Date   

Moshe of Kletzk-fat #general

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

According to various sources (reliable and others) some 200 years ago there was a
Rabbi David , Rav (Rabbi) of Novarodok. Also Known as the "Galya Mesechta" -a book
which he authored. I have read that he was the son of a Moshe of Kletzk.

In our family there is a tradition that we are descendants of the brother of the
above Rabbi David.

Does anyone have information about the above Moshe's family, family name (if he
had), other children etc.

TIA
Yoni Ben-Ari


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Moshe of Kletzk-fat #general

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

According to various sources (reliable and others) some 200 years ago there was a
Rabbi David , Rav (Rabbi) of Novarodok. Also Known as the "Galya Mesechta" -a book
which he authored. I have read that he was the son of a Moshe of Kletzk.

In our family there is a tradition that we are descendants of the brother of the
above Rabbi David.

Does anyone have information about the above Moshe's family, family name (if he
had), other children etc.

TIA
Yoni Ben-Ari


Rabbi Chaim Binyamin KATZENELLENBOGEN #general

Helen Wirtz <Helenwirtz@...>
 

I am looking for information on Ray Katzenelenbogen who was married to Jik
Kaplan in NYC on August 12, 1905. I obtained a copy of the marriage certificate which
states that her father's name is Hyman B. Katzenelenbogen. I am looking for more
info on this Hyman B. Katzenelenbogen, because I am wondering if he is the same Hyman
B. (Chaim Binyamin) Katzenelenbogen who died on 2/7/1903. He is buried at the Mount
Zion Cemetery in Queens -Maspeth, NY.

Any information about Hyman B. (Chaim Binyamin) Katzenelenbogen or about any
of his family members will be greatly appreciated.
Thank you,
Helen Wirtz


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Rabbi Chaim Binyamin KATZENELLENBOGEN #general

Helen Wirtz <Helenwirtz@...>
 

I am looking for information on Ray Katzenelenbogen who was married to Jik
Kaplan in NYC on August 12, 1905. I obtained a copy of the marriage certificate which
states that her father's name is Hyman B. Katzenelenbogen. I am looking for more
info on this Hyman B. Katzenelenbogen, because I am wondering if he is the same Hyman
B. (Chaim Binyamin) Katzenelenbogen who died on 2/7/1903. He is buried at the Mount
Zion Cemetery in Queens -Maspeth, NY.

Any information about Hyman B. (Chaim Binyamin) Katzenelenbogen or about any
of his family members will be greatly appreciated.
Thank you,
Helen Wirtz


Re: Help Reading Town Name on Shipping Manifest #general

Alexander Sharon <olek.sharon@...>
 

Deb Scheimer wrote
I was wondering whether anyone could read the town name in the far-right column
on line 3 of the manifest at this URL (manifest for Schiman Rudiak on 7 Jan 1909)
[or http://tinyurl.com/kwm2p5a --Mod.]
It looks like the town name is a 2-word name, but the transcribed name
of Wolaskic Mecherynce does not appear in the JewishGen Gazetteer or
Communities Databases
Deb,

It appears to be village Mizyuryn'tse (Polish: Miziurynce) located at 4959 2605
in Kremenets district of Volhynia.

Place is located in Wolhynia borsht belt near Yampol, Katerinovka, Lanivtsy and
Shumsk

Best

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Help Reading Town Name on Shipping Manifest #general

Alexander Sharon <olek.sharon@...>
 

Deb Scheimer wrote
I was wondering whether anyone could read the town name in the far-right column
on line 3 of the manifest at this URL (manifest for Schiman Rudiak on 7 Jan 1909)
[or http://tinyurl.com/kwm2p5a --Mod.]
It looks like the town name is a 2-word name, but the transcribed name
of Wolaskic Mecherynce does not appear in the JewishGen Gazetteer or
Communities Databases
Deb,

It appears to be village Mizyuryn'tse (Polish: Miziurynce) located at 4959 2605
in Kremenets district of Volhynia.

