Date   

Yizkor Book Project, October 2017 #warsaw #poland

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

As always, quite a lot has happened over the last month and a witness to
this, is the impressive list of projects below of those that were dealt
with during October.

For a start, another book has now been completed online - "Memories of
Ozarow" which was generously donated to the Yizkor Book Project by the
translator, William Fraiberg, who carried out the English translation of
the original book in French by the late Hillel Adler. We now have 140
complete books online and we continue the challenge of translating as
much of the Yizkor books to make them available to a wide public.

Last month, we were also pleased to see the addition of a new project for
Kaunas (Kovno), Lithuania - a book about the Schwabe Gymnasion that
existed there. It's importance is that it covers the lives of family
members who were students and teachers at the Gymnasion (high school).
The first sections are now online graciously translated by Rabbi Shalom
Bronstein and there are plans to set up a dedicated translations fund for
this book in order to facilitate the translation of its entirety.

I was pleased, this past month, to receive >from various people, the
sponsored translation of a number of entries on communities that are to
be found in the Yad Vashem Pinkasim (Encyclopedias of the Jewish
communities) and also the Marmaros Book. The communities covered in these
books are, particularly for the smaller ones, don't generally have their
own specific Yizkor book and the information covered by these entries is
truly unparalleled. If your predecessors came >from a community that, as
yet, you haven't found information on, please contact me and I'll assist
in seeing if an entry does exist in one of the aforementioned volumes.

The Yizkor Book in Print continues to plough ahead and more new books are
currently in the works. I, together with the people involved in this
project were very gratified to see that a book that they recently
published "A Memorial Book for Rokiskis and its Environs" saw a mention
in the local paper Rokiskis "Sirena". The article noted that the Rokiskis
Regional Museum had been delighted to receive a copy of the English
translation of this book and the paper outlined the Yizkor Book Project's
aim of translating yizkor books into English is making the history of the
Jewish communities is more accessible to Lithuanians. Truly wonderful to
learn about the impact the YBIP Project and the YB Project, in general, is
having around the globe.

And now for details of all the updates and additions that were carried out
in the Yizkor Book Project in October.

We have added in one new book:

- Kaunas (Kovno), Lithuania (A Palace That Sank)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kaunas1/Kaunas1.html


And added in 6 new entries:

- Craciunesti, Romania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00256.html

- Izabelin, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol8_00123.html

- Kamyanka Buzka, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Jewish communities of
Dziedzilow et al) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dziedzilow/Dzi158.html

- Knyszyn, Poland (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_poland/pol8_00561.html

- Pryborzhavske, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar241.html

- Zolotar'ovo, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar242.html

And we have continued to update 24 of our existing projects:

- Belki, Ukraine (The Bilker Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/belki/belki.html

- Brody, Ukraine (An Eternal Light: Brody in Memoriam)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/brody/brody.html

- Capresti, Moldova (Kapresht, our village; memorial book for the Jewish
community of Kapresht, Bessarabia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Capresti/Capresti.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Didyliv, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Jewish communities of
Dziedzilow, Winniki, Barszczowice, Pidelisek, Pidbaritz, Kukizov, Old
Jarczow, Pekalowice, Kamenopole & Nowy Jarczow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dziedzilow/Dziedzilow.html

- Kaluszyn, Poland (The Memorial Book of Kaluszyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kaluszyn/kaluszyn.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Kolomyya, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kolomey)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolomyya/kolomyya.html

- Kosava, Belarus (Memorial Book of Kosow Poleski)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kosava/Kosava.html

- Lenin, Belarus (The community of Lenin; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lenin/lenin.html

- Narach (Kobylnik), Belarus (Memorial Book of Kobylnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kobylnik/Kobylnik.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dworp.html [Polish]

- Ozarow, Poland (Memories of Ozarow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ozarow/Ozarow.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Pan Kapitan of Jordanow
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jordanow/Jordanow.html

- Rafalovka, Ukraine (Memorial book for the towns of Old Rafalowka, New
Rafalowka, Olizarka, Zoludzk and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rafalovka/rafalovka.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk - Memorial book of the Martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Slutsk, Belarus (Slutsk and vicinity memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/slutsk/slutsk.html

- Sosnove (Ludvipol), Ukraine (Ludvipol (Wolyn); in memory of the
Jewish community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ludvipol/Ludvipol.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the
neighboring villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to
find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland Yizkor Book Project, October 2017 #warsaw #poland

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

As always, quite a lot has happened over the last month and a witness to
this, is the impressive list of projects below of those that were dealt
with during October.

