Date   

Hello Goldberger #hungary

Volvi <volvi@...>
 

Yes, I don't know why it's the second time my post came as a blank, I am
close to giving up with the group. Oh well, last try.

This is what was supposed to have appeared.



Hello Everyone,

I am new to the group and have just received my first batch of SIG mail. =
Not sure why it comes all at once, but nevertheless will take this =
opportunity to introduce myself and a little of my background in case =
its of any interest to any.

My name is Volvi Goldberger. My parents and family came >from Kecskemet =
Hungary, where they left in 1949 to Vienna spending almost 5 years in =
the Rothchild Lager as it was known then. My father belonged to the =
Orthodox Shull and not the Neologue. My grandfather was the Chazan and =
Gabbe. before Kecskemet they originated >from Mohol now Mol in Serbia, =
(former Yugoslavia).

Most of the Goldberger's perished in the Holocaust. My father's mother's =
maiden name was Regina Rosner.

More details of my family can be found at, for those interested;

http://boards.ancestry.com/mbexec?htx=3Dboard&r=3Dan&p=3Dsurnames.goldber=
ger

Would be interesting if some of those above mentioned names may be of =
interest to some.

Until next time.

Volvi

Moderator VK: It comes all at once if you're signed up to receive your messages in digest format. That's what I do and find it's much easier to got through a batch of messages all at once. Have you checked the JGFF for GOLDBERGER and ROSNER?


Hungary SIG #Hungary Hello Goldberger #hungary

Volvi <volvi@...>
 

Yes, I don't know why it's the second time my post came as a blank, I am
close to giving up with the group. Oh well, last try.

This is what was supposed to have appeared.



Hello Everyone,

I am new to the group and have just received my first batch of SIG mail. =
Not sure why it comes all at once, but nevertheless will take this =
opportunity to introduce myself and a little of my background in case =
its of any interest to any.

My name is Volvi Goldberger. My parents and family came >from Kecskemet =
Hungary, where they left in 1949 to Vienna spending almost 5 years in =
the Rothchild Lager as it was known then. My father belonged to the =
Orthodox Shull and not the Neologue. My grandfather was the Chazan and =
Gabbe. before Kecskemet they originated >from Mohol now Mol in Serbia, =
(former Yugoslavia).

Most of the Goldberger's perished in the Holocaust. My father's mother's =
maiden name was Regina Rosner.

More details of my family can be found at, for those interested;

http://boards.ancestry.com/mbexec?htx=3Dboard&r=3Dan&p=3Dsurnames.goldber=
ger

Would be interesting if some of those above mentioned names may be of =
interest to some.

Until next time.

Volvi

Moderator VK: It comes all at once if you're signed up to receive your messages in digest format. That's what I do and find it's much easier to got through a batch of messages all at once. Have you checked the JGFF for GOLDBERGER and ROSNER?


Help-cannot locate NagyIda #hungary

MGS18@...
 

I have scanned all over the old hungarian county map of 1910 and I'm
seeing double already.

I cannot find this town called NagyIda. I thought it was in Ung county
but the closest I came was NagyLaz and I don't think that's the right
town. Maybe I'm looking in the wrong county.

Yes, I could pay $19.95 a month to sign up for that new hungarian village
finder site but I thought I'd try my luck with the group for free first.

Any help would be appreciated.

Mindy Soclof

Moderator VK: I think that you haven't been able to find Nagy Ida because it's not in Ung megye. Try Tirgu Mures-Viile Tecii now in Romania, formerly Transylvania.


Re: jri-pl digest: July 30, 2001 #poland

Plutsk@...
 

Marcia Kamien writes:

"In short, people took names they were given by immigration officers or that
they chose as sounding "Yankee.""

It's never surprising to see the old story re-emerge of someone whose "name
was changed at Ellis Island." After all, almost every American Jew has this
story in their family, or knows someone who swears it was true: "My bubbe
TOLD me her name was changed at Ellis Island! Are you saying my bubbe was a
LIAR?"