Place is located in Wolhynia borsht belt near Yampol, Katerinovka, Lanivtsy and
Shumsk

Best

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


viewmate translation - polish to english #poland

ann rock <pcwaustralia@...>
 

I've posted a vital record in Polish for which I need a loose
translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM30174
Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.

Julia Koenigstein


JRI Poland #Poland viewmate translation - polish to english #poland

ann rock <pcwaustralia@...>
 

I've posted a vital record in Polish for which I need a loose
translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM30174
Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.

Julia Koenigstein


Viewmate translation request for birth of JUDES SELZER #poland

Milton Koch
 

I've posted a vital record in Polish for which I need a loose
translation. I would appreciate clarification of many of the names.
It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM30162

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.

Milton Koch
SLEZER-Trembolwa, KOCH-Jagilenica


JRI Poland #Poland Viewmate translation request for birth of JUDES SELZER #poland

Milton Koch
 

I've posted a vital record in Polish for which I need a loose
translation. I would appreciate clarification of many of the names.
It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM30162

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.

Milton Koch
SLEZER-Trembolwa, KOCH-Jagilenica


Family from Janow-Lubielski #poland

MAGICWIES@...
 

My father's cousin, Hilel Himmel, a Holocaust survivor, is interested in
finding some family members or their offspring >from Janow-Lubielski,
Poland who may have survived or have information about the family. He
had three sisters: Sheindel, Esther and Ellke, and a brother Avraham.
Sheindel married Moshe Szarfstein prior to WWI. Any information would
be greatly appreciated

Jerome D Wiesenberg (magicwies@...)

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
Suggestions for research methods or resources may be shared with
the list.


ViewMate translation request - Polish #poland

David Ellis
 

I posted the birth record for my gg-gm to ViewMate and would be grateful for
translation >from the original Polish.
It can be found at the following address:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM30130
Response via e-mail (address below) is preferred.

Thank you very much!

------
David J Ellis
Natick, MA 01760
djemkitso@...


JRI Poland #Poland Family from Janow-Lubielski #poland

MAGICWIES@...
 

My father's cousin, Hilel Himmel, a Holocaust survivor, is interested in
finding some family members or their offspring >from Janow-Lubielski,
Poland who may have survived or have information about the family. He
had three sisters: Sheindel, Esther and Ellke, and a brother Avraham.
Sheindel married Moshe Szarfstein prior to WWI. Any information would
be greatly appreciated

Jerome D Wiesenberg (magicwies@...)

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
Suggestions for research methods or resources may be shared with
the list.


JRI Poland #Poland ViewMate translation request - Polish #poland

David Ellis
 

I posted the birth record for my gg-gm to ViewMate and would be grateful for
translation >from the original Polish.
It can be found at the following address:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM30130
Response via e-mail (address below) is preferred.

Thank you very much!

------
David J Ellis
Natick, MA 01760
djemkitso@...


Re: jri-pl digest #poland

chaim meiersdorf
 

On the Warsaw cemetery site http://cemetery.jewish.org.pl/
there are about 6 Majersdorfs listed. All of them are children of Abraham
Majersdorf. The matzevot all say child of Abraham Majersdorf >from Pultusk. I
want to be sure. Is the ">from Pultusk" referring to the Abraham or to the
person on the matzvevah. Either way this is most interesting to me since it
the first indication I have that at least some of my ancestors came from
Pultusk to Warsaw. I have no idea if they first came to Pultusk via Warsaw
or went directly to Pultusk. Or are there possibilities that I have not
considered.

Chaim Meiersdorf


JRI Poland #Poland RE: jri-pl digest #poland

chaim meiersdorf
 

On the Warsaw cemetery site http://cemetery.jewish.org.pl/
there are about 6 Majersdorfs listed. All of them are children of Abraham
Majersdorf. The matzevot all say child of Abraham Majersdorf >from Pultusk. I
want to be sure. Is the ">from Pultusk" referring to the Abraham or to the
person on the matzvevah. Either way this is most interesting to me since it
the first indication I have that at least some of my ancestors came from
Pultusk to Warsaw. I have no idea if they first came to Pultusk via Warsaw
or went directly to Pultusk. Or are there possibilities that I have not
considered.

