Date   

Using the British Pound Symbol #unitedkingdom

Louise Messik at JCR-UK <jcr-uk-mod@...>
 

Dear Members

I recently carried out a survey on the JGSGB list as to who is able to =
view
the British pound symbol =A3 and any other unusual characters when the
messages come through having been moderated.

It would appear limited to those who take their messages in the daily =
digest
form. All the others can see it perfectly.

I am in correspondence with JewishGen about this matter.

I apologise to those of you who take the digest. For the time being you
will see unusual characters instead of the normal sign and you will see =
an
equal sign at the end of the row.

If this disturbs you perhaps it would be better to change to normal =
receipt
until such time as this problem is resolved.

Louise Messik
Lead Moderator

=20


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Using the British Pound Symbol #unitedkingdom

Louise Messik at JCR-UK <jcr-uk-mod@...>
 

Dear Members

I recently carried out a survey on the JGSGB list as to who is able to =
view
the British pound symbol =A3 and any other unusual characters when the
messages come through having been moderated.

It would appear limited to those who take their messages in the daily =
digest
form. All the others can see it perfectly.

I am in correspondence with JewishGen about this matter.

I apologise to those of you who take the digest. For the time being you
will see unusual characters instead of the normal sign and you will see =
an
equal sign at the end of the row.

If this disturbs you perhaps it would be better to change to normal =
receipt
until such time as this problem is resolved.

Louise Messik
Lead Moderator

=20


Lithuanian groshes (coins) #belarus

Lee Nydell <lnydell@...>
 

I have seen a reference that in the year of 1626, the Jewish Community sent 1460
Lithuanian groshes (coins) to the government.
Can anyone tell me if this was a little or a lot of money in 1626?

Lee Nydell
Irvine, California, United States
lnydell@yahoo.com
Researching - NADEL, NUDEL, NIEDLE >from Russia, Belarus and Poland


Re: Seeking Yad Vashem submitter Khaim BERG from Israel #belarus

Eilat Gordin Levitan
 

Lee Nydell wrote;

Trying to locate a Khaim BERG, who lives in Israel and is a Shoah survivor.
On May 27, 1999 he submitted information to Yad Vashem about members
of his family....
The Yad Vashem reports include addresses of the submitters. By
clicking on the left you could see the original scanned report. Khaim
Berg must be a new immigrant >from Russia to Israel. The report (
including his address near the bottom with numbers) is in Russian.

Eilat Gordin Levitan
Los Angeles


Belarus SIG #Belarus Lithuanian groshes (coins) #belarus

Lee Nydell <lnydell@...>
 

I have seen a reference that in the year of 1626, the Jewish Community sent 1460
Lithuanian groshes (coins) to the government.
Can anyone tell me if this was a little or a lot of money in 1626?

Lee Nydell
Irvine, California, United States
lnydell@yahoo.com
Researching - NADEL, NUDEL, NIEDLE >from Russia, Belarus and Poland


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Seeking Yad Vashem submitter Khaim BERG from Israel #belarus

Eilat Gordin Levitan
 

Lee Nydell wrote;

Trying to locate a Khaim BERG, who lives in Israel and is a Shoah survivor.
On May 27, 1999 he submitted information to Yad Vashem about members
of his family....
The Yad Vashem reports include addresses of the submitters. By
clicking on the left you could see the original scanned report. Khaim
Berg must be a new immigrant >from Russia to Israel. The report (
including his address near the bottom with numbers) is in Russian.

Eilat Gordin Levitan
Los Angeles


Open sources #romania

Sorin Goldenberg <SorinG@...>
 

Hi,

For those who trace their roots in Iasi:

1. The Romanian publication: "Studia et Acta Historiae Iudaeorum
Romaniae", vol. 1, Stela Mrie, Imporana Catagrafiei[Moderator Note: signs
for diacritics removed] din anii 1824-1825, p. 51-138.
The article discuss a financial census performed in year 1824-1825 in
Moldova of the suditi - jews under foreign protection. The whole census
is at the Iasi Archives.
But - at the end of the article, there is a long list of hundreds of
names of family heads.