For a start, another book has now been completed online - "Memories of
Ozarow" which was generously donated to the Yizkor Book Project by the
translator, William Fraiberg, who carried out the English translation of
the original book in French by the late Hillel Adler. We now have 140
complete books online and we continue the challenge of translating as
much of the Yizkor books to make them available to a wide public.

Last month, we were also pleased to see the addition of a new project for
Kaunas (Kovno), Lithuania - a book about the Schwabe Gymnasion that
existed there. It's importance is that it covers the lives of family
members who were students and teachers at the Gymnasion (high school).
The first sections are now online graciously translated by Rabbi Shalom
Bronstein and there are plans to set up a dedicated translations fund for
this book in order to facilitate the translation of its entirety.

I was pleased, this past month, to receive >from various people, the
sponsored translation of a number of entries on communities that are to
be found in the Yad Vashem Pinkasim (Encyclopedias of the Jewish
communities) and also the Marmaros Book. The communities covered in these
books are, particularly for the smaller ones, don't generally have their
own specific Yizkor book and the information covered by these entries is
truly unparalleled. If your predecessors came >from a community that, as
yet, you haven't found information on, please contact me and I'll assist
in seeing if an entry does exist in one of the aforementioned volumes.

The Yizkor Book in Print continues to plough ahead and more new books are
currently in the works. I, together with the people involved in this
project were very gratified to see that a book that they recently
published "A Memorial Book for Rokiskis and its Environs" saw a mention
in the local paper Rokiskis "Sirena". The article noted that the Rokiskis
Regional Museum had been delighted to receive a copy of the English
translation of this book and the paper outlined the Yizkor Book Project's
aim of translating yizkor books into English is making the history of the
Jewish communities is more accessible to Lithuanians. Truly wonderful to
learn about the impact the YBIP Project and the YB Project, in general, is
having around the globe.

And now for details of all the updates and additions that were carried out
in the Yizkor Book Project in October.

We have added in one new book:

- Kaunas (Kovno), Lithuania (A Palace That Sank)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kaunas1/Kaunas1.html


And added in 6 new entries:

- Craciunesti, Romania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00256.html

- Izabelin, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol8_00123.html

- Kamyanka Buzka, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Jewish communities of
Dziedzilow et al) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dziedzilow/Dzi158.html

- Knyszyn, Poland (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_poland/pol8_00561.html

- Pryborzhavske, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar241.html

- Zolotar'ovo, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar242.html

And we have continued to update 24 of our existing projects:

- Belki, Ukraine (The Bilker Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/belki/belki.html

- Brody, Ukraine (An Eternal Light: Brody in Memoriam)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/brody/brody.html

- Capresti, Moldova (Kapresht, our village; memorial book for the Jewish
community of Kapresht, Bessarabia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Capresti/Capresti.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Didyliv, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Jewish communities of
Dziedzilow, Winniki, Barszczowice, Pidelisek, Pidbaritz, Kukizov, Old
Jarczow, Pekalowice, Kamenopole & Nowy Jarczow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dziedzilow/Dziedzilow.html

- Kaluszyn, Poland (The Memorial Book of Kaluszyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kaluszyn/kaluszyn.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Kolomyya, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kolomey)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolomyya/kolomyya.html

- Kosava, Belarus (Memorial Book of Kosow Poleski)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kosava/Kosava.html

- Lenin, Belarus (The community of Lenin; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lenin/lenin.html

- Narach (Kobylnik), Belarus (Memorial Book of Kobylnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kobylnik/Kobylnik.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dworp.html [Polish]

- Ozarow, Poland (Memories of Ozarow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ozarow/Ozarow.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Pan Kapitan of Jordanow
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jordanow/Jordanow.html

- Rafalovka, Ukraine (Memorial book for the towns of Old Rafalowka, New
Rafalowka, Olizarka, Zoludzk and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rafalovka/rafalovka.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk - Memorial book of the Martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Slutsk, Belarus (Slutsk and vicinity memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/slutsk/slutsk.html

- Sosnove (Ludvipol), Ukraine (Ludvipol (Wolyn); in memory of the
Jewish community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ludvipol/Ludvipol.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the
neighboring villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to
find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Bessarabia SIG, Update for October 2017 #general

Yefim Kogan
 

Hi everybody,

Please see the What's New Section for the details of what we did new in the
month of October.

