Date   

Lodz Registration Cards Update - 130,000 Names #poland

Margalit Ashira Ir
 

Dear Researchers,

In anticipation of the 2018 International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy (IAJGS ) in Warsaw, the Lodz Registration Extraction Team is
pleased to announce the addition of 20,000 Jewish names now available
on the JRI-Poland website. This information was extracted >from the
Lodz Registration Cards 1916-1921.

To date, the total number of names and families identified and indexed
is 130,000. This could not have been accomplished without the
dedication of our international group of volunteers who we thank for
their continued passion and commitment these past 3 years.

Our marathon to complete The Lodz Registration Card Project continues
with 58% of the project complete. To expedite the work, we need your
help! We welcome additional volunteers to join our incredible group
and help move our program forward to total completion. Polish
language skills are not required.

Please Contact Margalit.a.Ir@gmail.com with your interest to join
this team.

Our volunteer team is extracting the cards in alphabetical order. If
you wish to prioritize the extraction of your family's name, a
donation of $54 per name will result in a quick and dedicated
spreadsheet for your use.

Margalit Ashira Ir
Lodz Registration Cards
Program Leader
JRI-POLAND


Query on Polish Words #poland

Richard Cooper
 

Does anyone know the answer to two questions arising >from a birth
record transcription on JRI-PL, please?

1) Might the given name Gecel be connected (kinnui etc) to Nahum?

2) What is the translation of paikacza (or palkacza) buznicznego? Is
it synagogue shamash?

TIA,
Richard Cooper (NB: Not related to any COOPERs!)
Midhurst, UK
MILLET, ENGELBERG, BLUMENKEHL, SUSSWEIN, WACKS & PITERZIL >from Tarnow,
Dabrowa Tarnowska and Lezajsk
LEZTER, SALENDER, RINENBERG, EISEN & KRAETTER >from Rzeszow and Kolbuszowa
YAROSHEVSKY, SHAPOCHNIKOW & GRANITUR >from Odessa and Zlatopol/Novomirgorod
LEWINSTEIN >from Berdichev
ADLER, FINKELSTEIN, PARYLLE, WEINTRAUB & ZILZ >from Tarnopol and Trembowla
BORENSTEIN, MATELEVITCH,GODZINSKIJ & ZIMNOWICZ and >from Warsaw and Radun


JRI Poland #Poland Lodz Registration Cards Update - 130,000 Names #poland

Margalit Ashira Ir
 

Dear Researchers,

In anticipation of the 2018 International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy (IAJGS ) in Warsaw, the Lodz Registration Extraction Team is
pleased to announce the addition of 20,000 Jewish names now available
on the JRI-Poland website. This information was extracted >from the
Lodz Registration Cards 1916-1921.

To date, the total number of names and families identified and indexed
is 130,000. This could not have been accomplished without the
dedication of our international group of volunteers who we thank for
their continued passion and commitment these past 3 years.

Our marathon to complete The Lodz Registration Card Project continues
with 58% of the project complete. To expedite the work, we need your
help! We welcome additional volunteers to join our incredible group
and help move our program forward to total completion. Polish
language skills are not required.

Please Contact Margalit.a.Ir@gmail.com with your interest to join
this team.

Our volunteer team is extracting the cards in alphabetical order. If
you wish to prioritize the extraction of your family's name, a
donation of $54 per name will result in a quick and dedicated
spreadsheet for your use.

Margalit Ashira Ir
Lodz Registration Cards
Program Leader
JRI-POLAND


JRI Poland #Poland Query on Polish Words #poland

Richard Cooper
 

Does anyone know the answer to two questions arising >from a birth
record transcription on JRI-PL, please?

1) Might the given name Gecel be connected (kinnui etc) to Nahum?

2) What is the translation of paikacza (or palkacza) buznicznego? Is
it synagogue shamash?

