Date   

Re: The Rabbi of Wolbrom's Daughter - ViewMate #rabbinic

RCK
 

I apologize for the mistake of the link that did not work, it's been a
while since I was engaged in this.
I posted a copy of the relevant page on viewmate here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=75232
And the entire page and the book can be found here:
https://tinyurl.com/y5rsfn6t (it's on page 175 in the reader, which is
page 129 in the actual book's pagination).
Thank you very much.

Kol Tuv,
Reuven Chaim Klein
Beitar Illit, Israel
Author of: God versus Gods: Judaism in the Age of Idolatry (Mosaica Press, 2018)

MODERATOR NOTE: The original posted URL did work, but the text started
only after many blank pages, which may have led some readers to think
the URL was incorrect. Moderators check all URLs before posting.
Thanks to Reuven Chaim Klein for providing the specific portion of
interest on ViewMate.


NAAIRS New search site #southafrica

Saul Issroff
 

The National Archives of South Africa has a new site. The old site is
still active but only the new site will be updated. The new site has
some quirky features and requires a bit of trial and error. As before
it lacks a Soundex facility so one has to play around and be a bit
creative especially with surname variant spellings.

Home page https://www.nationalarchives.gov.za/
Then go to collections and the drop down menu.
https://www.nationalarchives.gov.za/node/737
https://www.nationalarchives.gov.za/search-the-collections

There is a different method of searching, Put the
surname first then a comma followed by the first names.
There is no way to set a date parameter.
The old site is still available at
http://www.national.archsrch.gov.za/sm300cv/smws/sm300dl


Saul Issroff
London


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: The Rabbi of Wolbrom's Daughter - ViewMate #rabbinic

RCK
 

I apologize for the mistake of the link that did not work, it's been a
while since I was engaged in this.
I posted a copy of the relevant page on viewmate here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=75232
And the entire page and the book can be found here:
https://tinyurl.com/y5rsfn6t (it's on page 175 in the reader, which is
page 129 in the actual book's pagination).
Thank you very much.

Kol Tuv,
Reuven Chaim Klein
Beitar Illit, Israel
Author of: God versus Gods: Judaism in the Age of Idolatry (Mosaica Press, 2018)

MODERATOR NOTE: The original posted URL did work, but the text started
only after many blank pages, which may have led some readers to think
the URL was incorrect. Moderators check all URLs before posting.
Thanks to Reuven Chaim Klein for providing the specific portion of
interest on ViewMate.


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica NAAIRS New search site #southafrica

Saul Issroff
 

The National Archives of South Africa has a new site. The old site is
still active but only the new site will be updated. The new site has
some quirky features and requires a bit of trial and error. As before
it lacks a Soundex facility so one has to play around and be a bit
creative especially with surname variant spellings.

Home page https://www.nationalarchives.gov.za/
Then go to collections and the drop down menu.
https://www.nationalarchives.gov.za/node/737
https://www.nationalarchives.gov.za/search-the-collections

There is a different method of searching, Put the
surname first then a comma followed by the first names.
There is no way to set a date parameter.
The old site is still available at
http://www.national.archsrch.gov.za/sm300cv/smws/sm300dl


Saul Issroff
London


JewishGen Education offer course: East Prussia and the Baltic Nations Oct 13-Nov 3 #courland #latvia

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen is again offering Research in East Prussia and the Baltic States
October 13-November 3.

If your ancestral roots are in East Prussia, Northern Poland, Western Lithuania,
Latvia and Estonia this class may help you break stumbling blocks in your research.
We will work in the records still in existence for these areas. Where records
are sparse we will concentrate on finding alternate sources.

We encourage you to send the instructor a brief summary of your research
information and questions to see if your research project fits within the scope
of this class.

JewishGen education classes are private, open for your posts 24/7. Students
should feel comfortable using computers for online research.
Tuition for this class is $150. for three weeks of instruction.
More information https://www.jewishgen.org/education/

Send your questions and application to nholden@interserv.com

Nancy Holden
Director of Education


Courland SIG #Courland #Latvia JewishGen Education offer course: East Prussia and the Baltic Nations Oct 13-Nov 3 #courland #latvia

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen is again offering Research in East Prussia and the Baltic States
October 13-November 3.

