Date   

Minsk Uezd Historical/Economic Summary on Website #belarus

David M. Fox <fox@...>
 

I am pleased to announce that the Minsk Uzed (District) Historic/Economic
Summary, which we commissioned Oleg Perzashkevich to complete, is now
available on our Belarus SIG website. Even if you have no connections to
Minsk District, I urge you to look through the various pages to see what
type of information is available and perhaps find enough people who might
want to get another Summary done for additional Districts.

I want to thank all of those of you who contributed funds to make this
happen. A special thanks to Risa Heywood, our webmaster, who was able to
get the Minsk Summary on our website in record time. While we realize
that the text may need some cleaning up, we wanted to get this
information to our members as soon as possible. I also want to thank
Oleg for the product he provided. To see the Minsk District Summary, go
to the Belarus SIG homepage
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/> and click on the Summary.

David Fox
fox@erols.com
Belarus SIG Coordinator


Belarus SIG #Belarus Minsk Uezd Historical/Economic Summary on Website #belarus

David M. Fox <fox@...>
 

I am pleased to announce that the Minsk Uzed (District) Historic/Economic
Summary, which we commissioned Oleg Perzashkevich to complete, is now
available on our Belarus SIG website. Even if you have no connections to
Minsk District, I urge you to look through the various pages to see what
type of information is available and perhaps find enough people who might
want to get another Summary done for additional Districts.

I want to thank all of those of you who contributed funds to make this
happen. A special thanks to Risa Heywood, our webmaster, who was able to
get the Minsk Summary on our website in record time. While we realize
that the text may need some cleaning up, we wanted to get this
information to our members as soon as possible. I also want to thank
Oleg for the product he provided. To see the Minsk District Summary, go
to the Belarus SIG homepage
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/> and click on the Summary.

David Fox
fox@erols.com
Belarus SIG Coordinator


Swarycewicze, Pinsk, Belarus #belarus

E.Doberstein <edoberst@...>
 

To Belarus SIG Members,
My Mother , Pesla[Pauline] DRYZUN, came >from the shtetl
Swarycewicze[Svaritsevichi], 28.3 mi. SSE of Pinsk,[now in Ukraine
according to JewishGen ShtetlSeeker].
My questions to the SIG are:
1. Does this village still exist ?
2. Where would records >from this shtetl be found ?
3. Where might inhabitants of this shtetl been transported to
during the Holocaust ?
Any info or ideas welcomed.

Evelyn Doberstein
E-mail <edoberst@compusmart.ab.ca>
Spruce Grove, Alberta, Canada.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Swarycewicze, Pinsk, Belarus #belarus

E.Doberstein <edoberst@...>
 

To Belarus SIG Members,
My Mother , Pesla[Pauline] DRYZUN, came >from the shtetl
Swarycewicze[Svaritsevichi], 28.3 mi. SSE of Pinsk,[now in Ukraine
according to JewishGen ShtetlSeeker].
My questions to the SIG are:
1. Does this village still exist ?
2. Where would records >from this shtetl be found ?
3. Where might inhabitants of this shtetl been transported to
during the Holocaust ?
Any info or ideas welcomed.

Evelyn Doberstein
E-mail <edoberst@compusmart.ab.ca>
Spruce Grove, Alberta, Canada.


Re: Koidanov #belarus

MEserner@...
 

I WOULD APPRECIATE MORE INFORMATION REGARDING THE MEMORIAL BOOK PUBLISHED BY
THE UNITED KOIDANOVER SOCIETY. WHERE IS IT AVAILABLE? WHAT PERIOD DOES IT
COVER?

DOES THE UNITED KOIDANOVER SOCIETY STILL EXIST?

THANK YOU

MICHAEL ESERNER

MODERATOR'S NOTE: In the future please use all caps only for surnames.
You should check the Yizkor Book Database which can be reached from
the JewishGen Homepage.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Koidanov #belarus

MEserner@...
 

I WOULD APPRECIATE MORE INFORMATION REGARDING THE MEMORIAL BOOK PUBLISHED BY
THE UNITED KOIDANOVER SOCIETY. WHERE IS IT AVAILABLE? WHAT PERIOD DOES IT
COVER?

DOES THE UNITED KOIDANOVER SOCIETY STILL EXIST?

THANK YOU

MICHAEL ESERNER

MODERATOR'S NOTE: In the future please use all caps only for surnames.
You should check the Yizkor Book Database which can be reached from
the JewishGen Homepage.


Mauthausen & Co #hungary

Gabor Hirsch <hirsch@...>
 

--------------8683C3681749EB2C706A88B2
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
X-MIME-Autoconverted: >from 8bit to quoted-printable by dns.cyberlink.ch id IAA05892

As there were a few questions about the list and book, I send you the
preface of the list in Hungarian (I removed the accents). I am sending
also the Summary Szita Szabolcs "Ways out of Hell", at the end of the
book there is a remark of an other publication of the athor "Verviragos
kovezet. (bloodstained? pavement) Mauthausen and subcamps, 1944-45. it
should have been published in 1992.

A mauthauseni magyar aldozatok nevlistaja.
A Mauthausen es 48 mellektaboranak tortenete magyar szempontbol 1945 ota
feldolgozasra var. Ennek elokeszulletekent hozzuk nyilvanossagra a
mauthauseni ismert nev=FC aldozatok nevet. A 120 lapot es egy potlapot
tartalmazo osszeallitas feltehetoleg 1945-ben, az amerikaiak
rendelkezesere, angolul keszult.

A vezeteknev =E9s a keresztnev utan a szuletesi =E9s a halalozasi idopont=
ot
tuntett=FCk fel, az utolso 51 nev a potlapro1 szarmazik. A becsi
Mauthausen archivum (Offentliches Denkmal und Museum Mauthausen)
gyujtemenyebe sorolt nevlistat betuhiven, Vero G=E1bor szives engedelyeve=
l
tesszuk kozze.


Summary
Ways out of Hell
Deported Hungarians in Austria, 1944-1945


Szabolcs Szita traces in this book the history of deported Hungarians in
Austria in the years of 1944 and 1945, following his books "Holocaust in
Front of the Alps", "Death Fort", "Forced Labour at the Fortification of
the Western Border Regions of Hungary". The book "Ways out of Hell" is
the first scientific survey of a scarcely studied chapter of the
war-time tragedy of the Hungarian Jews counting 825,000 souls
previously. He gives a critical account of the well-known history of the
Eichmann-commando, the protective Zionist activity in Hungary and the
so-called "Strasshof deportation." The abundant documentation is the
result of a recent research work offering documents of the fate of
hundred thousands of Hungarian deportees.


CHAPTER 1. THIS CHAPTER SUMMARIZES THE IMMEDIATE ANTECEDENTS OF A
CERTAIN PART OF THE DEPORTATIONS IN HUNGARY.