Chaim Meiersdorf


Majersdorf Pultusk Poland #poland

chaim meiersdorf
 

To all

I am stuck. My father, Shia Majersdorf. His father, Shmuel Majersdorf. His
father Yitzhak Mordeci Majersdorf b 1856. His father Yehuda Leib Majersdorf
b. 1834 married to Faige Rivka Newman. His father Abraham b.? to Chaya
Zlotowitz. I have the record >from the Pultusk archive.

Now for the problem. I have a Shamma Majersdorf b. 1843 married to Sura
Hershkopf. His parents are Abraham Majersdorf and Ruchala Zlotkovitz. This
is >from JRI Poland. You can look it up yourselves.

Are Yehuda Leib and Shamma brothers? The wives last names are the same but
not the first names. Is this a story of two sisters? We have this in our
family in modern times but not generations ago.

I was very careful. I wrote down all the information >from the extracted data
on JRI Poland without trying to have it conform to the tree of the Tribe.
Then I compared it to the same data as it appears on www.ancestry.com, just
to see that someone else read the data the same way. As of the present time
a limited amount of the JRI listings have been extracted. I am afraid that
we may have to wait until all the records are extracted to figure out how
all the Majersdorfs connect with each other.

Please offer advice. Public is just fine.

Chaim Meiersdorf


JRI Poland #Poland Majersdorf Pultusk Poland #poland

chaim meiersdorf
 

To all

I am stuck. My father, Shia Majersdorf. His father, Shmuel Majersdorf. His
father Yitzhak Mordeci Majersdorf b 1856. His father Yehuda Leib Majersdorf
b. 1834 married to Faige Rivka Newman. His father Abraham b.? to Chaya
Zlotowitz. I have the record >from the Pultusk archive.

Now for the problem. I have a Shamma Majersdorf b. 1843 married to Sura
Hershkopf. His parents are Abraham Majersdorf and Ruchala Zlotkovitz. This
is >from JRI Poland. You can look it up yourselves.

Are Yehuda Leib and Shamma brothers? The wives last names are the same but
not the first names. Is this a story of two sisters? We have this in our
family in modern times but not generations ago.

I was very careful. I wrote down all the information >from the extracted data
on JRI Poland without trying to have it conform to the tree of the Tribe.
Then I compared it to the same data as it appears on www.ancestry.com, just
to see that someone else read the data the same way. As of the present time
a limited amount of the JRI listings have been extracted. I am afraid that
we may have to wait until all the records are extracted to figure out how
all the Majersdorfs connect with each other.

Please offer advice. Public is just fine.

Chaim Meiersdorf


The 1910 Tarnopol Jewish Census Project #poland

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia proudly announces the completion of the indexing of the
Tarnopol 1910 Jewish Census (Spis ludnosci zydowskiej miasta Tarnopol
1910 r. ) the last official Galician census conducted by the Austrian
government. The data is being proofread and should be uploaded to the
All Galicia Database in early January. Detailed information about the
project and sample annotated images and indices can be found here:

http://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/tarnopol-1910-census/

Although the Austrian Empire - and the Polish government, which
followed after the collapse of the Empire - conducted censuses over an
eighty-two year period, very few original enumerations with names have
survived. Tarnopol, a large city about 128 miles east of Lemberg
(Lwow, Lviv,) attracted residents >from all over Galicia, and even
further afield, so the 1910 census is one of the more important
records of its kind for Galician researchers. Containing almost
14,000 names, it enumerates every Jewish resident living in Tarnopol
in 1910, along with information on people who had moved away
permanently or were studying in other locales, provided by family
members. Entire households are listed together with house numbers,
professions, and ages, with relationships clearly delineated.

