Date   

How to research family expelled from Spain; surname in The Netherlands was Barenholtz #general

Penelope Koven
 

There is some family information (undocumented) that my maternal great
grandmother's family (surnames Barenholtz and Baranoff in The
Netherlands, Poland and Ukraine) were expelled >from Spain in 1492. How
can that be verified and researched? How can I find the family name in
Spain?

Penelope Koven
Seattle, Washington


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen How to research family expelled from Spain; surname in The Netherlands was Barenholtz #general

Penelope Koven
 

There is some family information (undocumented) that my maternal great
grandmother's family (surnames Barenholtz and Baranoff in The
Netherlands, Poland and Ukraine) were expelled >from Spain in 1492. How
can that be verified and researched? How can I find the family name in
Spain?

Penelope Koven
Seattle, Washington


Re: What's the name of the town? #general

Yitzhak Sapir
 

It might be Rivne (also known as Rovno)

This is the name of a large Jewish town in Ukraine with over 10000
residents in 1897 and over 20000 in 1931:
https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/community.php?usbgn=-1052247

There is also a smaller town with less than 500 people in 1923:
https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/community.php?usbgn=-1052476
(Probably the first is intended)

Yitzhak Sapir

On Mon, Dec 17, 2018 Evan Fishman ebf2001@comcast.net wrote:
I'd appreciate an interpretation of the town name on line 15 of the manifest
for Sure Mendelstein who arrived in New York City on 28 January 1907. It
appears to be "Robma," but I can't find anything resembling that on JewishGen
Town Finder or Google. She was >from Starokonstantinov, Ukraine.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: What's the name of the town? #general

Yitzhak Sapir
 

It might be Rivne (also known as Rovno)

This is the name of a large Jewish town in Ukraine with over 10000
residents in 1897 and over 20000 in 1931:
https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/community.php?usbgn=-1052247

There is also a smaller town with less than 500 people in 1923:
https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/community.php?usbgn=-1052476
(Probably the first is intended)

Yitzhak Sapir

On Mon, Dec 17, 2018 Evan Fishman ebf2001@comcast.net wrote:
I'd appreciate an interpretation of the town name on line 15 of the manifest
for Sure Mendelstein who arrived in New York City on 28 January 1907. It
appears to be "Robma," but I can't find anything resembling that on JewishGen
Town Finder or Google. She was >from Starokonstantinov, Ukraine.


(Germany) Germany Has Agreed To One Time Payments for Survivors of Kindertransport #unitedkingdom

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany (Claims
Conference) said the German government had agreed to payments of 2,500 euros
($2,800) to those still alive >from among the 10,000 people who fled on the
so-called "Kindertransport." This year is the 80th anniversary of the
Kindertransport bringing children to Britain >from Nazi Germany and elsewhere
in Europe.

It is estimated that about 1,000 survivors are alive today. About half of
the survivors are alive in Britain with some resettled in the United States,
Israel, Canada, Australia and elsewhere. There were about 10,000 children
from Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia and Poland taken to Britain of which
7,500 were Jewish.

For almost all the cases, the parents who remained behind were murdered in
concentration camps. It was after Kristallnacht that the British
government agreed to allow an unspecified number of children as refugees
from Nazi Germany or its annexed territories. The first such transport
arrived in Harwich on December 2, 1938, with the last leaving Germany on
September 1, 1939 the day that World War ll broke out; and the final
transport >from continental Europe left the Netherlands on May 14, 1940, the
same day Dutch forces surrendered to the Nazis.

According to the Claims Conference, "the German payment is an
acknowledgement that this was a traumatic, horrible thing that happened to
them."

Since 1952 the German government has paid more than $80 billion to
individuals for suffering and losses resulting of persecution by the Nazis.

To read more see:
https://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2018/12/17/world/europe/ap-eu-jewish-claims-children.html

I have no further information. If you need more information contact the
Claims Conference, although at the time of this posting there is nothing
about the payment to Kindertransport survivors listed.
http://www.claimscon.org/

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


New data added to All-Lithuania Database - 4th quarter update #general

Russ Maurer
 

The quarterly addition of new data to our All Lithuania Database (ALD) is
now searchable online at https://www.litvaksig.org/search-ald/ or through
JewishGen. The following is a summary.

The grand total of new lines of data is 32,594.

Revision List Template (28,001 lines): Conscription lists for Vilnius city
and suburbs, as well as for Sejny Uyezd of Suwalki gubernia; family lists
for towns in the Zarasai district. A unique list in this upload is the 1942
census of the Siauliai ghetto, 4,733 lines.