1. Occupation of Hungary and the Eichmann-commando
The Eichmann-commando (SEK) arrived in Hungary on March 19, 1944, from
Mauthausen, together with the occupying German troops. Their task was to
carry out as swiftly and most radically as possible the "solution" of
the "Jewish problem" in Hungary. The deportation >from the countryside
was prepared in secret and with great care.


2. Mechanism opf the deportation and the transportation of the
provincial Jews
The schedule of the deportations was determined on May 4 and 5 1944 in
Vienna. The trains to the death factories were supervised by Franz
Novak, and data were also reported by Lasz1o Ferenczy,
Lieutenant-Colonel of the, Hungarian Gendarmerie. The "purging action"
lasted for 51 days, by July 9, 1944 437,402 Jews were transported to
Auschwitz/Birkenau.


3. SEK and Hungarian Zionists
The leaders of the Hungarian Jewish Council tried to save the Jews by
delaying negotiations and by paying "poll-tax" Zionist Rezso Kasztner
and associates participated ind the "human trade" of the SS. An
agreement was reached to spare temporarily 15,000 >from the country side
Jews with their families and the same number of Jews together with their
families >from the capital. At the end of June SEK transported the Jews
from the provinces to the "transit camp" at Strasshof a.d. Nordbahn
close to Vienna.


Chapter II. Forced labour of deported Hungarians in Austria.

1. Involvement of foreign manpower into the war-time economy
Austria lost after the German annexion its economic independence, too.
German Influence dominated the most important branches of industry. As
Vienna needed more manpower, the number of foreign workers were
increased considerably; thus the IS 000 deported Hungarians had to work
from the summer 1944 on in the area of Reichsgau Gross-Wien and of
Reichsgau Niederdonau.


2. First wave of deportation, camp Oberlanzendorf
A number of Hungarians (including deputies, party leaders, factory
owners, journalists) were deported before Strasshof, immediately ofter
the German occupation, to Vienna: at first to Camp Oberlanzendorf, to
the so-called "educatioon for work camp" of the Gestapo in Vienna, then
to Mauthausen and to Auschwitz. At least 350 to 400 prisoners fell in to
this group.


3. Second wave of deportation. SEK and Gestapo. Forced labour of
Hungarian prisoners in Vienna
About six thousand prisoners were transported >from Strasshof to Vienna.
Conditions of their work were carefully regulated, camps were guarded
the SS and the Gestapo. They had to make different kinds of forced
labours, mostly separated - >from city service and clearing of ruins to
work in smaller and larger industrial plants and seasonal agricultural
work. Scientific research resulted data about 68 camps for Hungarian
Jews and about 105 employers of Hungarian Jews in the Vienna area; these
data are summarized in tables. The Gestapo in Vienna held many
Hungarian patriots in custody, their imprisonment continued at
Mauthausen or at Sopronkohida.


4. Strasshof deportees in the area of Reichsgau Niederdonau
This administrative unit included Lower Austria, Northern Burgenland and
some parts of Southern Moravia; here nearly nine thousand Hungarian Jews
were sent to farms, to industrial and agricultural plants. Most of them
lived together with their families in miserable conditions. Many groups
were moved depending on the need for season works, they had to >from dawn
till dark (Children >from 12 years on). The supervision was in the
country side due to the lack of conditions less rigorous than in Vienna,
in most places they were treated more humane: eg. it was reported from
the Amstetten district: "The employment of Jews to work did not promote
in any case the antisemitic feelings of the population, it evolved even
more pity". In spite of warnings, sympathyzing peasants and housewives
helped them with clothes and food. Research revealed that in the area of
the Gau Niederdonau Hungarian Jews >from Strasshof were accomodated in at
least 175 villages, in so-called "family camps". The data of more than
250 places of work are summarized in a table.


5. The Angel's Mill in Felixdorf, camps in Lichtenwbrth and Gmiind
The establishment of two camps near Wiener Neustadt was due to the third
Hungarian wave of deportation. The camp Felixdorf "was in operation"
from January 1945: during the three months of existence, 1,865 prisoners
of 2,087 died here due to terrible conditions, and brutality of the SS.
In Lichtenwort, 2,500 prisoners (with the exception of 100 men and
women) vegetated in an industry hall >from December 1944 on; among them,
at least 1 600 died due to epidemics and misery. The tragedy of the two
camps was inseparable >from the command of SS Oberscharfuhrer Vrtoch. A
similar fate reached 1,700 prisoners who were transported from
fortification building to the granary-camp of Gmund at the end of 1944
where due to inhuman conditions 485 persons died in 54 days.


Chapter III. Third wave of deportation and the last weeks.


1. Fortifications at the boundary of the German Reich
from November 1944 on, fortifications were erected in Western Hungary to
protect the Reich. A senseless system of earthwork fortifications was
built and the overwhelming part of the manpower was deported Hungarian
Jews, civil persons and former slave workers. The cornerstone of the
fortification between Danube and Drau was at Pozsony (Bratislava). From
here to Irottko at Koszeg the so-called Niederdonau-line included 20
camps with 35,000 Hungarian prisoners who were driven to the everyday
toil; about 10 to 15,000 of them died during this slave labour, roughly
3,000 of them in Austrian territory.
Fortifications were built south of Irottko, too, on the section
Steiermark Nord, where 34,000 Hungarian Jews worked in 32 smaller camps.
In connection with these an with the mass murders in March 1945, 1,500
to 2,000 prisoners last their lives.


2. Deportees at the time of the Nazi collapse
Groups of the Hungarian Jews who worked on the fortifications were
dragged on foot in April 1945 to Mauthausen, many of them further to
Gunskirchen. SS-men carried out meanwhile several massacres, the German
and Austrian escort killed them by hundreds. The greater part of the
Strasshof deportees were liberated at their working or living place,
some of them in Bergen-Belsen or in Theresienstadt. The loss among
deported Hungarian Jews reached in the years 1944 and 1945 in Austrian.
territory 22 to 24,000 people.


3. To the history of the return of the deportees, May 1945
The greatest part of the liberated Hungarian deportees returned home -
in comparison to members of other nations - in bad conditions,
unprovided and without proper organization to Hungary. A study of the
vicissitudes of the survivors of their history is an imminent task for
the near future; its necessity is proven by the diary of the
hospital-train No. 1. sent for the Austrian deportees >from which a part
is published in this book. The book contains a good number of previously
unknown data on many groups of Hungarian prisoners, several lists of
losses, among them the unpublished list in alphabetic order of Hungarian
victims in Mauthausen, prepared in 1945.