Categories and comments covered are:

- old house number
- current street name and address
- place of birth (often district and town)
- gender
- relationships
- when the individual moved to Tarnopol, if not born there
- town and administrative district where registered (or where
relocation occurred - important because often the births of children
from one family could be registered in different places.)
- occupation (Polish with English translation
- listing religious marriages, versus civil marriages in the terms "ritual
wife"
- disposition of children who were orphans
- details on former residents who had emigrated >from Galicia to other
countries, or were attending schools elsewhere, provided by their
family members who were required to say whether a resident was
"present" or "absent"
- profession or "status," including details like "widow" or "widower"

Researchers will find some women enumerated as "ritual wife,"
clarifying that there was a religious marriage, but that the woman did
not share her husband's surname. (Since no marriage record would be
found for this couple, the census provides proof of the religious
marriage.) Dual surnames are provided for children, along with adults
--heading their own families -- whose parents had not participated in
a civil marriage. In these pages it is common to find people born
elsewhere and moved to Tarnopol, and, conversely, those families who
had already left the city for other countries, so this census should
provide clues as to the migration of your relatives. It lists many
people who "were absent" to "America" or "New York, America." Other
locales where residents moved (sometimes listed as cities, other times
as countries) are: Cologne, Frankfurt, Russia, Germany, Vienna, Lwow,
Prague, London, England, Switzerland, Argentina and Jerusalem.
Original places of birth are >from all over Galicia, as well as towns
in Germany, Romania, Vienna, New York, Kiev, Warsaw district and
Hungary. House numbers are cross-referenced with a street address.

In the "occupation" category, besides the expected entries --including
merchants, tinsmiths, tailors, innkeepers, lawyers, and doctors,
tradesman -- we find "students in Vienna" at seminaries, including
"cesarski krolewski" (imperial-royal; similar to
"kaiserlich-k=F6niglich", k.k.) and children listed as "residents of the
Jewish orphanage." As researchers begin to study this census there are
sure to be more illuminating findings that could be the key to
unlocking a family mystery or discovering relatives previously
unaccounted for and lost to time. Gesher Galica has indexed all
pertinent information >from this census, so the database will be quite
extensive.

Starting with the 1900 census, the birthdate column was expanded to
include year, month and day of birth. Despite this change, the 1910
census is not consistant in this area and often only the year is
given. Taking into account the fact that males wishing to evade
military service military service might have provided inaccaurate
answers, and the fact that some census takers mights have requested
documentation which many Jews would not have, the birthdates provided
should not be regarded as definitive, an attitude most genealogists
are already well aware of. Nevertheless, the listings of place of
birth and districts where one was registered should be of great help
to researchers in determining where a single family might have lived
over many years.

Keep in mind that as recently as ten years ago this census was
inaccessible to researchers. It is a wonderful accomplishment -- not
only that it is now available in searchable form -- but that it can
stand as a testimony to the many Jewish residents of Tarnopol who
perished in the Shoah and whose names are represented in its pages.
Almost 90 percent of the Galician population perished in the
Holocaust, and many of the residents of Tarnopol, which suffered
devastation in both World Wars, are memorialized in this enumeration.

Gesher Galicia will be making the images and Excel files available to
qualified researchers starting in a few weeks, with the database to
follow accessible to all. To learn more details, go to the project
web page. This census project is one facet of our "Galician Archival
Records Project," which can be read about here:
http://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/garp/. If you experience
genealogical success in studying the 1910 Tarnopol Census, please let
us know so we can report on your findings and celebrate them as well.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...
www.geshergalicia.org
http://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/tarnopol-1910-census/


JRI Poland #Poland The 1910 Tarnopol Jewish Census Project #poland

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia proudly announces the completion of the indexing of the
Tarnopol 1910 Jewish Census (Spis ludnosci zydowskiej miasta Tarnopol
1910 r. ) the last official Galician census conducted by the Austrian
government. The data is being proofread and should be uploaded to the
All Galicia Database in early January. Detailed information about the
project and sample annotated images and indices can be found here:

http://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/tarnopol-1910-census/

Although the Austrian Empire - and the Polish government, which
followed after the collapse of the Empire - conducted censuses over an
eighty-two year period, very few original enumerations with names have
survived. Tarnopol, a large city about 128 miles east of Lemberg
(Lwow, Lviv,) attracted residents >from all over Galicia, and even
further afield, so the 1910 census is one of the more important
records of its kind for Galician researchers. Containing almost
14,000 names, it enumerates every Jewish resident living in Tarnopol
in 1910, along with information on people who had moved away
permanently or were studying in other locales, provided by family
members. Entire households are listed together with house numbers,
professions, and ages, with relationships clearly delineated.

