Date   

Re: Pawel Hertz #general

cecilia <myths@...>
 

On 23 Sep 2010 14:14:40 -0700, myths@ic24.net (cecilia) wrote:
[...] some decades in the middle of the 20C (roughly mid 1830s to
mid 1970s).[...]
I meant mid 1930s to mid 1970s. I apologise to any whom the typo
confused.

Cecilia Nyleve


Contacting Chevra Kadisha in Gan Yavne, Israel #general

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

In early June, I wrote to the Chevra Kadisha in Gan Yavne, Israel inquiring
about a relative who is likely buried there.

I have not received a reply of any kind.

Is someone in Israel willing to call them for me? I will send you the letter
I sent them.

This is the information >from the Israeli JGS website:

Phone: 08-8574410 New cemetery on SE near Kibbutz
Hatzor
Mobile Phone: 050-414520 Old cemetery north of town.


Gan Yavne Religious Council
Yosef Kablan
Herzl St. 8
70800
Gan Yavne
Israel

Thank you,
Eden Joachim
esjoachim@optonline.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Pawel Hertz #general

cecilia <myths@...>
 

On 23 Sep 2010 14:14:40 -0700, myths@ic24.net (cecilia) wrote:
[...] some decades in the middle of the 20C (roughly mid 1830s to
mid 1970s).[...]
I meant mid 1930s to mid 1970s. I apologise to any whom the typo
confused.

Cecilia Nyleve


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Contacting Chevra Kadisha in Gan Yavne, Israel #general

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

In early June, I wrote to the Chevra Kadisha in Gan Yavne, Israel inquiring
about a relative who is likely buried there.

I have not received a reply of any kind.

Is someone in Israel willing to call them for me? I will send you the letter
I sent them.

This is the information >from the Israeli JGS website:

Phone: 08-8574410 New cemetery on SE near Kibbutz
Hatzor
Mobile Phone: 050-414520 Old cemetery north of town.


Gan Yavne Religious Council
Yosef Kablan
Herzl St. 8
70800
Gan Yavne
Israel

Thank you,
Eden Joachim
esjoachim@optonline.net


Re: Alternate Surnames #poland

Sally Bruckheimer
 

Obviously Barney was the UK/USA name used by Reuben. His surname was
shortened to Scher.

His surname was written in Europe however the clerk heard the name,
in whatever language that clerk used; nobody asked for the correct
spelling, as spelling was not important. If Reuben lived in
Russian Poland, it might have been in Cyrillic letters or Latin letters
(Russian or Polish), but if Reuben wrote his surname he would have
probably written it in Hebrew letters - in Yiddish.

All this causes spelling differences. Then, if an indexer transliterates
the Polish or Russian or Yiddish, there are further changes possible.
It is possible that some individuals misread the often difficult handwritten
records, and other indexes obviously are different.

So look at all the surnames, and consider what the name originally was.
You have to consider all the possibilities in looking for future records.
"Sz-" is the more common Polish spelling of the English sound "Sh-" or
German/Yiddish "Sch-". JRI-Poland's spelling should be close to the
Polish spelling and, indeed, the name is "Sz-", however the rest of
the name varies.

Sally Bruckheimer
Piscataway, NJ

MODERATOR'S NOTE: To see possible spelling variants of surnames in
a town, look at the surname lists linked >from the "Your Town" pages
on the JRI-Poland website.


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Alternate Surnames #poland

Sally Bruckheimer
 

Obviously Barney was the UK/USA name used by Reuben. His surname was
shortened to Scher.

His surname was written in Europe however the clerk heard the name,
in whatever language that clerk used; nobody asked for the correct
spelling, as spelling was not important. If Reuben lived in
Russian Poland, it might have been in Cyrillic letters or Latin letters
(Russian or Polish), but if Reuben wrote his surname he would have
probably written it in Hebrew letters - in Yiddish.

All this causes spelling differences. Then, if an indexer transliterates
the Polish or Russian or Yiddish, there are further changes possible.
It is possible that some individuals misread the often difficult handwritten
records, and other indexes obviously are different.