Tax / Voters Template (3,320 lines): A variety of records for towns in the
Panevezys and Zarasai districts, including tax and elector lists, passport
issuance records, real estate owners, and a list of reserve soldiers.
Also, a list of craftsmen for the Zarasai district.

Internal Passports (1,273 lines): Foreign passport applications for Vilnius
City.

Please note that not all data in a particular template is actually data of
that specific type - e.g., in this upload, passport issuance records appear
in the tax & voter template; conscription lists appear in the revision list
template. Please look at all search results even if you don't think the
record type category is relevant to your search. You just never know what
you'll find.

Also, we note that all of these lists have been available to qualified donors
for at least the last 18 months. To become a qualified donor for a district or
project and gain first access to new translations, as well as spreadsheets
for past translations, please visit the LitvakSIG website, www.litvaksig.org .

Happy hunting!

Russ Maurer & Eden Joachim


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom (Germany) Germany Has Agreed To One Time Payments for Survivors of Kindertransport #unitedkingdom

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany (Claims
Conference) said the German government had agreed to payments of 2,500 euros
($2,800) to those still alive >from among the 10,000 people who fled on the
so-called "Kindertransport." This year is the 80th anniversary of the
Kindertransport bringing children to Britain >from Nazi Germany and elsewhere
in Europe.

It is estimated that about 1,000 survivors are alive today. About half of
the survivors are alive in Britain with some resettled in the United States,
Israel, Canada, Australia and elsewhere. There were about 10,000 children
from Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia and Poland taken to Britain of which
7,500 were Jewish.

For almost all the cases, the parents who remained behind were murdered in
concentration camps. It was after Kristallnacht that the British
government agreed to allow an unspecified number of children as refugees
from Nazi Germany or its annexed territories. The first such transport
arrived in Harwich on December 2, 1938, with the last leaving Germany on
September 1, 1939 the day that World War ll broke out; and the final
transport >from continental Europe left the Netherlands on May 14, 1940, the
same day Dutch forces surrendered to the Nazis.

According to the Claims Conference, "the German payment is an
acknowledgement that this was a traumatic, horrible thing that happened to
them."

Since 1952 the German government has paid more than $80 billion to
individuals for suffering and losses resulting of persecution by the Nazis.

To read more see:
https://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2018/12/17/world/europe/ap-eu-jewish-claims-children.html

I have no further information. If you need more information contact the
Claims Conference, although at the time of this posting there is nothing
about the payment to Kindertransport survivors listed.
http://www.claimscon.org/

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New data added to All-Lithuania Database - 4th quarter update #general

Russ Maurer
 

The quarterly addition of new data to our All Lithuania Database (ALD) is
now searchable online at https://www.litvaksig.org/search-ald/ or through
JewishGen. The following is a summary.

The grand total of new lines of data is 32,594.

Revision List Template (28,001 lines): Conscription lists for Vilnius city
and suburbs, as well as for Sejny Uyezd of Suwalki gubernia; family lists
for towns in the Zarasai district. A unique list in this upload is the 1942
census of the Siauliai ghetto, 4,733 lines.

Tax / Voters Template (3,320 lines): A variety of records for towns in the
Panevezys and Zarasai districts, including tax and elector lists, passport
issuance records, real estate owners, and a list of reserve soldiers.
Also, a list of craftsmen for the Zarasai district.

Internal Passports (1,273 lines): Foreign passport applications for Vilnius
City.

Please note that not all data in a particular template is actually data of
that specific type - e.g., in this upload, passport issuance records appear
in the tax & voter template; conscription lists appear in the revision list
template. Please look at all search results even if you don't think the
record type category is relevant to your search. You just never know what
you'll find.

Also, we note that all of these lists have been available to qualified donors
for at least the last 18 months. To become a qualified donor for a district or
project and gain first access to new translations, as well as spreadsheets
for past translations, please visit the LitvakSIG website, www.litvaksig.org .

Happy hunting!