No, of course not. I'm sure your bubbe was as wonderful as mine; and believe
me, my bubbe was pretty wonderful! Nevertheless, no one's name -- either
surname or given name -- was changed by immigration officials at Ellis Island
(or any other port of entry). Then, as now, a legal name change could only
be carried out by a judge. Then, as now, there were no name change forms or
procedures of any sort. In fact, writing or re-writing an immigrant's name
wasn't part of the entry process at all. Immigration officials merely
identified the person standing before them as the person whose name had been
written on the passenger manifest on the European side. They didn't care
what the name was, and if they mispronounced it that was fine with them too.
(Many of us have seen our relatives' Final Petitions for Naturalization,
including a section where the candidate could petition the court for a name
change if he or she wanted to. A legal name change could ONLY be performed
by a judge at the time of naturalization or in another court of law.)

Back to the immigration process: If a person was detained for a Special
Inquiry (S.I.) or similar procedure, their name might have been copied >from
the passenger manifest onto another page, but this copied version of the name
wasn't intended to alter the immigrant's name, didn't "stick" with the
immigrant after the S.I., and wasn't even shown or told to him or her.

Why the persistent story of Ellis Island name changes? I believe it's
because many people did in fact INFORMALLY change their names when the
entered the U.S. or shortly thereafter, either on their own or on the advice
of the relatives who met them. If a person chose a new first name or
surname when they entered the country, or was told what their new "American"
name was by relatives, and never used another name >from that time forward,
then the name was changed "de facto" (by the fact of usage) though not "de
jure" (by law).

Informal adoption of a new name is in fact perfectly common today in
non-immigration situations. Anyone can do business under a name which is not
their birth name. As long as you have no intention to defraud anyone, you
can use any "D.B.A." -- "Doing Business As" -- name you like. Just ask
"Prince" or "Madonna," "Puff Daddy" or "Tiny Tim," "Chef Boyardee" or "Mrs.
Grass".

So yes, your bubbe told you the truth when she said her name changed >from
"Malka Schwartzshtein" to "Minnie Blackstone" at Ellis Island; but no, that
change was not done by any immigration official or through any official
action.

So now it's cleared up once and for all, right?

Steve Gold
Detroit area


Re: Phraseology of Kopyczince/Kopychintsy #poland

Willie46@...
 

I am sure that Mr. Goodman is correct, in many instances, that the practice
of
using two placenames for a town is to "transliterate" a Polish name. However
in this example, and others where a town that was once in Poland and is now
in another country, there is good reason to identify the town by both
names/spellings.

In most databases of town names (e.g., JewishGen Family Finder, Where
Once We Walked), the accepted protocol is to use the modern contemporary
name/spelling of each town. In the JRI-Poland AGAD Indexing project, 84 of
the 87 towns are currently in Ukraine and, therefore, use the current
Ukrainian
name/spelling. However, prior to WW2, the same town was in Poland and
used the Polish name/spelling.

To be consistent with major databases and reference materials of Jewish
genealogical value, the AGAD project must use the contemporary Ukrainian
name/spelling. However, the AGAD project must frequently communicate
with the Polish State Archives AGAD Archives, who use the Polish
name/spelling. And, many researchers may still refer to their town using
the Polish era name.

Therefore, the current Ukrainian town of Kopychintsy was Kopyczynce and
researchers will use either spelling to identify the town that they are
referring.

Not all Ukrainian towns, formerly in Poland and Galicia, had their name
changed. Some towns still maintain the same exact spelling, such as Bobrka,
Gologory, and Skalat.

Other towns names were changed completely (not just a spelling variation)
such as:
Stanislawow became Ivano Frankovsk
Zabie became Verkhovina
Zolkiew became Nesterov

When referring to a town that are part of the AGAD Project, it may be best
to use both names/spellings.

Mark Halpern
AGAD Archive Coordinator

In a message dated 7/31/01 1:25:17 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
stan@hashkedim.com writes:

As the phraseology "<placename1> (now <placename2>)", as in the above
snippet, appears very often in JewishGen and JRI postings, perhaps it may
be useful to make a point about this entirely typical example: It is not
that
the latter name has replaced the former one in any way whatever;
"Kopychintsy" is merely a spelling based on English phonetics and
orthographic conventions. "Kopyczince" is the Polish spelling, which, when
pronounced correctly, sounds exactly like "Kopychintsy" to an American
or other English-speaking person. It is misleading to imply that
"Kopychintsy" is a new (or merely other) name by which the place
is known, and leads to needless confusion on the part of anyone searching
for invormation on the place.