TIA,
Richard Cooper (NB: Not related to any COOPERs!)
Midhurst, UK
MILLET, ENGELBERG, BLUMENKEHL, SUSSWEIN, WACKS & PITERZIL >from Tarnow,
Dabrowa Tarnowska and Lezajsk
LEZTER, SALENDER, RINENBERG, EISEN & KRAETTER >from Rzeszow and Kolbuszowa
YAROSHEVSKY, SHAPOCHNIKOW & GRANITUR >from Odessa and Zlatopol/Novomirgorod
LEWINSTEIN >from Berdichev
ADLER, FINKELSTEIN, PARYLLE, WEINTRAUB & ZILZ >from Tarnopol and Trembowla
BORENSTEIN, MATELEVITCH,GODZINSKIJ & ZIMNOWICZ and >from Warsaw and Radun


JRI-Poland adds more Warszawa Data to the Database #poland

hadassahlipsius
 

Jewish Records Indexing-Poland recently added another 2685 more Warszawa
records to the JRI-Poland database.

The new additions include the following:

Fond 200 - Sygnatura 85, 1898 Marriages District 5
Fond 200 - Sygnatura 92, 1892 Births District 5/6
Fond 200 - Sygnatura 155, 1906-1908 Marriages District 10
Fond 180 - Sygnatura 30, 1842 Births District 4
Fond 180 - Sygnatura 31, 1841 Birth, Marriage and Deaths District 7/8

With these new additions, the JRI-Poland database now has almost 192,000
vital records for the city of Warszawa. We continue to work on adding
additional data, links and extracting more information on the data already
on line.

The indexing project for the City of Warszawa is extensive and JRI-Poland
has made the commitment to support the completion of the effort. Please
consider making a donation to the Warszawa PSA project to help further the
indexing.

Good luck in your search!

Hadassah Lipsius
Warszawa Shtetl CO-OP Coordinator
Warszawa Archive Coordinator
JRI-Poland


JRI Poland #Poland JRI-Poland adds more Warszawa Data to the Database #poland

hadassahlipsius
 

Jewish Records Indexing-Poland recently added another 2685 more Warszawa
records to the JRI-Poland database.

The new additions include the following:

Fond 200 - Sygnatura 85, 1898 Marriages District 5
Fond 200 - Sygnatura 92, 1892 Births District 5/6
Fond 200 - Sygnatura 155, 1906-1908 Marriages District 10
Fond 180 - Sygnatura 30, 1842 Births District 4
Fond 180 - Sygnatura 31, 1841 Birth, Marriage and Deaths District 7/8

With these new additions, the JRI-Poland database now has almost 192,000
vital records for the city of Warszawa. We continue to work on adding
additional data, links and extracting more information on the data already
on line.

The indexing project for the City of Warszawa is extensive and JRI-Poland
has made the commitment to support the completion of the effort. Please
consider making a donation to the Warszawa PSA project to help further the
indexing.

Good luck in your search!

Hadassah Lipsius
Warszawa Shtetl CO-OP Coordinator
Warszawa Archive Coordinator
JRI-Poland


Ukraine database additions in June #ukraine

Janette Silverman
 

Dear friends:
With the digital availability of FHL images some of our indexed records
are already linked to those images. When you do a search on JewisGen if
there is a microfilm number and it is underlined, then it is linked to
the Family History Library's digital image. You will need to be signed
into your free account at FamilySearch.org in order to access the images
but you can do so >from home! Thanks to Michael Tobias for connecting
the Ukraine indexes to those images.

We have added the following new data to the JewishGen Ukraine databases:

Vasilkov 1816 and Belaya Tserkov 1850 revision lists - 1,047 lines
Litin 1882 revision list - 862 lines
Odessa 1897 census - 243 lines
Stavische 1847 community book - 37 lines
Tuchin 1851-1858 revision list 2,998 lines

Stavishche 1847 births - 101 lines
Tarascha BMD - 611 lines
Zashkov 1848-1851 births - 44 lines
Zhivotovv 1851 marriage - 9 lines
Koshevata 1847-51 BD 107 lines

Thank you to the numerous volunteers who are working so hard on
translations and transcriptions. Thank you also to Alex Krakovsky for
the work he is doing in the archives in Ukraine to digitize data and
make it freely available at https://tinyurl.com/Ukraine-databases

New data will be added in September. I'll be visiting the CAHJP in
October to discuss their new data acquisitions, what we would like from
various archives, and the possibility of linking the indexes made from
data we acquired >from CAHJP to the records.

