Date   

Ordering Copies of Documents Online from the National Archive - Problem #unitedkingdom

N.Landau@...
 

Has anyone tried ordering copies of documents online >from the National
Archives using the http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/digitalexpress/?

I tried this and didn't get it to work ie the shopping basket didn't seem to
operate/

I have emailed the Archives. Has anyone managed to successfully order using
it.

Nick Landau
London, UK


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Ordering Copies of Documents Online from the National Archive - Problem #unitedkingdom

N.Landau@...
 

Has anyone tried ordering copies of documents online >from the National
Archives using the http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/digitalexpress/?

I tried this and didn't get it to work ie the shopping basket didn't seem to
operate/

I have emailed the Archives. Has anyone managed to successfully order using
it.

Nick Landau
London, UK


Contact info for Arthur Bay or George Mason #lithuania

Deena Berton <deenahome@...>
 

If anyone knows how to contact Arthur Bay or George Mason, please send me
their email addresses privately or ask them to contact me.

They are members of the Telsiai District Research Group but recent emails to
them have bounced.

Thank you in advance for your help,
Deena Berton
Telsiai District Coordinator
LitvakSIG
deenahome@camcom.com


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Contact info for Arthur Bay or George Mason #lithuania

Deena Berton <deenahome@...>
 

If anyone knows how to contact Arthur Bay or George Mason, please send me
their email addresses privately or ask them to contact me.

They are members of the Telsiai District Research Group but recent emails to
them have bounced.

Thank you in advance for your help,
Deena Berton
Telsiai District Coordinator
LitvakSIG
deenahome@camcom.com


Re: Lomza region #poland

Alexander Sharon
 

Shari Kantrow wrote:

Was Lomza part of Russian-Poland?
Yes, it was.

Regards,

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab.


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Lomza region #poland

Alexander Sharon
 

Shari Kantrow wrote:

Was Lomza part of Russian-Poland?
Yes, it was.

Regards,

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab.


Mauritius Jewish cemetery #general

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

As described at www.jewishgen.org/cemetery/africa/mauritius.html, many
hundreds of Jewish refugees trying to enter Palestine were deported to
Mauritius, in the Indian Ocean, and detained there during 1940-1945. 127 of
the detainees never left the island and are buried in the St. Martin Jewish
Cemetery in Bambous. Henry Wellisch has transcribed data about them from
the book "The Mauritian Shekel: The Story of the Jewish Detainees in
Mauritius, 1940-1945," by Genevieve Pitot (Port Louis, Mauritius: Editions
Vizavi, 1998), and this is now available online as part of the JewishGen
Online World Burial Registry (JOWBR) at
www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/. If you include "Town Is Exactly
Mauritius" in your JOWBR search, you will be searching this information.

Please note that, in JOWBR, the field labelled "Place of Birth" should,
instead, be understood to be "Country of Origin."

For most of the deceased, the age at death, date of burial, and plot
location are also recorded.

Thanks very much to Henry for doing the data entry, to Owen Griffiths of
Mauritius for granting permission for us to place it online, and to Joyce
Field and Nolan Altman of JOWBR for incorporating the data into the
ever-expanding database of Jewish burials.

If you are related to one of the detainees >from Danzig, please contact me if
you would like to share his/her/your story on the Danzig SIG website
(www.jewishgen.org/danzig).

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


Re: Anglicization of Polish Names #general

Jules Levin
 

: "It does seem strange that Samuel took it upon himself to
anglicize the forename of a parent who was in Poland and therefore
not in need of anglicization, but we know little of Samuel and his
proclivities."

This odd practice was not uncommon in the States. In a number of
obituaries, I found family members who hadn't immigrated given
American names. In one case, Chana became Anna, and her husband
Raphael was written as Robert. Who knows why, though I can imagine a
number of possibilities.
Perhaps under the influence of the Polish (and even Lithuanian)
bourgeoisie and professionals, who did sometimes use "English" names
such as Robert.
Jules Levin


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Mauritius Jewish cemetery #general

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

As described at www.jewishgen.org/cemetery/africa/mauritius.html, many
hundreds of Jewish refugees trying to enter Palestine were deported to
Mauritius, in the Indian Ocean, and detained there during 1940-1945. 127 of
the detainees never left the island and are buried in the St. Martin Jewish
Cemetery in Bambous. Henry Wellisch has transcribed data about them from
the book "The Mauritian Shekel: The Story of the Jewish Detainees in
Mauritius, 1940-1945," by Genevieve Pitot (Port Louis, Mauritius: Editions
Vizavi, 1998), and this is now available online as part of the JewishGen
Online World Burial Registry (JOWBR) at
www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/. If you include "Town Is Exactly
Mauritius" in your JOWBR search, you will be searching this information.