--------------8683C3681749EB2C706A88B2
Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

<HTML>
As there were a few questions about the list and book, I send you the preface
of the list in Hungarian (I removed the accents). I am sending also the
Summary Szita Szabolcs "Ways out of Hell", at the end of the book there
is a remark of an other publication of the athor "<B>Verviragos kovezet</B>.
(bloodstained? pavement) Mauthausen and subcamps, 1944-45. it should have
been published in 1992.

<P><B>A mauthauseni magyar aldozatok nevlistaja.</B>
<BR>A Mauthausen es 48 mellektaboranak tortenete magyar szempontbol 1945
ota feldolgozasra var. Ennek elokeszulletekent hozzuk nyilvanossagra a
mauthauseni ismert nev&uuml; aldozatok nevet. A 120 lapot es egy potlapot
tartalmazo osszeallitas feltehetoleg 1945-ben, az amerikaiak rendelkezesere,
angolul keszult.

<P>A vezeteknev &eacute;s a keresztnev utan a szuletesi &eacute;s a halalozasi
idopontot tuntett&uuml;k fel, az utolso 51 nev a potlapro1 szarmazik. A
becsi Mauthausen archivum (Offentliches Denkmal und Museum Mauthausen)
gyujtemenyebe sorolt nevlistat betuhiven, Vero G&aacute;bor szives engedelyevel
tesszuk kozze.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P><B><FONT SIZE=+1>Summary</FONT></B>
<BR>Ways out of Hell
<BR>Deported Hungarians in Austria, 1944-1945
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>Szabolcs Szita traces in this book the history of deported Hungarians
in Austria in the years of 1944 and 1945, following his books "Holocaust
in Front of the Alps", "Death Fort", "Forced Labour at the Fortification
of the Western Border Regions of Hungary".&nbsp; The book "Ways out of
Hell" is the first scientific survey of a scarcely studied chapter of the
war-time tragedy of the Hungarian Jews counting 825,000 souls previously.
He gives a critical account of the well-known history of the Eichmann-commando,
the protective Zionist activity in Hungary and the so-called "Strasshof
deportation." The abundant documentation is the result of a recent research
work offering documents of the fate of hundred thousands of Hungarian deportees.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>CHAPTER 1. THIS CHAPTER SUMMARIZES THE IMMEDIATE ANTECEDENTS OF A CERTAIN
PART OF THE DEPORTATIONS IN HUNGARY.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>1. Occupation of Hungary and the Eichmann-commando
<BR>The Eichmann-commando (SEK) arrived in Hungary on March 19, 1944, from
Mauthausen, together with the occupying German troops. Their task was to
carry out as swiftly and most radically as possible the "solution" of the
"Jewish problem" in Hungary.&nbsp; The deportation >from the countryside
was prepared in secret and with great care.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>2. Mechanism opf the deportation and the transportation of the provincial
Jews
<BR>The schedule of the deportations was determined on May 4 and 5 1944
in Vienna. The trains to the death factories were supervised by Franz Novak,
and data were also reported by Lasz1o Ferenczy, Lieutenant-Colonel of the,
Hungarian Gendarmerie. The "purging action" lasted for 51 days, by July
9, 1944 437,402 Jews were transported to Auschwitz/Birkenau.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>3. SEK and Hungarian Zionists
<BR>The leaders of the Hungarian Jewish Council tried to save the Jews
by delaying negotiations and by paying "poll-tax" Zionist Rezso Kasztner
and associates participated ind the "human trade" of the SS. An agreement
was reached to spare temporarily 15,000 >from the country side Jews with
their families and the same number of Jews together with their families
from the capital. At the end of June SEK transported the Jews >from the
provinces to the "transit camp" at Strasshof a.d. Nordbahn close to Vienna.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>Chapter II. Forced labour of deported Hungarians in Austria.

<P>1. Involvement of foreign manpower into the war-time economy
<BR>Austria lost after the German annexion its economic independence, too.
German Influence dominated the most important branches of industry. As
Vienna needed more manpower, the number of foreign workers were increased
considerably; thus the IS 000 deported Hungarians had to work >from the
summer 1944 on in the area of Reichsgau Gross-Wien and of Reichsgau Niederdonau.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>2. First wave of deportation, camp Oberlanzendorf
<BR>A number of Hungarians (including deputies, party leaders, factory
owners, journalists) were deported before Strasshof, immediately ofter
the German occupation, to Vienna: at first to Camp Oberlanzendorf, to the
so-called "educatioon for work camp" of the Gestapo in Vienna, then to
Mauthausen and to Auschwitz. At least 350 to 400 prisoners fell in to this
group.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>3. Second wave of deportation. SEK and Gestapo. Forced labour of Hungarian
prisoners in Vienna
<BR>About six thousand prisoners were transported >from Strasshof to Vienna.
Conditions of their work were carefully regulated, camps were guarded the
SS and the Gestapo. They had to make different kinds of forced labours,
mostly separated - >from city service and clearing of ruins to work in smaller
and larger industrial plants and seasonal agricultural work. Scientific
research resulted data about 68 camps for Hungarian Jews and about 105
employers of Hungarian Jews in the Vienna area; these data are summarized
in tables.&nbsp; The Gestapo in Vienna held many Hungarian patriots in
custody, their imprisonment continued at Mauthausen or at Sopronkohida.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>4. Strasshof deportees in the area of Reichsgau Niederdonau
<BR>This administrative unit included Lower Austria, Northern Burgenland
and some parts of Southern Moravia; here nearly nine thousand Hungarian
Jews were sent to farms, to industrial and agricultural plants. Most of
them lived together with their families in miserable conditions. Many groups
were moved depending on the need for season works, they had to >from dawn
till dark (Children >from 12 years on). The supervision was in the country
side due to the lack of conditions less rigorous than in Vienna, in most
places they were treated more humane: eg. it was reported >from the Amstetten
district: "The employment of Jews to work did not promote in any case the
antisemitic feelings of the population, it evolved even more pity". In
spite of warnings, sympathyzing peasants and housewives helped them with
clothes and food. Research revealed that in the area of the Gau Niederdonau
Hungarian Jews >from Strasshof were accomodated in at least 175 villages,
in so-called "family camps". The data of more than 250 places of work are
summarized in a table.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>5. The Angel's Mill in Felixdorf, camps in Lichtenwbrth and Gmiind
<BR>The establishment of two camps near Wiener Neustadt was due to the
third Hungarian wave of deportation. The camp Felixdorf "was in operation"
from January 1945: during the three months of existence, 1,865 prisoners
of 2,087 died here due to terrible conditions, and brutality of the SS.
In Lichtenwort, 2,500 prisoners (with the exception of 100 men and women)
vegetated in an industry hall >from December 1944 on; among them, at least
1 600 died due to epidemics and misery. The tragedy of the two camps was
inseparable >from the command of SS Oberscharfuhrer Vrtoch. A similar fate
reached 1,700 prisoners who were transported >from fortification building
to the granary-camp of Gmund at the end of 1944 where due to inhuman conditions
485 persons died in 54 days.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>Chapter III. Third wave of deportation and the last weeks.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>1. Fortifications at the boundary of the German Reich
<BR>>from November 1944 on, fortifications were erected in Western Hungary
to protect the Reich. A senseless system of earthwork fortifications was
built and the overwhelming part of the manpower was deported Hungarian
Jews, civil persons and former slave workers.&nbsp; The cornerstone of
the fortification between Danube and Drau was at Pozsony (Bratislava).
from here to Irottko at Koszeg the so-called Niederdonau-line included
20 camps with 35,000 Hungarian prisoners who were driven to the everyday
toil; about 10 to 15,000 of them died during this slave labour, roughly
3,000 of them in Austrian territory.
<BR>Fortifications were built south of Irottko, too, on the section Steiermark
Nord, where 34,000 Hungarian Jews worked in 32 smaller camps. In connection
with these an with the mass murders in March 1945, 1,500 to 2,000 prisoners
last their lives.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>2. Deportees at the time of the Nazi collapse
<BR>Groups of the Hungarian Jews who worked on the fortifications were
dragged on foot in April 1945 to Mauthausen, many of them further to Gunskirchen.
SS-men carried out meanwhile several massacres, the German and Austrian
escort killed them by hundreds.&nbsp; The greater part of the Strasshof
deportees were liberated at their working or living place, some of them
in Bergen-Belsen or in Theresienstadt. The loss among deported Hungarian
Jews reached in the years 1944 and 1945 in Austrian. territory 22 to 24,000
people.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>3. To the history of the return of the deportees, May 1945
<BR>The greatest part of the liberated Hungarian deportees returned home
- in comparison to members of other nations - in bad conditions, unprovided
and without proper organization to Hungary. A study of the vicissitudes
of the survivors of their history is an imminent task for the near future;
its necessity is proven by the diary of the hospital-train No. 1. sent
for the Austrian deportees >from which a part is published in this book.
The book contains a good number of previously unknown data on many groups
of Hungarian prisoners, several lists of losses, among them the unpublished
list in alphabetic order of Hungarian victims in Mauthausen, prepared in
1945.
<BR>&nbsp;
<BR>&nbsp;</HTML>