Please, do not ask me to send you copies of records >from the indexes.
All of us working on record acquisition and managing translation
projects as well as most of our translators are volunteers. We do not
have staff available to look for and send you records, and in some
cases, we are bound by agreements with some archives not to do so.

I hope to see many of you in Warsaw at the IAJGS conference.

Janette

--
Dr. Janette Silverman
JewishGen Ukraine-SIG Coordinator
ukrainesig.coordinator@gmail.com
http://www.jewishgen.org/Ukraine/default.asp
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Ukraine-SIG/180102942060505


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Ukraine database additions in June #ukraine

Janette Silverman
 

Dear friends:
With the digital availability of FHL images some of our indexed records
are already linked to those images. When you do a search on JewisGen if
there is a microfilm number and it is underlined, then it is linked to
the Family History Library's digital image. You will need to be signed
into your free account at FamilySearch.org in order to access the images
but you can do so >from home! Thanks to Michael Tobias for connecting
the Ukraine indexes to those images.

We have added the following new data to the JewishGen Ukraine databases:

Vasilkov 1816 and Belaya Tserkov 1850 revision lists - 1,047 lines
Litin 1882 revision list - 862 lines
Odessa 1897 census - 243 lines
Stavische 1847 community book - 37 lines
Tuchin 1851-1858 revision list 2,998 lines

Stavishche 1847 births - 101 lines
Tarascha BMD - 611 lines
Zashkov 1848-1851 births - 44 lines
Zhivotovv 1851 marriage - 9 lines
Koshevata 1847-51 BD 107 lines

Thank you to the numerous volunteers who are working so hard on
translations and transcriptions. Thank you also to Alex Krakovsky for
the work he is doing in the archives in Ukraine to digitize data and
make it freely available at https://tinyurl.com/Ukraine-databases

New data will be added in September. I'll be visiting the CAHJP in
October to discuss their new data acquisitions, what we would like from
various archives, and the possibility of linking the indexes made from
data we acquired >from CAHJP to the records.

Please, do not ask me to send you copies of records >from the indexes.
All of us working on record acquisition and managing translation
projects as well as most of our translators are volunteers. We do not
have staff available to look for and send you records, and in some
cases, we are bound by agreements with some archives not to do so.

I hope to see many of you in Warsaw at the IAJGS conference.

Janette

--
Dr. Janette Silverman
JewishGen Ukraine-SIG Coordinator
ukrainesig.coordinator@gmail.com
http://www.jewishgen.org/Ukraine/default.asp
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Ukraine-SIG/180102942060505


Searching for one Isaac Zipperstein (married to Chantzia/Chassie) that arrived in the US on 30-May-1910 in Galveston, Texas #general

Avraham Y. Kahana
 

Hello all,

I have posted months (and years) ago about me searching for my
Zipperstein relatives that made to the US in the beginning of the
1900s. Fortunately JewishGen and the community made my efforts
successful, allowing me to find 2 of my great grandmother's siblings.
Today I am starting the quest for one of the other 2 remaining:
Yitzchak Zipperstein.

Below is the ship manifest one can find at Ancestry for him. The first
thing I did was writing the Texas Jewish Genealogical Society
inquiring about him.

What other leads should I try, given the data below is the only thing I have ?

Thanks in advance,
Avraham Y. Kahana
Israel

Manifest

Name: Isaak Ziperstein (wife Chassie? Channie? in Lipkany
Either headed to Davenport Iowa or Victor Colorado
Age on Arrival: 28
Birth Date: 1882
Birthplace: Lipkang, Russia, Russia
Gender: Male
Race: Hebrew
Port of Departure: Bremen, Germany
Arrival Date: 30 May 1910
Port of Arrival: Galveston, Texas, USA
Vessel: Franklin
Friend's Name: Colo Wheatland
Last Residence: Russia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching for one Isaac Zipperstein (married to Chantzia/Chassie) that arrived in the US on 30-May-1910 in Galveston, Texas #general

Avraham Y. Kahana
 

Hello all,

I have posted months (and years) ago about me searching for my
Zipperstein relatives that made to the US in the beginning of the
1900s. Fortunately JewishGen and the community made my efforts
successful, allowing me to find 2 of my great grandmother's siblings.
Today I am starting the quest for one of the other 2 remaining:
Yitzchak Zipperstein.

