892, both marrying two sisters, again their first
cousins.
Thankfully, the third brother, my grandfather, found a bride outside
the family!

Since Odessa was home to a huge community, offering lots of socially
compatible matches, I have been trying to find a reason for these
repeated marriages.
Do you have similar examples? Does anyone know how these marriages
were considered in Orthodox and liberal circles at the time?


I would be very grateful for any example, lead or anecdote.

Thanks a lot in advance,

N. Ried


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen STEVENS RIVLIN #general

Jules Feldman
 

I will be grateful for information on and/or contact with a Mr D. J.
STEVENS, or his family, who probably live in the UK.
His mother was Florence Ann nee RIVLIN, known as "Florry", born in 1910 in
Wales and passed away in 1996.
Thanks,
Jules Feldman,
Kibbutz Yizreel

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Marriage Between First Cousins #ukraine

David Jacobs <djacobs@...>
 

On April 30, N. Ried asked about marriage between first cousins


My maternal grandparents were first cousins; their mothers were
sisters. They were married in the US shortly after my grandfather
sent enough money for my grandmother to come. I wondered why they
didn't marry in Russia, but the probable explanation is that my
grandfather had to leave Russia in a hurry to avoid serving in the
Russo-Japanese war.
I asked a rabbi whether first cousin marriage was ok under Jewish law.
She said it is ok. Then recently I read a biography of Zeev Jabotinsky.
It said his parents could not marry in Russia because it was illegal
in Czarist Russia. If cousins in Odessa did marry perhaps the rabbi
had no problems with it, and the civil authorities were not informed.
Interestingly, according to Wikipedia, first cousin marriage is
illegal in some states in the US. My grandparents were married in
Philadelphia and first cousin marriage is illegal in Pennsylvania.
In Indiana where I grew up and my grandparents lived first cousin
marriages are void. Maybe the laws in the early 20th century were
different or probably when they arrived in the US around 1905
they never asked.

David Jacobs
Framingham, Massachusetts
Forman and Rader, Cherkassy and Kremenchug

Subject: marriages between first cousins
From: njried@...
Date: Mon, 30 Apr 2018 11:24:01 +0200
X-Message-Number: 1

Shalom,

In my tree, I have two examples of first cousins marrying each other,
both in Odessa
First people born respectively in 1856 and 1856, >from a bourgeois,
rather assimilated background, and later two of their children, born
in 1888 and 1892, both marrying two sisters, again their first
cousins.
Thankfully, the third brother, my grandfather, found a bride outside
the family!

Since Odessa was home to a huge community, offering lots of socially
compatible matches, I have been trying to find a reason for these
repeated marriages.
Do you have similar examples? Does anyone know how these marriages
were considered in Orthodox and liberal circles at the time?


I would be very grateful for any example, lead or anecdote.

Thanks a lot in advance,

N. Ried


Looking for town Krivoi Ossen, Russia about 1920 #general

Alberto Guido Chester
 

I am looking for the place of origin of a relative whose name was
Yasbitzky (sp).

The oral records >from the 1920's state the place as Krivoi Ossen.

I have found in Jewishgen databases

1. Krivoi could be Krivvi Rih (UKr) or Krivoy Roj (Rus)

2. Krivoi could be Krive Ozero (Ukr) or Krivoye Ozero (Rus)

Does the ending Ossen have any meaning?

Is one of both a possibility?

Any other suggestions?

PS:. Yabizky departed >from Bremen to Argentina and his ship brother
from the same town was named Dejtiar.
Thanks in advance

Alberto Guido Chester
Buenos Aires, Argentina


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for town Krivoi Ossen, Russia about 1920 #general

Alberto Guido Chester
 

I am looking for the place of origin of a relative whose name was
Yasbitzky (sp).

The oral records >from the 1920's state the place as Krivoi Ossen.

I have found in Jewishgen databases

1. Krivoi could be Krivvi Rih (UKr) or Krivoy Roj (Rus)

2. Krivoi could be Krive Ozero (Ukr) or Krivoye Ozero (Rus)

Does the ending Ossen have any meaning?

Is one of both a possibility?

Any other suggestions?

PS:. Yabizky departed >from Bremen to Argentina and his ship brother
from the same town was named Dejtiar.
Thanks in advance

Alberto Guido Chester
Buenos Aires, Argentina


ViewMate Request German Translation #general

Allan Karan
 

Greetings,

I've posted a birth certificate in German for which I need a translation.
It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM66583

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application or
directly to me.

Thank you very much.

Researching:
KARAN (CHARON, KHARON, KHARAKH, CHARACH) and KNIGER >from Kopyl; Grozovo;
Chepeli; Slutsk, Belarus, PERSKY >from Kremenchuk, Ukraine EPSTEIN >from
Kobrin, Belarus

Allan S. Karan
White Plains, NY
@akaran


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate Request German Translation #general

Allan Karan
 

Greetings,

I've posted a birth certificate in German for which I need a translation.
It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM66583

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application or
directly to me.

Thank you very much.

