Date   

IAJGS Records Access Alert Postings October 2018 #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

As mentioned previously, every month I post a listing of the IAJGS Records
Access Alert topics >from the previous month for you to see the variety of
issues.some were posted on this discussion group as they were final edicts,
but advocacy, and pending legislation and regulations- were not posted to
the discussion group-all postings are included below. Any postings that had
a time limit for access, such as free access that has expired are not
included below.

+ (Australia) Australia Privacy Law and Proposed Legislation Regarding
Technology Surveillance on Smart Phones and More

+ (Australia) Proposed Changes to Marriage Certificates-Removal of Father's
Name, Mother's Maiden Name and More

+ (Canada) New USMCA Treaty Extends Canadian Copyright 20 years

+ (European Union) Facebook May Be Fined $1.63 Billion For Law Violation in
Data Breach; CJEU Final Determination Permits Access to Personal Data
Retained by Electronic Communications Service and Access does Not Constitute
a Serious Privcay Infringement.

+ (European Union) More on the Proposed E Regulation and Concern that
Proposal Places Privacy of Pedophiles Above Children's Safety

+ (European Union) Twitter Under Investigation for Non-Compliance with GDPR

+ (European Union) Update on Data Transfer Privacy Shield; Google to Charge
Android Phone Makers; Refusal to Sign GDPR Information Documents

+ (European Union) Withdrawal of Litigation Against Ireland as Apple Pays
$13.1 Billion Fine for Late Collection of Taxes; Gemalto Report 3.3 Billion
Records Breached Worldwide

+ (European Union; Spain) The European Parliament Adopted New EU Rules on
Free Flow of Non-Personal Data; Spain Constitutional Court Decision on Right
to be Forgotten; US Internet Bill of Rights

+ (Germany) Staatsarchiv Hamburg Destruction of One Million Death
Records--IAJGS Response

+ Hundreds of Thousands of Google Plus Users Their Private Data
Exposed-Which was Not Disclosed

+ (Ireland) Irish Data Protection Commissioner Opens Formal Probe About
Facebook's recent Data Breach

+ Microsoft 6-Month Content Removal Report Including Right to be Forgotten

+ (Switzerland) Swiss Federal Archives Digitization Project

+ (UK) British Red Cross New Online Database of Historic Artifacts

+ (US) Internet Bill of Rights-Consumer Protections

+ (US) Library of Congress Webinar October 10 on Digital Reference and LOC
National Screening Room Website

+ (US) More on the 2020 Census Citizenship Question and Litigation

+ (US) Nearly One-Third of Death Certificates List Wrong Cause of Death

+ (US) Supreme Court Shields Secretary Ross >from Deposition on US 2020
Census Leaves Open Questioning of Justice Department and Administration

+ (US) Trump Administration Asks Supreme Court to Postpone Trial on 2020
Census Citizenship Question

+ (US-California) State Agrees to Delay Net Neutrality Law As FCC Repeal is
Challenged In Court

+ (US-Colorado) US Supreme Court to Decide Whether They Hear Independent
Open Court Records

+ (US-NYC) Reclaim the Records Sues NYC DORIS --Again -This time for
Brooklyn "Old Town" Records

+ (US) Property Rights Privately Held Cemetery VS Access to Cemetery

+ (US-Maine ) Maine Final Regulations on Access to Vital Records

+ (US-Maine) Correction on one of the URLS in the Maine Vital Records
Posting of October 5, 2018

+ (US-Missouri) US Census 1880- 13 Pages Found 99th Enumeration District in
Perry County

+ (US-VT) Vermont Sued By Broadband Industry Trying to Stop Net Neutrality
Law and other Net Neutrality Laws Being Challenged

IAJGS opened its Records Access Alerts to anyone who is interested. This
was announced previously. We now have subscribers >from many genealogical
organizations not previously able to subscribe. To be on top of what is
happening I encourage you to register for the Records Access Alerts to
receive the information in a timely manner. If you are interested in any of
the above items, please register for the IAJGS Records Access Alert and look
at them in the archives. To register for the IAJGS Records Access Alert go
to: http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/listinfo/records-access-alerts and
follow the instructions to enter your email address, full name and which
genealogical organization you belong to-a society, SIG or a subscriber of
JewishGen, Avotaynu Online, Legal Genealogist etc. You will receive an
email response that you have to reply to, or the subscription will not be
finalized. The alerts are archived and once you register you may access the
archives at: http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/private/records-access-alerts/

The IAJGS Records Access Alert is not a daily announcement list. Depending
on what happens worldwide, there may be no postings for several days and
other times there may be several in one day.

These are listed alphabetically not chronologically. Each month the locales
covered differ.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen IAJGS Records Access Alert Postings October 2018 #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

As mentioned previously, every month I post a listing of the IAJGS Records
Access Alert topics >from the previous month for you to see the variety of
issues.some were posted on this discussion group as they were final edicts,
but advocacy, and pending legislation and regulations- were not posted to
the discussion group-all postings are included below. Any postings that had
a time limit for access, such as free access that has expired are not
included below.

+ (Australia) Australia Privacy Law and Proposed Legislation Regarding
Technology Surveillance on Smart Phones and More

+ (Australia) Proposed Changes to Marriage Certificates-Removal of Father's
Name, Mother's Maiden Name and More

+ (Canada) New USMCA Treaty Extends Canadian Copyright 20 years

+ (European Union) Facebook May Be Fined $1.63 Billion For Law Violation in
Data Breach; CJEU Final Determination Permits Access to Personal Data
Retained by Electronic Communications Service and Access does Not Constitute
a Serious Privcay Infringement.

+ (European Union) More on the Proposed E Regulation and Concern that
Proposal Places Privacy of Pedophiles Above Children's Safety

+ (European Union) Twitter Under Investigation for Non-Compliance with GDPR

+ (European Union) Update on Data Transfer Privacy Shield; Google to Charge
Android Phone Makers; Refusal to Sign GDPR Information Documents

+ (European Union) Withdrawal of Litigation Against Ireland as Apple Pays
$13.1 Billion Fine for Late Collection of Taxes; Gemalto Report 3.3 Billion
Records Breached Worldwide

+ (European Union; Spain) The European Parliament Adopted New EU Rules on
Free Flow of Non-Personal Data; Spain Constitutional Court Decision on Right
to be Forgotten; US Internet Bill of Rights

+ (Germany) Staatsarchiv Hamburg Destruction of One Million Death
Records--IAJGS Response

+ Hundreds of Thousands of Google Plus Users Their Private Data
Exposed-Which was Not Disclosed

+ (Ireland) Irish Data Protection Commissioner Opens Formal Probe About
Facebook's recent Data Breach

+ Microsoft 6-Month Content Removal Report Including Right to be Forgotten

+ (Switzerland) Swiss Federal Archives Digitization Project

+ (UK) British Red Cross New Online Database of Historic Artifacts

+ (US) Internet Bill of Rights-Consumer Protections

+ (US) Library of Congress Webinar October 10 on Digital Reference and LOC
National Screening Room Website

+ (US) More on the 2020 Census Citizenship Question and Litigation

+ (US) Nearly One-Third of Death Certificates List Wrong Cause of Death

+ (US) Supreme Court Shields Secretary Ross >from Deposition on US 2020
Census Leaves Open Questioning of Justice Department and Administration