Below is the ship manifest one can find at Ancestry for him. The first
thing I did was writing the Texas Jewish Genealogical Society
inquiring about him.

What other leads should I try, given the data below is the only thing I have ?

Thanks in advance,
Avraham Y. Kahana
Israel

Manifest

Name: Isaak Ziperstein (wife Chassie? Channie? in Lipkany
Either headed to Davenport Iowa or Victor Colorado
Age on Arrival: 28
Birth Date: 1882
Birthplace: Lipkang, Russia, Russia
Gender: Male
Race: Hebrew
Port of Departure: Bremen, Germany
Arrival Date: 30 May 1910
Port of Arrival: Galveston, Texas, USA
Vessel: Franklin
Friend's Name: Colo Wheatland
Last Residence: Russia


(Belarus) Nazi Concentration Camp Maly Trostenets Memorial Opens #belarus

Jan Meisels Allen
 

One of Nazi concentration camps, almost forgotten, Maly Trostenets, also
known as Maly Troscianiec in Polish and Maly Trastsyanets in Belarusian,
about 12 kilometers south-east of Minsk, within the former Soviet Union was
virtually unknown during the Soviet era. It was originally set up in the
1940s by Nazi Germany to incarcerate Soviet prisoners of war. It was turned
into an extermination camp between July 1942 and October 1943. Between
Spring 1942-Summer 1944 200,000 people were murdered at the camp, making it
one of the largest extermination camps created by the Nazis. In 1943-1944
when the Red Army was approaching, the Nazis decided to destroy the evidence
and burned the bodies. Only 17 people survived. It is the fourth largest
Nazi extermination camp after Auschwitz, Majdanek and Treblinka. Jews from
Europe, mainly >from Belarus, Poland, Austria, and Czechoslovakia were the
largest group among the victims, including 22,000 German Jews and 30,000
Jews >from nearby Minsk. They were murdered and buried in the nearby
Blahaushchyna forest.

For the first time the German President traveled to Belarus, along with the
presidents of Austria and Belarus, the Polish presidential chancellery State
Secretary, Czech parliament's deputy speaker, World Jewish Congress
representative, and the President of Belarus attended the memorial's
opening. As Soviet narrative victims of Maly Trosents, were incorrectly
referred to as "Soviet civilians, partisans, resistance fighters," as the
Soviet culture of remembrance excludes the Holocaust. Holocaust crimes that
took place east of Auschwitz have been hardly recognized.

There are two memorials at Trostenets. In 2015 the "Gate of Remembrance"
was inaugurated. This is the path which the victims walked to their deaths.
The second memorial is at the killing field. Historians and architects
combined forces to combine the two memorials so that today there is one.

A video of the memorial is available at:
https://www.tvr.by/eng/news/obshchestvo/v_trostentse_byli_unichtozheny_sotni
_tysyach_evreev/ The narrative is Belarusian.

To read more see:
https://www.rferl.org/a/top-level-delegations-in-minsk-to-unveil-memorial-to
-victims-of-nazi-camp/29327532.html
And: https://tinyurl.com/ybaq5ae7
Original url:

https://www.dw.com/en/belarus-an-unknown-story-of-the-holocaust-brings-forgo
tten-camp-back-into-europes-conscience/a-44456445

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Belarus SIG #Belarus (Belarus) Nazi Concentration Camp Maly Trostenets Memorial Opens #belarus

Jan Meisels Allen
 

One of Nazi concentration camps, almost forgotten, Maly Trostenets, also
known as Maly Troscianiec in Polish and Maly Trastsyanets in Belarusian,
about 12 kilometers south-east of Minsk, within the former Soviet Union was
virtually unknown during the Soviet era. It was originally set up in the
1940s by Nazi Germany to incarcerate Soviet prisoners of war. It was turned
into an extermination camp between July 1942 and October 1943. Between
Spring 1942-Summer 1944 200,000 people were murdered at the camp, making it
one of the largest extermination camps created by the Nazis. In 1943-1944
when the Red Army was approaching, the Nazis decided to destroy the evidence
and burned the bodies. Only 17 people survived. It is the fourth largest
Nazi extermination camp after Auschwitz, Majdanek and Treblinka. Jews from
Europe, mainly >from Belarus, Poland, Austria, and Czechoslovakia were the
largest group among the victims, including 22,000 German Jews and 30,000
Jews >from nearby Minsk. They were murdered and buried in the nearby
Blahaushchyna forest.