Please note that, in JOWBR, the field labelled "Place of Birth" should,
instead, be understood to be "Country of Origin."

For most of the deceased, the age at death, date of burial, and plot
location are also recorded.

Thanks very much to Henry for doing the data entry, to Owen Griffiths of
Mauritius for granting permission for us to place it online, and to Joyce
Field and Nolan Altman of JOWBR for incorporating the data into the
ever-expanding database of Jewish burials.

If you are related to one of the detainees >from Danzig, please contact me if
you would like to share his/her/your story on the Danzig SIG website
(www.jewishgen.org/danzig).

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Anglicization of Polish Names #general

Jules Levin
 

: "It does seem strange that Samuel took it upon himself to
anglicize the forename of a parent who was in Poland and therefore
not in need of anglicization, but we know little of Samuel and his
proclivities."

This odd practice was not uncommon in the States. In a number of
obituaries, I found family members who hadn't immigrated given
American names. In one case, Chana became Anna, and her husband
Raphael was written as Robert. Who knows why, though I can imagine a
number of possibilities.
Perhaps under the influence of the Polish (and even Lithuanian)
bourgeoisie and professionals, who did sometimes use "English" names
such as Robert.
Jules Levin


Re: What does Rav mean? #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

At 6:57 PM -0400 8/10/06, JOECYP@aol.com wrote:

Rav means rabbi. Rav Yosef was Rabbi Yosef.
Actually, not quite. Many people nowadays misread the abbreviation
"R" as Rav when in reality it represents the Yiddish word "Reb" --
which, when written out in full, is spelled the same way as "Rav"
which means simply "Mr" and not "Rabbi" at all. The confusion of
"Rav" with "Reb" is very common nowadays because so many Jews are
unfamiliar with Yiddish and unaware that "R" = "Rev" = "Mr."

This would explain why Walter Spector's ancestor was designated on
other stones or documents simply as "Yosef" and not as"Rav Yosef."

An actual rabbi is normally designated with the definite article as
HA-Rav (meaning "The Rabbi" ) So-and- so ben So-and-so.

Judith Romney Wegner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: What does Rav mean? #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

At 6:57 PM -0400 8/10/06, JOECYP@aol.com wrote:

Rav means rabbi. Rav Yosef was Rabbi Yosef.
Actually, not quite. Many people nowadays misread the abbreviation
"R" as Rav when in reality it represents the Yiddish word "Reb" --
which, when written out in full, is spelled the same way as "Rav"
which means simply "Mr" and not "Rabbi" at all. The confusion of
"Rav" with "Reb" is very common nowadays because so many Jews are
unfamiliar with Yiddish and unaware that "R" = "Rev" = "Mr."

This would explain why Walter Spector's ancestor was designated on
other stones or documents simply as "Yosef" and not as"Rav Yosef."

An actual rabbi is normally designated with the definite article as
HA-Rav (meaning "The Rabbi" ) So-and- so ben So-and-so.

Judith Romney Wegner


Re: What does Rav mean? #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 8/10/2006 6:22:04 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
educonser@comcast.net writes:

< < I had a great uncle's tombstone translated. His father's name(my
ggfather) was translated as Rav Yosef. On the nine other tombstones
for his children is just Yosef. Does Rav have a special significance? >>

==The Hebrew word rav means "great," "much," "many."

==It is also a title meaning "master." In the Talmud, and among Ashkenazim,
Rav is a title for a rabbi--or, more correctly, Rabbi is an English rendering
of Rav.

==A rabbi is usually referred to in official documents and on tombstones as
heRav (the Rabbi) or Morenu heRav (our teacher, the Rabbi) or heRav haGaon
(the Rabbi and exalted scholar) or other words attesting to his status.