+ (US) Trump Administration Asks Supreme Court to Postpone Trial on 2020
Census Citizenship Question

+ (US-California) State Agrees to Delay Net Neutrality Law As FCC Repeal is
Challenged In Court

+ (US-Colorado) US Supreme Court to Decide Whether They Hear Independent
Open Court Records

+ (US-NYC) Reclaim the Records Sues NYC DORIS --Again -This time for
Brooklyn "Old Town" Records

+ (US) Property Rights Privately Held Cemetery VS Access to Cemetery

+ (US-Maine ) Maine Final Regulations on Access to Vital Records

+ (US-Maine) Correction on one of the URLS in the Maine Vital Records
Posting of October 5, 2018

+ (US-Missouri) US Census 1880- 13 Pages Found 99th Enumeration District in
Perry County

+ (US-VT) Vermont Sued By Broadband Industry Trying to Stop Net Neutrality
Law and other Net Neutrality Laws Being Challenged

IAJGS opened its Records Access Alerts to anyone who is interested. This
was announced previously. We now have subscribers >from many genealogical
organizations not previously able to subscribe. To be on top of what is
happening I encourage you to register for the Records Access Alerts to
receive the information in a timely manner. If you are interested in any of
the above items, please register for the IAJGS Records Access Alert and look
at them in the archives. To register for the IAJGS Records Access Alert go
to: http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/listinfo/records-access-alerts and
follow the instructions to enter your email address, full name and which
genealogical organization you belong to-a society, SIG or a subscriber of
JewishGen, Avotaynu Online, Legal Genealogist etc. You will receive an
email response that you have to reply to, or the subscription will not be
finalized. The alerts are archived and once you register you may access the
archives at: http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/private/records-access-alerts/

The IAJGS Records Access Alert is not a daily announcement list. Depending
on what happens worldwide, there may be no postings for several days and
other times there may be several in one day.

These are listed alphabetically not chronologically. Each month the locales
covered differ.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Residence Lists #general

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear researchers,

I am sending this post not only to Bessarabia SIG, but also to JewishGen
Discussion group, because it may help many researchers working in other regions.

We are working on new sets of Revision List records to be ready in December of
this year. The Bessarabia Revision List database include not only Revision
Lists, but also Special Lists, Men's lists, and also Residence lists. The
different lists have different purpose and have in many cases different
information. Today I want to let you know about one list which caught my
attention. It is a Residence list for Yassy uezd (district) of Bessarabia
gubernia (province) for 1875. I need to explain to you first why the district
called Yassy? The town Yassy, was never part of Bessarabia. Town Yassy was
a capital of Moldova (Moldavia) Principality before 1812. When Bessarabia
became part of Russian Empire. Yassy was a major center in Moldova (Moldavia)
principality and later in the new state of Romania. Yassy district before 1812
spread on both sides of Prut river (the border between Romania and Russian
empire in 1812), and after 1812 the district in Bessarabia was also known as
Yassy district until 1887, when it was renamed to Beltsy district. Town of
Beltsy was alsways a main town in Yassy and later Beltsy district in
Bessarabia.

The regular Revision lists is a list of people Registered in a particular town,
possible also people lived in same town, but not necessarily. We have discussed
this already that Registration in one of the societies (estates) was mandatory
in Russian Empire, and people living in small towns, villages had to register
in a bigger towns, because societies did not exist for Middle Class or Merchants
in smaller places.

The list for Yassy (Beltsy) uezd for 1875 is a resident list. People were
present on that year in one of the towns of Yassy(Beltsy) uezd, but most of them
were registered in other places: in large towns of that uezd, like Beltsy,
Faleshty, colony Aleksandreny or other uezd (districts) in Bessarabia, like
Orgeev, Teleneshty, Kishinev, Khotin, Novoselitsa, Lipkany, Soroki and many
others, also in that same list there are families registered in **other**
provinces of Russian Empire, >from many towns Mogilev-Podolsky, Yampol, Litin
and others in Podolia, also Zaslav, Polone, etc. in Volyn, also in a number
of towns in Grodno, Kherson, Kiev provinces. The reason families were
registered in other provinces is most likely that someone arrived to
Bessarabia to get married, and got a family and left living in Bessarabia, or
possible arrived to settle on the land, and did not change the registration.

The last group of people in that list or 1,726 people >from 449 families are
citizens of Foreign countries, and there are 108 such families (25%!). Most
of them are >from Moldova principality (later became Romania), but also there
were citizens of Austria, Turkey, and Greece. Many of these families in 1875
did not have yet the surnames. By the way if you search in Romania -
Bessarabia database and put Turkey for example at "Any field" you will get
about 500 records, and >from them 300 birth records where father is a citizen
of Turkey. Or if you put in "Any field" - citizen, you will get many
thousands records where someone in the family is a citizen of another country.

I am suggesting for example for people interested in Volyn, do such search and
look for all records with Volyn in the comments, and same for all other
provinces.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK >from Kaushany, Bendery, SRULEVICH >from Tarutino,
Ismail, KHALIMOVICH >from Galats, Romania


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Residence Lists #general

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear researchers,

I am sending this post not only to Bessarabia SIG, but also to JewishGen
Discussion group, because it may help many researchers working in other regions.

We are working on new sets of Revision List records to be ready in December of
this year. The Bessarabia Revision List database include not only Revision
Lists, but also Special Lists, Men's lists, and also Residence lists. The
different lists have different purpose and have in many cases different
information. Today I want to let you know about one list which caught my
attention. It is a Residence list for Yassy uezd (district) of Bessarabia
gubernia (province) for 1875. I need to explain to you first why the district
called Yassy? The town Yassy, was never part of Bessarabia. Town Yassy was
a capital of Moldova (Moldavia) Principality before 1812. When Bessarabia
became part of Russian Empire. Yassy was a major center in Moldova (Moldavia)
principality and later in the new state of Romania. Yassy district before 1812
spread on both sides of Prut river (the border between Romania and Russian
empire in 1812), and after 1812 the district in Bessarabia was also known as
Yassy district until 1887, when it was renamed to Beltsy district. Town of
Beltsy was alsways a main town in Yassy and later Beltsy district in
Bessarabia.

The regular Revision lists is a list of people Registered in a particular town,
possible also people lived in same town, but not necessarily. We have discussed
this already that Registration in one of the societies (estates) was mandatory
in Russian Empire, and people living in small towns, villages had to register
in a bigger towns, because societies did not exist for Middle Class or Merchants
in smaller places.

The list for Yassy (Beltsy) uezd for 1875 is a resident list. People were
present on that year in one of the towns of Yassy(Beltsy) uezd, but most of them
were registered in other places: in large towns of that uezd, like Beltsy,
Faleshty, colony Aleksandreny or other uezd (districts) in Bessarabia, like
Orgeev, Teleneshty, Kishinev, Khotin, Novoselitsa, Lipkany, Soroki and many
others, also in that same list there are families registered in **other**
provinces of Russian Empire, >from many towns Mogilev-Podolsky, Yampol, Litin
and others in Podolia, also Zaslav, Polone, etc. in Volyn, also in a number
of towns in Grodno, Kherson, Kiev provinces. The reason families were
registered in other provinces is most likely that someone arrived to
Bessarabia to get married, and got a family and left living in Bessarabia, or
possible arrived to settle on the land, and did not change the registration.