--------------8683C3681749EB2C706A88B2--


Hungary SIG #Hungary Mauthausen & Co #hungary

Gabor Hirsch <hirsch@...>
 

--------------8683C3681749EB2C706A88B2
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
X-MIME-Autoconverted: >from 8bit to quoted-printable by dns.cyberlink.ch id IAA05892

As there were a few questions about the list and book, I send you the
preface of the list in Hungarian (I removed the accents). I am sending
also the Summary Szita Szabolcs "Ways out of Hell", at the end of the
book there is a remark of an other publication of the athor "Verviragos
kovezet. (bloodstained? pavement) Mauthausen and subcamps, 1944-45. it
should have been published in 1992.

A mauthauseni magyar aldozatok nevlistaja.
A Mauthausen es 48 mellektaboranak tortenete magyar szempontbol 1945 ota
feldolgozasra var. Ennek elokeszulletekent hozzuk nyilvanossagra a
mauthauseni ismert nev=FC aldozatok nevet. A 120 lapot es egy potlapot
tartalmazo osszeallitas feltehetoleg 1945-ben, az amerikaiak
rendelkezesere, angolul keszult.

A vezeteknev =E9s a keresztnev utan a szuletesi =E9s a halalozasi idopont=
ot
tuntett=FCk fel, az utolso 51 nev a potlapro1 szarmazik. A becsi
Mauthausen archivum (Offentliches Denkmal und Museum Mauthausen)
gyujtemenyebe sorolt nevlistat betuhiven, Vero G=E1bor szives engedelyeve=
l
tesszuk kozze.


Summary
Ways out of Hell
Deported Hungarians in Austria, 1944-1945


Szabolcs Szita traces in this book the history of deported Hungarians in
Austria in the years of 1944 and 1945, following his books "Holocaust in
Front of the Alps", "Death Fort", "Forced Labour at the Fortification of
the Western Border Regions of Hungary". The book "Ways out of Hell" is
the first scientific survey of a scarcely studied chapter of the
war-time tragedy of the Hungarian Jews counting 825,000 souls
previously. He gives a critical account of the well-known history of the
Eichmann-commando, the protective Zionist activity in Hungary and the
so-called "Strasshof deportation." The abundant documentation is the
result of a recent research work offering documents of the fate of
hundred thousands of Hungarian deportees.


CHAPTER 1. THIS CHAPTER SUMMARIZES THE IMMEDIATE ANTECEDENTS OF A
CERTAIN PART OF THE DEPORTATIONS IN HUNGARY.


1. Occupation of Hungary and the Eichmann-commando
The Eichmann-commando (SEK) arrived in Hungary on March 19, 1944, from
Mauthausen, together with the occupying German troops. Their task was to
carry out as swiftly and most radically as possible the "solution" of
the "Jewish problem" in Hungary. The deportation >from the countryside
was prepared in secret and with great care.


2. Mechanism opf the deportation and the transportation of the
provincial Jews
The schedule of the deportations was determined on May 4 and 5 1944 in
Vienna. The trains to the death factories were supervised by Franz
Novak, and data were also reported by Lasz1o Ferenczy,
Lieutenant-Colonel of the, Hungarian Gendarmerie. The "purging action"
lasted for 51 days, by July 9, 1944 437,402 Jews were transported to
Auschwitz/Birkenau.


3. SEK and Hungarian Zionists
The leaders of the Hungarian Jewish Council tried to save the Jews by
delaying negotiations and by paying "poll-tax" Zionist Rezso Kasztner
and associates participated ind the "human trade" of the SS. An
agreement was reached to spare temporarily 15,000 >from the country side
Jews with their families and the same number of Jews together with their
families >from the capital. At the end of June SEK transported the Jews
from the provinces to the "transit camp" at Strasshof a.d. Nordbahn
close to Vienna.


Chapter II. Forced labour of deported Hungarians in Austria.

1. Involvement of foreign manpower into the war-time economy
Austria lost after the German annexion its economic independence, too.
German Influence dominated the most important branches of industry. As
Vienna needed more manpower, the number of foreign workers were
increased considerably; thus the IS 000 deported Hungarians had to work
from the summer 1944 on in the area of Reichsgau Gross-Wien and of
Reichsgau Niederdonau.


2. First wave of deportation, camp Oberlanzendorf
A number of Hungarians (including deputies, party leaders, factory
owners, journalists) were deported before Strasshof, immediately ofter
the German occupation, to Vienna: at first to Camp Oberlanzendorf, to
the so-called "educatioon for work camp" of the Gestapo in Vienna, then
to Mauthausen and to Auschwitz. At least 350 to 400 prisoners fell in to
this group.