I have no idea what or where Kopyczynce is. My point concerns
misunderstanding of spelling conventions.


Re: translations of names from the Old Country #poland

Robert Strumwasser <RobertStrum@...>
 

On Tuesday, July 31, 2001 1:01 AM, M6rose@aol.com wrote:

I see a lot of questions >from people asking if their gmother Sura/Sora
could
have been called Sophie...and the like.
<snip>
In short, people took names they were given by immigration officers or
that
they chose as sounding "Yankee."
While I thought Ms. Kamien's post was generally well-explained and useful,
I feel compelled to correct one item.

It is now generally accepted that absolutely no name changes occurred at
Ellis Island. Indeed, the INS conducted a study and found no documented
cases of a name change at Ellis Island. I believe that Marion Smith wrote
an article debunking this common mis-conception in Avotaynu, but I was
unable to find it before posting this.

Finally, a fast search in the JG Digest archives found a variety of posts
discussing this topic.

Robert Strumwasser
Sharon, MA, USA
RobertStrum@email.msn.com

Researching:
any STRUMWASSER, STROMWASSER, STRONGWATER, STONEWATER
from Taurage, Lith -- COHN, GLICKMAN, ROZ, SIEGAL, HURWITZ; ABRAMAWITZ >from
Kamenets Pod., Ukr -- JURIST/URIST, SAPOSNICK, PETCHEKOVSKY, CZAP
from Sadgura, Ukr -- KARPEL, LOBL; >from Zhelibory & Voynilov, Ukr -- KALTER
from Sudilkov & Slavuta, Ukr -- KUDISH, RUTFIELD, LERNER, KATZ, CUTLER
from Rafalowka, Ukr -- ROSENFELD, BRATT; >from Vilna gub., Lith: LURIE,
LEVEN


Hungary SIG #Hungary Help-cannot locate NagyIda #hungary

MGS18@...
 

I have scanned all over the old hungarian county map of 1910 and I'm
seeing double already.

I cannot find this town called NagyIda. I thought it was in Ung county
but the closest I came was NagyLaz and I don't think that's the right
town. Maybe I'm looking in the wrong county.

Yes, I could pay $19.95 a month to sign up for that new hungarian village
finder site but I thought I'd try my luck with the group for free first.

Any help would be appreciated.

Mindy Soclof

Moderator VK: I think that you haven't been able to find Nagy Ida because it's not in Ung megye. Try Tirgu Mures-Viile Tecii now in Romania, formerly Transylvania.


JRI Poland #Poland Re: jri-pl digest: July 30, 2001 #poland

Plutsk@...
 

Marcia Kamien writes:

"In short, people took names they were given by immigration officers or that
they chose as sounding "Yankee.""

It's never surprising to see the old story re-emerge of someone whose "name
was changed at Ellis Island." After all, almost every American Jew has this
story in their family, or knows someone who swears it was true: "My bubbe
TOLD me her name was changed at Ellis Island! Are you saying my bubbe was a
LIAR?"

No, of course not. I'm sure your bubbe was as wonderful as mine; and believe
me, my bubbe was pretty wonderful! Nevertheless, no one's name -- either
surname or given name -- was changed by immigration officials at Ellis Island
(or any other port of entry). Then, as now, a legal name change could only
be carried out by a judge. Then, as now, there were no name change forms or
procedures of any sort. In fact, writing or re-writing an immigrant's name
wasn't part of the entry process at all. Immigration officials merely
identified the person standing before them as the person whose name had been
written on the passenger manifest on the European side. They didn't care
what the name was, and if they mispronounced it that was fine with them too.
(Many of us have seen our relatives' Final Petitions for Naturalization,
including a section where the candidate could petition the court for a name
change if he or she wanted to. A legal name change could ONLY be performed
by a judge at the time of naturalization or in another court of law.)