The last group of people in that list or 1,726 people >from 449 families are
citizens of Foreign countries, and there are 108 such families (25%!). Most
of them are >from Moldova principality (later became Romania), but also there
were citizens of Austria, Turkey, and Greece. Many of these families in 1875
did not have yet the surnames. By the way if you search in Romania -
Bessarabia database and put Turkey for example at "Any field" you will get
about 500 records, and >from them 300 birth records where father is a citizen
of Turkey. Or if you put in "Any field" - citizen, you will get many
thousands records where someone in the family is a citizen of another country.

I am suggesting for example for people interested in Volyn, do such search and
look for all records with Volyn in the comments, and same for all other
provinces.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK >from Kaushany, Bendery, SRULEVICH >from Tarutino,
Ismail, KHALIMOVICH >from Galats, Romania


Yizkor Book Project, October 2018 #yiddish

bounce-3593674-772983@...
 

Shalom,

I could not send out this Yizkor Book Project report without relating
to the recent horrendous murders in Pittsburgh. In a project which deals
intrinsically with the tragic consequences of Jewish hatred, it is always
disturbing to see that this same senseless hatred continues to this very
day. Our hearts and thoughts go out to the families of the victims and,
in fact, to all the Jewish community of Pittsburgh and pray that events
of this kind don't reoccur there and anywhere else.

And now to the report. Whilst this month we can't announce the completion
of a Yizkor book translation, I can say that there are several that are
just a whisker's way >from completion. I'm quite certain that I will be
able to pass on good news about several books in coming reports.

I am pleased, however, to announce that the Yizkor Books in Print Project
recently published the "Book of Stryj" on Stryj, Ukraine. The book was
coordinated over the years by Mike Kalt and its translation encouraged
vigorously by Uriel Zur Shutzer z"l >from the Stryj organization in Israel
who sadly passed away before the project was completed. In the final
stages of this project, we were extremely fortunate that Susan Rosin
stepped up and took on the considerable task of translating a major part
of this book, enabling its completion and now, its publishing.

Another published book made available recently by the YBIP Project is
"We Remember Lest the World Forget" covering the Holocaust in Belarus
and, in particular, the unique history of the Minsk Ghetto. The
translation of the original Russian book was facilitated by The Together
Plan, a UK Charity, and was kindly presented to the YB Project to be
published. Last month, the book was also made available online and
appears in our Translations Index under "Minsk, Belarus". Purchase
details of both of these books may be found via the link the Yizkor
books in Print link appearing at the end of this report, as does the
link to our Translations Index.

A recent addition to the list of our Translation Funds is the book
"Memorial Book of the Community of Siedlce" covering Siedlce, Poland.
This translation fund, like the many others, is our way of enabling
those with family connections and interest in a particular community,
to take part in a group effort to financially support the translation
of the book relating to its history and people. A link list to this
fund and all the other current funds appears at the end of this report
and please see if you are able to contribute to one of these projects
providing very unique information on our lost communities.


And now for the additions and updates are what we've carried out during
October:

We have added in one new book:

- Minsk, Belarus (We Remember Lest the World Forget)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/weremember/weremember.html

We have added in 8 new entries:

- Hanusovce nad Topl'ou, Slovakia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities
in Slovakia) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/slo172.html

- Jezor, Poland (Sosnowiec and the Surrounding Region in Zaglembie)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sosnowiec/Sos357.html

- Marijampole, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_263.html

- Pilviskiai, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_352.html

- Sarata, Ukraine (Akkerman and the towns of its district; memorial
book) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/akkerman/akk337.html

- Taurage, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_499.html

- Utena, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_566.html

- Virbalis, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_661.html

And we have continued to update 19 of our existing projects:

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Budanov, Ukraine (Book of Budzanow)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Budanov/Budanov.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of Dubno,
Wolyn) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dubno/dubno.html

- Dynow, Poland (The Memorial Book of Jewish Dinov)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dynow1/dynow1.html

- Kamyanyets, Belarus (Memorial Book of Kamenets Litovsk, Zastavye,
and Colonies) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kamenets/Kamenets.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Monor, Hungary (Bound by Fate: In Memory of the Jewish Community of
Monor) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Monor/Monor.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memories >from Nowy-Dwor)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/nowy_dwor1/nowy_dwor1.html

- Przemysl, Poland (Przemysl memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/przemysl/przemysl.html

- Smarhon, Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszowp.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the
neighboring villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23
communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- The Jacob Rassen Story
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JacobRassen/JacobRassen.html

- Turobin, Poland (The Turobin book; in memory of the Jewish community)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Turobin/Turobin.html

- Wolomin, Poland (Volomin; a memorial to the Jewish community of
Volomin) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/wolomin/wolomin.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Yiddish Theatre and Vadeville #YiddishTheatre Yizkor Book Project, October 2018 #yiddish

bounce-3593674-772983@...
 

Shalom,

I could not send out this Yizkor Book Project report without relating
to the recent horrendous murders in Pittsburgh. In a project which deals
intrinsically with the tragic consequences of Jewish hatred, it is always
disturbing to see that this same senseless hatred continues to this very
day. Our hearts and thoughts go out to the families of the victims and,
in fact, to all the Jewish community of Pittsburgh and pray that events
of this kind don't reoccur there and anywhere else.

And now to the report. Whilst this month we can't announce the completion
of a Yizkor book translation, I can say that there are several that are
just a whisker's way >from completion. I'm quite certain that I will be
able to pass on good news about several books in coming reports.

I am pleased, however, to announce that the Yizkor Books in Print Project
recently published the "Book of Stryj" on Stryj, Ukraine. The book was
coordinated over the years by Mike Kalt and its translation encouraged
vigorously by Uriel Zur Shutzer z"l >from the Stryj organization in Israel
who sadly passed away before the project was completed. In the final
stages of this project, we were extremely fortunate that Susan Rosin
stepped up and took on the considerable task of translating a major part
of this book, enabling its completion and now, its publishing.

Another published book made available recently by the YBIP Project is
"We Remember Lest the World Forget" covering the Holocaust in Belarus
and, in particular, the unique history of the Minsk Ghetto. The
translation of the original Russian book was facilitated by The Together
Plan, a UK Charity, and was kindly presented to the YB Project to be
published. Last month, the book was also made available online and
appears in our Translations Index under "Minsk, Belarus". Purchase
details of both of these books may be found via the link the Yizkor
books in Print link appearing at the end of this report, as does the
link to our Translations Index.

A recent addition to the list of our Translation Funds is the book
"Memorial Book of the Community of Siedlce" covering Siedlce, Poland.
This translation fund, like the many others, is our way of enabling
those with family connections and interest in a particular community,
to take part in a group effort to financially support the translation
of the book relating to its history and people. A link list to this
fund and all the other current funds appears at the end of this report
and please see if you are able to contribute to one of these projects
providing very unique information on our lost communities.


