Date   

(European Union) European Jewish Cemeteries Initiative Launches New Website With Surveys of 1500 Jewish Cemeteries #romania

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The European Jewish Cemeteries Initiative (ESJF) has launched its new
website funded by the European Union. It has mapped 1500 cemeteries in 5
countries: Greece, Lithuania, Moldova, Slovakia and the Ukraine. See:
https://www.myheritage.com/research/category-3030/military-documents. The
open access data base include all the surveys being done in 2019-2020 may be
accessed at: https://www.esjf-surveys.org/surveys/

As each cemetery is completed and processed aerial photographs, historical
data and geographical data will be uploaded to the website. This is a work
in progress.

As previously reported, the European Union provided 800,000 Euros for the
project. The ESJF started work in 2015 by surveying and fencing Jewish
cemeteries to protect them >from destruction. With the EU grant, it has
expanded its mission using drone technology and historical research to map
the 1500 Jewish cemetery sites in the 5 aforementioned countries. TO read
more about the ESJF see: https://www.esjf-surveys.org/about-us/

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Romania SIG #Romania (European Union) European Jewish Cemeteries Initiative Launches New Website With Surveys of 1500 Jewish Cemeteries #romania

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The European Jewish Cemeteries Initiative (ESJF) has launched its new
website funded by the European Union. It has mapped 1500 cemeteries in 5
countries: Greece, Lithuania, Moldova, Slovakia and the Ukraine. See:
https://www.myheritage.com/research/category-3030/military-documents. The
open access data base include all the surveys being done in 2019-2020 may be
accessed at: https://www.esjf-surveys.org/surveys/

As each cemetery is completed and processed aerial photographs, historical
data and geographical data will be uploaded to the website. This is a work
in progress.

As previously reported, the European Union provided 800,000 Euros for the
project. The ESJF started work in 2015 by surveying and fencing Jewish
cemeteries to protect them >from destruction. With the EU grant, it has
expanded its mission using drone technology and historical research to map
the 1500 Jewish cemetery sites in the 5 aforementioned countries. TO read
more about the ESJF see: https://www.esjf-surveys.org/about-us/

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Storozhynets and Nepolokivtsi #romania

Sabrina Bonus <sabrina.bonus@...>
 

This is my first post, and thanks in advance for any assistance. I
have been searching the online databases for family in Storojinetz to
no avail. My grandmother was born there in 1915 and came to the U.S.
1935, her brothers shortly after. I have a paper copy of her birth
record extracted in 1935, and a certificate of nationality with the
names of all her siblings and her mother, plus the mother's date of
birth (1884, Nepolocauti) and death (1934, Storojinetz).

The surname for everyone in the documents is Sonnenreich. The father
is not listed, and this is who I most want to find. My understanding
is that he died before 1934. I am told that after the children were
orphaned in 1934, the authorities took possession of the house and
turned it into a police station. 4 siblings came to the U.S. and 2
siblings stayed behind and died in or on the way to Transnistra.

Did any records survive >from these towns? If so, I must be doing
something wrong. I read about a cemetery project 2 years ago, but not
sure of the status of that.

Sabrina


Romania SIG #Romania Storozhynets and Nepolokivtsi #romania

Sabrina Bonus <sabrina.bonus@...>
 

This is my first post, and thanks in advance for any assistance. I
have been searching the online databases for family in Storojinetz to
no avail. My grandmother was born there in 1915 and came to the U.S.
1935, her brothers shortly after. I have a paper copy of her birth
record extracted in 1935, and a certificate of nationality with the
names of all her siblings and her mother, plus the mother's date of
birth (1884, Nepolocauti) and death (1934, Storojinetz).

The surname for everyone in the documents is Sonnenreich. The father
is not listed, and this is who I most want to find. My understanding
is that he died before 1934. I am told that after the children were
orphaned in 1934, the authorities took possession of the house and
turned it into a police station. 4 siblings came to the U.S. and 2
siblings stayed behind and died in or on the way to Transnistra.

Did any records survive >from these towns? If so, I must be doing
something wrong. I read about a cemetery project 2 years ago, but not
sure of the status of that.

Sabrina


Re: Finding a grave in Craiova #romania

K Charles Real Estate <charles@...>
 

Thank you for your response.