For the first time the German President traveled to Belarus, along with the
presidents of Austria and Belarus, the Polish presidential chancellery State
Secretary, Czech parliament's deputy speaker, World Jewish Congress
representative, and the President of Belarus attended the memorial's
opening. As Soviet narrative victims of Maly Trosents, were incorrectly
referred to as "Soviet civilians, partisans, resistance fighters," as the
Soviet culture of remembrance excludes the Holocaust. Holocaust crimes that
took place east of Auschwitz have been hardly recognized.

There are two memorials at Trostenets. In 2015 the "Gate of Remembrance"
was inaugurated. This is the path which the victims walked to their deaths.
The second memorial is at the killing field. Historians and architects
combined forces to combine the two memorials so that today there is one.

A video of the memorial is available at:
https://www.tvr.by/eng/news/obshchestvo/v_trostentse_byli_unichtozheny_sotni
_tysyach_evreev/ The narrative is Belarusian.

To read more see:
https://www.rferl.org/a/top-level-delegations-in-minsk-to-unveil-memorial-to
-victims-of-nazi-camp/29327532.html
And: https://tinyurl.com/ybaq5ae7
Original url:

https://www.dw.com/en/belarus-an-unknown-story-of-the-holocaust-brings-forgo
tten-camp-back-into-europes-conscience/a-44456445

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Baruch Dayan HaEmet - Ruth Gamper Silver #belarus

david.feldman@...
 

It is with much sadness that we report that Ruth Gamper Silver passed away
Monday, June 25, 2018. Robinn Magid posted the following message on
Jewishgen and JRI-Poland earlier today.

I am saddened to report the recent and sudden passing of Ruth Gamper Silver,
a longtime volunteer in the Jewish Genealogy world and a good friend to many
of us. Ruth volunteered in the Belarus SIG as a data acquisition coordinator
and with Paul Zoglin and David Feldman, worked hard to create a cooperative
relationship with other SIGs. Ruth was a dedicated and active volunteer for
JRI-Poland.org working with me in the Lublin region for many years. Her
cheerful attitude, willingness to help, and ability to tell a story will be
sorely missed. Ruth loved her family and her cats very much. May her memory
be for a blessing.

Robinn Magid
Berkeley, California
robinn.magid@gmail.com

For the past 7 years, both Paul and I have worked closely with Ruth who
coordinated all of our projects. Through her tireless work she completely
reorganized the project workflow for the Belarus SIG and kept all of our
projects running smoothly. Ruth lived in Geneva Switzerland when she joined
the Belarus SIG and more recently moved to Montreal.

Here is a link to her obituary:
https://www.paperman.com/en/funerals/2018-6-28-ruth-gamper-silver

We thank Ruth for all her hard-work, dedication and friendship. You will be
sorely missed.

David Feldman
Paul Zoglin


Belarus SIG #Belarus Baruch Dayan HaEmet - Ruth Gamper Silver #belarus

david.feldman@...
 

It is with much sadness that we report that Ruth Gamper Silver passed away
Monday, June 25, 2018. Robinn Magid posted the following message on
Jewishgen and JRI-Poland earlier today.

I am saddened to report the recent and sudden passing of Ruth Gamper Silver,
a longtime volunteer in the Jewish Genealogy world and a good friend to many
of us. Ruth volunteered in the Belarus SIG as a data acquisition coordinator
and with Paul Zoglin and David Feldman, worked hard to create a cooperative
relationship with other SIGs. Ruth was a dedicated and active volunteer for
JRI-Poland.org working with me in the Lublin region for many years. Her
cheerful attitude, willingness to help, and ability to tell a story will be
sorely missed. Ruth loved her family and her cats very much. May her memory
be for a blessing.

Robinn Magid
Berkeley, California
robinn.magid@gmail.com

For the past 7 years, both Paul and I have worked closely with Ruth who
coordinated all of our projects. Through her tireless work she completely
reorganized the project workflow for the Belarus SIG and kept all of our
projects running smoothly. Ruth lived in Geneva Switzerland when she joined
the Belarus SIG and more recently moved to Montreal.