And now for the additions and updates are what we've carried out during
October:

We have added in one new book:

- Minsk, Belarus (We Remember Lest the World Forget)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/weremember/weremember.html

We have added in 8 new entries:

- Hanusovce nad Topl'ou, Slovakia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities
in Slovakia) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/slo172.html

- Jezor, Poland (Sosnowiec and the Surrounding Region in Zaglembie)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sosnowiec/Sos357.html

- Marijampole, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_263.html

- Pilviskiai, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_352.html

- Sarata, Ukraine (Akkerman and the towns of its district; memorial
book) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/akkerman/akk337.html

- Taurage, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_499.html

- Utena, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_566.html

- Virbalis, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_661.html

And we have continued to update 19 of our existing projects:

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Budanov, Ukraine (Book of Budzanow)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Budanov/Budanov.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of Dubno,
Wolyn) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dubno/dubno.html

- Dynow, Poland (The Memorial Book of Jewish Dinov)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dynow1/dynow1.html

- Kamyanyets, Belarus (Memorial Book of Kamenets Litovsk, Zastavye,
and Colonies) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kamenets/Kamenets.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Monor, Hungary (Bound by Fate: In Memory of the Jewish Community of
Monor) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Monor/Monor.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memories >from Nowy-Dwor)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/nowy_dwor1/nowy_dwor1.html

- Przemysl, Poland (Przemysl memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/przemysl/przemysl.html

- Smarhon, Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszowp.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the
neighboring villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23
communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- The Jacob Rassen Story
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JacobRassen/JacobRassen.html

- Turobin, Poland (The Turobin book; in memory of the Jewish community)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Turobin/Turobin.html

- Wolomin, Poland (Volomin; a memorial to the Jewish community of
Volomin) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/wolomin/wolomin.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Residence Lists #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear researchers,

I am sending this post not only to Bessarabia SIG, but also to JewishGen Discussion group, because
it may help many researchers working in other regions.

We are working on new sets of Revision List records to be ready in December of this year. The
Bessarabia Revision List database include not only Revision Lists, but also Special Lists, Men's lists,
and also Residence lists. The different lists have different purposes and have in many cases different
information.

Today I want to let you know about one list which caught my attention. It is a Residence list for Yassy
(district) of Bessarabia gubernia (province) for 1875. I need to explain to you first why the district
called Yassy? The town Yassy, was never part of Bessarabia. Town Yassy was a capital of Moldova
(Moldavia) Principality before 1812. When Bessarabia became part of Russian Empire. Yassy was a
major center in Moldova (Moldavia) principality and later in the new state of Romania. Yassy district
before 1812 spread on both sides of Prut river (the border between Romania and Russian empire in
1812), and after 1812 the district in Bessarabia was also known as Yassy district until 1887, when it
was renamed to Beltsy district. Town of Beltsy was alsways a main town in Yassy and later Beltsy
district in Bessarabia.

The regular Revision lists is a list of people Registered in a particular town, possible also people
lived in same town, but not necessarily. We have discussed this already that Registration in one of
the societies (estates) was mandatory in Russian Empire, and people living in small towns, villages
had to register in a bigger towns, because societies did not exist for Middle Class or Merchants in
smaller places.

The list for Yassy (Beltsy) uezd for 1875 is a resident list. People were present on that year in one
of the towns of Yassy(Beltsy) uezd, but most of them were registered in other places: in large
towns of that uezd, like Beltsy, Faleshty, colony Aleksandreny or other uezd (districts) in
Bessarabia, like Orgeev, Teleneshty, Kishinev, Khotin, Novoselitsa, Lipkany, Soroki and many
others, also in that same list there are families registered in OTHER provinces of Russian Empire,
from many towns Mogilev-Podolsky, Yampol, Litin and others in Podolia, also Zaslav, Polone, etc.
in Volyn, also in a number of towns in Grodno, Kherson, Kiev provinces. The reason families
were registered in other provinces is most likely that someone arrived to Bessarabia to get
married, and got a family and left living in Bessarabia, or possibly arrived to settle on the land,
and did not change the registration.

The last group of people in that list or 1,726 people >from 449 families are citizens of Foreign
countries, and there are 108 such families (25%!). Most of them are >from Moldova principality
(later became Romania), but also there were citizens of Austria, Turkey, and Greece. Many of
these families in 1875 did not have yet the surnames. By the way if you search in Romania -
Bessarabia database and put Turkey for example at "Any field" you will get about 500 records,
and >from them 300 birth records where father is a citizen of Turkey. Or if you put in "Any
field" - citizen, you will get many thousands records where someone in the family is a citizen
of another country.

I am suggesting for example for people interested in Volyn, do such search and look for all
records with Volyn in the comments, and same for all other provinces.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK >from Kaushany, Bendery, SRULEVICH >from Tarutino, Ismail,
KHALIMOVICH >from Galats, Romania


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Residence Lists #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear researchers,

I am sending this post not only to Bessarabia SIG, but also to JewishGen Discussion group, because
it may help many researchers working in other regions.

We are working on new sets of Revision List records to be ready in December of this year. The
Bessarabia Revision List database include not only Revision Lists, but also Special Lists, Men's lists,
and also Residence lists. The different lists have different purposes and have in many cases different
information.

Today I want to let you know about one list which caught my attention. It is a Residence list for Yassy
(district) of Bessarabia gubernia (province) for 1875. I need to explain to you first why the district
called Yassy? The town Yassy, was never part of Bessarabia. Town Yassy was a capital of Moldova
(Moldavia) Principality before 1812. When Bessarabia became part of Russian Empire. Yassy was a
major center in Moldova (Moldavia) principality and later in the new state of Romania. Yassy district
before 1812 spread on both sides of Prut river (the border between Romania and Russian empire in
1812), and after 1812 the district in Bessarabia was also known as Yassy district until 1887, when it
was renamed to Beltsy district. Town of Beltsy was alsways a main town in Yassy and later Beltsy
district in Bessarabia.

The regular Revision lists is a list of people Registered in a particular town, possible also people
lived in same town, but not necessarily. We have discussed this already that Registration in one of
the societies (estates) was mandatory in Russian Empire, and people living in small towns, villages
had to register in a bigger towns, because societies did not exist for Middle Class or Merchants in
smaller places.

The list for Yassy (Beltsy) uezd for 1875 is a resident list. People were present on that year in one
of the towns of Yassy(Beltsy) uezd, but most of them were registered in other places: in large
towns of that uezd, like Beltsy, Faleshty, colony Aleksandreny or other uezd (districts) in
Bessarabia, like Orgeev, Teleneshty, Kishinev, Khotin, Novoselitsa, Lipkany, Soroki and many
others, also in that same list there are families registered in OTHER provinces of Russian Empire,
from many towns Mogilev-Podolsky, Yampol, Litin and others in Podolia, also Zaslav, Polone, etc.
in Volyn, also in a number of towns in Grodno, Kherson, Kiev provinces. The reason families
were registered in other provinces is most likely that someone arrived to Bessarabia to get
married, and got a family and left living in Bessarabia, or possibly arrived to settle on the land,
and did not change the registration.

The last group of people in that list or 1,726 people >from 449 families are citizens of Foreign
countries, and there are 108 such families (25%!). Most of them are >from Moldova principality
(later became Romania), but also there were citizens of Austria, Turkey, and Greece. Many of
these families in 1875 did not have yet the surnames. By the way if you search in Romania -
Bessarabia database and put Turkey for example at "Any field" you will get about 500 records,
and >from them 300 birth records where father is a citizen of Turkey. Or if you put in "Any
field" - citizen, you will get many thousands records where someone in the family is a citizen
of another country.