Best Regards

Charles German
charles@kcharlesrealestate.com.au


Romania SIG #Romania RE: Finding a grave in Craiova #romania

K Charles Real Estate <charles@...>
 

Thank you for your response.

Best Regards

Charles German
charles@kcharlesrealestate.com.au


Soviet censuses #general

Joseph Walder <jswalder@...>
 

Are any of the Soviet-era censuses in a form similar to the 1897
Russian Empire census or US censuses? In other words, is it possible
to search for particular names >from particular places? By "search"
here I mean visual inspection as well as using possibly digitized and
indexed records.

Thanks for any suggestions.

Joseph Walder, Portland, Oregon, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Soviet censuses #general

Joseph Walder <jswalder@...>
 

Are any of the Soviet-era censuses in a form similar to the 1897
Russian Empire census or US censuses? In other words, is it possible
to search for particular names >from particular places? By "search"
here I mean visual inspection as well as using possibly digitized and
indexed records.

Thanks for any suggestions.

Joseph Walder, Portland, Oregon, USA


This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #general

Bruce Drake
 

This week's excerpt is the story of an "ordinary" man. It is perhaps
not as dramatic as many of the Yizkor book chapters presented here,
but it is a portrait of a man "happy with his portion of life" who
worked many jobs, each of which provides its own picture of life in
the shtetl. In the beginning, Todres was a water-carrier, then a
grave-digger ("When his work was done, he used to take out >from his
pocket a bottle of whisky or spirit and drank, but he never was
drunk.") and undertaker.

When his earnings were not enough, he worked as a helper in the
synagogue. When the sexton's daughter scandalized the congregation by
converting to Christianity and marrying a Pole, Todres took his place,
winning over those who were less than happy about his new role. He
brought home every penny he earned to his wife (who cooked for him
meals that were "very far >from good and tasty.") Todres' story, "Image
of Ordinary People," is >from the Yizkor book of Sopotkin, Belarus.

URL: https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/2272160752806067

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #general

Bruce Drake
 

This week's excerpt is the story of an "ordinary" man. It is perhaps
not as dramatic as many of the Yizkor book chapters presented here,
but it is a portrait of a man "happy with his portion of life" who
worked many jobs, each of which provides its own picture of life in
the shtetl. In the beginning, Todres was a water-carrier, then a
grave-digger ("When his work was done, he used to take out >from his
pocket a bottle of whisky or spirit and drank, but he never was
drunk.") and undertaker.

When his earnings were not enough, he worked as a helper in the
synagogue. When the sexton's daughter scandalized the congregation by
converting to Christianity and marrying a Pole, Todres took his place,
winning over those who were less than happy about his new role. He
brought home every penny he earned to his wife (who cooked for him
meals that were "very far >from good and tasty.") Todres' story, "Image
of Ordinary People," is >from the Yizkor book of Sopotkin, Belarus.

URL: https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/2272160752806067

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


Re: Need Help with Unknown Towns in Galicia #galicia

Bette Mas
 

Claudia Bullock wrote: <<My grandfather, Morris Newman, indicated on
his Connecticut Naturalization papers that he was born in Satin, Austria,
and that his last place of residence before immigrating to the U.S. was
Frassin, Austria. He also says on his World War I draft registration that he
was born in Saiten, Galicia, Austria. Now, my grandfather was the oldest
of 4 brothers, and his younger brothers are all known to have been born
in Czortkow. What is puzzling is that there doesn't seem to be any town
called Saiten, or Satin. So, I am looking for advice on what town this
could possibly be...>>

-----

The first rule when trying to identify an immigrant's unknown town is to
be sure you have obtained all possible family documents and data >from
Ancestry.

The town of Satin or Saiten, Austria was not found in Gesher Galicia's
Galician Town Locator or JewishGen Gazetteer, searching by distance
and direction >from Czortkow, now Chortkiv, Ukraine (coordinates 4901
2548).
< https://www.geshergalicia.org/galician-town-locator/ >
< https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/LocTown.asp >

Claudia did not mention having Morris Newman's ship manifest. Per his
naturalization documents, including Certificate of Arrival, Morris
immigrated 26 Jul 1910 as Moses Neuman on the Noordam >from
Rotterdam. Morris' ship manifest lists stepmother Neche Newman in
Frassin Bucowina, destination brother Max in Hartford Conn, and place
of birth Husiatyn, Austria.