1) We have upgraded the list of Cemeteries in Bessarabia/Moldova with new
cemeteries we worked for last several month

2) We have completed working on Otaci (Ataki) Jewish Cemetery, one of incredible
Jewish Cemeteries in the region. The project was very complicated. First, we
received a Ataki Written burial registry, a donation >from Miriam Weiner and
Routes to Roots Foundation as part of the agreement, see
https://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/MiriamW.html
I would like to thank Miriam personally for this donation and for all materials
she shared with Bessarabia SIG. We have also received about 2500+ images of
graves dated >from middle of 18 century to 20th century. All these images we
translated and deciphered. Some images we could not read, and they will be in
Unknown Grave section. Our translators and researchers did a terrific job, and
want to congratulate all for a wonderful job you did. The third part of the
project was to reconcile two first steps and not having duplicates.

- 2203 records with 1733 photographs are sent to JewishGen/JOWBR.

Also there are 258 photos of unknown graves available at the Bessarabia SIG
website and >from Otaci Cemetery report. That report has a lot of additional
information, maps, photos, and more.

There are couple of sections at the cemetery, not accessible, and it most likely
has about 1000-1200 graves. We will need to do clearing the paths of this
cemetery in order to get to these tombstones. Also if you did not donate yet for
that cemetery, please do so. It will help to cover all the costs.

Please let us know if you have any questions, ideas of how to make our
Bessarabia SIG and the website better.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan, Inna Vayner
JewishGen Bessarabia SIG Leaders and Coordinators


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Bessarabia SIG, Update for October 2017 #general

Yefim Kogan
 

Hi everybody,

Please see the What's New Section for the details of what we did new in the
month of October.

1) We have upgraded the list of Cemeteries in Bessarabia/Moldova with new
cemeteries we worked for last several month

2) We have completed working on Otaci (Ataki) Jewish Cemetery, one of incredible
Jewish Cemeteries in the region. The project was very complicated. First, we
received a Ataki Written burial registry, a donation >from Miriam Weiner and
Routes to Roots Foundation as part of the agreement, see
https://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/MiriamW.html
I would like to thank Miriam personally for this donation and for all materials
she shared with Bessarabia SIG. We have also received about 2500+ images of
graves dated >from middle of 18 century to 20th century. All these images we
translated and deciphered. Some images we could not read, and they will be in
Unknown Grave section. Our translators and researchers did a terrific job, and
want to congratulate all for a wonderful job you did. The third part of the
project was to reconcile two first steps and not having duplicates.

- 2203 records with 1733 photographs are sent to JewishGen/JOWBR.

Also there are 258 photos of unknown graves available at the Bessarabia SIG
website and >from Otaci Cemetery report. That report has a lot of additional
information, maps, photos, and more.

There are couple of sections at the cemetery, not accessible, and it most likely
has about 1000-1200 graves. We will need to do clearing the paths of this
cemetery in order to get to these tombstones. Also if you did not donate yet for
that cemetery, please do so. It will help to cover all the costs.

Please let us know if you have any questions, ideas of how to make our
Bessarabia SIG and the website better.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan, Inna Vayner
JewishGen Bessarabia SIG Leaders and Coordinators


JGSPBCI FL -reminder: November Membership Meeting - Wednesday, November 8, 2017 #general

Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
 

WHO: Jewish Genealogical Society of Palm Beach County, FL

WHAT: Wednesday November 8, 2017 Membership Meeting
WHERE: South County Civic Center, 16700 Jog Road, Delray Beach, FL
TIME: 11:30 AM - 3PM
Guests are always welcome. A $5.00 guest fee may be applied to membership if
guest wishes to join.

Agenda:
11:30 AM-12:15 PM: SIG meeting {Special Interest Group} Ukraine, led by Eric
Sharenow
12:30 PM-1:PM Brick Wall - led by P.P. Mark Jacobson and Board member Phyllis
Kramer
1PM-3PM - **Program** - preceded by brief business meeting

Mona Morris. co-founder and a Past President of JGSPBCI, "will present a
step-by-step tour of the many tools available to start a family search: "Back
to the Past: How to begin Your Journey into Genealogical Research". She will
provide a wealth of tips on how to find family history without having to browse
multiple ancestry sites to build a family tree. Mona, a Certified Professional
Genealogist [CPG], will share advice on getting started with a family search
and will answer frequently asked family history questions."