Here is a link to her obituary:
https://www.paperman.com/en/funerals/2018-6-28-ruth-gamper-silver

We thank Ruth for all her hard-work, dedication and friendship. You will be
sorely missed.

David Feldman
Paul Zoglin


DNA Testing Find People Cherry Pick Their Results #dna

Jan Meisels Allen
 

A recent study published in the American Journal of Sociology, Genetic
Options: The Impact of Genetic Ancestry Testing on Consumers' Racial and
Ethnic Identities, finds that genetic ancestry testing did not change their
"beliefs" as to whom they are, regardless of the DNA testing showing they
might have Hispanic, Native American, black or other heritage.

The study of 100 Americans >from various ethnic and racial backgrounds who
had taken the home DNA test and then the researchers returned 18 months
later to determine if the tests shifted how they saw their identity, instead
showed the DNA testes tended to "cherry pick" rather than embrace some of
their findings based on preconceived biases. Fifty-nine percent of the
participants did not alter their views on their identity, despite the
information in the tests. Another study finding was, those who embraced
their test results, more than 80% of them went on to document this change in
the census - upending the tradition of racial categories based solely on
appearance or knowledge of descent.

Some of the results as reported in The Guardian, found whites were likely to
embrace their new racial identities as long as they believed others would
still accept them. One of the comments about a participant who before the
test identified as a white Mexican American the article was, was found to
have Native American, Celtic and Jewish ancestry. Researchers found "he
embraced his Jewish roots over the other ancestries highlighted in the
test."
To read The Guardian article see:
https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/jul/01/home-dna-test-kits-race-ethnicity-dna-ancestry

The study may be accessed and purchased >from the American Journal of
Sociology found at:
https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/full/10.1086/697487

Thank you to Jeanette Rosenberg, JGS Great Britain, for sharing The
Guardian article with us.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


DNA Research #DNA DNA Testing Find People Cherry Pick Their Results #dna

Jan Meisels Allen
 

A recent study published in the American Journal of Sociology, Genetic
Options: The Impact of Genetic Ancestry Testing on Consumers' Racial and
Ethnic Identities, finds that genetic ancestry testing did not change their
"beliefs" as to whom they are, regardless of the DNA testing showing they
might have Hispanic, Native American, black or other heritage.

The study of 100 Americans >from various ethnic and racial backgrounds who
had taken the home DNA test and then the researchers returned 18 months
later to determine if the tests shifted how they saw their identity, instead
showed the DNA testes tended to "cherry pick" rather than embrace some of
their findings based on preconceived biases. Fifty-nine percent of the
participants did not alter their views on their identity, despite the
information in the tests. Another study finding was, those who embraced
their test results, more than 80% of them went on to document this change in
the census - upending the tradition of racial categories based solely on
appearance or knowledge of descent.

Some of the results as reported in The Guardian, found whites were likely to
embrace their new racial identities as long as they believed others would
still accept them. One of the comments about a participant who before the
test identified as a white Mexican American the article was, was found to
have Native American, Celtic and Jewish ancestry. Researchers found "he
embraced his Jewish roots over the other ancestries highlighted in the
test."
To read The Guardian article see:
https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/jul/01/home-dna-test-kits-race-ethnicity-dna-ancestry

The study may be accessed and purchased >from the American Journal of
Sociology found at:
https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/full/10.1086/697487

Thank you to Jeanette Rosenberg, JGS Great Britain, for sharing The
Guardian article with us.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Hersch SCHUTZ, died 1936, Kalush Ukraine #general

Deborah Schultz
 

Hello. I have a photo of a tombstone in the old Jewish cemetery of
Kalush, Ukraine. (Before WWI, it was in Galicia. Between the wars, it
was in Poland.) The name Hersch SCHUTZ appears in Latin letters. The
rest of the inscription is in Hebrew, and gives his Hebrew name as
Tsvi son of Yitskhak HaLevi. Tsvi-Hersch died on the holiday of
Simkhat Torah 5697 (= 9 October 1936). That's all the information I
have on him.