JewishGen Communities Locality Page for Husyatyn, Ukraine
< https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/community.php?usbgn=-1039957 >
Husiatyn was in Galicia, Austria before WWI and in Kopyczynce district,
Tarnopol province, Poland between the Wars. Coordinates 4904 2613.

JewishGen Communities Locality Page for Frasin, Romania
< https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/community.php?usbgn=-1159506 >
Frassin was in Bukovina, Austria before WWI and in Romania between the
Wars. Coordinates 4732 2548.

Bukovina is a historical region today divided between Romania and
Ukraine. A region of Moldavia during the Middle Ages, the territory of
what became known as Bukovina was, >from 1774 to 1918, an
administrative division of the Habsburg Monarchy, the Austrian Empire,
and Austria-Hungary.

Bette Stoop Mas
USA


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia RE: Need Help with Unknown Towns in Galicia #galicia

Bette Mas
 

Claudia Bullock wrote: <<My grandfather, Morris Newman, indicated on
his Connecticut Naturalization papers that he was born in Satin, Austria,
and that his last place of residence before immigrating to the U.S. was
Frassin, Austria. He also says on his World War I draft registration that he
was born in Saiten, Galicia, Austria. Now, my grandfather was the oldest
of 4 brothers, and his younger brothers are all known to have been born
in Czortkow. What is puzzling is that there doesn't seem to be any town
called Saiten, or Satin. So, I am looking for advice on what town this
could possibly be...>>

-----

The first rule when trying to identify an immigrant's unknown town is to
be sure you have obtained all possible family documents and data >from
Ancestry.

The town of Satin or Saiten, Austria was not found in Gesher Galicia's
Galician Town Locator or JewishGen Gazetteer, searching by distance
and direction >from Czortkow, now Chortkiv, Ukraine (coordinates 4901
2548).
< https://www.geshergalicia.org/galician-town-locator/ >
< https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/LocTown.asp >

Claudia did not mention having Morris Newman's ship manifest. Per his
naturalization documents, including Certificate of Arrival, Morris
immigrated 26 Jul 1910 as Moses Neuman on the Noordam >from
Rotterdam. Morris' ship manifest lists stepmother Neche Newman in
Frassin Bucowina, destination brother Max in Hartford Conn, and place
of birth Husiatyn, Austria.

JewishGen Communities Locality Page for Husyatyn, Ukraine
< https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/community.php?usbgn=-1039957 >
Husiatyn was in Galicia, Austria before WWI and in Kopyczynce district,
Tarnopol province, Poland between the Wars. Coordinates 4904 2613.

JewishGen Communities Locality Page for Frasin, Romania
< https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/community.php?usbgn=-1159506 >
Frassin was in Bukovina, Austria before WWI and in Romania between the
Wars. Coordinates 4732 2548.

Bukovina is a historical region today divided between Romania and
Ukraine. A region of Moldavia during the Middle Ages, the territory of
what became known as Bukovina was, >from 1774 to 1918, an
administrative division of the Habsburg Monarchy, the Austrian Empire,
and Austria-Hungary.

Bette Stoop Mas
USA


Fourteenth International Conference on Jewish Names Bar-Ilan University June 3, 2019 #general

Saul Issroff
 

Fourteenth International Conference on Jewish Names
Bar-Ilan University, The Faculty of Jewish Studies, The Israel and
Golda Koschitzky Department of Jewish History and Contemporary Jewry
The Project for the Study of Jewish Names

Monday, June 3, 2019, The Midrasha (Building 405), Bar-Ilan
University, Ramat-Gan, Israel

Session 1: 9:00-10:45: Names and their Meanings
Chair: Prof. Meir Bar-Ilan
Greetings: Prof. Kimmy Caplan, Chair, The Department of Jewish History
and Contemporary Jewry
Prof. Aaron Demsky, Head of the Project for the Study
of Jewish Names

Avshalom Kor: >from Netanyahu to Gans, >from Binyamin to Benny (Hebrew)