Researching:
KARAN (CHARON, KHARON, KHARAKH, CHARACH) and KNIGER >from Kopyl; Grozovo;
Chepeli; Slutsk, Belarus, PERSKY >from Kremenchuk, Ukraine EPSTEIN >from
Kobrin, Belarus

Allan S. Karan
White Plains, NY
@akaran


Viewmate requests - short translations of Yiddish #general

Jeff Miller
 

I've posted four sentences >from the backs of two family picture postcards,
the first two are >from the first postcard and the third and fourth are from
the second postcard, all in Yiddish, for which I need translations.
The four are on Viewmate at the following addresses...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM66559
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM66560
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM66561
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM66562

What I know about the two picture postcards is the majority in my album
relate to my Fraider family >from Ukraine. My grandmother Jennie (Shayndl)
Fraider married Mordechai/Mottel/Max Mlynarz/Miller >from Ostroleka Poland
in New York in November 1916. At least one of the postcards has the year
1925 in the text.

I can determine >from the little I can read of the Yiddish that the town name
Ostroleka is mentioned. I don't know the context, and don't know the
identities of the persons depicted on the opposite sides of the postcards,
and have no knowledge of whether my grandparents knew each other or related
individuals >from the in-law families in Eastern Europe, so this might help
me determine the answers to some of these questions.

Please respond via the form provided in the Viewmate application.
Thank you very much.

Jeff Miller
Maryland

MODERATOR NOTE: The last of the four images is in Polish, not Yiddish.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Viewmate requests - short translations of Yiddish #general

Jeff Miller
 

I've posted four sentences >from the backs of two family picture postcards,
the first two are >from the first postcard and the third and fourth are from
the second postcard, all in Yiddish, for which I need translations.
The four are on Viewmate at the following addresses...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM66559
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM66560
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM66561
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM66562

What I know about the two picture postcards is the majority in my album
relate to my Fraider family >from Ukraine. My grandmother Jennie (Shayndl)
Fraider married Mordechai/Mottel/Max Mlynarz/Miller >from Ostroleka Poland
in New York in November 1916. At least one of the postcards has the year
1925 in the text.

I can determine >from the little I can read of the Yiddish that the town name
Ostroleka is mentioned. I don't know the context, and don't know the
identities of the persons depicted on the opposite sides of the postcards,
and have no knowledge of whether my grandparents knew each other or related
individuals >from the in-law families in Eastern Europe, so this might help
me determine the answers to some of these questions.

Please respond via the form provided in the Viewmate application.
Thank you very much.

Jeff Miller
Maryland

MODERATOR NOTE: The last of the four images is in Polish, not Yiddish.


ViewMate translation request - Russian #general

Mike Lazar <mike@...>
 

Hi,

I've posted two pages out my grandfathers Russian passport which appears
to have been issued on 31 Mar 1899. It's probably written in 'Old Russian'
so I'm told. There also appears to be a year, (possibly 1893), written on
the LH page. I'm not sure what this could be, particularly as he was only
15 in 1893!

The image of these two pages is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM66517

I'd just love it if someone was able to translate them for me.

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thanks very much.

Michael Lazar


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation request - Russian #general

Mike Lazar <mike@...>
 

Hi,

I've posted two pages out my grandfathers Russian passport which appears
to have been issued on 31 Mar 1899. It's probably written in 'Old Russian'
so I'm told. There also appears to be a year, (possibly 1893), written on
the LH page. I'm not sure what this could be, particularly as he was only
15 in 1893!

The image of these two pages is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM66517

I'd just love it if someone was able to translate them for me.

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thanks very much.

Michael Lazar


IAJGS Warsaw Conference Early Bird Deadline Extension *and* Notice of Special Lecture #sephardic

IAJGS Listserv Communications <iajgs2018@...>
 

The conference organizers are pleased to announce that the "Early
Bird" Registration deadline has been extended until 11:59 PM CDT this
coming Saturday, 5 May. To get the best rate for the full conference,
please register by Saturday. With the program now available on the
IAJGS Conference website iajgs2018.org and the schedule of SIG
luncheons now available there as well, this may be a good time to
register for the full conference. (Full conference registration rates
increase on Sunday. One and two day reservation rates remain the same.)

Further, the IAJGs 2018 Warsaw Conference Program Committee is
delighted to announce the addition of an intriguing new lecture by
Professor Jolanta Ambrosewicz-Jacobs of Jagiellonian University of
Krakow at our conference called:

Memory Conflicts in Poland Related to the Jewish Past & the Holocaust

This lecture addresses the current public discourse in Poland and will
occur on Tuesday, August 7th, 2018. The presentation includes an
evaluation of existing educational projects in Poland as they relate
to Jewish history and the Holocaust.

It is just one of the more than 200 special events occurring at the
next IAJGS 2018 Warsaw Conference, presented by approximately 170
lecturers and their colleagues >from at least 22 different countries!

Review the Preliminary Conference Schedule and other registation
details at iajgs2018.org and then join the more than 600 genealogists
who have already registered for the conference.

Sign up for our historic conference today and let us know that you are
coming so we can plan accordingly.