If your ancestral roots are in East Prussia, Northern Poland, Western Lithuania,
Latvia and Estonia this class may help you break stumbling blocks in your research.
We will work in the records still in existence for these areas. Where records
are sparse we will concentrate on finding alternate sources.

We encourage you to send the instructor a brief summary of your research
information and questions to see if your research project fits within the scope
of this class.

JewishGen education classes are private, open for your posts 24/7. Students
should feel comfortable using computers for online research.
Tuition for this class is $150. for three weeks of instruction.
More information https://www.jewishgen.org/education/

Send your questions and application to nholden@interserv.com

Nancy Holden
Director of Education


Origin of Latvian Jews #latvia

Jeff Canin <jeffcanin07@...>
 

Dear Latvia Group,

I'm trying to determine if my family in Latvia could have originally
come >from Spain or Portugal after the Jewish populations there were
expelled in the 1500s. My grandfather, Joseph Chanin (Hebrew spelling
would be chet nun yud nun) was born in Varaklani around 1872. The
English spelling for his name could be Hanin, Kanin, Khanin or Canin.
Joe always said he was Sephardic and the family originally came >from
Portugal, but I can't find any evidence that Jews >from Portugal made
it to Latvia. His father was Mendel Chanin and grandfather, born
around 1828 was Shmul Ber (Samuel) Chanin.

Are the Latvian Jews generally considered to be Sephardic?

Thank you very much in advance for any help you can give me.

Warm regards,

Jeff Canin


Latvia SIG #Latvia Origin of Latvian Jews #latvia

Jeff Canin <jeffcanin07@...>
 

Dear Latvia Group,

I'm trying to determine if my family in Latvia could have originally
come >from Spain or Portugal after the Jewish populations there were
expelled in the 1500s. My grandfather, Joseph Chanin (Hebrew spelling
would be chet nun yud nun) was born in Varaklani around 1872. The
English spelling for his name could be Hanin, Kanin, Khanin or Canin.
Joe always said he was Sephardic and the family originally came >from
Portugal, but I can't find any evidence that Jews >from Portugal made
it to Latvia. His father was Mendel Chanin and grandfather, born
around 1828 was Shmul Ber (Samuel) Chanin.

Are the Latvian Jews generally considered to be Sephardic?

Thank you very much in advance for any help you can give me.

Warm regards,

Jeff Canin


JewishGen Education offer course: East Prussia and the Baltic Nations Oct 13-Nov 3 #latvia

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen is again offering Research in East Prussia and the Baltic
States October 13-November 3.

If your ancestral roots are in East Prussia, Northern Poland, Western
Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia this class may help you break stumbling
blocks in your research. We will work in the records still in existence
for these areas. Where records are sparse we will concentrate on finding
alternate sources.

We encourage you to send the instructor a brief summary of your research
information and questions to see if your research project fits within
the scope of this class.

JewishGen education classes are private, open for your posts 24/7.
Students should feel comfortable using computers for online research.
Tuition for this class is $150. for three weeks of instruction.
More information https://www.jewishgen.org/education/

Send your questions and application to nholden@interserv.com

Nancy Holden
Director of Education


Latvia SIG #Latvia JewishGen Education offer course: East Prussia and the Baltic Nations Oct 13-Nov 3 #latvia

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen is again offering Research in East Prussia and the Baltic
States October 13-November 3.

If your ancestral roots are in East Prussia, Northern Poland, Western
Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia this class may help you break stumbling
blocks in your research. We will work in the records still in existence
for these areas. Where records are sparse we will concentrate on finding
alternate sources.

We encourage you to send the instructor a brief summary of your research
information and questions to see if your research project fits within
the scope of this class.