Categories and comments covered are:

- old house number
- current street name and address
- place of birth (often district and town)
- gender
- relationships
- when the individual moved to Tarnopol, if not born there
- town and administrative district where registered (or where
relocation occurred - important because often the births of children
from one family could be registered in different places.)
- occupation (Polish with English translation
- listing religious marriages, versus civil marriages in the terms "ritual
wife"
- disposition of children who were orphans
- details on former residents who had emigrated >from Galicia to other
countries, or were attending schools elsewhere, provided by their
family members who were required to say whether a resident was
"present" or "absent"
- profession or "status," including details like "widow" or "widower"

Researchers will find some women enumerated as "ritual wife,"
clarifying that there was a religious marriage, but that the woman did
not share her husband's surname. (Since no marriage record would be
found for this couple, the census provides proof of the religious
marriage.) Dual surnames are provided for children, along with adults
--heading their own families -- whose parents had not participated in
a civil marriage. In these pages it is common to find people born
elsewhere and moved to Tarnopol, and, conversely, those families who
had already left the city for other countries, so this census should
provide clues as to the migration of your relatives. It lists many
people who "were absent" to "America" or "New York, America." Other
locales where residents moved (sometimes listed as cities, other times
as countries) are: Cologne, Frankfurt, Russia, Germany, Vienna, Lwow,
Prague, London, England, Switzerland, Argentina and Jerusalem.
Original places of birth are >from all over Galicia, as well as towns
in Germany, Romania, Vienna, New York, Kiev, Warsaw district and
Hungary. House numbers are cross-referenced with a street address.

In the "occupation" category, besides the expected entries --including
merchants, tinsmiths, tailors, innkeepers, lawyers, and doctors,
tradesman -- we find "students in Vienna" at seminaries, including
"cesarski krolewski" (imperial-royal; similar to
"kaiserlich-k=F6niglich", k.k.) and children listed as "residents of the
Jewish orphanage." As researchers begin to study this census there are
sure to be more illuminating findings that could be the key to
unlocking a family mystery or discovering relatives previously
unaccounted for and lost to time. Gesher Galica has indexed all
pertinent information >from this census, so the database will be quite
extensive.

Starting with the 1900 census, the birthdate column was expanded to
include year, month and day of birth. Despite this change, the 1910
census is not consistant in this area and often only the year is
given. Taking into account the fact that males wishing to evade
military service military service might have provided inaccaurate
answers, and the fact that some census takers mights have requested
documentation which many Jews would not have, the birthdates provided
should not be regarded as definitive, an attitude most genealogists
are already well aware of. Nevertheless, the listings of place of
birth and districts where one was registered should be of great help
to researchers in determining where a single family might have lived
over many years.

Keep in mind that as recently as ten years ago this census was
inaccessible to researchers. It is a wonderful accomplishment -- not
only that it is now available in searchable form -- but that it can
stand as a testimony to the many Jewish residents of Tarnopol who
perished in the Shoah and whose names are represented in its pages.
Almost 90 percent of the Galician population perished in the
Holocaust, and many of the residents of Tarnopol, which suffered
devastation in both World Wars, are memorialized in this enumeration.

Gesher Galicia will be making the images and Excel files available to
qualified researchers starting in a few weeks, with the database to
follow accessible to all. To learn more details, go to the project
web page. This census project is one facet of our "Galician Archival
Records Project," which can be read about here:
http://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/garp/. If you experience
genealogical success in studying the 1910 Tarnopol Census, please let
us know so we can report on your findings and celebrate them as well.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...
www.geshergalicia.org
http://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/tarnopol-1910-census/

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