3. Second wave of deportation. SEK and Gestapo. Forced labour of
Hungarian prisoners in Vienna
About six thousand prisoners were transported >from Strasshof to Vienna.
Conditions of their work were carefully regulated, camps were guarded
the SS and the Gestapo. They had to make different kinds of forced
labours, mostly separated - >from city service and clearing of ruins to
work in smaller and larger industrial plants and seasonal agricultural
work. Scientific research resulted data about 68 camps for Hungarian
Jews and about 105 employers of Hungarian Jews in the Vienna area; these
data are summarized in tables. The Gestapo in Vienna held many
Hungarian patriots in custody, their imprisonment continued at
Mauthausen or at Sopronkohida.


4. Strasshof deportees in the area of Reichsgau Niederdonau
This administrative unit included Lower Austria, Northern Burgenland and
some parts of Southern Moravia; here nearly nine thousand Hungarian Jews
were sent to farms, to industrial and agricultural plants. Most of them
lived together with their families in miserable conditions. Many groups
were moved depending on the need for season works, they had to >from dawn
till dark (Children >from 12 years on). The supervision was in the
country side due to the lack of conditions less rigorous than in Vienna,
in most places they were treated more humane: eg. it was reported from
the Amstetten district: "The employment of Jews to work did not promote
in any case the antisemitic feelings of the population, it evolved even
more pity". In spite of warnings, sympathyzing peasants and housewives
helped them with clothes and food. Research revealed that in the area of
the Gau Niederdonau Hungarian Jews >from Strasshof were accomodated in at
least 175 villages, in so-called "family camps". The data of more than
250 places of work are summarized in a table.


5. The Angel's Mill in Felixdorf, camps in Lichtenwbrth and Gmiind
The establishment of two camps near Wiener Neustadt was due to the third
Hungarian wave of deportation. The camp Felixdorf "was in operation"
from January 1945: during the three months of existence, 1,865 prisoners
of 2,087 died here due to terrible conditions, and brutality of the SS.
In Lichtenwort, 2,500 prisoners (with the exception of 100 men and
women) vegetated in an industry hall >from December 1944 on; among them,
at least 1 600 died due to epidemics and misery. The tragedy of the two
camps was inseparable >from the command of SS Oberscharfuhrer Vrtoch. A
similar fate reached 1,700 prisoners who were transported from
fortification building to the granary-camp of Gmund at the end of 1944
where due to inhuman conditions 485 persons died in 54 days.


Chapter III. Third wave of deportation and the last weeks.


1. Fortifications at the boundary of the German Reich
from November 1944 on, fortifications were erected in Western Hungary to
protect the Reich. A senseless system of earthwork fortifications was
built and the overwhelming part of the manpower was deported Hungarian
Jews, civil persons and former slave workers. The cornerstone of the
fortification between Danube and Drau was at Pozsony (Bratislava). From
here to Irottko at Koszeg the so-called Niederdonau-line included 20
camps with 35,000 Hungarian prisoners who were driven to the everyday
toil; about 10 to 15,000 of them died during this slave labour, roughly
3,000 of them in Austrian territory.
Fortifications were built south of Irottko, too, on the section
Steiermark Nord, where 34,000 Hungarian Jews worked in 32 smaller camps.
In connection with these an with the mass murders in March 1945, 1,500
to 2,000 prisoners last their lives.


2. Deportees at the time of the Nazi collapse
Groups of the Hungarian Jews who worked on the fortifications were
dragged on foot in April 1945 to Mauthausen, many of them further to
Gunskirchen. SS-men carried out meanwhile several massacres, the German
and Austrian escort killed them by hundreds. The greater part of the
Strasshof deportees were liberated at their working or living place,
some of them in Bergen-Belsen or in Theresienstadt. The loss among
deported Hungarian Jews reached in the years 1944 and 1945 in Austrian.
territory 22 to 24,000 people.


3. To the history of the return of the deportees, May 1945
The greatest part of the liberated Hungarian deportees returned home -
in comparison to members of other nations - in bad conditions,
unprovided and without proper organization to Hungary. A study of the
vicissitudes of the survivors of their history is an imminent task for
the near future; its necessity is proven by the diary of the
hospital-train No. 1. sent for the Austrian deportees >from which a part
is published in this book. The book contains a good number of previously
unknown data on many groups of Hungarian prisoners, several lists of
losses, among them the unpublished list in alphabetic order of Hungarian
victims in Mauthausen, prepared in 1945.



--------------8683C3681749EB2C706A88B2
Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

<HTML>
As there were a few questions about the list and book, I send you the preface
of the list in Hungarian (I removed the accents). I am sending also the
Summary Szita Szabolcs "Ways out of Hell", at the end of the book there
is a remark of an other publication of the athor "<B>Verviragos kovezet</B>.
(bloodstained? pavement) Mauthausen and subcamps, 1944-45. it should have
been published in 1992.

<P><B>A mauthauseni magyar aldozatok nevlistaja.</B>
<BR>A Mauthausen es 48 mellektaboranak tortenete magyar szempontbol 1945
ota feldolgozasra var. Ennek elokeszulletekent hozzuk nyilvanossagra a
mauthauseni ismert nev&uuml; aldozatok nevet. A 120 lapot es egy potlapot
tartalmazo osszeallitas feltehetoleg 1945-ben, az amerikaiak rendelkezesere,
angolul keszult.