For additional information, please click on our website:
www.jgspalmbeachcounty.org

Submitted by:

Sylvia Furshman Nusinov, APG

President Emerita
Genealogy Resources Workbook Editor
JGSPBCI, Florida


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSPBCI FL -reminder: November Membership Meeting - Wednesday, November 8, 2017 #general

Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
 

WHO: Jewish Genealogical Society of Palm Beach County, FL

WHAT: Wednesday November 8, 2017 Membership Meeting
WHERE: South County Civic Center, 16700 Jog Road, Delray Beach, FL
TIME: 11:30 AM - 3PM
Guests are always welcome. A $5.00 guest fee may be applied to membership if
guest wishes to join.

Agenda:
11:30 AM-12:15 PM: SIG meeting {Special Interest Group} Ukraine, led by Eric
Sharenow
12:30 PM-1:PM Brick Wall - led by P.P. Mark Jacobson and Board member Phyllis
Kramer
1PM-3PM - **Program** - preceded by brief business meeting

Mona Morris. co-founder and a Past President of JGSPBCI, "will present a
step-by-step tour of the many tools available to start a family search: "Back
to the Past: How to begin Your Journey into Genealogical Research". She will
provide a wealth of tips on how to find family history without having to browse
multiple ancestry sites to build a family tree. Mona, a Certified Professional
Genealogist [CPG], will share advice on getting started with a family search
and will answer frequently asked family history questions."

For additional information, please click on our website:
www.jgspalmbeachcounty.org

Submitted by:

Sylvia Furshman Nusinov, APG

President Emerita
Genealogy Resources Workbook Editor
JGSPBCI, Florida


Bialystok Questions #poland

David Slater
 

Family lore has it that my ggrandmother Zelda (WASILKOVSKY) KRAUZE
[1856-1936] (who lived n Bialystok with family prior to 1904 emigration to
U.S.) was a “cook for the Russian Army”. My assumption is she was not a
directly paid employee of the Russian government, but rather independently
sold cooked kosher meals to Jewish soldiers garrisoned in Bialystok, or,
possibly was an independent contractor if such an arrangement even existed.
Can anyone shed information on how Jewish soldiers obtained Kosher food in
Bialystok during the late 19th-early 20th centuries?

Zelda’s sister Neshke (WASILKOVSKY) FIKSEL [abt 1854-bef. 1893] (who also
lived in Bialystok with her family, but never appears to have emigrated)
married Jankiel FIKSEL whose family owned or managed a theater (name of
theater unknown) in Bialystok around the turn of the 20th century. I don’t
know if it was a Yiddish theater or some other sort of theater. Does anyone
know if there would be surviving Bialystok property tax, sales or lease
records for the theater somewhere to be searched? Does anyone know if any
Bialystok Yiddish newspapers >from the late 19th thru early 20th century are
archived anywhere? My thought is there may be a paid advertisement for the
theater which may list the name of the manager or proprietor.

Many thanks!!

David Slater

Researching

SCHLACHTER, BARON, DROBIS/DROBIZ/DROBES, MORVITZ/MOFTEZ, IOFFE/YAFFE/JAFFE,
SKODOWITZ; – Kavarskas, Lithuania
DROBIS/DROBIZ/DROBES; - Anyksciai, Lithuania
SIMONSOHN/SIMSON, WEINSTEIN, WINBLER, SCHWARTZ; – Riga, Latvia
KRAUZE/KRAUSE, FIKSEL/FIXEL, WASILKOVSKY, WEISS, SPECTOR, KUPER/KOOPER; –
Bialystok, Poland
WASILKOVSKY, SPECTOR, COHEN; – Wasilkow, Poland
TAICH/DAJCZ/DEUTSCH, MOSHKOVSKY, MONTE, ROCKOVITZ, BUCKOVITZKI, MEIROVITZ,
KUZINETZ; – Slonim, Belarus
FUCHS/FOX, PALEYS/PALEY; – Bobruisk, Belarus


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Bialystok Questions #poland

David Slater
 

Family lore has it that my ggrandmother Zelda (WASILKOVSKY) KRAUZE
[1856-1936] (who lived n Bialystok with family prior to 1904 emigration to
U.S.) was a “cook for the Russian Army”. My assumption is she was not a
directly paid employee of the Russian government, but rather independently
sold cooked kosher meals to Jewish soldiers garrisoned in Bialystok, or,
possibly was an independent contractor if such an arrangement even existed.
Can anyone shed information on how Jewish soldiers obtained Kosher food in
Bialystok during the late 19th-early 20th centuries?