Back to the immigration process: If a person was detained for a Special
Inquiry (S.I.) or similar procedure, their name might have been copied >from
the passenger manifest onto another page, but this copied version of the name
wasn't intended to alter the immigrant's name, didn't "stick" with the
immigrant after the S.I., and wasn't even shown or told to him or her.

Why the persistent story of Ellis Island name changes? I believe it's
because many people did in fact INFORMALLY change their names when the
entered the U.S. or shortly thereafter, either on their own or on the advice
of the relatives who met them. If a person chose a new first name or
surname when they entered the country, or was told what their new "American"
name was by relatives, and never used another name >from that time forward,
then the name was changed "de facto" (by the fact of usage) though not "de
jure" (by law).

Informal adoption of a new name is in fact perfectly common today in
non-immigration situations. Anyone can do business under a name which is not
their birth name. As long as you have no intention to defraud anyone, you
can use any "D.B.A." -- "Doing Business As" -- name you like. Just ask
"Prince" or "Madonna," "Puff Daddy" or "Tiny Tim," "Chef Boyardee" or "Mrs.
Grass".

So yes, your bubbe told you the truth when she said her name changed >from
"Malka Schwartzshtein" to "Minnie Blackstone" at Ellis Island; but no, that
change was not done by any immigration official or through any official
action.

So now it's cleared up once and for all, right?

Steve Gold
Detroit area


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Phraseology of Kopyczince/Kopychintsy #poland

Willie46@...
 

I am sure that Mr. Goodman is correct, in many instances, that the practice
of
using two placenames for a town is to "transliterate" a Polish name. However
in this example, and others where a town that was once in Poland and is now
in another country, there is good reason to identify the town by both
names/spellings.

In most databases of town names (e.g., JewishGen Family Finder, Where
Once We Walked), the accepted protocol is to use the modern contemporary
name/spelling of each town. In the JRI-Poland AGAD Indexing project, 84 of
the 87 towns are currently in Ukraine and, therefore, use the current
Ukrainian
name/spelling. However, prior to WW2, the same town was in Poland and
used the Polish name/spelling.

To be consistent with major databases and reference materials of Jewish
genealogical value, the AGAD project must use the contemporary Ukrainian
name/spelling. However, the AGAD project must frequently communicate
with the Polish State Archives AGAD Archives, who use the Polish
name/spelling. And, many researchers may still refer to their town using
the Polish era name.

Therefore, the current Ukrainian town of Kopychintsy was Kopyczynce and
researchers will use either spelling to identify the town that they are
referring.

Not all Ukrainian towns, formerly in Poland and Galicia, had their name
changed. Some towns still maintain the same exact spelling, such as Bobrka,
Gologory, and Skalat.

Other towns names were changed completely (not just a spelling variation)
such as:
Stanislawow became Ivano Frankovsk
Zabie became Verkhovina
Zolkiew became Nesterov

When referring to a town that are part of the AGAD Project, it may be best
to use both names/spellings.

Mark Halpern
AGAD Archive Coordinator

In a message dated 7/31/01 1:25:17 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
stan@hashkedim.com writes:

As the phraseology "<placename1> (now <placename2>)", as in the above
snippet, appears very often in JewishGen and JRI postings, perhaps it may
be useful to make a point about this entirely typical example: It is not
that
the latter name has replaced the former one in any way whatever;
"Kopychintsy" is merely a spelling based on English phonetics and
orthographic conventions. "Kopyczince" is the Polish spelling, which, when
pronounced correctly, sounds exactly like "Kopychintsy" to an American
or other English-speaking person. It is misleading to imply that
"Kopychintsy" is a new (or merely other) name by which the place
is known, and leads to needless confusion on the part of anyone searching
for invormation on the place.

I have no idea what or where Kopyczynce is. My point concerns
misunderstanding of spelling conventions.


JRI Poland #Poland RE: translations of names from the Old Country #poland

Robert Strumwasser <RobertStrum@...>
 

On Tuesday, July 31, 2001 1:01 AM, M6rose@aol.com wrote:

I see a lot of questions >from people asking if their gmother Sura/Sora
could
have been called Sophie...and the like.
<snip>
In short, people took names they were given by immigration officers or
that
they chose as sounding "Yankee."
While I thought Ms. Kamien's post was generally well-explained and useful,
I feel compelled to correct one item.