<P>A vezeteknev &eacute;s a keresztnev utan a szuletesi &eacute;s a halalozasi
idopontot tuntett&uuml;k fel, az utolso 51 nev a potlapro1 szarmazik. A
becsi Mauthausen archivum (Offentliches Denkmal und Museum Mauthausen)
gyujtemenyebe sorolt nevlistat betuhiven, Vero G&aacute;bor szives engedelyevel
tesszuk kozze.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P><B><FONT SIZE=+1>Summary</FONT></B>
<BR>Ways out of Hell
<BR>Deported Hungarians in Austria, 1944-1945
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>Szabolcs Szita traces in this book the history of deported Hungarians
in Austria in the years of 1944 and 1945, following his books "Holocaust
in Front of the Alps", "Death Fort", "Forced Labour at the Fortification
of the Western Border Regions of Hungary".&nbsp; The book "Ways out of
Hell" is the first scientific survey of a scarcely studied chapter of the
war-time tragedy of the Hungarian Jews counting 825,000 souls previously.
He gives a critical account of the well-known history of the Eichmann-commando,
the protective Zionist activity in Hungary and the so-called "Strasshof
deportation." The abundant documentation is the result of a recent research
work offering documents of the fate of hundred thousands of Hungarian deportees.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>CHAPTER 1. THIS CHAPTER SUMMARIZES THE IMMEDIATE ANTECEDENTS OF A CERTAIN
PART OF THE DEPORTATIONS IN HUNGARY.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>1. Occupation of Hungary and the Eichmann-commando
<BR>The Eichmann-commando (SEK) arrived in Hungary on March 19, 1944, from
Mauthausen, together with the occupying German troops. Their task was to
carry out as swiftly and most radically as possible the "solution" of the
"Jewish problem" in Hungary.&nbsp; The deportation >from the countryside
was prepared in secret and with great care.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>2. Mechanism opf the deportation and the transportation of the provincial
Jews
<BR>The schedule of the deportations was determined on May 4 and 5 1944
in Vienna. The trains to the death factories were supervised by Franz Novak,
and data were also reported by Lasz1o Ferenczy, Lieutenant-Colonel of the,
Hungarian Gendarmerie. The "purging action" lasted for 51 days, by July
9, 1944 437,402 Jews were transported to Auschwitz/Birkenau.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>3. SEK and Hungarian Zionists
<BR>The leaders of the Hungarian Jewish Council tried to save the Jews
by delaying negotiations and by paying "poll-tax" Zionist Rezso Kasztner
and associates participated ind the "human trade" of the SS. An agreement
was reached to spare temporarily 15,000 >from the country side Jews with
their families and the same number of Jews together with their families
from the capital. At the end of June SEK transported the Jews >from the
provinces to the "transit camp" at Strasshof a.d. Nordbahn close to Vienna.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>Chapter II. Forced labour of deported Hungarians in Austria.

<P>1. Involvement of foreign manpower into the war-time economy
<BR>Austria lost after the German annexion its economic independence, too.
German Influence dominated the most important branches of industry. As
Vienna needed more manpower, the number of foreign workers were increased
considerably; thus the IS 000 deported Hungarians had to work >from the
summer 1944 on in the area of Reichsgau Gross-Wien and of Reichsgau Niederdonau.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>2. First wave of deportation, camp Oberlanzendorf
<BR>A number of Hungarians (including deputies, party leaders, factory
owners, journalists) were deported before Strasshof, immediately ofter
the German occupation, to Vienna: at first to Camp Oberlanzendorf, to the
so-called "educatioon for work camp" of the Gestapo in Vienna, then to
Mauthausen and to Auschwitz. At least 350 to 400 prisoners fell in to this
group.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>3. Second wave of deportation. SEK and Gestapo. Forced labour of Hungarian
prisoners in Vienna
<BR>About six thousand prisoners were transported >from Strasshof to Vienna.
Conditions of their work were carefully regulated, camps were guarded the
SS and the Gestapo. They had to make different kinds of forced labours,
mostly separated - >from city service and clearing of ruins to work in smaller
and larger industrial plants and seasonal agricultural work. Scientific
research resulted data about 68 camps for Hungarian Jews and about 105
employers of Hungarian Jews in the Vienna area; these data are summarized
in tables.&nbsp; The Gestapo in Vienna held many Hungarian patriots in
custody, their imprisonment continued at Mauthausen or at Sopronkohida.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>4. Strasshof deportees in the area of Reichsgau Niederdonau
<BR>This administrative unit included Lower Austria, Northern Burgenland
and some parts of Southern Moravia; here nearly nine thousand Hungarian
Jews were sent to farms, to industrial and agricultural plants. Most of
them lived together with their families in miserable conditions. Many groups
were moved depending on the need for season works, they had to >from dawn
till dark (Children >from 12 years on). The supervision was in the country
side due to the lack of conditions less rigorous than in Vienna, in most
places they were treated more humane: eg. it was reported >from the Amstetten
district: "The employment of Jews to work did not promote in any case the
antisemitic feelings of the population, it evolved even more pity". In
spite of warnings, sympathyzing peasants and housewives helped them with
clothes and food. Research revealed that in the area of the Gau Niederdonau
Hungarian Jews >from Strasshof were accomodated in at least 175 villages,
in so-called "family camps". The data of more than 250 places of work are
summarized in a table.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>5. The Angel's Mill in Felixdorf, camps in Lichtenwbrth and Gmiind
<BR>The establishment of two camps near Wiener Neustadt was due to the
third Hungarian wave of deportation. The camp Felixdorf "was in operation"
from January 1945: during the three months of existence, 1,865 prisoners
of 2,087 died here due to terrible conditions, and brutality of the SS.
In Lichtenwort, 2,500 prisoners (with the exception of 100 men and women)
vegetated in an industry hall >from December 1944 on; among them, at least
1 600 died due to epidemics and misery. The tragedy of the two camps was
inseparable >from the command of SS Oberscharfuhrer Vrtoch. A similar fate
reached 1,700 prisoners who were transported >from fortification building
to the granary-camp of Gmund at the end of 1944 where due to inhuman conditions
485 persons died in 54 days.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>Chapter III. Third wave of deportation and the last weeks.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>1. Fortifications at the boundary of the German Reich
<BR>>from November 1944 on, fortifications were erected in Western Hungary
to protect the Reich. A senseless system of earthwork fortifications was
built and the overwhelming part of the manpower was deported Hungarian
Jews, civil persons and former slave workers.&nbsp; The cornerstone of
the fortification between Danube and Drau was at Pozsony (Bratislava).
from here to Irottko at Koszeg the so-called Niederdonau-line included
20 camps with 35,000 Hungarian prisoners who were driven to the everyday
toil; about 10 to 15,000 of them died during this slave labour, roughly
3,000 of them in Austrian territory.
<BR>Fortifications were built south of Irottko, too, on the section Steiermark
Nord, where 34,000 Hungarian Jews worked in 32 smaller camps. In connection
with these an with the mass murders in March 1945, 1,500 to 2,000 prisoners
last their lives.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>2. Deportees at the time of the Nazi collapse
<BR>Groups of the Hungarian Jews who worked on the fortifications were
dragged on foot in April 1945 to Mauthausen, many of them further to Gunskirchen.
SS-men carried out meanwhile several massacres, the German and Austrian
escort killed them by hundreds.&nbsp; The greater part of the Strasshof
deportees were liberated at their working or living place, some of them
in Bergen-Belsen or in Theresienstadt. The loss among deported Hungarian
Jews reached in the years 1944 and 1945 in Austrian. territory 22 to 24,000
people.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>3. To the history of the return of the deportees, May 1945
<BR>The greatest part of the liberated Hungarian deportees returned home
- in comparison to members of other nations - in bad conditions, unprovided
and without proper organization to Hungary. A study of the vicissitudes
of the survivors of their history is an imminent task for the near future;
its necessity is proven by the diary of the hospital-train No. 1. sent
for the Austrian deportees >from which a part is published in this book.
The book contains a good number of previously unknown data on many groups
of Hungarian prisoners, several lists of losses, among them the unpublished
list in alphabetic order of Hungarian victims in Mauthausen, prepared in
1945.
<BR>&nbsp;
<BR>&nbsp;</HTML>

--------------8683C3681749EB2C706A88B2--


Re: [LDS microfilm #poland

JLowenkron@...
 