==It was common among Ashkenazim to bestow an honorary title to just about
any adult male. The most common form was Reb, Yiddish for Rav (identical
spelling in both Hebrew and Yiddish, but lacking the initial heh, for "the" that
marks heRav as a rabbi).

==heRav is a rabbi. Reb is used as an honorific title for just about any
adult male who hasn't been caught stealing or selling pork, the equivalent of
Mr. By coincidence, the Hebrew for Mister is Mar (actually an Aramaic term)
spelled mem-resh or M-R, and for Mrs it's MaRaTH, the Th in old Jerusalem and
Ashkenazi pronunciation being pronounced rather like an S, so that MRS in
Aramaic is . . . . MRS.

==The tombstone of a real rabbi, even if he couldn't preach and never kept a
job for long is almost always inscribed with a number of honorific terms
that go beyond Rav. What you have on the tombstone in question is almost
certainly a simple "Reb" or "Mr."

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: What does Rav mean? #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 8/10/2006 6:22:04 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
educonser@comcast.net writes:

< < I had a great uncle's tombstone translated. His father's name(my
ggfather) was translated as Rav Yosef. On the nine other tombstones
for his children is just Yosef. Does Rav have a special significance? >>

==The Hebrew word rav means "great," "much," "many."

==It is also a title meaning "master." In the Talmud, and among Ashkenazim,
Rav is a title for a rabbi--or, more correctly, Rabbi is an English rendering
of Rav.

==A rabbi is usually referred to in official documents and on tombstones as
heRav (the Rabbi) or Morenu heRav (our teacher, the Rabbi) or heRav haGaon
(the Rabbi and exalted scholar) or other words attesting to his status.

==It was common among Ashkenazim to bestow an honorary title to just about
any adult male. The most common form was Reb, Yiddish for Rav (identical
spelling in both Hebrew and Yiddish, but lacking the initial heh, for "the" that
marks heRav as a rabbi).

==heRav is a rabbi. Reb is used as an honorific title for just about any
adult male who hasn't been caught stealing or selling pork, the equivalent of
Mr. By coincidence, the Hebrew for Mister is Mar (actually an Aramaic term)
spelled mem-resh or M-R, and for Mrs it's MaRaTH, the Th in old Jerusalem and
Ashkenazi pronunciation being pronounced rather like an S, so that MRS in
Aramaic is . . . . MRS.

==The tombstone of a real rabbi, even if he couldn't preach and never kept a
job for long is almost always inscribed with a number of honorific terms
that go beyond Rav. What you have on the tombstone in question is almost
certainly a simple "Reb" or "Mr."

Michael Bernet, New York


Re: origin of family name AMSTERDAM #general

Roger Lustig <julierog@...>
 

Hamster--> Amster? Can't say I've ever encountered "Hamster" used as a
compliment. "Hamstern"="to hoard." I bet "Amsel" (blackbird) is just
as likely. As you suggest, that could be a kinnui for Asher.

Oh, and Glogau ins't quite in Posen; it's one of the two ancient Jewish
cities of Silesia, i.e., where the Jews weren't expelled in the 15thC.
(Zuelz is the other.) You can see Posen province >from Glogau on a clear
day, though.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ

MBernet@aol.com wrote:

==Lars Menk lists only the city of Amsterdam as the source for the Amsterdam
name in his dictionary of German Jewish surnames. He lists a nunmber of
differeent families in Frankfurt/Mainin 1679, 1686, and 1710, also in Friedberg
which is near Frankfurt, and in Glogau which, I think, is in Posen

==BenZion Kaganoff does not list Amsterdam but lists Amster, which he says
is derived >from the German for hamster and may be a name for "a diligent,
industrious individual."

==I speculate the name may also be an "elaboration" of the German-Jewish
first name Anselm/Amsel/Anschel which is a kinnuy for Ascher (one of the 12
tribes). This would be similar to the origin of Berlin/er in many cases, >from
Issachar (a tribe) to Beer (kinnuy) to Berlin, an important city.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: origin of family name AMSTERDAM #general

Roger Lustig <julierog@...>
 

Hamster--> Amster? Can't say I've ever encountered "Hamster" used as a
compliment. "Hamstern"="to hoard." I bet "Amsel" (blackbird) is just
as likely. As you suggest, that could be a kinnui for Asher.