Russ Maurer & Eden Joachim


Re: Two sons with same Hebrew name? #general

Jim Yarin
 

Jeremy,
I have seen brothers with the same Hebrew given names >from the same general
era you describe, and attribute this to an effort to "hide" one of them from
the government's effort to draft boys. Only one is recorded in a census
record, so when authorities come around looking for him, they are only
looking for one. But I think this only applies where the two sons are close
in age. Were I you, Jeremy, I would quadruple check all of the information
you have for accuracy, to make sure in fact the two men had the same father,
as you may have made an incorrect assumption. Too often, what seems like an
unusual surname can be quite common in a small community, and
cousins/relatives of about the same age can be born with identical names
(given and surnames -- Abraham in this case), and might even have children,
separately, who they give the same name to (Yechezkial Leib, in this case).
I'd make sure that Abraham Deguts, with two different wives, as you've
concluded, is actually one person and not two. If two people, they very
likely may have named their sons after the same revered community
member/ancestor/relative. This possibility seems more likely given the 25
year difference between the two identically named men, who you think are
half brothers. Given the date of that generation, it may be simply that you
don't have adequate data to conclude one way or the other.

Jim Yarin
Acton, MA

<<I have a question about naming traditions that I'd like to seek people's
opinion on:
A while ago, I discovered an old Russian record which indicated that my
wife's great-grandfather Asker Deggots (Hebrew name Yechezkiel ben Avraham)
had an older half-brother called Hatskel Leib Deguts, who was born in Russia
about 25 years before Asker was born. They had the same father but different
mothers. I always assumed that this older half-brother must have died before
Asker was born, as surely the father, Abraham Deguts, wouldn't have given
the same Hebrew name to two sons....however, this week, I discovered that a
man called Leib Degutz emigrated >from Russia to the US in the 1890s. As the
surname Deggots / Degutz is so rare (perhaps unique?), it seemed highly
likely that this Leib Degutz came >from the same family as Asker. When I
looked further into this, I discovered that Leib Degutz was the son of an
Abraham Degutz, and he was born around the same time as Asker's half-brother
Hatskel Leib Deguts . Could Leib and Hatskel Leib be the same person, I
wondered? Yesterday, I found a photo of Leib's daughter's gravestone, and
this gives the Hebrew name of her father as Yechezkiel Yehuda. As Leib is a
common Yiddish kinnui for Yehuda, it seems pretty certain that the Leib
Degutz who went to the US was indeed Asker's half-brother.

But is this possible??? Does anyone know if it has ever been common practice
for two sons to have the same Hebrew name at the same time? Does it make a
difference that they were only half-brothers, and one was Yechezkiel (known
as Asker) while the other was Yechezkiel Yehuda (known as Leib)?
Many thanks,
Jeremy Schuman>>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Two sons with same Hebrew name? #general

Jim Yarin
 

Jeremy,
I have seen brothers with the same Hebrew given names >from the same general
era you describe, and attribute this to an effort to "hide" one of them from
the government's effort to draft boys. Only one is recorded in a census
record, so when authorities come around looking for him, they are only
looking for one. But I think this only applies where the two sons are close
in age. Were I you, Jeremy, I would quadruple check all of the information
you have for accuracy, to make sure in fact the two men had the same father,
as you may have made an incorrect assumption. Too often, what seems like an
unusual surname can be quite common in a small community, and
cousins/relatives of about the same age can be born with identical names
(given and surnames -- Abraham in this case), and might even have children,
separately, who they give the same name to (Yechezkial Leib, in this case).
I'd make sure that Abraham Deguts, with two different wives, as you've
concluded, is actually one person and not two. If two people, they very
likely may have named their sons after the same revered community
member/ancestor/relative. This possibility seems more likely given the 25
year difference between the two identically named men, who you think are
half brothers. Given the date of that generation, it may be simply that you
don't have adequate data to conclude one way or the other.

Jim Yarin
Acton, MA

<<I have a question about naming traditions that I'd like to seek people's
opinion on:
A while ago, I discovered an old Russian record which indicated that my
wife's great-grandfather Asker Deggots (Hebrew name Yechezkiel ben Avraham)
had an older half-brother called Hatskel Leib Deguts, who was born in Russia
about 25 years before Asker was born. They had the same father but different
mothers. I always assumed that this older half-brother must have died before
Asker was born, as surely the father, Abraham Deguts, wouldn't have given
the same Hebrew name to two sons....however, this week, I discovered that a
man called Leib Degutz emigrated >from Russia to the US in the 1890s. As the
surname Deggots / Degutz is so rare (perhaps unique?), it seemed highly
likely that this Leib Degutz came >from the same family as Asker. When I
looked further into this, I discovered that Leib Degutz was the son of an
Abraham Degutz, and he was born around the same time as Asker's half-brother
Hatskel Leib Deguts . Could Leib and Hatskel Leib be the same person, I
wondered? Yesterday, I found a photo of Leib's daughter's gravestone, and
this gives the Hebrew name of her father as Yechezkiel Yehuda. As Leib is a
common Yiddish kinnui for Yehuda, it seems pretty certain that the Leib
Degutz who went to the US was indeed Asker's half-brother.