So look at all the surnames, and consider what the name originally was.
You have to consider all the possibilities in looking for future records.
"Sz-" is the more common Polish spelling of the English sound "Sh-" or
German/Yiddish "Sch-". JRI-Poland's spelling should be close to the
Polish spelling and, indeed, the name is "Sz-", however the rest of
the name varies.

Sally Bruckheimer
Piscataway, NJ

MODERATOR'S NOTE: To see possible spelling variants of surnames in
a town, look at the surname lists linked >from the "Your Town" pages
on the JRI-Poland website.


ViewMate Translation (Hebrew/Lithuanian) - Death Certificate #lithuania

James R. Platt <jamesrplatt@...>
 

I am seeking help in the translation of a death record written in
Hebrew and Lithuanian. Your help is much appreciated.

Here is the ViewMate link:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16575

Thank you.

-James Platt
New York

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania ViewMate Translation (Hebrew/Lithuanian) - Death Certificate #lithuania

James R. Platt <jamesrplatt@...>
 

I am seeking help in the translation of a death record written in
Hebrew and Lithuanian. Your help is much appreciated.

Here is the ViewMate link:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16575

Thank you.

-James Platt
New York

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


Forum of Genealogy - Paris #general

Micheline Gutmann <asso@...>
 

The French Federation of Genealogy organize next week-end, on 25 and 26
September,a forum of Genealogy called Genea@2010 at the National Archives,
60 rue des Francs-Bourgeois, Paris 3e
You may look at www.genami.org

GenAmi will be present and happy to receive everybody and give information
for free at stand 14-15
Free entrance

Micheline GUTMANN, President of GenAmi, Paris, France


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Forum of Genealogy - Paris #general

Micheline Gutmann <asso@...>
 

The French Federation of Genealogy organize next week-end, on 25 and 26
September,a forum of Genealogy called Genea@2010 at the National Archives,
60 rue des Francs-Bourgeois, Paris 3e
You may look at www.genami.org

GenAmi will be present and happy to receive everybody and give information
for free at stand 14-15
Free entrance

Micheline GUTMANN, President of GenAmi, Paris, France


Re: Teenage heads of household #general

Lisa Grayson <lisa@...>
 

Paulette Bronstein wrote:
I have a question about the Vilnius Archives... How could 15 and 16 year old
young men be heads of households?

My g-g-uncle Zander MARUCHES, who changed his name to Alexander FINK in the US,
was born in Vilnius in 1818, married at 13, and was a father by age 16. Source
documents are consistent, with the exception of a ship manifest that implies he
was really born in 1816. His wife was born in 1813.

It's hard to imagine a 21st-century texting teenager in low-slung baggy pants as
a head of household, much less a married father. How different the lives of those
19th-century boys must have been.

Lisa Grayson
Chicago, Illinois USA


ViewMate Translation (Hebrew/Lithuanian) - Death Certificate #general

James R. Platt <jamesrplatt@...>
 

I am seeking help in the translation of a death record written in
Hebrew and Lithuanian. Your help is much appreciated.

Here is the ViewMate link:

(1) http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16575

Thank you.

James Platt
New York


Ancestry.com Aquires iArchives (Footnote.com) #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Ancestry.com announced today that it has entered into a definitive agreement
to acquire iArchives, Inc. and its branded website, Footnote.com for
approximately $27 million in a mix of Ancestry.com stock, cash and
assumption of liabilities.

iArchives digitizes and delivers high-quality images of American historical
records of individuals involved in the Revolutionary War, Continental
Congress, Civil War, and other US historical events to Footnote.com
subscribers interested in early American roots. iArchives has digitized more
than 65 million original source documents to date through its proprietary
digitization process for paper, microfilm and microfiche collections.
Upon completion of the transaction, iArchives will become a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Ancestry.com. The transaction is subject to various closing
conditions and is expected to close early in the fourth quarter of 2010.