It is now generally accepted that absolutely no name changes occurred at
Ellis Island. Indeed, the INS conducted a study and found no documented
cases of a name change at Ellis Island. I believe that Marion Smith wrote
an article debunking this common mis-conception in Avotaynu, but I was
unable to find it before posting this.

Finally, a fast search in the JG Digest archives found a variety of posts
discussing this topic.

Robert Strumwasser
Sharon, MA, USA
RobertStrum@email.msn.com

Researching:
any STRUMWASSER, STROMWASSER, STRONGWATER, STONEWATER
from Taurage, Lith -- COHN, GLICKMAN, ROZ, SIEGAL, HURWITZ; ABRAMAWITZ >from
Kamenets Pod., Ukr -- JURIST/URIST, SAPOSNICK, PETCHEKOVSKY, CZAP
from Sadgura, Ukr -- KARPEL, LOBL; >from Zhelibory & Voynilov, Ukr -- KALTER
from Sudilkov & Slavuta, Ukr -- KUDISH, RUTFIELD, LERNER, KATZ, CUTLER
from Rafalowka, Ukr -- ROSENFELD, BRATT; >from Vilna gub., Lith: LURIE,
LEVEN


Re: JewishGen IS protecting you against viruses.... #hungary

Ernest Fine <egfine@...>
 

This needs some further comment. I've placed my comments after the various
sections of the original posting.

Ernie Fine
Vienna, VA

----- Original Message -----
From: "Howard Spindel" <howard@sci1.com>
To: "JRI-Poland" <jri-pl@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Cc: <howard@sci1.com>
Sent: Sunday, July 29, 2001 4:33 PM
Subject: [jri-pl] Re: JewishGen IS protecting you against viruses....


So you cannot depend on the filename to tell you whether
an attachment is safe to open or not.
I've never seen this. Has anyone ever seen a mail client that actually hides
the real name of the attachment? The names are disguised, sure, but they
still show up as virus-something-or-other.doc.scr - or whatever. The final
three characters are the tipoff. You shouldn't ever open an attachment
ending in .SCR, .PIF, .VBS, .EXE, .BAT, .CMD, .COM... I'm sure I've
forgotten a few more.

Microsoft Word (.doc files) and Microsoft Excel (.xls files) can contain a
kind of virus called a macro virus. They cannot be assumed to be safe.
It's not just Word and Excel; it's anything with VBA behind it -
Outlook/Outlook Express and MS-Access too. In fact, it's the manipulation of
the Outlook and Outlook Express address books that is behind the rapid
spread of many of today's viruses (as Howard discusses further in the note).

A virus may even be capable of destroying your hardware in
addition to your software.
This is a common myth, but it's not true. There has never been a virus
capable of destroying hardware. Destroying the formatting on a hard drive,
yes, but that can be reformatted. The only way a virus could "destroy"
hardware would be to set up some sort of repetitive disk access situation
that would wear out the disk... but most people would turn off their PC long
before that happened. And I'm not aware of anyone developing such a virus.

Norton AV can also be configured to
automatically update itself to protect against the latest virus threats.
Watch out for the default on this; it may not be what you want. I'd suggest
you set this program - it's called "Live Update" - to update at least
weekly.

Then your option is to delete the
infected file and replace it with an original copy of the file. This will
involve re-installing programs and pieces of the operating system. Unless
you are an advanced user this will probably be difficult for
you. Restoring >from recent backups is the best way to go.
Generally, the antivirus program identifies a single "module" (program or
piece of a program) as being infected. If the antivirus program cannot
"clean" the module, it will tell you that. In many cases, you can simply
copy the module >from the installation disc, to replace the infected module.
You may need to do a reinstall if the module is "packed" in a file, and you
can't get to it directly. Also, if you have more than one PC with this
program on it, you can copy the uninfected module onto diskette (or ZIP disk
or other media) and then replace the infected one.


JRI Poland #Poland Re: JewishGen IS protecting you against viruses.... #poland

Ernest Fine <egfine@...>
 

This needs some further comment. I've placed my comments after the various
sections of the original posting.