But is this possible??? Does anyone know if it has ever been common practice
for two sons to have the same Hebrew name at the same time? Does it make a
difference that they were only half-brothers, and one was Yechezkiel (known
as Asker) while the other was Yechezkiel Yehuda (known as Leib)?
Many thanks,
Jeremy Schuman>>


shochet Yudel Shlomo - what next? #poland

Sylvia Caras
 

My grandfather arrived in the United States in 1892 with his wife and
two daughters and settled in Boston. I have found quite a lot about
him >from that date forward and about his wife's family in Lithuania
and in the United States.

I am trying to find more about him, where he came from, whether he
had siblings, his parents.

What I know is that he registered the births of his daughters in
Bialystok in 1891, surname Yudelowna, that at first he was a shochet
in Boston, and that his wife's family came >from Valbevizik. I'm
wondering if I might be able to track him through his religious
training or shtetl lists or even a Jewish marriage registry (I'd
guess 1888 or 1889). I'd appreciate any suggestions on next steps.

Yudel Shlomo (Joseph) Badanowitz son of Shlioma-Shaya

Sylvia Caras, Santa Cruz, California


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland shochet Yudel Shlomo - what next? #poland

Sylvia Caras
 

My grandfather arrived in the United States in 1892 with his wife and
two daughters and settled in Boston. I have found quite a lot about
him >from that date forward and about his wife's family in Lithuania
and in the United States.

I am trying to find more about him, where he came from, whether he
had siblings, his parents.

What I know is that he registered the births of his daughters in
Bialystok in 1891, surname Yudelowna, that at first he was a shochet
in Boston, and that his wife's family came >from Valbevizik. I'm
wondering if I might be able to track him through his religious
training or shtetl lists or even a Jewish marriage registry (I'd
guess 1888 or 1889). I'd appreciate any suggestions on next steps.

Yudel Shlomo (Joseph) Badanowitz son of Shlioma-Shaya

Sylvia Caras, Santa Cruz, California


Mlawa town and origin of last name MLAVSKJI/MLAVSKY #general

alla pinsky
 

Hello,
My family roots in the last 3 generations are >from Ukraine/Russian
Empire. My paternal last name, MLAVSKJI, based on phonetics, seems to
have links to town of Mlawa in Poland.
Does it make sense to anyone?

My paternal great grandfather given name was Bensimon (as I have found
in tax records >from 1907) which is most likely 2 names, Ben and Simon.
These names don't seem to be originated >from Poland or Ukraine or
Russian Empire.

Does my thinkinking make sense to anyone?

Appreciate any and all thoughts, Alla Pinsky


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Mlawa town and origin of last name MLAVSKJI/MLAVSKY #general

alla pinsky
 

Hello,
My family roots in the last 3 generations are >from Ukraine/Russian
Empire. My paternal last name, MLAVSKJI, based on phonetics, seems to
have links to town of Mlawa in Poland.
Does it make sense to anyone?

My paternal great grandfather given name was Bensimon (as I have found
in tax records >from 1907) which is most likely 2 names, Ben and Simon.
These names don't seem to be originated >from Poland or Ukraine or
Russian Empire.

Does my thinkinking make sense to anyone?

Appreciate any and all thoughts, Alla Pinsky


Re: Identify birthplace "Werche Volimer Gov"? #general

Igor Holyboroda
 

Dear colleagues!
In his message of Sat, 15 Dec 2018 David Brostoff wrote:
"I am trying to identify the birthplace of Dora (Scheine) FINKELSTEIN (ca.
1885-1906).
Her 1907 passenger list gives Werche Volimer Gov (or perhaps Gav).
Gov seems be an abbreviation for gubernia but I can't find anything close to
Volimer in the list of Russian governates here:
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_governorates_of_the_Russian_Empire>
Her naturalization petition gives Verhov, Rus., which I assume is the Werche
above, although I cannot locate it using the JewishGen Gazetteer, etc.
Other documents give only Russia."

I think "Werche Volimer Gov" should be Cherche village in the Volyn
(represented in the document as "Volimer") gubernia of the Russian
empire.