JewishGen education classes are private, open for your posts 24/7.
Students should feel comfortable using computers for online research.
Tuition for this class is $150. for three weeks of instruction.
More information https://www.jewishgen.org/education/

Send your questions and application to nholden@interserv.com

Nancy Holden
Director of Education


Which DNA test? #dna

arnold friedman <afriedman21@...>
 

hi everyone,

my wife's mother is 91, and the only possible test is a swab sample (not spit).

i see that Family Tree DNA has swab test
Is there a way to do ancestry by putting the end of the qtip swab in the tube?
Other recommendations for swab tests?

the most difficult line with genealogy research is my wife's mother's
maternal grandfather's family. my genealogy research is back through
the early 1800s on the maternal grandmother side.

assuming familytreedna is the best solution, please advise whether i
should get autosomal DNA test >from familytreedna or the mtdna test?
one chat person >from family tree dna recommended mtdna and the other
the autosomal. So now confused.

thank you

arnold friedman


DNA Research #DNA Which DNA test? #dna

arnold friedman <afriedman21@...>
 

hi everyone,

my wife's mother is 91, and the only possible test is a swab sample (not spit).

i see that Family Tree DNA has swab test
Is there a way to do ancestry by putting the end of the qtip swab in the tube?
Other recommendations for swab tests?

the most difficult line with genealogy research is my wife's mother's
maternal grandfather's family. my genealogy research is back through
the early 1800s on the maternal grandmother side.

assuming familytreedna is the best solution, please advise whether i
should get autosomal DNA test >from familytreedna or the mtdna test?
one chat person >from family tree dna recommended mtdna and the other
the autosomal. So now confused.

thank you

arnold friedman


ViewMate Translation/Interpretation Request - Polish #general

Linda Habenstreit
 

I've posted a vital record in Polish for which I need a translation/interpretation.
It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=75295

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

Thank you very much.

Linda Habenstreit


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate Translation/Interpretation Request - Polish #general

Linda Habenstreit
 

I've posted a vital record in Polish for which I need a translation/interpretation.
It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=75295

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

Thank you very much.

Linda Habenstreit


JewishGen Education offers course: East Prussia and the Baltic Nations, Oct 13-Nov 3 #general

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen is again offering Research in East Prussia and the Baltic States
October 13-November 3.

If your ancestral roots are in East Prussia, Northern Poland, Western Lithuania,
Latvia and Estonia this class may help you break stumbling blocks in your
research.

We will work in the records still in existence for these areas. Where records
are sparse we will concentrate on finding alternate sources.

We encourage you to send the instructor a brief summary of your research
information and questions to see if your research project fits within the scope
of this class.

JewishGen education classes are private, open for your posts 24/7. Students
should feel comfortable using computers for online research.

Tuition for this class is $150 for three weeks of instruction.
More information https://www.jewishgen.org/education/

Send your questions and application to nholden@interserv.com

Nancy Holden
Director of Education


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JewishGen Education offers course: East Prussia and the Baltic Nations, Oct 13-Nov 3 #general

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen is again offering Research in East Prussia and the Baltic States
October 13-November 3.

If your ancestral roots are in East Prussia, Northern Poland, Western Lithuania,
Latvia and Estonia this class may help you break stumbling blocks in your
research.

We will work in the records still in existence for these areas. Where records
are sparse we will concentrate on finding alternate sources.

We encourage you to send the instructor a brief summary of your research
information and questions to see if your research project fits within the scope
of this class.

JewishGen education classes are private, open for your posts 24/7. Students
should feel comfortable using computers for online research.

Tuition for this class is $150 for three weeks of instruction.
More information https://www.jewishgen.org/education/

Send your questions and application to nholden@interserv.com

Nancy Holden
Director of Education


Re: Oppenheim surname #general

sbloom@...
 

Roberta-

Some questions to ask before you jump to conclusions regarding Sepharidic
ancestry would be:

Who are these folks >from Majorca? Are they all >from the same documented family
group? How long have they been in Spain and do they know their ancestry well
(how far back) ? What is their surname? They could "just" be Ashkenazim who
moved some time well after the Jewish expulsion of 1492. That will just have
to be something you explore with those cousins.

The surname refers to a town in Western Germany so could date back a long time
from when Jews first settled there (middle ages).
That seems to be the case for other surnames such as Heilbronn/Halpern >from the
same region. However, with such names many people who hold the name now are
likely to be late adopters of the surname (that is, took it for whatever reason
when asked/forced to adopt surnames in the early 1800's in Eastern Europe).

So, you could indeed descend >from a group that went, say, >from Spain to France
and then to Germany and into Eastern Europe.