See you in Warsaw - August 5-10, 2018

Dan Oren
IAJGS 2018 Warsaw Conference Listserv Communications
Woodbridge, Connecticut USA


IAJGS Warsaw Conference Early Bird Deadline Extension *and* Notice of Special Lecture #yiddish

IAJGS Listserv Communications <iajgs2018@...>
 

The conference organizers are pleased to announce that the "Early
Bird" Registration deadline has been extended until 11:59 PM CDT this
coming Saturday, 5 May. To get the best rate for the full conference,
please register by Saturday. With the program now available on the
IAJGS Conference website iajgs2018.org and the schedule of SIG
luncheons now available there as well, this may be a good time to
register for the full conference. (Full conference registration rates
increase on Sunday. One and two day reservation rates remain the same.)

Further, the IAJGs 2018 Warsaw Conference Program Committee is
delighted to announce the addition of an intriguing new lecture by
Professor Jolanta Ambrosewicz-Jacobs of Jagiellonian University of
Krakow at our conference called:

Memory Conflicts in Poland Related to the Jewish Past & the Holocaust

This lecture addresses the current public discourse in Poland and will
occur on Tuesday, August 7th, 2018. The presentation includes an
evaluation of existing educational projects in Poland as they relate
to Jewish history and the Holocaust.

It is just one of the more than 200 special events occurring at the
next IAJGS 2018 Warsaw Conference, presented by approximately 170
lecturers and their colleagues >from at least 22 different countries!

Review the Preliminary Conference Schedule and other registation
details at iajgs2018.org and then join the more than 600 genealogists
who have already registered for the conference.

Sign up for our historic conference today and let us know that you are
coming so we can plan accordingly.

See you in Warsaw - August 5-10, 2018

Dan Oren
IAJGS 2018 Warsaw Conference Listserv Communications
Woodbridge, Connecticut USA


IAJGS Warsaw Conference Early Bird Deadline Extension *and* Notice of Special Lecture #yizkorbooks

IAJGS Listserv Communications <iajgs2018@...>
 

The conference organizers are pleased to announce that the "Early
Bird" Registration deadline has been extended until 11:59 PM CDT this
coming Saturday, 5 May. To get the best rate for the full conference,
please register by Saturday. With the program now available on the
IAJGS Conference website iajgs2018.org and the schedule of SIG
luncheons now available there as well, this may be a good time to
register for the full conference. (Full conference registration rates
increase on Sunday. One and two day reservation rates remain the same.)

Further, the IAJGs 2018 Warsaw Conference Program Committee is
delighted to announce the addition of an intriguing new lecture by
Professor Jolanta Ambrosewicz-Jacobs of Jagiellonian University of
Krakow at our conference called:

Memory Conflicts in Poland Related to the Jewish Past & the Holocaust

This lecture addresses the current public discourse in Poland and will
occur on Tuesday, August 7th, 2018. The presentation includes an
evaluation of existing educational projects in Poland as they relate
to Jewish history and the Holocaust.

It is just one of the more than 200 special events occurring at the
next IAJGS 2018 Warsaw Conference, presented by approximately 170
lecturers and their colleagues >from at least 22 different countries!

Review the Preliminary Conference Schedule and other registation
details at iajgs2018.org and then join the more than 600 genealogists
who have already registered for the conference.

Sign up for our historic conference today and let us know that you are
coming so we can plan accordingly.

See you in Warsaw - August 5-10, 2018

Dan Oren
IAJGS 2018 Warsaw Conference Listserv Communications
Woodbridge, Connecticut USA


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim IAJGS Warsaw Conference Early Bird Deadline Extension *and* Notice of Special Lecture #sephardic

IAJGS Listserv Communications <iajgs2018@...>
 

The conference organizers are pleased to announce that the "Early
Bird" Registration deadline has been extended until 11:59 PM CDT this
coming Saturday, 5 May. To get the best rate for the full conference,
please register by Saturday. With the program now available on the
IAJGS Conference website iajgs2018.org and the schedule of SIG
luncheons now available there as well, this may be a good time to
register for the full conference. (Full conference registration rates
increase on Sunday. One and two day reservation rates remain the same.)

Further, the IAJGs 2018 Warsaw Conference Program Committee is
delighted to announce the addition of an intriguing new lecture by
Professor Jolanta Ambrosewicz-Jacobs of Jagiellonian University of
Krakow at our conference called:

Memory Conflicts in Poland Related to the Jewish Past & the Holocaust

This lecture addresses the current public discourse in Poland and will
occur on Tuesday, August 7th, 2018. The presentation includes an
evaluation of existing educational projects in Poland as they relate
to Jewish history and the Holocaust.

It is just one of the more than 200 special events occurring at the
next IAJGS 2018 Warsaw Conference, presented by approximately 170
lecturers and their colleagues >from at least 22 different countries!

Review the Preliminary Conference Schedule and other registation
details at iajgs2018.org and then join the more than 600 genealogists
who have already registered for the conference.

Sign up for our historic conference today and let us know that you are
coming so we can plan accordingly.

See you in Warsaw - August 5-10, 2018

Dan Oren
IAJGS 2018 Warsaw Conference Listserv Communications
Woodbridge, Connecticut USA