Ernie Fine
Vienna, VA

----- Original Message -----
From: "Howard Spindel" <howard@sci1.com>
To: "JRI-Poland" <jri-pl@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Cc: <howard@sci1.com>
Sent: Sunday, July 29, 2001 4:33 PM
Subject: [jri-pl] Re: JewishGen IS protecting you against viruses....


So you cannot depend on the filename to tell you whether
an attachment is safe to open or not.
I've never seen this. Has anyone ever seen a mail client that actually hides
the real name of the attachment? The names are disguised, sure, but they
still show up as virus-something-or-other.doc.scr - or whatever. The final
three characters are the tipoff. You shouldn't ever open an attachment
ending in .SCR, .PIF, .VBS, .EXE, .BAT, .CMD, .COM... I'm sure I've
forgotten a few more.

Microsoft Word (.doc files) and Microsoft Excel (.xls files) can contain a
kind of virus called a macro virus. They cannot be assumed to be safe.
It's not just Word and Excel; it's anything with VBA behind it -
Outlook/Outlook Express and MS-Access too. In fact, it's the manipulation of
the Outlook and Outlook Express address books that is behind the rapid
spread of many of today's viruses (as Howard discusses further in the note).

A virus may even be capable of destroying your hardware in
addition to your software.
This is a common myth, but it's not true. There has never been a virus
capable of destroying hardware. Destroying the formatting on a hard drive,
yes, but that can be reformatted. The only way a virus could "destroy"
hardware would be to set up some sort of repetitive disk access situation
that would wear out the disk... but most people would turn off their PC long
before that happened. And I'm not aware of anyone developing such a virus.

Norton AV can also be configured to
automatically update itself to protect against the latest virus threats.
Watch out for the default on this; it may not be what you want. I'd suggest
you set this program - it's called "Live Update" - to update at least
weekly.

Then your option is to delete the
infected file and replace it with an original copy of the file. This will
involve re-installing programs and pieces of the operating system. Unless
you are an advanced user this will probably be difficult for
you. Restoring >from recent backups is the best way to go.
Generally, the antivirus program identifies a single "module" (program or
piece of a program) as being infected. If the antivirus program cannot
"clean" the module, it will tell you that. In many cases, you can simply
copy the module >from the installation disc, to replace the infected module.
You may need to do a reinstall if the module is "packed" in a file, and you
can't get to it directly. Also, if you have more than one PC with this
program on it, you can copy the uninfected module onto diskette (or ZIP disk
or other media) and then replace the infected one.


Passenger list markings #ukraine

Steve Gabai <sgabai@...>
 

I'm just wondering if anyone would know...

Under column 2 of a 1920 Ellis Island passenger list titled: "HEAD-TAX
STATUS (This column for use of Government officials only.)" - what the
letters D and R stand for.

Thanks.

You can reply privately.

Searching: Russia - GREENBERG, GREENBAUM, SCHRAPATZ - SCROPOTICH, RATOVETSKY
& SILVER

Italy/Turkey - GABAI, ALGRANATI, ABOUAF, ROUSSO - RUSSO, CARMONA & TARANTO


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Passenger list markings #ukraine

Steve Gabai <sgabai@...>
 

I'm just wondering if anyone would know...

Under column 2 of a 1920 Ellis Island passenger list titled: "HEAD-TAX
STATUS (This column for use of Government officials only.)" - what the
letters D and R stand for.

Thanks.

You can reply privately.

Searching: Russia - GREENBERG, GREENBAUM, SCHRAPATZ - SCROPOTICH, RATOVETSKY
& SILVER

Italy/Turkey - GABAI, ALGRANATI, ABOUAF, ROUSSO - RUSSO, CARMONA & TARANTO


Re: jewroots@yahoo.com #galicia

Carol Cohen <cgandhc@...>
 

I have received a communication >from the Jewish Roots Department attached
to Jewish Orthodox Community Kiev, Ukraine, and I wonder if anyone has ever
heard of them or had dealings with them.

Thanks,

Carol Cohen
Carol Cohen
cgandhc@ont.com
Dallas, TX USA


Rzeszow PSA Project is Underway #galicia

EDENSARA@...
 