2. Another Romanian publication: "Izvoare si marturii referitoare la
evreii din Romania". Among the thousands of pages (3 volumes, in two
parts each). Vol 3 deals with the 19th century, you may find tables of
names, especially >from Iasi. I also found a table of names >from
Stefanesti, but since all of them are given names only it does not seem
too useful to me.

You may find the books in a good university library. And for no. 1 - You
do not need exactly to know Romanian, an online dictionary will be
enough.

Regards,
Sorin Goldenberg,
Israel
MODERATOR NOTE: Our system cannot "read" diacritical markers such as umlauts, etc..
Please do not use them in future correspondence.


Romania SIG #Romania Open sources #romania

Sorin Goldenberg <SorinG@...>
 

Hi,

For those who trace their roots in Iasi:

1. The Romanian publication: "Studia et Acta Historiae Iudaeorum
Romaniae", vol. 1, Stela Mrie, Imporana Catagrafiei[Moderator Note: signs
for diacritics removed] din anii 1824-1825, p. 51-138.
The article discuss a financial census performed in year 1824-1825 in
Moldova of the suditi - jews under foreign protection. The whole census
is at the Iasi Archives.
But - at the end of the article, there is a long list of hundreds of
names of family heads.

2. Another Romanian publication: "Izvoare si marturii referitoare la
evreii din Romania". Among the thousands of pages (3 volumes, in two
parts each). Vol 3 deals with the 19th century, you may find tables of
names, especially >from Iasi. I also found a table of names >from
Stefanesti, but since all of them are given names only it does not seem
too useful to me.

You may find the books in a good university library. And for no. 1 - You
do not need exactly to know Romanian, an online dictionary will be
enough.

Regards,
Sorin Goldenberg,
Israel
MODERATOR NOTE: Our system cannot "read" diacritical markers such as umlauts, etc..
Please do not use them in future correspondence.


Searching SCHWAMENFELD #general

loufine@...
 

Hi Genners,

Searching for Steven SCHWAMENFELD, son of Jack & Evelyn Schwamenfeld.
I am related to his mother.

Please respond privately

--
Louis A. Fine
Bellingham WA
E-mail: loufine@comcast.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching SCHWAMENFELD #general

loufine@...
 

Hi Genners,

Searching for Steven SCHWAMENFELD, son of Jack & Evelyn Schwamenfeld.
I am related to his mother.

Please respond privately

--
Louis A. Fine
Bellingham WA
E-mail: loufine@comcast.net


HESSEL (Hesel) - BLEIBERG #ukraine

Anita Hasson <hassony@...>
 

Dear Genners !

Looking for HESSEL (Hesel, Gesel) and BLEIBERG
from UKRAINE and/or POLAND.
If anyone has them in his family-tree, please send
me the details - and I shall be glad to exchange
information.


Thanks -
Anita.

*Please reply privately.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine HESSEL (Hesel) - BLEIBERG #ukraine

Anita Hasson <hassony@...>
 

Dear Genners !

Looking for HESSEL (Hesel, Gesel) and BLEIBERG
from UKRAINE and/or POLAND.
If anyone has them in his family-tree, please send
me the details - and I shall be glad to exchange
information.


Thanks -
Anita.

*Please reply privately.


Re: Reference Book on Jews from Posen #poland

David & Diana Laufer <dlaufer@...>
 

In response to Geoff Kaiser's request for information on the book by
Heppner and Herzberg the following extract >from
http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/PosenResources.html#Heppner
may be of interest.

An excellent resource for information on Jewish communities in specific
towns was written in German at the turn of the 20th century: Aus
Vergangenheit und Geganwart der Juden und der jüd. Gemeinden in
den Posener Landen, nach gedruckten und ungedruckten Quellen. The
book has two parts: a history of
Jews in Posen (about 300 pages) and a history of specific Jewish
Communities in Posen (about 700 pages). A total of 130 communities
are profiled (>from Adelnau to Zydowo). Most of the profiles run
no more than 5 pages, although there are several that are much longer
than that (such as the one for Posen city).