I am suggesting for example for people interested in Volyn, do such search and look for all
records with Volyn in the comments, and same for all other provinces.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK >from Kaushany, Bendery, SRULEVICH >from Tarutino, Ismail,
KHALIMOVICH >from Galats, Romania


Archival Inventories - need several translators from Russian #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Hi everybody,

I have told you about Archival Inventories we got >from Miriam Weiner's Collection.

It is about 300-400 typed pages in Russian for all Jewish material in Moldovan Archive in Kishinev.
I have already copied 100 >from them and Logan Kleinwaks did the OCR - to put the information
into a table, where we can edit it. Another volunteer, Roberta Jaffer, who is now in charge of
JGSGB Bessarabia SIG, agreed to make copies of all other pages, which will go to Logan too.

The next steps are following:
1) The table after OCR should be checked against the copies of the originals and part of it,
especially dates will need some corrections
2) After that we need to translate all this into English, similar to what I did for one of the Districts
- Bendery.
3) Among these pages there are a lot of references to people, and the next step would be to get
all this information to put into our Bessarabia SIG Miriam Weiner's collection database
4) There are several more steps for later.

I am looking forward for volunteers to do step 1 and step 2... and for that we need people who
can translate >from Russian.

Thanks a lot to Logan and Roberta and also to volunteers who are going to continue this very
important work.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK >from Kaushany, Bendery, SRULEVICH >from Tarutino, Ismail,
KHALIMOVICH >from Galats, Romania


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Archival Inventories - need several translators from Russian #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Hi everybody,

I have told you about Archival Inventories we got >from Miriam Weiner's Collection.

It is about 300-400 typed pages in Russian for all Jewish material in Moldovan Archive in Kishinev.
I have already copied 100 >from them and Logan Kleinwaks did the OCR - to put the information
into a table, where we can edit it. Another volunteer, Roberta Jaffer, who is now in charge of
JGSGB Bessarabia SIG, agreed to make copies of all other pages, which will go to Logan too.

The next steps are following:
1) The table after OCR should be checked against the copies of the originals and part of it,
especially dates will need some corrections
2) After that we need to translate all this into English, similar to what I did for one of the Districts
- Bendery.
3) Among these pages there are a lot of references to people, and the next step would be to get
all this information to put into our Bessarabia SIG Miriam Weiner's collection database
4) There are several more steps for later.

I am looking forward for volunteers to do step 1 and step 2... and for that we need people who
can translate >from Russian.

Thanks a lot to Logan and Roberta and also to volunteers who are going to continue this very
important work.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK >from Kaushany, Bendery, SRULEVICH >from Tarutino, Ismail,
KHALIMOVICH >from Galats, Romania


Yizkor Book Project, October 2018 #subcarpathia

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

I could not send out this Yizkor Book Project report without relating
to the recent horrendous murders in Pittsburgh. In a project which deals
intrinsically with the tragic consequences of Jewish hatred, it is always
disturbing to see that this same senseless hatred continues to this very
day. Our hearts and thoughts go out to the families of the victims and,
in fact, to all the Jewish community of Pittsburgh and pray that events
of this kind don't reoccur there and anywhere else.

And now to the report. Whilst this month we can't announce the completion
of a Yizkor book translation, I can say that there are several that are
just a whisker's way >from completion. I'm quite certain that I will be
able to pass on good news about several books in coming reports.

I am pleased, however, to announce that the Yizkor Books in Print Project
recently published the "Book of Stryj" on Stryj, Ukraine. The book was
coordinated over the years by Mike Kalt and its translation encouraged
vigorously by Uriel Zur Shutzer z"l >from the Stryj organization in Israel
who sadly passed away before the project was completed. In the final
stages of this project, we were extremely fortunate that Susan Rosin
stepped up and took on the considerable task of translating a major part
of this book, enabling its completion and now, its publishing.

Another published book made available recently by the YBIP Project is
"We Remember Lest the World Forget" covering the Holocaust in Belarus
and, in particular, the unique history of the Minsk Ghetto. The
translation of the original Russian book was facilitated by The Together
Plan, a UK Charity, and was kindly presented to the YB Project to be
published. Last month, the book was also made available online and
appears in our Translations Index under "Minsk, Belarus". Purchase
details of both of these books may be found via the link the Yizkor
books in Print link appearing at the end of this report, as does the
link to our Translations Index.

A recent addition to the list of our Translation Funds is the book
"Memorial Book of the Community of Siedlce" covering Siedlce, Poland.
This translation fund, like the many others, is our way of enabling
those with family connections and interest in a particular community,
to take part in a group effort to financially support the translation
of the book relating to its history and people. A link list to this
fund and all the other current funds appears at the end of this report
and please see if you are able to contribute to one of these projects
providing very unique information on our lost communities.


And now for the additions and updates are what we've carried out during
October:

We have added in one new book:

- Minsk, Belarus (We Remember Lest the World Forget)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/weremember/weremember.html

We have added in 8 new entries:

- Hanusovce nad Topl'ou, Slovakia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities
in Slovakia) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/slo172.html

- Jezor, Poland (Sosnowiec and the Surrounding Region in Zaglembie)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sosnowiec/Sos357.html

- Marijampole, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_263.html

- Pilviskiai, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_352.html

- Sarata, Ukraine (Akkerman and the towns of its district; memorial
book) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/akkerman/akk337.html

- Taurage, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_499.html

- Utena, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_566.html

- Virbalis, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_661.html

And we have continued to update 19 of our existing projects:

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Budanov, Ukraine (Book of Budzanow)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Budanov/Budanov.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of Dubno,
Wolyn) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dubno/dubno.html

- Dynow, Poland (The Memorial Book of Jewish Dinov)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dynow1/dynow1.html

- Kamyanyets, Belarus (Memorial Book of Kamenets Litovsk, Zastavye,
and Colonies) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kamenets/Kamenets.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Monor, Hungary (Bound by Fate: In Memory of the Jewish Community of
Monor) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Monor/Monor.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memories >from Nowy-Dwor)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/nowy_dwor1/nowy_dwor1.html

- Przemysl, Poland (Przemysl memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/przemysl/przemysl.html

- Smarhon, Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszowp.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the
neighboring villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23
communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- The Jacob Rassen Story
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JacobRassen/JacobRassen.html

- Turobin, Poland (The Turobin book; in memory of the Jewish community)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Turobin/Turobin.html

- Wolomin, Poland (Volomin; a memorial to the Jewish community of
Volomin) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/wolomin/wolomin.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Subcarpathia SIG #Subcarpathia Yizkor Book Project, October 2018 #subcarpathia

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

I could not send out this Yizkor Book Project report without relating
to the recent horrendous murders in Pittsburgh. In a project which deals
intrinsically with the tragic consequences of Jewish hatred, it is always
disturbing to see that this same senseless hatred continues to this very
day. Our hearts and thoughts go out to the families of the victims and,
in fact, to all the Jewish community of Pittsburgh and pray that events
of this kind don't reoccur there and anywhere else.