As of this notification there was nothing noted on either the Ancestry.com
nor Footnote.com websites. For more information continue to look at:
http://corporate.ancestry.com/press/press-releases/ and
http://www.footnote.com/page/120_footnote_press_room/

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Director-at-Large
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Teenage heads of household #general

Lisa Grayson <lisa@...>
 

Paulette Bronstein wrote:
I have a question about the Vilnius Archives... How could 15 and 16 year old
young men be heads of households?

My g-g-uncle Zander MARUCHES, who changed his name to Alexander FINK in the US,
was born in Vilnius in 1818, married at 13, and was a father by age 16. Source
documents are consistent, with the exception of a ship manifest that implies he
was really born in 1816. His wife was born in 1813.

It's hard to imagine a 21st-century texting teenager in low-slung baggy pants as
a head of household, much less a married father. How different the lives of those
19th-century boys must have been.

Lisa Grayson
Chicago, Illinois USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate Translation (Hebrew/Lithuanian) - Death Certificate #general

James R. Platt <jamesrplatt@...>
 

I am seeking help in the translation of a death record written in
Hebrew and Lithuanian. Your help is much appreciated.

Here is the ViewMate link:

(1) http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16575

Thank you.

James Platt
New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Ancestry.com Aquires iArchives (Footnote.com) #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Ancestry.com announced today that it has entered into a definitive agreement
to acquire iArchives, Inc. and its branded website, Footnote.com for
approximately $27 million in a mix of Ancestry.com stock, cash and
assumption of liabilities.

iArchives digitizes and delivers high-quality images of American historical
records of individuals involved in the Revolutionary War, Continental
Congress, Civil War, and other US historical events to Footnote.com
subscribers interested in early American roots. iArchives has digitized more
than 65 million original source documents to date through its proprietary
digitization process for paper, microfilm and microfiche collections.
Upon completion of the transaction, iArchives will become a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Ancestry.com. The transaction is subject to various closing
conditions and is expected to close early in the fourth quarter of 2010.

As of this notification there was nothing noted on either the Ancestry.com
nor Footnote.com websites. For more information continue to look at:
http://corporate.ancestry.com/press/press-releases/ and
http://www.footnote.com/page/120_footnote_press_room/

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Director-at-Large
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Re: Brothers with different surnames #general

Sally Bruckheimer
 

Surnames can be tricky in Russian Poland. The year isn't mentioned, but surnames
were not settled until well after adoption in 1827. So the family could have
'forgotten' the origianl name and used another if the sons were born early in
the 19th century.

The usual reasons for disparate records were:

1. The parents were married religiously but not civilly when the oldest son or
sons were born, so the oldest carried the mother's maiden name. The younger,
born after the parents married civilly, carried the father's surname.

2. The father might have died, so the sons were actually half-brothers, with the
same mother and different fathers. As Alex Sharon recently pointed out with
uncles, our European ancestors did not keep track of the nuances that
genealogists today expect.

3. The draft the exempted oldest son, so the 'odd' son might have been
registered as the oldest son of a son-less family (and exempt >from the draft)
while the rest were registered to the actual family.

4. It was possible in Jewish families for the groom to take the bride's surname
if the bride had no brothers. That way the father of the bride would have
someone to carry on the surname, and to say kaddish for him.

Sally Bruckheimer
Piscataway, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Brothers with different surnames #general

Sally Bruckheimer
 

Surnames can be tricky in Russian Poland. The year isn't mentioned, but surnames
were not settled until well after adoption in 1827. So the family could have
'forgotten' the origianl name and used another if the sons were born early in
the 19th century.

The usual reasons for disparate records were:

1. The parents were married religiously but not civilly when the oldest son or
sons were born, so the oldest carried the mother's maiden name. The younger,
born after the parents married civilly, carried the father's surname.

2. The father might have died, so the sons were actually half-brothers, with the
same mother and different fathers. As Alex Sharon recently pointed out with
uncles, our European ancestors did not keep track of the nuances that
genealogists today expect.

3. The draft the exempted oldest son, so the 'odd' son might have been
registered as the oldest son of a son-less family (and exempt >from the draft)
while the rest were registered to the actual family.