Amichay Schwartz (Ariel University): Ashtori Ha-Parḟi: The Origin of
the Name and the Location of Florencia (Hebrew)

Yosef Rivlin (Bar-Ilan University): Kabbalistic Naming Instructions
and their Effect (Hebrew)

Amer Dahamshe (The Arab Academic College of Education in Israel,
Haifa): Names and Memory: Street Signs in the Jewish Quarter of the
Old City of Jerusalem (Hebrew)

Session 2: 11:00-12:30: Methodological Aspects of the Study of Names
Chair: Prof. Emmanuel Friedheim

Mechael Osband (University of Haifa, Ohalo, Kineret, and Tel-Hai
Academic Colleges): Majduliyya: A Case Study in the Question of Name
Preservation in the Golan (Hebrew)

Felicia Waldman (University of Bucharest): Drawing a Genealogical Tree
â?? Overcoming Inaccurate or Missing Local Archival Sources (English)

Nardo Bonomi Braverman (Greve in Chianti â?? Firenze): Toponymic
Surnames in Italian Jewish Onomastics: A Handy Source (English)

Carmi J. Neiger (Elmhurst College): Finding Distinctive Jewish Names
in Cincinnati, Ohio (English)
Session 3: 14:00-15:15: Naming in Literature, Halakhah and Custom
Chair: Prof. Aaron Demsky
Greetings: Prof. Yaron Harel, Dean of the Faculty of Jewish Studies

Erga Heller (Kaye Academic College of Education): In the Beginning
there was Ziva: Naming Israeli Characters in Popular American
English-Speaking Television Series (Hebrew)

Yaron Silverstein (Hemdat Hadarom College): "Eretz Israel" in the
Byzantine Period: A Study of the Jerusalem Talmud's Understanding of
"The Area Settled by the Returnees >from Babylon" (Hebrew)

Aharon Gaimani (Bar-Ilan University): First Names as a Segula (a
Charm) for Good Fortune and Longevity in Ketubbot (Prenuptial
Agreements) >from Yemen (Hebrew)

Session 4: 15:30-17:00: Jewish Names in Europe
Chair: Prof. Gershon Bacon

Letizia Cerqueglini (Tel Aviv University): Jewish Family Names in the
Papal State >from the Sixteenth Century to the Italian Unification
(English)

Johannes Czakai (Hebrew University of Jerusalem): Switzerland Between
the Carpathians and Prut: The History of Jewish Family Names in
Bukovina (English)

Aleksandra Zurek-Huszcz (University of Warsaw): First Names of
Converts >from Judaism to Christianity in Warsaw 1826-1850 (English)

Igor Kusin (University of Zagreb): First Names of Zagreb Jews >from the
Beginning of the 19th Century until the Second World War (English)

Session 5: 17:15-18:45: Biblical Names >from Antiquity to Modern Times
Chair: Prof. Michael Avioz

Aharon Tavger (Ariel University) and Chris McKinny (Texas A&M
University Corpus Christi): The Meaning of the Toponyms Millo and
Bethmillo: A New Interpretation According to New Archaeological and
Historical-Geographical Aspects (Hebrew)

Gershon Galil (University of Haifa): A New Look at the Etymology of
Goliath's Name (Hebrew)

Mitka R. Golub (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem): On a Digital
Onomasticon and on Personal Names with the Element Ba'al in First
Temple Period Epigraphic Artifacts and in the Bible (Hebrew)

Ruvik Rosenthal: Biblical Eponyms as Creators of National and Cultural
Identity (Hebrew)

The conference is supported by the Faculty of Jewish Studies and the
Koschitzky Fund, Bar-Ilan University..For information:
Yigal.Levin@biu.ac.il
The Public is Welcome!

Note several well known genealogists are speakers.