And now to the report. Whilst this month we can't announce the completion
of a Yizkor book translation, I can say that there are several that are
just a whisker's way >from completion. I'm quite certain that I will be
able to pass on good news about several books in coming reports.

I am pleased, however, to announce that the Yizkor Books in Print Project
recently published the "Book of Stryj" on Stryj, Ukraine. The book was
coordinated over the years by Mike Kalt and its translation encouraged
vigorously by Uriel Zur Shutzer z"l >from the Stryj organization in Israel
who sadly passed away before the project was completed. In the final
stages of this project, we were extremely fortunate that Susan Rosin
stepped up and took on the considerable task of translating a major part
of this book, enabling its completion and now, its publishing.

Another published book made available recently by the YBIP Project is
"We Remember Lest the World Forget" covering the Holocaust in Belarus
and, in particular, the unique history of the Minsk Ghetto. The
translation of the original Russian book was facilitated by The Together
Plan, a UK Charity, and was kindly presented to the YB Project to be
published. Last month, the book was also made available online and
appears in our Translations Index under "Minsk, Belarus". Purchase
details of both of these books may be found via the link the Yizkor
books in Print link appearing at the end of this report, as does the
link to our Translations Index.

A recent addition to the list of our Translation Funds is the book
"Memorial Book of the Community of Siedlce" covering Siedlce, Poland.
This translation fund, like the many others, is our way of enabling
those with family connections and interest in a particular community,
to take part in a group effort to financially support the translation
of the book relating to its history and people. A link list to this
fund and all the other current funds appears at the end of this report
and please see if you are able to contribute to one of these projects
providing very unique information on our lost communities.


And now for the additions and updates are what we've carried out during
October:

We have added in one new book:

- Minsk, Belarus (We Remember Lest the World Forget)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/weremember/weremember.html

We have added in 8 new entries:

- Hanusovce nad Topl'ou, Slovakia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities
in Slovakia) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/slo172.html

- Jezor, Poland (Sosnowiec and the Surrounding Region in Zaglembie)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sosnowiec/Sos357.html

- Marijampole, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_263.html

- Pilviskiai, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_352.html

- Sarata, Ukraine (Akkerman and the towns of its district; memorial
book) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/akkerman/akk337.html

- Taurage, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_499.html

- Utena, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_566.html

- Virbalis, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_661.html

And we have continued to update 19 of our existing projects:

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Budanov, Ukraine (Book of Budzanow)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Budanov/Budanov.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of Dubno,
Wolyn) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dubno/dubno.html

- Dynow, Poland (The Memorial Book of Jewish Dinov)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dynow1/dynow1.html

- Kamyanyets, Belarus (Memorial Book of Kamenets Litovsk, Zastavye,
and Colonies) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kamenets/Kamenets.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Monor, Hungary (Bound by Fate: In Memory of the Jewish Community of
Monor) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Monor/Monor.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memories >from Nowy-Dwor)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/nowy_dwor1/nowy_dwor1.html

- Przemysl, Poland (Przemysl memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/przemysl/przemysl.html

- Smarhon, Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszowp.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the
neighboring villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23
communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- The Jacob Rassen Story
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JacobRassen/JacobRassen.html

- Turobin, Poland (The Turobin book; in memory of the Jewish community)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Turobin/Turobin.html

- Wolomin, Poland (Volomin; a memorial to the Jewish community of
Volomin) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/wolomin/wolomin.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Yizkor Book Project, October 2018 #unitedkingdom

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

I could not send out this Yizkor Book Project report without relating
to the recent horrendous murders in Pittsburgh. In a project which deals
intrinsically with the tragic consequences of Jewish hatred, it is always
disturbing to see that this same senseless hatred continues to this very
day. Our hearts and thoughts go out to the families of the victims and,
in fact, to all the Jewish community of Pittsburgh and pray that events
of this kind don't reoccur there and anywhere else.

And now to the report. Whilst this month we can't announce the completion
of a Yizkor book translation, I can say that there are several that are
just a whisker's way >from completion. I'm quite certain that I will be
able to pass on good news about several books in coming reports.

I am pleased, however, to announce that the Yizkor Books in Print Project
recently published the "Book of Stryj" on Stryj, Ukraine. The book was
coordinated over the years by Mike Kalt and its translation encouraged
vigorously by Uriel Zur Shutzer z"l >from the Stryj organization in Israel
who sadly passed away before the project was completed. In the final
stages of this project, we were extremely fortunate that Susan Rosin
stepped up and took on the considerable task of translating a major part
of this book, enabling its completion and now, its publishing.

Another published book made available recently by the YBIP Project is
"We Remember Lest the World Forget" covering the Holocaust in Belarus
and, in particular, the unique history of the Minsk Ghetto. The
translation of the original Russian book was facilitated by The Together
Plan, a UK Charity, and was kindly presented to the YB Project to be
published. Last month, the book was also made available online and
appears in our Translations Index under "Minsk, Belarus". Purchase
details of both of these books may be found via the link the Yizkor
books in Print link appearing at the end of this report, as does the
link to our Translations Index.

A recent addition to the list of our Translation Funds is the book
"Memorial Book of the Community of Siedlce" covering Siedlce, Poland.
This translation fund, like the many others, is our way of enabling
those with family connections and interest in a particular community,
to take part in a group effort to financially support the translation
of the book relating to its history and people. A link list to this
fund and all the other current funds appears at the end of this report
and please see if you are able to contribute to one of these projects
providing very unique information on our lost communities.


And now for the additions and updates are what we've carried out during
October:

We have added in one new book:

- Minsk, Belarus (We Remember Lest the World Forget)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/weremember/weremember.html

We have added in 8 new entries:

- Hanusovce nad Topl'ou, Slovakia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities
in Slovakia) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/slo172.html

- Jezor, Poland (Sosnowiec and the Surrounding Region in Zaglembie)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sosnowiec/Sos357.html

- Marijampole, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_263.html

- Pilviskiai, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_352.html

- Sarata, Ukraine (Akkerman and the towns of its district; memorial
book) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/akkerman/akk337.html

- Taurage, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_499.html

- Utena, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_566.html

- Virbalis, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_661.html

And we have continued to update 19 of our existing projects:

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Budanov, Ukraine (Book of Budzanow)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Budanov/Budanov.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of Dubno,
Wolyn) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dubno/dubno.html

- Dynow, Poland (The Memorial Book of Jewish Dinov)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dynow1/dynow1.html

- Kamyanyets, Belarus (Memorial Book of Kamenets Litovsk, Zastavye,
and Colonies) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kamenets/Kamenets.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Monor, Hungary (Bound by Fate: In Memory of the Jewish Community of
Monor) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Monor/Monor.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memories >from Nowy-Dwor)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/nowy_dwor1/nowy_dwor1.html

- Przemysl, Poland (Przemysl memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/przemysl/przemysl.html

- Smarhon, Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszowp.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the
neighboring villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23
communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- The Jacob Rassen Story
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JacobRassen/JacobRassen.html

- Turobin, Poland (The Turobin book; in memory of the Jewish community)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Turobin/Turobin.html

- Wolomin, Poland (Volomin; a memorial to the Jewish community of
Volomin) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/wolomin/wolomin.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Yizkor Book Project, October 2018 #unitedkingdom

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

I could not send out this Yizkor Book Project report without relating
to the recent horrendous murders in Pittsburgh. In a project which deals
intrinsically with the tragic consequences of Jewish hatred, it is always
disturbing to see that this same senseless hatred continues to this very
day. Our hearts and thoughts go out to the families of the victims and,
in fact, to all the Jewish community of Pittsburgh and pray that events
of this kind don't reoccur there and anywhere else.