A typical profile goes something like this: when Jews first came to
the town (or received permission to settle there), the terms that
the Jewish community had to abide to for the privilege of establishing
a community, some demographic information (number of households and total
population in given years), names of the communities' Rabbis and officers
of the congregation (or the founders of the congregation), and names of
prominent Jews in the community.

Heppner, Aaron, 1865- and Herzberg, Isaak
Aus Vergangenheit und Geganwart der Juden und der jüd. Gemeinden in
den Posener Landen, nach gedruckten und ungedruckten Quellen.
Koschmin, 1909 [i.e. 1904-29]
CALL NUMBER: DS135 .P62 P64
Also available on 17 microfiches, catalogue no. J-23-112/1, from:
InterDocumentation Company bv
P. O. Box 11205, 2301 EE Leiden
The Netherlands.

Is CALL NUMBER the same as the ISBN ?

regards

David Laufer
Sydney NSW Australia

MODERATOR'S NOTE: A Call Number is the way a book is identified
and shelved in a particular library, usually using a system such as
LC (Library of Congress) shown above, or Dewey. The ISBN number
is an international identifier for a particular book.


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Reference Book on Jews from Posen #poland

David & Diana Laufer <dlaufer@...>
 

In response to Geoff Kaiser's request for information on the book by
Heppner and Herzberg the following extract >from
http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/PosenResources.html#Heppner
may be of interest.

An excellent resource for information on Jewish communities in specific
towns was written in German at the turn of the 20th century: Aus
Vergangenheit und Geganwart der Juden und der jüd. Gemeinden in
den Posener Landen, nach gedruckten und ungedruckten Quellen. The
book has two parts: a history of
Jews in Posen (about 300 pages) and a history of specific Jewish
Communities in Posen (about 700 pages). A total of 130 communities
are profiled (>from Adelnau to Zydowo). Most of the profiles run
no more than 5 pages, although there are several that are much longer
than that (such as the one for Posen city).

A typical profile goes something like this: when Jews first came to
the town (or received permission to settle there), the terms that
the Jewish community had to abide to for the privilege of establishing
a community, some demographic information (number of households and total
population in given years), names of the communities' Rabbis and officers
of the congregation (or the founders of the congregation), and names of
prominent Jews in the community.

Heppner, Aaron, 1865- and Herzberg, Isaak
Aus Vergangenheit und Geganwart der Juden und der jüd. Gemeinden in
den Posener Landen, nach gedruckten und ungedruckten Quellen.
Koschmin, 1909 [i.e. 1904-29]
CALL NUMBER: DS135 .P62 P64
Also available on 17 microfiches, catalogue no. J-23-112/1, from:
InterDocumentation Company bv
P. O. Box 11205, 2301 EE Leiden
The Netherlands.

Is CALL NUMBER the same as the ISBN ?

regards

David Laufer
Sydney NSW Australia

MODERATOR'S NOTE: A Call Number is the way a book is identified
and shelved in a particular library, usually using a system such as
LC (Library of Congress) shown above, or Dewey. The ISBN number
is an international identifier for a particular book.


Hauschner/Haushner Family Birnbaum/Bresslau #poland

Helen McCaig <helenmccaig@...>
 

I am looking for further information to add to the Hauschner Family
Tree. My great grandmother and great grandfather were Friedereke
Schwarz born 1811 and Jakob Hauschner (?) died Birnbaum (?)
(Miedzychod)/ Friedereke died in Bresslau (Wroclaw). I can't find any
records for Birnbaum which was in Prussia at that time. I have a family
tree that includes their children Marcus b 1840, Herman b1841, Isaac
1850, Gustav 1851. There must have been more children. Another family
member thinks there was a Jacob and a Henrietta. I was looking at
additional pages of testimony and I think Jacob Hauschner was the son of
Henrietta but I now can't find the particular source. Can anyone help?
I think some of Herman's offspring emigrated to South Africa while
other family members emigated to America and Israel. My grandfather
Isaac ended up in Scotland not sure if he was heading for America.