Dear Ileana,
I dont know if your local FHC has this book that is helpful for "rough"
interpretations..ours in Manhattan does...it's called the "Paper Trail" and
has commonly used words and phrases in many languages, including Polish...it
is generally good enough to figure out things generally mentioned in Census
and Marriage records...ask at your FHC..at ours, they keep it next to the Main
Desk..Jane


JRI Poland #Poland Re: [LDS microfilm #poland

JLowenkron@...
 

Dear Ileana,
I dont know if your local FHC has this book that is helpful for "rough"
interpretations..ours in Manhattan does...it's called the "Paper Trail" and
has commonly used words and phrases in many languages, including Polish...it
is generally good enough to figure out things generally mentioned in Census
and Marriage records...ask at your FHC..at ours, they keep it next to the Main
Desk..Jane


Chile white pages #latinamerica

Myron Chijner <mchijner@...>
 

Hello all Latamsiggers,
First, I want to thank everyone who responded to my "Chiam=Jaime"
question a while back. The responses were swift and plentiful.
For those searching in Chile, there is now a site to search white
pages. Unfortunately, it is not as easy as the Argentinean site. In
this site the country is broken up into several regions and then cities
are listed within each region. I was successful in a Santiago search.
What city would have the second biggest jewish population in Chile? I
did try some of the larger towns without success. When doing a name
search this site allows you to search by the mother's or father's name.
Leave one of these boxes blank when searching. This will allow for more
matches. The site is at http://www.blancas.cl/index.html and can be
accessed through http://www.contractjobs.com/tel/cl/

Good luck and Happy Chanukah,
Myron
Myron Chijner mchijner@weir.net
Weirton, WV


Latin America #LatinAmerica Chile white pages #latinamerica

Myron Chijner <mchijner@...>
 

Hello all Latamsiggers,
First, I want to thank everyone who responded to my "Chiam=Jaime"
question a while back. The responses were swift and plentiful.
For those searching in Chile, there is now a site to search white
pages. Unfortunately, it is not as easy as the Argentinean site. In
this site the country is broken up into several regions and then cities
are listed within each region. I was successful in a Santiago search.
What city would have the second biggest jewish population in Chile? I
did try some of the larger towns without success. When doing a name
search this site allows you to search by the mother's or father's name.
Leave one of these boxes blank when searching. This will allow for more
matches. The site is at http://www.blancas.cl/index.html and can be
accessed through http://www.contractjobs.com/tel/cl/

Good luck and Happy Chanukah,
Myron
Myron Chijner mchijner@weir.net
Weirton, WV


Urgent Need For Belarus Relief #belarus

David M. Fox <fox@...>
 

Dear Members of the Belarus SIG:

I realize that this is a genealogical forum, and I hope this message
will not upset too many people. As many of you know Frank Swartz, a
member of this SIG, has reported on the deteriorating conditions for the
approximately 75,000 Jews that remain in Belarus. I received a message
from Frank this week describing the terrible situation in a children's
hospital where there are cases of meningitis. The doctors and nurses
have no sterile latex gloves to use when treating patients with
infectious deseases. As anyone who has worked in a medical setting
knows, infections can spread rapidly in a hospital that does not have
proper infection control. While the rubber gloves are only the tip of
the iceberg, I am trying to get some sent over with a group of Yeshvia
University students who are leaving for Minsk on Dec. 28 to conduct a
"Winter Camp" for Jewish youths in Belarus.

If anyone on this discussion group can obtain the donation of boxes of
sterile latex gloves (they usually come in boxes on 100) or wishes to
purchase some >from a medical supply store, they would be greatly
appreciated at the hospital to stop the spread of desease.

There is also a critical need for sugar substitute (Sweet N Low) for
diabetic patients. Latex gloves and Sweet N Low are not available in
Belarus.

Frank will be sending a message with specific medicine requirements
later this week.

I have arranged with Frank Swartz to have a group of Yeshiva University
students, who are leaving for Minsk >from NY on Dec. 28, to carry the
gloves and Sweet N Low as excess baggage and deliver them directly to
Frank so we know they will be received at the children's hospital.

Please send the boxes of latex gloves or Sweet N Low to:
Ari Wartelsky
YUSSR
2525 Amsterdam Ave. Suite 103
New York, NY 1003

Also, please send Ari and myself a private e-mail message telling what
you are sending so they can prepare their luggage accordingly.
<ariw@yussr.org>
<fox@erols.com>

I have also made arrangements with B'nai B'rith International Center for
Public Policy to undertake a massive relief effort for the Jews of
Belarus. More information on this will follow as arrangements for
collection and shipment of larger quantities of aid are arranged.

Please remember that while we are all united in a common bond to
research our ancestors and look back at the past, we also have a
responsiblity to look forward to the survival of our fellow Jews in
Belarus, some of whom may even be our long lost relatives.

David Fox
fox@erols.com
Belarus SIG Coordinator


Belarus SIG #Belarus Urgent Need For Belarus Relief #belarus

David M. Fox <fox@...>
 

Dear Members of the Belarus SIG:

I realize that this is a genealogical forum, and I hope this message
will not upset too many people. As many of you know Frank Swartz, a
member of this SIG, has reported on the deteriorating conditions for the
approximately 75,000 Jews that remain in Belarus. I received a message
from Frank this week describing the terrible situation in a children's
hospital where there are cases of meningitis. The doctors and nurses
have no sterile latex gloves to use when treating patients with
infectious deseases. As anyone who has worked in a medical setting
knows, infections can spread rapidly in a hospital that does not have
proper infection control. While the rubber gloves are only the tip of
the iceberg, I am trying to get some sent over with a group of Yeshvia
University students who are leaving for Minsk on Dec. 28 to conduct a
"Winter Camp" for Jewish youths in Belarus.

If anyone on this discussion group can obtain the donation of boxes of
sterile latex gloves (they usually come in boxes on 100) or wishes to
purchase some >from a medical supply store, they would be greatly
appreciated at the hospital to stop the spread of desease.

There is also a critical need for sugar substitute (Sweet N Low) for
diabetic patients. Latex gloves and Sweet N Low are not available in
Belarus.

Frank will be sending a message with specific medicine requirements
later this week.

I have arranged with Frank Swartz to have a group of Yeshiva University
students, who are leaving for Minsk >from NY on Dec. 28, to carry the
gloves and Sweet N Low as excess baggage and deliver them directly to
Frank so we know they will be received at the children's hospital.