Oh, and Glogau ins't quite in Posen; it's one of the two ancient Jewish
cities of Silesia, i.e., where the Jews weren't expelled in the 15thC.
(Zuelz is the other.) You can see Posen province >from Glogau on a clear
day, though.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ

MBernet@aol.com wrote:

==Lars Menk lists only the city of Amsterdam as the source for the Amsterdam
name in his dictionary of German Jewish surnames. He lists a nunmber of
differeent families in Frankfurt/Mainin 1679, 1686, and 1710, also in Friedberg
which is near Frankfurt, and in Glogau which, I think, is in Posen

==BenZion Kaganoff does not list Amsterdam but lists Amster, which he says
is derived >from the German for hamster and may be a name for "a diligent,
industrious individual."

==I speculate the name may also be an "elaboration" of the German-Jewish
first name Anselm/Amsel/Anschel which is a kinnuy for Ascher (one of the 12
tribes). This would be similar to the origin of Berlin/er in many cases, >from
Issachar (a tribe) to Beer (kinnuy) to Berlin, an important city.


Death Certificate: Anna (COHEN) SIEGEL, Cleveland. Yours?? #general

Dayna <zoeys_mom@...>
 

Hi all,

I recently ordered and received a death certificate
for a woman I thought was my Aunt. Turns out it was
another woman with the same name. So in case *this*
Anna Siegel happens to belong to any of you out there,
I'm posting the info on the death certificate. If she
is "yours" and you'd like to have the actual
certificate, just email me privately and I'd be happy
to mail it to you.

This is ALL of the info in the death certificate,
exactly as written:

Name of deceased: Anna SIEGEL
DOD: 8-25-1936
Age: 65
Widow of Abraham SIEGEL
Place of death: Orthodox Old Folks Home, 736 Lakeview,
Cleveland, Ohio (Cuyahoga County)
Father of deceased: Judea COHEN
Mother of deceased: Unknown
Parents & deceased all born: Roumania
Funeral director: Samuel Berkowitz
Burial at Ridge Road, 8-26-1936
Cause of death: "Possible Coronary Thronbosis,
Possible Pulmonary Embolus" onset, same day as death
Contributory causes of death: "Lipoma of Buttock, 10
years duration, non-malignant" It also says there was
a surgical "excision of Lipoma on 8-19-1936"
Informant: Old Age Home

Dayna Chalif
CA., USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Death Certificate: Anna (COHEN) SIEGEL, Cleveland. Yours?? #general

Dayna <zoeys_mom@...>
 

Hi all,

I recently ordered and received a death certificate
for a woman I thought was my Aunt. Turns out it was
another woman with the same name. So in case *this*
Anna Siegel happens to belong to any of you out there,
I'm posting the info on the death certificate. If she
is "yours" and you'd like to have the actual
certificate, just email me privately and I'd be happy
to mail it to you.

This is ALL of the info in the death certificate,
exactly as written:

Name of deceased: Anna SIEGEL
DOD: 8-25-1936
Age: 65
Widow of Abraham SIEGEL
Place of death: Orthodox Old Folks Home, 736 Lakeview,
Cleveland, Ohio (Cuyahoga County)
Father of deceased: Judea COHEN
Mother of deceased: Unknown
Parents & deceased all born: Roumania
Funeral director: Samuel Berkowitz
Burial at Ridge Road, 8-26-1936
Cause of death: "Possible Coronary Thronbosis,
Possible Pulmonary Embolus" onset, same day as death
Contributory causes of death: "Lipoma of Buttock, 10
years duration, non-malignant" It also says there was
a surgical "excision of Lipoma on 8-19-1936"
Informant: Old Age Home

Dayna Chalif
CA., USA


Question about Surname "German" and "Shapiro" #general

Diane Harman-Hoog <harmanhoog@...>
 

When I do a Soundex search on sounds like "German" in the databases, I also
get returns for the name Shapiro. Does anyone know what the connection is?

Diane

Diane Harman-Hoog
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~wileydorrharman/
Extended family genealogy web site


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Question about Surname "German" and "Shapiro" #general

Diane Harman-Hoog <harmanhoog@...>
 

When I do a Soundex search on sounds like "German" in the databases, I also
get returns for the name Shapiro. Does anyone know what the connection is?

Diane

Diane Harman-Hoog
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~wileydorrharman/
Extended family genealogy web site