Presumably Hauschner was the name given to the family by the Germans.
It does not seem to be very common. The Avotaynu books of
German/Jewish surnames is not very helpful.

I am also finding it difficult to find where birth certificates would be
held for the family. I visited both Miedzychod, Wroclaw and Poznan last
year and was unable to locate the office that would hold such
documentation.

Any help would be appreciated.

Helen McCaig

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
Suggestions for archival or other research may be shared with the list.


JRI Poland #Poland Hauschner/Haushner Family Birnbaum/Bresslau #poland

Helen McCaig <helenmccaig@...>
 

I am looking for further information to add to the Hauschner Family
Tree. My great grandmother and great grandfather were Friedereke
Schwarz born 1811 and Jakob Hauschner (?) died Birnbaum (?)
(Miedzychod)/ Friedereke died in Bresslau (Wroclaw). I can't find any
records for Birnbaum which was in Prussia at that time. I have a family
tree that includes their children Marcus b 1840, Herman b1841, Isaac
1850, Gustav 1851. There must have been more children. Another family
member thinks there was a Jacob and a Henrietta. I was looking at
additional pages of testimony and I think Jacob Hauschner was the son of
Henrietta but I now can't find the particular source. Can anyone help?
I think some of Herman's offspring emigrated to South Africa while
other family members emigated to America and Israel. My grandfather
Isaac ended up in Scotland not sure if he was heading for America.

Presumably Hauschner was the name given to the family by the Germans.
It does not seem to be very common. The Avotaynu books of
German/Jewish surnames is not very helpful.

I am also finding it difficult to find where birth certificates would be
held for the family. I visited both Miedzychod, Wroclaw and Poznan last
year and was unable to locate the office that would hold such
documentation.

Any help would be appreciated.

Helen McCaig

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
Suggestions for archival or other research may be shared with the list.


Re: Visiting Poland #poland

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

Hi,

Zamenhofa Street is still there. In fact one of the major hotels in
Bialystok the Braniki is at 25 Zamenhofa but it may be that the current
numbering system doesn't correspond well at all to what it was in 1941.
As you may know Zamenhofa is named for Ludwik Zamenhof the creator of
the artificial language Esparanto. As I remember his home is on the
corner of Biala Street. It's somewhat of a tourist site that you can
visit. This neighborhood was one of the old Jewish neighborhoods and
was probably best known for the presence of the rather impressive Choral
Synagogue. It was also sometimes called the Zabludowski synagogue. This
synagogue was built by Zamenhof's father I think in the mid 1800's, and
it was burned during the destruction of the Ghetto in 1943. Zamenhof
Street will be easy to find.

To find out specifically what happened to your family in Bialystok
during the Shoa may not be possible. I quickly looked for the name on
various things that I have but didn't find it. There where very many
ways and very many places in which Bialystoker Jews suffered and met
their fate during the Shoa. So there are many possibilities. There do
not appear to be very extensive lists or records that help us learn the
fate of specific Bialystoker Jews. Most of this is lost forever. Most
Jews >from Bialystok who ended up deported to death camps went to
Treblinka, Auschwitz, or Majdanek, in that order. There were also some
pretty extensive mass killings that were carried out locally in or near
the Ghetto >from June of 1941 to August of 1943. Many of the "Thursday"
victims came >from the area of Zamenhof street. This took place on
Thursday July 3rd 1943. Men >from the age about 16-60 were taken by the
Germans >from their homes and there was a "selection". Several hundred
were taken to the edge of town to Pietrasze field and killed there.
Unlike Warsaw for instance not as many died in Bialystok within the
ghetto of starvation and disease. I will keep a look out for the name
Walicki, and will email you if I find anything.