Saul Issroff


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Fourteenth International Conference on Jewish Names Bar-Ilan University June 3, 2019 #general

Saul Issroff
 

Fourteenth International Conference on Jewish Names
Bar-Ilan University, The Faculty of Jewish Studies, The Israel and
Golda Koschitzky Department of Jewish History and Contemporary Jewry
The Project for the Study of Jewish Names

Monday, June 3, 2019, The Midrasha (Building 405), Bar-Ilan
University, Ramat-Gan, Israel

Session 1: 9:00-10:45: Names and their Meanings
Chair: Prof. Meir Bar-Ilan
Greetings: Prof. Kimmy Caplan, Chair, The Department of Jewish History
and Contemporary Jewry
Prof. Aaron Demsky, Head of the Project for the Study
of Jewish Names

Avshalom Kor: >from Netanyahu to Gans, >from Binyamin to Benny (Hebrew)

Amichay Schwartz (Ariel University): Ashtori Ha-Parḟi: The Origin of
the Name and the Location of Florencia (Hebrew)

Yosef Rivlin (Bar-Ilan University): Kabbalistic Naming Instructions
and their Effect (Hebrew)

Amer Dahamshe (The Arab Academic College of Education in Israel,
Haifa): Names and Memory: Street Signs in the Jewish Quarter of the
Old City of Jerusalem (Hebrew)

Session 2: 11:00-12:30: Methodological Aspects of the Study of Names
Chair: Prof. Emmanuel Friedheim

Mechael Osband (University of Haifa, Ohalo, Kineret, and Tel-Hai
Academic Colleges): Majduliyya: A Case Study in the Question of Name
Preservation in the Golan (Hebrew)

Felicia Waldman (University of Bucharest): Drawing a Genealogical Tree
â?? Overcoming Inaccurate or Missing Local Archival Sources (English)

Nardo Bonomi Braverman (Greve in Chianti â?? Firenze): Toponymic
Surnames in Italian Jewish Onomastics: A Handy Source (English)

Carmi J. Neiger (Elmhurst College): Finding Distinctive Jewish Names
in Cincinnati, Ohio (English)
Session 3: 14:00-15:15: Naming in Literature, Halakhah and Custom
Chair: Prof. Aaron Demsky
Greetings: Prof. Yaron Harel, Dean of the Faculty of Jewish Studies

Erga Heller (Kaye Academic College of Education): In the Beginning
there was Ziva: Naming Israeli Characters in Popular American
English-Speaking Television Series (Hebrew)

Yaron Silverstein (Hemdat Hadarom College): "Eretz Israel" in the
Byzantine Period: A Study of the Jerusalem Talmud's Understanding of
"The Area Settled by the Returnees >from Babylon" (Hebrew)

Aharon Gaimani (Bar-Ilan University): First Names as a Segula (a
Charm) for Good Fortune and Longevity in Ketubbot (Prenuptial
Agreements) >from Yemen (Hebrew)

Session 4: 15:30-17:00: Jewish Names in Europe
Chair: Prof. Gershon Bacon

Letizia Cerqueglini (Tel Aviv University): Jewish Family Names in the
Papal State >from the Sixteenth Century to the Italian Unification
(English)

Johannes Czakai (Hebrew University of Jerusalem): Switzerland Between
the Carpathians and Prut: The History of Jewish Family Names in
Bukovina (English)

Aleksandra Zurek-Huszcz (University of Warsaw): First Names of
Converts >from Judaism to Christianity in Warsaw 1826-1850 (English)

Igor Kusin (University of Zagreb): First Names of Zagreb Jews >from the
Beginning of the 19th Century until the Second World War (English)

Session 5: 17:15-18:45: Biblical Names >from Antiquity to Modern Times
Chair: Prof. Michael Avioz

Aharon Tavger (Ariel University) and Chris McKinny (Texas A&M
University Corpus Christi): The Meaning of the Toponyms Millo and
Bethmillo: A New Interpretation According to New Archaeological and
Historical-Geographical Aspects (Hebrew)

Gershon Galil (University of Haifa): A New Look at the Etymology of
Goliath's Name (Hebrew)

Mitka R. Golub (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem): On a Digital
Onomasticon and on Personal Names with the Element Ba'al in First
Temple Period Epigraphic Artifacts and in the Bible (Hebrew)

Ruvik Rosenthal: Biblical Eponyms as Creators of National and Cultural
Identity (Hebrew)

The conference is supported by the Faculty of Jewish Studies and the
Koschitzky Fund, Bar-Ilan University..For information:
Yigal.Levin@biu.ac.il
The Public is Welcome!

Note several well known genealogists are speakers.