And now to the report. Whilst this month we can't announce the completion
of a Yizkor book translation, I can say that there are several that are
just a whisker's way >from completion. I'm quite certain that I will be
able to pass on good news about several books in coming reports.

I am pleased, however, to announce that the Yizkor Books in Print Project
recently published the "Book of Stryj" on Stryj, Ukraine. The book was
coordinated over the years by Mike Kalt and its translation encouraged
vigorously by Uriel Zur Shutzer z"l >from the Stryj organization in Israel
who sadly passed away before the project was completed. In the final
stages of this project, we were extremely fortunate that Susan Rosin
stepped up and took on the considerable task of translating a major part
of this book, enabling its completion and now, its publishing.

Another published book made available recently by the YBIP Project is
"We Remember Lest the World Forget" covering the Holocaust in Belarus
and, in particular, the unique history of the Minsk Ghetto. The
translation of the original Russian book was facilitated by The Together
Plan, a UK Charity, and was kindly presented to the YB Project to be
published. Last month, the book was also made available online and
appears in our Translations Index under "Minsk, Belarus". Purchase
details of both of these books may be found via the link the Yizkor
books in Print link appearing at the end of this report, as does the
link to our Translations Index.

A recent addition to the list of our Translation Funds is the book
"Memorial Book of the Community of Siedlce" covering Siedlce, Poland.
This translation fund, like the many others, is our way of enabling
those with family connections and interest in a particular community,
to take part in a group effort to financially support the translation
of the book relating to its history and people. A link list to this
fund and all the other current funds appears at the end of this report
and please see if you are able to contribute to one of these projects
providing very unique information on our lost communities.


And now for the additions and updates are what we've carried out during
October:

We have added in one new book:

- Minsk, Belarus (We Remember Lest the World Forget)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/weremember/weremember.html

We have added in 8 new entries:

- Hanusovce nad Topl'ou, Slovakia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities
in Slovakia) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/slo172.html

- Jezor, Poland (Sosnowiec and the Surrounding Region in Zaglembie)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sosnowiec/Sos357.html

- Marijampole, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_263.html

- Pilviskiai, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_352.html

- Sarata, Ukraine (Akkerman and the towns of its district; memorial
book) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/akkerman/akk337.html

- Taurage, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_499.html

- Utena, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_566.html

- Virbalis, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_661.html

And we have continued to update 19 of our existing projects:

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Budanov, Ukraine (Book of Budzanow)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Budanov/Budanov.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of Dubno,
Wolyn) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dubno/dubno.html

- Dynow, Poland (The Memorial Book of Jewish Dinov)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dynow1/dynow1.html

- Kamyanyets, Belarus (Memorial Book of Kamenets Litovsk, Zastavye,
and Colonies) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kamenets/Kamenets.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Monor, Hungary (Bound by Fate: In Memory of the Jewish Community of
Monor) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Monor/Monor.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memories >from Nowy-Dwor)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/nowy_dwor1/nowy_dwor1.html

- Przemysl, Poland (Przemysl memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/przemysl/przemysl.html

- Smarhon, Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszowp.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the
neighboring villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23
communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- The Jacob Rassen Story
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JacobRassen/JacobRassen.html

- Turobin, Poland (The Turobin book; in memory of the Jewish community)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Turobin/Turobin.html

- Wolomin, Poland (Volomin; a memorial to the Jewish community of
Volomin) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/wolomin/wolomin.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Re: Cold-Calling a Distant Relative Who Doesn't Know the Family Was Jewish #general

C Chaykin
 

To Angie as well as the person who whose family came >from Ukraine (sorry I lost
track of your original submission):

How sad that you lost your chance to get more information about your family >from
these newly-found cousins.

Also, hindsight is 20-20, but perhaps news about hidden Jewish ancestry should
be shared, preferentially, with person whose ancestors converted. It would then
be up to them whether to tell their spouse and family about their newfound
Jewish ancestry.

Carol Chaykin

From: Angie Elfassi <aelfassi51@yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 2 Nov 2018

In reply to this story, and my story is not about people denying their Jewish
ancestry, but I have been told, and found, that it is better to first write a
letter before making a phone call. I phoned a 2nd cousin once removed, who had
been adopted at birth. I was very excited when I found her and I phoned her
and she denied that she was the adopted child of .... (intentionally left
blank). But her older brother (also adopted at birth) had given me sufficient
information to know that I'd found the correct person.

So, again, better to write or email first!
I tried calling a man who is my 3rd cousin twice removed. I know his father's
headstone has a cross on it, so I already knew the family had left Judaism...
I mentioned that the family came >from a small town in Ukraine. She sounded
surprised, but told me to go on. So I asked her what she knew about the
family's religious background. She asked "what do you mean". So I said that
the family was originally Jewish. Well, she immediately changed her tone,
and said "I'm sorry, but the details don't match my husband's family. I have
to go. Bye".
Anyone else encounter this? Maybe I shouldn't have brought up religion, and
simply tried to get as much info as possible?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Cold-Calling a Distant Relative Who Doesn't Know the Family Was Jewish #general

C Chaykin
 

To Angie as well as the person who whose family came >from Ukraine (sorry I lost
track of your original submission):

How sad that you lost your chance to get more information about your family >from
these newly-found cousins.

Also, hindsight is 20-20, but perhaps news about hidden Jewish ancestry should
be shared, preferentially, with person whose ancestors converted. It would then
be up to them whether to tell their spouse and family about their newfound
Jewish ancestry.

Carol Chaykin

From: Angie Elfassi <aelfassi51@yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 2 Nov 2018

In reply to this story, and my story is not about people denying their Jewish
ancestry, but I have been told, and found, that it is better to first write a
letter before making a phone call. I phoned a 2nd cousin once removed, who had
been adopted at birth. I was very excited when I found her and I phoned her
and she denied that she was the adopted child of .... (intentionally left
blank). But her older brother (also adopted at birth) had given me sufficient
information to know that I'd found the correct person.

So, again, better to write or email first!
I tried calling a man who is my 3rd cousin twice removed. I know his father's
headstone has a cross on it, so I already knew the family had left Judaism...
I mentioned that the family came >from a small town in Ukraine. She sounded
surprised, but told me to go on. So I asked her what she knew about the
family's religious background. She asked "what do you mean". So I said that
the family was originally Jewish. Well, she immediately changed her tone,
and said "I'm sorry, but the details don't match my husband's family. I have
to go. Bye".
Anyone else encounter this? Maybe I shouldn't have brought up religion, and
simply tried to get as much info as possible?