Please send the boxes of latex gloves or Sweet N Low to:
Ari Wartelsky
YUSSR
2525 Amsterdam Ave. Suite 103
New York, NY 1003

Also, please send Ari and myself a private e-mail message telling what
you are sending so they can prepare their luggage accordingly.
<ariw@yussr.org>
<fox@erols.com>

I have also made arrangements with B'nai B'rith International Center for
Public Policy to undertake a massive relief effort for the Jews of
Belarus. More information on this will follow as arrangements for
collection and shipment of larger quantities of aid are arranged.

Please remember that while we are all united in a common bond to
research our ancestors and look back at the past, we also have a
responsiblity to look forward to the survival of our fellow Jews in
Belarus, some of whom may even be our long lost relatives.

David Fox
fox@erols.com
Belarus SIG Coordinator


Re: Koidanov #belarus

YuriShch1@...
 

In a message dated 12/15/98 10:37:04 AM Pacific Standard Time,
levenchick@hotmail.com writes:

<<
My father Elihu EVENCHICK born Isidore Evenchick in Koidanov, Belarus
in 1900 or 1901 spelled the name Kurdanov. Ihave read that the town is
now called Dyarzhinsk but an edition of the Soviet Encyclopedia says
Koidanov is the railroad station of Dyarzhinsk (previously spelled
Dzerzhinsk on maps. My father told me Koidanov is about 25 miles sw of
Minsk and was about 1/2 Jewish and 1/2 non-jewish in population. Does
anyone have exact information on the relation of old Koidanov to Modern
Dyarzhinsk >>

Dear Les!

My grandfather, Chaim (Yefim), son of Movsha, Marshak was born in Dzerzhinsk
/ Koidanovo (I prefer to use its Russian -- English transliteration rather
than Belarussian -- Engish) in 1905. I know this town pretty well since my
grandparents lived in Minsk and every time I visited them my grandfather took
me to Dzerzhinsk and showed me the places connected with his childhood.

The names Koidanovo and Dzerzhinsk correspond to the same town. For some
reasons the name of station had not been changed in 1929 when the town was
renamed after the Felix Dzerzhinski, the first Bolshevik's chief of the GPU /
NKVD / KGB.

The City of Minsk is getting larger and larger, and now Dzerzhinsk almost
became a part of the megapolis. I believe it won't be existing as a separated
town in several years.

If you have some questions, please email me at: YuriShch1@aol.com

Sincerely,
Yuri Shcherbina


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Koidanov #belarus

YuriShch1@...
 

In a message dated 12/15/98 10:37:04 AM Pacific Standard Time,
levenchick@hotmail.com writes:

<<
My father Elihu EVENCHICK born Isidore Evenchick in Koidanov, Belarus
in 1900 or 1901 spelled the name Kurdanov. Ihave read that the town is
now called Dyarzhinsk but an edition of the Soviet Encyclopedia says
Koidanov is the railroad station of Dyarzhinsk (previously spelled
Dzerzhinsk on maps. My father told me Koidanov is about 25 miles sw of
Minsk and was about 1/2 Jewish and 1/2 non-jewish in population. Does
anyone have exact information on the relation of old Koidanov to Modern
Dyarzhinsk >>

Dear Les!

My grandfather, Chaim (Yefim), son of Movsha, Marshak was born in Dzerzhinsk
/ Koidanovo (I prefer to use its Russian -- English transliteration rather
than Belarussian -- Engish) in 1905. I know this town pretty well since my
grandparents lived in Minsk and every time I visited them my grandfather took
me to Dzerzhinsk and showed me the places connected with his childhood.

The names Koidanovo and Dzerzhinsk correspond to the same town. For some
reasons the name of station had not been changed in 1929 when the town was
renamed after the Felix Dzerzhinski, the first Bolshevik's chief of the GPU /
NKVD / KGB.

The City of Minsk is getting larger and larger, and now Dzerzhinsk almost
became a part of the megapolis. I believe it won't be existing as a separated
town in several years.

If you have some questions, please email me at: YuriShch1@aol.com

Sincerely,
Yuri Shcherbina


Re: jri-pl digest: December 14, 1998 #poland

Rsbromley@...
 

In reply to the person trying to read the LDS microfilm. I had a Polish and
Russian translator write out for me the key words that I was looking for. That
helped narrow my search. Then I took the most likely documents in for complete
translation. I have found that the language in the old documents seems to
present translation difficulties and you get somewhat different translations
from different translators. This seems to be particuarly true of names.
Rebecca Snyder Bromley


JRI Poland #Poland Re: jri-pl digest: December 14, 1998 #poland

Rsbromley@...
 

In reply to the person trying to read the LDS microfilm. I had a Polish and
Russian translator write out for me the key words that I was looking for. That
helped narrow my search. Then I took the most likely documents in for complete
translation. I have found that the language in the old documents seems to
present translation difficulties and you get somewhat different translations
from different translators. This seems to be particuarly true of names.
Rebecca Snyder Bromley


New indices to be added to JRI - Poland database #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

Dear friends of Jewish Records Indexing - Poland:

As a result of the tremendous efforts by JRI - Poland Shtetl CO-OP
leaders and their teams, Shtetl CO-OP coordinator Hadassah
Lipsius, and our data manipulation volunteers, the flow of completed
indices has been heating up. As a result, there is now actually an
extensive backlog to be added to the database.

As soon as JRI-Poland Database Manager Michael Tobias (the most
overworked volunteer in the Jewish genealogical world) gets back
from and recovers >from his research trip to Belarus, we expect the
indices to an additional 25 - 30 thousand records for the following
towns will start to appear in the database:

Brzeziny
Drobin
Konskie
Kurow
Lodz
Radomsko
Radzilow
Sochocin
Wolbrom
Wyszogrod
Zdunska Wola
Zychlyn

Stanley Diamond
Coordinator, Jewish Records Indexing - Poland


JRI Poland #Poland New indices to be added to JRI - Poland database #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

Dear friends of Jewish Records Indexing - Poland:

As a result of the tremendous efforts by JRI - Poland Shtetl CO-OP
leaders and their teams, Shtetl CO-OP coordinator Hadassah
Lipsius, and our data manipulation volunteers, the flow of completed
indices has been heating up. As a result, there is now actually an
extensive backlog to be added to the database.

As soon as JRI-Poland Database Manager Michael Tobias (the most
overworked volunteer in the Jewish genealogical world) gets back
from and recovers >from his research trip to Belarus, we expect the
indices to an additional 25 - 30 thousand records for the following
towns will start to appear in the database:

Brzeziny
Drobin
Konskie
Kurow
Lodz
Radomsko
Radzilow
Sochocin
Wolbrom
Wyszogrod
Zdunska Wola
Zychlyn

Stanley Diamond
Coordinator, Jewish Records Indexing - Poland