Tilford Bartman, www.zabludow.com


Batya Dashefsky wrote:


I will be visiting Poland in 9 months and am specifically trying to
find out what happened to my family who were living in Bialystok in
1941.

I have an address and I think a last name- Walicki, 27 Zamenhofa.
If anyone is familiar with the city and can point me in the right
direction I would appreciate it.

Thanks

Batya Dashefsky
Jerusalem

MODERATOR'S NOTE: While Discussion Group rules require that any
recommendation of guides, hotels, etc. must be sent privately,
other suggestions for research or travel to Bialystok may be
shared with the list.


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Re: Visiting Poland #poland

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

Hi,

Zamenhofa Street is still there. In fact one of the major hotels in
Bialystok the Braniki is at 25 Zamenhofa but it may be that the current
numbering system doesn't correspond well at all to what it was in 1941.
As you may know Zamenhofa is named for Ludwik Zamenhof the creator of
the artificial language Esparanto. As I remember his home is on the
corner of Biala Street. It's somewhat of a tourist site that you can
visit. This neighborhood was one of the old Jewish neighborhoods and
was probably best known for the presence of the rather impressive Choral
Synagogue. It was also sometimes called the Zabludowski synagogue. This
synagogue was built by Zamenhof's father I think in the mid 1800's, and
it was burned during the destruction of the Ghetto in 1943. Zamenhof
Street will be easy to find.

To find out specifically what happened to your family in Bialystok
during the Shoa may not be possible. I quickly looked for the name on
various things that I have but didn't find it. There where very many
ways and very many places in which Bialystoker Jews suffered and met
their fate during the Shoa. So there are many possibilities. There do
not appear to be very extensive lists or records that help us learn the
fate of specific Bialystoker Jews. Most of this is lost forever. Most
Jews >from Bialystok who ended up deported to death camps went to
Treblinka, Auschwitz, or Majdanek, in that order. There were also some
pretty extensive mass killings that were carried out locally in or near
the Ghetto >from June of 1941 to August of 1943. Many of the "Thursday"
victims came >from the area of Zamenhof street. This took place on
Thursday July 3rd 1943. Men >from the age about 16-60 were taken by the
Germans >from their homes and there was a "selection". Several hundred
were taken to the edge of town to Pietrasze field and killed there.
Unlike Warsaw for instance not as many died in Bialystok within the
ghetto of starvation and disease. I will keep a look out for the name
Walicki, and will email you if I find anything.

Tilford Bartman, www.zabludow.com


Batya Dashefsky wrote:


I will be visiting Poland in 9 months and am specifically trying to
find out what happened to my family who were living in Bialystok in
1941.

I have an address and I think a last name- Walicki, 27 Zamenhofa.
If anyone is familiar with the city and can point me in the right
direction I would appreciate it.

Thanks

Batya Dashefsky
Jerusalem

MODERATOR'S NOTE: While Discussion Group rules require that any
recommendation of guides, hotels, etc. must be sent privately,
other suggestions for research or travel to Bialystok may be
shared with the list.


FREEDMAN #general

Norman Greenfeld
 

My wife's grandfather,Joseph FREEDMAN, died in 1924, came >from Polotosk. In
a copy of a holographic will, he referred to his brother, Hyman L. FREEDMAN
from Polotosk, a sister, Sophia AFFSENSKI and another brother, Max, of Holyoke
Massachusetts.. My wife's father never spoke of his family. Anything one may
have of either the town or the family would be most appreciated. You may
answer privately to ngreenf1@nycap.rr.com.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen FREEDMAN #general

Norman Greenfeld
 

My wife's grandfather,Joseph FREEDMAN, died in 1924, came >from Polotosk. In
a copy of a holographic will, he referred to his brother, Hyman L. FREEDMAN
from Polotosk, a sister, Sophia AFFSENSKI and another brother, Max, of Holyoke
Massachusetts.. My wife's father never spoke of his family. Anything one may
have of either the town or the family would be most appreciated. You may
answer privately to ngreenf1@nycap.rr.com.