The JGS of Montreal's next program- Monday, November 05, 2018 #general

Merle Kastner <mbkgrand18@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Montreal,
in association with the Jewish Public Library,
presents: Ellin Bessner:
"The Untold Stories of Canada's Jewish Fighters in Uniform in WWII"

Canadian author and journalist Ellin Bessner will discuss the methods
which she used to research for her new book, "Double Threat: Canadian Jews,
the Military, and World War II." Six years of research led to her documenting
the experiences of more than 17,000 Canadian Jews who donned a uniform in WWII.
Until now, Canada hasn't properly acknowledged their important contribution to the
Allied victory in the Second World War. They fought >from Dunkirk to D-Day
and beyond - they weren't only fighting for freedom and democracy but also,
to save their own people >from Hitler's Final Solution.

The meeting will be held on
Monday, November 05, 2018, at 7:30 pm
Gelber Conference Centre
5151 Cote Ste-Catherine/1 Carre Cummings

For all information on our upcoming meetings & Sunday Morning
Family Tree Workshops - JGS of Montreal Hotline - 24 hours a day:
514-484-0969 Please visit the JGS of Montreal website:
http://jgs-montreal.org/ and follow us on our Facebook page.

Merle Kastner, JGSM Programming
merlebk18@gmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The JGS of Montreal's next program- Monday, November 05, 2018 #general

Merle Kastner <mbkgrand18@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Montreal,
in association with the Jewish Public Library,
presents: Ellin Bessner:
"The Untold Stories of Canada's Jewish Fighters in Uniform in WWII"

Canadian author and journalist Ellin Bessner will discuss the methods
which she used to research for her new book, "Double Threat: Canadian Jews,
the Military, and World War II." Six years of research led to her documenting
the experiences of more than 17,000 Canadian Jews who donned a uniform in WWII.
Until now, Canada hasn't properly acknowledged their important contribution to the
Allied victory in the Second World War. They fought >from Dunkirk to D-Day
and beyond - they weren't only fighting for freedom and democracy but also,
to save their own people >from Hitler's Final Solution.

The meeting will be held on
Monday, November 05, 2018, at 7:30 pm
Gelber Conference Centre
5151 Cote Ste-Catherine/1 Carre Cummings

For all information on our upcoming meetings & Sunday Morning
Family Tree Workshops - JGS of Montreal Hotline - 24 hours a day:
514-484-0969 Please visit the JGS of Montreal website:
http://jgs-montreal.org/ and follow us on our Facebook page.

Merle Kastner, JGSM Programming
merlebk18@gmail.com


Re: Cold-Calling a Distant Relative Who Doesn't Know the Family Was Jewish #general

MERYL RIZZOTTI
 

Another thing to keep in mind is that sometimes children who are adopted are not
told that they were adopted. I have a relative who adopted two children and never
told them they were adopted. The son suddenly passed away in his forties >from a
heart attack. However, his younger sister suspected she was adopted and became
concerned that she would suffer the same unfortunate fate but was afraid/reluctant
to ask her mother. It was an open secret but no one talked about it and many years
later, as an adult, I was warned by another cousin, closer in age to the adoptive
mother, that anyone who brought the subject of adoption up to that relative would
be cut out of her life. About a year or so ago the cousin called me asked me if
she was adopted. She had found her brother's original birth certificate in her
father's belongings after he (the father) passed away (her parents had divorced)
but there were no records for her. The adoptive brother's birth parents had no
Jewish ancestry. After some hemming and hawing and without admitting that I knew
I claimed that I couldn't say for sure but offered to help her try to find the
information as she has health issues and felt she should know the truth. I
suggested she take a DNA test and I researched all baby girls born on her
birthday in LA. I found 3 matches. One was her adoptive name, The adoptive mother
had told her that originally she was going to name her a name that had an unusual
spelling but the grandfather was not pleased with that name so she gave her a
different name. One of the other record matches was that unusual first name. Her
birth mother had given her a first name and an initial. The third record was a
different record number. I then found a woman with the surname on that birth
record and there was also a family tree on Ancestry. Unfortunately, the owner of
the tree did not want to confront the woman we suspected was her birth mother
even though I pointed out the birth mother had named her and most likely she
might want to reconnect to the baby she gave up for adoption. The DNA test did
not provide any answers and the owner of the tree claimed that she was not a
DNA match to a known child of that possible birth mother and thus refused to
approach the woman we suspected was her birth mother nor give us the name of the
child she had later given birth to. The woman we had suspected to be the birth
mother was not Jewish and my cousin's DNA test indicated she was not as Jewish
as she thought she was. Obviously, her birth father was Jewish. I now feel that
the reason the owner of the tree did not want to help with the connection was
due to the fact that my cousin was raised Jewish and has a very strong Jewish
identity. The potential birth mother had subsequently married a couple of times
but not to Jewish men. I feel the owner of the tree was not comfortable with the
possibility that there might be a Jew in the family tree. So, at this point it
is doubtful that she will ever know who her birth parents were which is very sad.

Meryl Rizzotti
Los Angeles,Ca


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Cold-Calling a Distant Relative Who Doesn't Know the Family Was Jewish #general

MERYL RIZZOTTI
 

Another thing to keep in mind is that sometimes children who are adopted are not
told that they were adopted. I have a relative who adopted two children and never
told them they were adopted. The son suddenly passed away in his forties >from a
heart attack. However, his younger sister suspected she was adopted and became
concerned that she would suffer the same unfortunate fate but was afraid/reluctant
to ask her mother. It was an open secret but no one talked about it and many years
later, as an adult, I was warned by another cousin, closer in age to the adoptive
mother, that anyone who brought the subject of adoption up to that relative would
be cut out of her life. About a year or so ago the cousin called me asked me if
she was adopted. She had found her brother's original birth certificate in her
father's belongings after he (the father) passed away (her parents had divorced)
but there were no records for her. The adoptive brother's birth parents had no
Jewish ancestry. After some hemming and hawing and without admitting that I knew
I claimed that I couldn't say for sure but offered to help her try to find the
information as she has health issues and felt she should know the truth. I
suggested she take a DNA test and I researched all baby girls born on her
birthday in LA. I found 3 matches. One was her adoptive name, The adoptive mother
had told her that originally she was going to name her a name that had an unusual
spelling but the grandfather was not pleased with that name so she gave her a
different name. One of the other record matches was that unusual first name. Her
birth mother had given her a first name and an initial. The third record was a
different record number. I then found a woman with the surname on that birth
record and there was also a family tree on Ancestry. Unfortunately, the owner of
the tree did not want to confront the woman we suspected was her birth mother
even though I pointed out the birth mother had named her and most likely she
might want to reconnect to the baby she gave up for adoption. The DNA test did
not provide any answers and the owner of the tree claimed that she was not a
DNA match to a known child of that possible birth mother and thus refused to
approach the woman we suspected was her birth mother nor give us the name of the
child she had later given birth to. The woman we had suspected to be the birth
mother was not Jewish and my cousin's DNA test indicated she was not as Jewish
as she thought she was. Obviously, her birth father was Jewish. I now feel that
the reason the owner of the tree did not want to help with the connection was
due to the fact that my cousin was raised Jewish and has a very strong Jewish
identity. The potential birth mother had subsequently married a couple of times
but not to Jewish men. I feel the owner of the tree was not comfortable with the
possibility that there might be a Jew in the family tree. So, at this point it
is doubtful that she will ever know who her birth parents were which is very sad.

Meryl Rizzotti
Los Angeles,Ca

37381 - 37400 of 661852