Regards,
Igor Holyboroda,
Lviv, Ukraine.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Identify birthplace "Werche Volimer Gov"? #general

Igor Holyboroda
 

Dear colleagues!
In his message of Sat, 15 Dec 2018 David Brostoff wrote:
"I am trying to identify the birthplace of Dora (Scheine) FINKELSTEIN (ca.
1885-1906).
Her 1907 passenger list gives Werche Volimer Gov (or perhaps Gav).
Gov seems be an abbreviation for gubernia but I can't find anything close to
Volimer in the list of Russian governates here:
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_governorates_of_the_Russian_Empire>
Her naturalization petition gives Verhov, Rus., which I assume is the Werche
above, although I cannot locate it using the JewishGen Gazetteer, etc.
Other documents give only Russia."

I think "Werche Volimer Gov" should be Cherche village in the Volyn
(represented in the document as "Volimer") gubernia of the Russian
empire.

Regards,
Igor Holyboroda,
Lviv, Ukraine.


Re: Identify birthplace "Werche Volimer Gov"? #general

Orit Lavi
 

Dear friends,

David Brostoff asked about the birthplace of Dora (Scheine) FINKELSTEIN (ca.
1885-1906), who arrived to Philadelphia in 1906.
"Her 1907 passenger list gives Werche Volimer Gov (or perhaps Gav)".

The place of origin is most likely the village Werchy (Polish), in Vohlyn
Gubernia - now called Verkhi (Verkhy), Ukraine.

It is located north about 37 km north east of Kovel, close to Kamien Koszyrski
(now Kamen Kashirskiy, Ukraine).

While Werchy does not appear among the Jewish communities in Poland, Yad Vashem
lists over 50 records related to this place.

Good luck,

Orit Lavi
Tsukey Yam, Israel


Re: Identify birthplace "Werche Volimer Gov"? #general

Igor Holyboroda
 

Dear colleagues!
In his message of Sat, 15 Dec 2018 David Brostoff wrote:
"I am trying to identify the birthplace of Dora (Scheine) FINKELSTEIN (ca.
1885-1906).
Her 1907 passenger list gives Werche Volimer Gov (or perhaps Gav).
Gov seems be an abbreviation for gubernia but I can't find anything close to
Volimer in the list of Russian governates here:
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_governorates_of_the_Russian_Empire>
Her naturalization petition gives Verhov, Rus., which I assume is the Werche
above, although I cannot locate it using the JewishGen Gazetteer, etc.
Other documents give only Russia."

I think "Werche Volimer Gov" should be Cherche village in the Volyn
(represented in the document as "Volimer") gubernia of the Russian
empire.
Regards,
Igor Holyboroda,
Lviv, Ukraine.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Identify birthplace "Werche Volimer Gov"? #general

Orit Lavi
 

Dear friends,

David Brostoff asked about the birthplace of Dora (Scheine) FINKELSTEIN (ca.
1885-1906), who arrived to Philadelphia in 1906.
"Her 1907 passenger list gives Werche Volimer Gov (or perhaps Gav)".

The place of origin is most likely the village Werchy (Polish), in Vohlyn
Gubernia - now called Verkhi (Verkhy), Ukraine.

It is located north about 37 km north east of Kovel, close to Kamien Koszyrski
(now Kamen Kashirskiy, Ukraine).

While Werchy does not appear among the Jewish communities in Poland, Yad Vashem
lists over 50 records related to this place.

Good luck,

Orit Lavi
Tsukey Yam, Israel


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Identify birthplace "Werche Volimer Gov"? #ukraine

Igor Holyboroda
 

Dear colleagues!
In his message of Sat, 15 Dec 2018 David Brostoff wrote:
"I am trying to identify the birthplace of Dora (Scheine) FINKELSTEIN (ca.
1885-1906).
Her 1907 passenger list gives Werche Volimer Gov (or perhaps Gav).
Gov seems be an abbreviation for gubernia but I can't find anything close to
Volimer in the list of Russian governates here:
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_governorates_of_the_Russian_Empire>
Her naturalization petition gives Verhov, Rus., which I assume is the Werche
above, although I cannot locate it using the JewishGen Gazetteer, etc.
Other documents give only Russia."

I think "Werche Volimer Gov" should be Cherche village in the Volyn
(represented in the document as "Volimer") gubernia of the Russian
empire.
Regards,
Igor Holyboroda,
Lviv, Ukraine.

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