4. It was possible in Jewish families for the groom to take the bride's surname
if the bride had no brothers. That way the father of the bride would have
someone to carry on the surname, and to say kaddish for him.

Sally Bruckheimer
Piscataway, NJ


My trip to Serbia #hungary

ericalishahn@...
 

My trip to Serbia
Â
Hello all. I was in Serbia >from Sept 7-11,2010, in the northern area now
called Vojvodina, which was once Hungary. In the course of my trip I spent an
afternoon with Antal Kocsis in Topola, who is an amateur historian. An ethnic
Hungarian and devout Roman Catholic he has become the historian of the now lost
Jewish community of Topola. Among things in the 1970s he saved the Neolog
synagogue >from being torn down and today it is the local library. He has spent
years working on saving the Jewish cemetery and is currently trying to save the
house of Adolf ALLEIN who led the Orthodox community. His hope is to make it a
Jewish museum. Note (Adolf ALLEIN was my great grandmother's brother.) He has
among things an extensive list of the members of the Jewish community pre war.Â
I have the index. The book is in draft form in Hungarian. He would welcome any
requests for information >from anyone with a surname in the book. Note he is not
a genealogist, simply a local historian. We of course visited the cemetery,
which, as do all of the cemeteries, had a memorial listing the dead of the
Holocaust. Antal knows alot about how the Jews came to this area. For instance
he told me the BUCHWALDs are purportedly >from Bosnia, he thinks Sarajevo. The
HAHNs were a large family based in Sombor.
I spent the evening of the beginning of Rosh Hoshanah with the Jewish Community
in Subotica/Szabadka. They are Neolog. It was a large happy gathering. The
Jewish community in Serbiais intact although small. They are organized into an
entitled called the Federation of Jewish Communities in Serbia.
They were interested in looking at my own genealogy charts, but not particularly
interested in the other information I had. However the next day I was escorted
by Ernest LICHT who supervises the cemetery in Suboticato the cemetery. There
among things was the grave of my great grandparents Jozsef HAHN and Tirza
ALLEIN. It is a very well cared for cemetery, with of course a holocaust
memorial. The cemetery on site caretaker has a handwritten list of the burials
there.Â

In the afternoon I visited the Jewish cemetery in Csantaver, which is a village
about 5 miles >from Subotica. This is a cemetery hidden behind a small farm, and
not very well cared for. It is not a very big cemetery. There is where my
greatgrandparentsâ?? parents are buried. I would say >from reading the tombstones
that many of the occupants are either named Buchwald or Basch, (names in my own
genealogy.)
I also made several visits to the historical archives in Subotica, where they
went out of their way to provide as much help as possible. As probably all of
you know, in the nineteenth century the religious communities were supposed to
provide vital records to the civil authorities, and here is where the records
are for most of northern Vojvodina. For the Jewish records (referred to as
rabbinical records) there is a fair amount, starting mid nineteenth century, but
they are certainly not complete. I don't know where any other records might
be. For instance in my own case, I know my grandfather was born in 1888 in
Csantaver, but he is not in these records, although his two brothers and two of
his sisters are.  I took a copy of the list of Jewish records available in the
archives.
Along the way I also visited another Jewish cemetery in Sombor which was not
well cared for.
We also visited a couple of civil registry offices, which are located in every
village.Â

The trip as you can imagine was profoundly moving, walking into the foreign
world >from which my grandfather came.
I would say that doing genealogy there is more feasible than perhaps most people
believe. My guide who has done genealogy for Danube Swabians but not Jews was
surprised at what we could find.

 This is all work which must be done in Serbia. Someone interested in these
records will need to arrange to have someone in Serbiaexamine them or perhaps
come to Serbiathemselves.
I have looked at the surnames many of you sent me and there is no question I saw
those same names in the cemeteries and the rabbinical records and the list
prepared by Antal Kocsis. I will go through the list and contact you
individually if I am confident I saw the name you were seeking.

Erica Hahn Monrovia, Ca

Moderator: This message has been run through a decoder but still includes some
odd letters that probably result >from the use of special fonts or other special
characters. Please make sure that messages are sent in plain text and do not
include any such features. Contact Erica off-list if you would like her to search
for names.