I have been trying to find out more about him or his family, but I
can't find any vital records for Kalush. I have read that many of
these records were burned in a fire in the city during World War I. I
have tried several resources already, such as online databases
(Ancestry, Family Search, Ellis Island, JewishGen databases, and
Gesher Galicia). I have also emailed other researchers looking for the
surname SCHUTZ in Kalush. I found on Gesher Galicia that the house of
a Hersch SCHUTZ on Szewczenki Street in Kalusz was "completely
destroyed" in 1918 (by the same fire that destroyed the records?). Is
it likely this was the same man? I thought the name was fairly common.

Unfortunately, I have found no additional information about him or his
family. I want to make sure I really do try everything. I understand
that new records come online all the time, and that I should try these
searches again in a few months. My questions are:

1) Is there anything else I'm missing right now?

2) Does anybody recognize this man?

I appreciate any help, and also your time. Thanks!

--
Deborah Schultz, Metro Detroit, Michigan
schultzd@umich.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Hersch SCHUTZ, died 1936, Kalush Ukraine #general

Deborah Schultz
 

Hello. I have a photo of a tombstone in the old Jewish cemetery of
Kalush, Ukraine. (Before WWI, it was in Galicia. Between the wars, it
was in Poland.) The name Hersch SCHUTZ appears in Latin letters. The
rest of the inscription is in Hebrew, and gives his Hebrew name as
Tsvi son of Yitskhak HaLevi. Tsvi-Hersch died on the holiday of
Simkhat Torah 5697 (= 9 October 1936). That's all the information I
have on him.

I have been trying to find out more about him or his family, but I
can't find any vital records for Kalush. I have read that many of
these records were burned in a fire in the city during World War I. I
have tried several resources already, such as online databases
(Ancestry, Family Search, Ellis Island, JewishGen databases, and
Gesher Galicia). I have also emailed other researchers looking for the
surname SCHUTZ in Kalush. I found on Gesher Galicia that the house of
a Hersch SCHUTZ on Szewczenki Street in Kalusz was "completely
destroyed" in 1918 (by the same fire that destroyed the records?). Is
it likely this was the same man? I thought the name was fairly common.

Unfortunately, I have found no additional information about him or his
family. I want to make sure I really do try everything. I understand
that new records come online all the time, and that I should try these
searches again in a few months. My questions are:

1) Is there anything else I'm missing right now?

2) Does anybody recognize this man?

I appreciate any help, and also your time. Thanks!

--
Deborah Schultz, Metro Detroit, Michigan
schultzd@umich.edu


Using a pre-purchased ticket under a different name #general

Toby Gass <tgass@...>
 

After years of looking for evidence of my great and great-great
grandparents' immigration to the US, I have finally found records of
ticket purchases for most of them in the Rosenbaum Bank ticket purchase
ledgers. Even with the information in the ledgers, including shipping
line names, ports, names and ages of the ticket holders, etc., I still
cannot find them on any ship manifests.

There were two trips, to different ports (Philadelphia and Baltimore),
from different ports (Antwerp and Bremen), in different years (1891 and
1893), and on different lines (Red Star and Nord Deutscher Lloyd); four
people travelled. It seems unlikely that there would be no record of any
of them.

I am wondering if anyone knows the answer to the following question: If
a ticket was purchased in the name of a certain individual, did the
person have to travel under that name, or could the ticket be used with
a different name?

Thank you for the assistance.

Toby Gass


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Using a pre-purchased ticket under a different name #general

Toby Gass <tgass@...>
 

After years of looking for evidence of my great and great-great
grandparents' immigration to the US, I have finally found records of
ticket purchases for most of them in the Rosenbaum Bank ticket purchase
ledgers. Even with the information in the ledgers, including shipping
line names, ports, names and ages of the ticket holders, etc., I still
cannot find them on any ship manifests.

There were two trips, to different ports (Philadelphia and Baltimore),
from different ports (Antwerp and Bremen), in different years (1891 and
1893), and on different lines (Red Star and Nord Deutscher Lloyd); four
people travelled. It seems unlikely that there would be no record of any
of them.

I am wondering if anyone knows the answer to the following question: If
a ticket was purchased in the name of a certain individual, did the
person have to travel under that name, or could the ticket be used with
a different name?

Thank you for the assistance.

Toby Gass

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