More DNA testing of your Oppenheim cousins and this Majorca group could
potentially straighten things out. However, don't be surprised if it becomes a
long standing mystery.

Good luck!

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia

Roberta Berman wrote:
I traced my Oppenheim line back to my gr-grandfather Yitchak Oppenheim, born
in Brest-Litovsk in the early 1800s. YDNA testing on that line closely matches
others >from Majorca. FTDNA Family Finder has a 3-5 cousin match with my
immediate family and me with someone who knows that his family is >from Majorca.

My origin map on FTDNA shows roots in Spain, the Mediterranean, Turkey and
Eastern Europe.

So it seems there is the possibility that the Oppenheim line goes back to
Majorca. Oppenheim is not a Sephardic name, so at some point this unknown
ancestral family's surname would have been changed. So my question is, what
are the possibilities of where the name change to Oppenheim might have
occurred?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Oppenheim surname #general

sbloom@...
 

Roberta-

Some questions to ask before you jump to conclusions regarding Sepharidic
ancestry would be:

Who are these folks >from Majorca? Are they all >from the same documented family
group? How long have they been in Spain and do they know their ancestry well
(how far back) ? What is their surname? They could "just" be Ashkenazim who
moved some time well after the Jewish expulsion of 1492. That will just have
to be something you explore with those cousins.

The surname refers to a town in Western Germany so could date back a long time
from when Jews first settled there (middle ages).
That seems to be the case for other surnames such as Heilbronn/Halpern >from the
same region. However, with such names many people who hold the name now are
likely to be late adopters of the surname (that is, took it for whatever reason
when asked/forced to adopt surnames in the early 1800's in Eastern Europe).

So, you could indeed descend >from a group that went, say, >from Spain to France
and then to Germany and into Eastern Europe.

More DNA testing of your Oppenheim cousins and this Majorca group could
potentially straighten things out. However, don't be surprised if it becomes a
long standing mystery.

Good luck!

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia

Roberta Berman wrote:
I traced my Oppenheim line back to my gr-grandfather Yitchak Oppenheim, born
in Brest-Litovsk in the early 1800s. YDNA testing on that line closely matches
others >from Majorca. FTDNA Family Finder has a 3-5 cousin match with my
immediate family and me with someone who knows that his family is >from Majorca.

My origin map on FTDNA shows roots in Spain, the Mediterranean, Turkey and
Eastern Europe.

So it seems there is the possibility that the Oppenheim line goes back to
Majorca. Oppenheim is not a Sephardic name, so at some point this unknown
ancestral family's surname would have been changed. So my question is, what
are the possibilities of where the name change to Oppenheim might have
occurred?


(European Union) Google Wins! Right to be Forgotten Not Extraterritorial Per EU Court of Justice

Jan Meisels Allen
 

 After two years of waiting, the European Union’s Court of Justice ruled in favor of Google that the right to be forgotten is not extraterritorial—it applies only within the European Union. The Court said Europe could not impose the right to be forgotten on countries that do not recognize the law. “The balance between right to privacy and protection of personal data, on the one hand, and the freedom of information of internet users, on the other, is likely to vary significantly around the world,” the Court said in its decision. Google and other search engines will have to take measures to “effectively prevent or at the very least, seriously discourage” users in the European Union from using other versions of its site to access removed content. The Court further said, “Currently, there is no obligation under EU law, for a search engine operator who grants a request for de-referencing made by a data subject... to carry out such a de-referencing on all the versions of its search engine.” It further ruled, EU law requires a search engine operator to carry out such a de-referencing on the versions of its search engine corresponding to all the member states.

 There were many friends of the court documents in support of Google’s case, including Microsoft, Reporter’s Committee for Freedom of the Press and more.

Google stated upon learning of the Court’s ruling, “Since 2014, we’ve worked hard to implement the right to be forgotten in Europe, and to strike a sensible balance between people’s rights of access to information and privacy. It’s good to see that the court agreed with our arguments.”

 In 2014, the Court of Justice ruled against Google in a case about a Spanish man after he failed to get the deletion of an auction notice of his repossessed home dating from 1998 from a Catalan website. That case established the right to be forgotten. Since then Google says it has received 845,501 requests for “right to be forgotten” leading to 45 percent of the 3.3 million links being removed. Right to be forgotten only applied to search engine links, not the actual content.  Actual content may be difficult to find if one is not familiar with the sites, which is why search engines are so effective in helping the researcher find the appropriate links.