Saul Issroff


Re: Seeking Grave Photo - Glogow, Poland #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Jayne Summers wrote:
My great-grandfather, Avraham Heuman, passed away around 1910. The family
lived in a village in or near Glogow, Poland. My aunt told me that mail to
the family used to be addressed to "Glogow Colo Jeshuv" (not entirely sure
about the spelling).
Is the Jewish cemetery in that area intact? If anyone is nearby and can get
a grave photo, or let me know if there's any record of his grave, I'd
appreciate it.
Jayne,

Town was known as Glogow kolo Rzeszowa (Glogow near Rzeszow).
Following end of WWII and the incorporation by Poland German lands,
including town Glogau, which was renamed Glogow. "Your"Glogow has been
renamed to Glogow Malopolski.

There were two Jewish cemeteries in town, the old cemetery was established
in 1712, as usual, on the land located beyond town walls. Cemetery was
officially closed in 1935, but apparently some burials continue during WWII.
Please refer to Mr. Bielawski outstanding "kirkuty" site at:

http://www.kirkuty.xip.pl/glogow_malopolski.htm

New cemetery was established at the beginning of 20 century and according to
publication: "Krawiec J., Jewish community of G'ogow Ma'opolski', 120 people
were buried there till year 1939.

Both cemeteries have been completely destroyed, no matzevot left. Some
cemetery stones were used to improve streets hardness surfaces, and the
majority have been utilized, as usual, by the locals for their construction
needs.

Please also visit:

https://sztetl.org.pl/en/towns/g/99-glogow-malopolski

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Seeking Grave Photo - Glogow, Poland #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Jayne Summers wrote:
My great-grandfather, Avraham Heuman, passed away around 1910. The family
lived in a village in or near Glogow, Poland. My aunt told me that mail to
the family used to be addressed to "Glogow Colo Jeshuv" (not entirely sure
about the spelling).
Is the Jewish cemetery in that area intact? If anyone is nearby and can get
a grave photo, or let me know if there's any record of his grave, I'd
appreciate it.
Jayne,

Town was known as Glogow kolo Rzeszowa (Glogow near Rzeszow).
Following end of WWII and the incorporation by Poland German lands,
including town Glogau, which was renamed Glogow. "Your"Glogow has been
renamed to Glogow Malopolski.

There were two Jewish cemeteries in town, the old cemetery was established
in 1712, as usual, on the land located beyond town walls. Cemetery was
officially closed in 1935, but apparently some burials continue during WWII.
Please refer to Mr. Bielawski outstanding "kirkuty" site at:

http://www.kirkuty.xip.pl/glogow_malopolski.htm

New cemetery was established at the beginning of 20 century and according to
publication: "Krawiec J., Jewish community of G'ogow Ma'opolski', 120 people
were buried there till year 1939.

Both cemeteries have been completely destroyed, no matzevot left. Some
cemetery stones were used to improve streets hardness surfaces, and the
majority have been utilized, as usual, by the locals for their construction
needs.

Please also visit:

https://sztetl.org.pl/en/towns/g/99-glogow-malopolski

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


NYC Records help #general

Steve Pickoltz
 

Help and or Guidance needed. Here goes.

In part, this is the info that that I sent to the Archives Center at the
Records Management Division for NYC.

I have a Birth Record #18810 dated May 21, 1893 for a male, no name PICKHOLTZ,
born at the Sloan Maternity Hospital in NYC. The father is only listed as
PICKHOLTZ, and the mother is listed as "Lena" PICKHOLTZ. (The new owners of
this hospital no longer have records going back that far.)

I also have a Death Cert. #20801, dated June 4, 1893, for a Israel PICKHOLTZ,
who died at the Hebrew Sheltering Arms, located at 210 Madison St., NYC. The
parents are listed as Jakiel and "Marie" Pickholtz. The child was said to be
14 days old at death.

If you notice, the mothers' names are different, but the time between birth
and death seem correct, so this could be the same person.

I am looking to prove this un-named PICKHOLTZ and the Israel PICKHOLTZ are one
in the same. This can only be done if the mothers are the same. This is the
only info I have been able to find on this (these) families. Can you help?