Hungary SIG #Hungary My trip to Serbia #hungary

ericalishahn@...
 

My trip to Serbia
Â
Hello all. I was in Serbia >from Sept 7-11,2010, in the northern area now
called Vojvodina, which was once Hungary. In the course of my trip I spent an
afternoon with Antal Kocsis in Topola, who is an amateur historian. An ethnic
Hungarian and devout Roman Catholic he has become the historian of the now lost
Jewish community of Topola. Among things in the 1970s he saved the Neolog
synagogue >from being torn down and today it is the local library. He has spent
years working on saving the Jewish cemetery and is currently trying to save the
house of Adolf ALLEIN who led the Orthodox community. His hope is to make it a
Jewish museum. Note (Adolf ALLEIN was my great grandmother's brother.) He has
among things an extensive list of the members of the Jewish community pre war.Â
I have the index. The book is in draft form in Hungarian. He would welcome any
requests for information >from anyone with a surname in the book. Note he is not
a genealogist, simply a local historian. We of course visited the cemetery,
which, as do all of the cemeteries, had a memorial listing the dead of the
Holocaust. Antal knows alot about how the Jews came to this area. For instance
he told me the BUCHWALDs are purportedly >from Bosnia, he thinks Sarajevo. The
HAHNs were a large family based in Sombor.
I spent the evening of the beginning of Rosh Hoshanah with the Jewish Community
in Subotica/Szabadka. They are Neolog. It was a large happy gathering. The
Jewish community in Serbiais intact although small. They are organized into an
entitled called the Federation of Jewish Communities in Serbia.
They were interested in looking at my own genealogy charts, but not particularly
interested in the other information I had. However the next day I was escorted
by Ernest LICHT who supervises the cemetery in Suboticato the cemetery. There
among things was the grave of my great grandparents Jozsef HAHN and Tirza
ALLEIN. It is a very well cared for cemetery, with of course a holocaust
memorial. The cemetery on site caretaker has a handwritten list of the burials
there.Â

In the afternoon I visited the Jewish cemetery in Csantaver, which is a village
about 5 miles >from Subotica. This is a cemetery hidden behind a small farm, and
not very well cared for. It is not a very big cemetery. There is where my
greatgrandparentsâ?? parents are buried. I would say >from reading the tombstones
that many of the occupants are either named Buchwald or Basch, (names in my own
genealogy.)
I also made several visits to the historical archives in Subotica, where they
went out of their way to provide as much help as possible. As probably all of
you know, in the nineteenth century the religious communities were supposed to
provide vital records to the civil authorities, and here is where the records
are for most of northern Vojvodina. For the Jewish records (referred to as
rabbinical records) there is a fair amount, starting mid nineteenth century, but
they are certainly not complete. I don't know where any other records might
be. For instance in my own case, I know my grandfather was born in 1888 in
Csantaver, but he is not in these records, although his two brothers and two of
his sisters are.  I took a copy of the list of Jewish records available in the
archives.
Along the way I also visited another Jewish cemetery in Sombor which was not
well cared for.
We also visited a couple of civil registry offices, which are located in every
village.Â

The trip as you can imagine was profoundly moving, walking into the foreign
world >from which my grandfather came.
I would say that doing genealogy there is more feasible than perhaps most people
believe. My guide who has done genealogy for Danube Swabians but not Jews was
surprised at what we could find.

 This is all work which must be done in Serbia. Someone interested in these
records will need to arrange to have someone in Serbiaexamine them or perhaps
come to Serbiathemselves.
I have looked at the surnames many of you sent me and there is no question I saw
those same names in the cemeteries and the rabbinical records and the list
prepared by Antal Kocsis. I will go through the list and contact you
individually if I am confident I saw the name you were seeking.

Erica Hahn Monrovia, Ca

Moderator: This message has been run through a decoder but still includes some
odd letters that probably result >from the use of special fonts or other special
characters. Please make sure that messages are sent in plain text and do not
include any such features. Contact Erica off-list if you would like her to search
for names.