Dear Fellow Researcher,

At long last, indexing has started on the Jewish vital records in the Rzeszow
branch of the Polish State Archives under the auspices of the Jewish Records
Indexing - Poland / PSA project. I am the Archive Coordinator for this
project.

There are no Mormon microfilms of Jewish records for these towns; except for
a index of a small number of Rzeszow births in the holdings of the Lviv,
Ukraine archives, there are NO records in the JRI - Poland database for these
towns.

The Rzeszow Archives holdings include the following 19th century birth,
marriage and death records:

Town Births Marriages Deaths
Nieblyec 240 8

Rzeszow 8871 9077

Sokolow 4864 438 2810

Tyczyn 1629 28

Other than the town of Niebylec, the data entry is being done by staff at the
Rzeszow Archives working directly for JRI - Poland. Please refer to the
JRI-Poland website <http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/psastat1.htm> for
additional information on the Rzeszow project.
If anyone has any questions about the Rzeszow project, please contact me
directly at EDENSARA@aol.com.

Sincerely,

Eden S. Joachim
Archive Coordinator
Rzeszow Branch, Polish State Archives Project



EDENSARA@aol.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: jewroots@yahoo.com #galicia

Carol Cohen <cgandhc@...>
 

I have received a communication >from the Jewish Roots Department attached
to Jewish Orthodox Community Kiev, Ukraine, and I wonder if anyone has ever
heard of them or had dealings with them.

Thanks,

Carol Cohen
Carol Cohen
cgandhc@ont.com
Dallas, TX USA


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Rzeszow PSA Project is Underway #galicia

EDENSARA@...
 

Dear Fellow Researcher,

At long last, indexing has started on the Jewish vital records in the Rzeszow
branch of the Polish State Archives under the auspices of the Jewish Records
Indexing - Poland / PSA project. I am the Archive Coordinator for this
project.

There are no Mormon microfilms of Jewish records for these towns; except for
a index of a small number of Rzeszow births in the holdings of the Lviv,
Ukraine archives, there are NO records in the JRI - Poland database for these
towns.

The Rzeszow Archives holdings include the following 19th century birth,
marriage and death records:

Town Births Marriages Deaths
Nieblyec 240 8

Rzeszow 8871 9077

Sokolow 4864 438 2810

Tyczyn 1629 28

Other than the town of Niebylec, the data entry is being done by staff at the
Rzeszow Archives working directly for JRI - Poland. Please refer to the
JRI-Poland website <http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/psastat1.htm> for
additional information on the Rzeszow project.
If anyone has any questions about the Rzeszow project, please contact me
directly at EDENSARA@aol.com.

Sincerely,

Eden S. Joachim
Archive Coordinator
Rzeszow Branch, Polish State Archives Project



EDENSARA@aol.com


source of Ella? #galicia

Lisa Dashman <ldashman@...>
 

Dear Genners,
On a 1903 New York City marriage license, the name of a great-aunt born in Galicia
is stated as "Ella". I would be grateful for suggestions of what her name may
have been in Yiddish or German. I have been unable to locate her in either
the EIDB or ship manifest microfilms thus far.

Thank you in advance.

Best wishes,
Lisa Dashman
Croton-on-Hudson, NY


Re: Village of Kalush #galicia

Alexander Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

Hi

Information gathered by Miriam Weiner in her books has been correlated
with the Polish State Archives. If there is no information in Poland
AGAD or USC Srodmiescie availble, it is evident that vital records for
Kalusz did not survive HaShoa.

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor

PS. Just for the records.
Kalusz (Kalush) was a town, not a village, with a general population
numbering around 10,000 souls.

Alexander

----- Original Message -----
From: "Lee Bothast" <bothast@earthlink.net>
To: "Gesher Galicia SIG" <galicia@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Monday, July 30, 2001 20:09
Subject: [galicia] Village of Kalush

I'm researching family >from Kalush, near Ivano-Frankivsk and am having =
difficulty locating where vital records are stored for this town. Miriam =
Weiner's book lists only Land Records as being available. Does anyone =
know if there are more records available for this town and where they =
might be kept?