What I got >from the Archives Center was a form to fill out to get a "Birth
Record" at a cost of $15.00. I already have it as stated above in the letter
to them.

Does anyone have a suggestion?

Steve Pickholtz
New Jersey
nj55turtle@comcast.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen NYC Records help #general

Steve Pickoltz
 

Help and or Guidance needed. Here goes.

In part, this is the info that that I sent to the Archives Center at the
Records Management Division for NYC.

I have a Birth Record #18810 dated May 21, 1893 for a male, no name PICKHOLTZ,
born at the Sloan Maternity Hospital in NYC. The father is only listed as
PICKHOLTZ, and the mother is listed as "Lena" PICKHOLTZ. (The new owners of
this hospital no longer have records going back that far.)

I also have a Death Cert. #20801, dated June 4, 1893, for a Israel PICKHOLTZ,
who died at the Hebrew Sheltering Arms, located at 210 Madison St., NYC. The
parents are listed as Jakiel and "Marie" Pickholtz. The child was said to be
14 days old at death.

If you notice, the mothers' names are different, but the time between birth
and death seem correct, so this could be the same person.

I am looking to prove this un-named PICKHOLTZ and the Israel PICKHOLTZ are one
in the same. This can only be done if the mothers are the same. This is the
only info I have been able to find on this (these) families. Can you help?

What I got >from the Archives Center was a form to fill out to get a "Birth
Record" at a cost of $15.00. I already have it as stated above in the letter
to them.

Does anyone have a suggestion?

Steve Pickholtz
New Jersey
nj55turtle@comcast.net


26,825 lines added to LitvakSIG All-LIthuania database #general

Russ Maurer
 

The latest update to the free, searchable All-Lithuania database
(https://www.litvaksig.org/search-ald/ ) is live. The new additions are
as follows:

**Tax and Voters Lists** database: A variety of tax, elector, retired
soldier, postal bank record, real estate owner, farmer, certificate,
and burial ticket lists for towns in Kaunas and Zarasai districts
(2496 lines). Also, fallen soldiers of the 16th division >from the
book, "Road to Victory, 1942-1945" (1257 lines).

**Revision List** database, part 2: Another part of the Emigration to
Eretz Israel data (1,111 lines); family lists for Orlya and Shchuchyn
in the Lida district (4,821 lines); several conscription lists, mostly
for Vilnius but also for Marijampole (15,665 lines); and
merchants/family/taxpayer lists for Vidzi in Zarasai district (199
lines).

**Births** database: Pumpenai (Panevezys district) births >from 1893 and
1894 (73 lines).

**Deaths** database: Memel (Klaipeda district) deaths, 1874-1915 (688 lines).

**Internal Passports** database: Applications for foreign passports
(passports for foreign travel), Vilnius, 1924-1927 (515 lines).

Happy hunting!

Russ Maurer
Records Acquisition and Translation Coordinator, LitvakSIG


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 26,825 lines added to LitvakSIG All-LIthuania database #general

Russ Maurer
 

The latest update to the free, searchable All-Lithuania database
(https://www.litvaksig.org/search-ald/ ) is live. The new additions are
as follows:

**Tax and Voters Lists** database: A variety of tax, elector, retired
soldier, postal bank record, real estate owner, farmer, certificate,
and burial ticket lists for towns in Kaunas and Zarasai districts
(2496 lines). Also, fallen soldiers of the 16th division >from the
book, "Road to Victory, 1942-1945" (1257 lines).

**Revision List** database, part 2: Another part of the Emigration to
Eretz Israel data (1,111 lines); family lists for Orlya and Shchuchyn
in the Lida district (4,821 lines); several conscription lists, mostly
for Vilnius but also for Marijampole (15,665 lines); and
merchants/family/taxpayer lists for Vidzi in Zarasai district (199
lines).

**Births** database: Pumpenai (Panevezys district) births >from 1893 and
1894 (73 lines).

**Deaths** database: Memel (Klaipeda district) deaths, 1874-1915 (688 lines).

**Internal Passports** database: Applications for foreign passports
(passports for foreign travel), Vilnius, 1924-1927 (515 lines).

Happy hunting!

Russ Maurer
Records Acquisition and Translation Coordinator, LitvakSIG

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