 The Court’s decision however, leaves open the possibility for France and other national governments within the EU to force Google to take down links globally in special cases judged necessary to protect an individual’s privacy.

 To read the EU Court of Justice press release see:

https://curia.europa.eu/jcms/upload/docs/application/pdf/2019-09/cp190112en.pdf

The EU Court of Justice website crashed as a result of all the attempts to access the actual decision. There is a link to the case in aforementioned press release that I suggest you try tomorrow or later today as currently the site is still not working intermittently. This is the direct link for the judgement: https://tinyurl.com/y6rmbg3g

Original url:

http://curia.europa.eu/juris/document/document.jsf?docid=218105&mode=req&pageIndex=1&dir=&occ=first&part=1&text=&doclang=EN&cid=175

To read more see:

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/24/technology/europe-google-right-to-be-forgotten.html

and

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/sep/24/victory-for-google-in-landmark-right-to-be-forgotten-case  

The decision is available in all EU supported languages. The above link is for English. Click the drop down box where it says language of the document for accessing all the supported languages.

 History

The case was brought after the French Data Privacy Regulator, CNIL  required Google to globally remove links to pages containing information about a person that they felt was damaging or false. Google introduced geo-blocking as a result, which stopped European users from being able to see delisted links but not for the other parts of the world.  CNIL argued that a regional application of the rule was worthless because people could still find the information if they were outside Europe. CNIL tried to impose a fine of 100,000 Euros, saying the geo-location did not go far enough and wanted the links removed globally. Google argued that if the rule were applied outside of Europe, the obligation could be abused by authoritarian governments trying to cover up human rights abuses.

 To read the previous postings about Google and right to be forgotten,  go to the archives of the IAJGS Records Access Alert at:  http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/private/records-access-alerts/. You must be registered to access the archives. 

To register go to: http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/listinfo/records-access-alerts  and follow the instructions to enter your email address, full name and which genealogical  organization with whom you are affiliated   You will receive an email response that you have to reply to or the subscription will not be finalized.

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 

 



Regarding Family Search 1920's-1930s #belarus

Anna Doggart
 

Regarding Jenny Rapaport's search in 1920s and 1930s for family records
in Belarus, we have had amazing results >from the Belarus state archives
in Minsk. We found FRIEDLAND family going back to 1814 census and HEIFETZ
family going back to 1869 marriage. Before that we didn't even know
where our grandfather Victor FRIEDLAND came from, although we knew he
had a wallpaper factory in MINSK >from around 1910 to 1918.
Write to them by email to say what names you are looking for. Each name will
count as a separate search. They will let you know how much they want for
the search. You then pay in advance. We thought their charges were reasonable.
We found a Russian lady who sent all communications in Russian for us.

Our searches took nearly 8 months to come through and we then paid a further
sum before they sent us the results. They included information >from census
birth, death and marriage registries, business and addresses.
Once you have the records( if they find any) you can, if you are interested,
ask for copies of actual documents. (Further cost of course for this work.
They had initially found the record of my great grandparents marriage in 1869.
Normally this would have included the names of the parents of both bride and
groom and occupations of father, so a good one to look at. Unfortunately for us
the record came >from a book with a list of marriages and all the others include
names of parents but in our case not. So it isn't always successful.
t always successful.
Anna
anna.doggart@btopenworld.com
Researching FRIEDLAND HEIFETZ LEVIN BLUMIN SCHWARZKOPF in ORSHA MINSK WARS=
AW MOSCOW HARBIN BIALYSTOK=20
By the way I only have email for Belarus archive in Cyrillic script so please
look for it yourself on line or if stuck contact me and I'll try and cut and
paste it.



Subject: Looking for Family Records >from 1920s-1930s From: Jenny Rappaport <jennyrappaport@gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 14 Sep 2019 21:49:13 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1
I'm interested in finding records for my family in Belarus >from the
early 1900s through the beginning of World War II. I'm most interested
in the period of the 1920s and 1930s.

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