Zelda’s sister Neshke (WASILKOVSKY) FIKSEL [abt 1854-bef. 1893] (who also
lived in Bialystok with her family, but never appears to have emigrated)
married Jankiel FIKSEL whose family owned or managed a theater (name of
theater unknown) in Bialystok around the turn of the 20th century. I don’t
know if it was a Yiddish theater or some other sort of theater. Does anyone
know if there would be surviving Bialystok property tax, sales or lease
records for the theater somewhere to be searched? Does anyone know if any
Bialystok Yiddish newspapers >from the late 19th thru early 20th century are
archived anywhere? My thought is there may be a paid advertisement for the
theater which may list the name of the manager or proprietor.

Many thanks!!

David Slater

Researching

SCHLACHTER, BARON, DROBIS/DROBIZ/DROBES, MORVITZ/MOFTEZ, IOFFE/YAFFE/JAFFE,
SKODOWITZ; – Kavarskas, Lithuania
DROBIS/DROBIZ/DROBES; - Anyksciai, Lithuania
SIMONSOHN/SIMSON, WEINSTEIN, WINBLER, SCHWARTZ; – Riga, Latvia
KRAUZE/KRAUSE, FIKSEL/FIXEL, WASILKOVSKY, WEISS, SPECTOR, KUPER/KOOPER; –
Bialystok, Poland
WASILKOVSKY, SPECTOR, COHEN; – Wasilkow, Poland
TAICH/DAJCZ/DEUTSCH, MOSHKOVSKY, MONTE, ROCKOVITZ, BUCKOVITZKI, MEIROVITZ,
KUZINETZ; – Slonim, Belarus
FUCHS/FOX, PALEYS/PALEY; – Bobruisk, Belarus


Bialystok Questions #poland

David Slater
 

Family lore has it that my ggrandmother Zelda (WASILKOVSKY) KRAUZE
[1856-1936] (who lived n Bialystok with family prior to 1904 emigration to
U.S.) was a “cook for the Russian Army”. My assumption is she was not a
directly paid employee of the Russian government, but rather independently
sold cooked kosher meals to Jewish soldiers garrisoned in Bialystok, or,
possibly was an independent contractor if such an arrangement even existed.
Can anyone shed information on how Jewish soldiers obtained Kosher food in
Bialystok during the late 19th-early 20th centuries?

Zelda’s sister Neshke (WASILKOVSKY) FIKSEL [abt 1854-bef. 1893] (who also
lived in Bialystok with her family, but never appears to have emigrated)
married Jankiel FIKSEL whose family owned or managed a theater (name of
theater unknown) in Bialystok around the turn of the 20th century. I don’t
know if it was a Yiddish theater or some other sort of theater. Does anyone
know if there would be surviving Bialystok property tax, sales or lease
records for the theater somewhere to be searched? Does anyone know if any
Bialystok Yiddish newspapers >from the late 19th thru early 20th century are
archived anywhere? My thought is there may be a paid advertisement for the
theater which may list the name of the manager or proprietor.

Many thanks!!

David Slater

Researching

SCHLACHTER, BARON, DROBIS/DROBIZ/DROBES, MORVITZ/MOFTEZ, IOFFE/YAFFE/JAFFE,
SKODOWITZ; – Kavarskas, Lithuania

DROBIS/DROBIZ/DROBES; - Anyksciai, Lithuania

SIMONSOHN/SIMSON, WEINSTEIN, WINBLER, SCHWARTZ; – Riga, Latvia

KRAUZE/KRAUSE, FIKSEL/FIXEL, WASILKOVSKY, WEISS, SPECTOR, KUPER/KOOPER; –
Bialystok, Poland

WASILKOVSKY, SPECTOR, COHEN; – Wasilkow, Poland

TAICH/DAJCZ/DEUTSCH, MOSHKOVSKY, MONTE, ROCKOVITZ, BUCKOVITZKI, MEIROVITZ,
KUZINETZ; – Slonim, Belarus

FUCHS/FOX, PALEYS/PALEY; – Bobruisk, Belarus


JRI Poland #Poland Bialystok Questions #poland

David Slater
 

Family lore has it that my ggrandmother Zelda (WASILKOVSKY) KRAUZE
[1856-1936] (who lived n Bialystok with family prior to 1904 emigration to
U.S.) was a “cook for the Russian Army”. My assumption is she was not a
directly paid employee of the Russian government, but rather independently
sold cooked kosher meals to Jewish soldiers garrisoned in Bialystok, or,
possibly was an independent contractor if such an arrangement even existed.
Can anyone shed information on how Jewish soldiers obtained Kosher food in
Bialystok during the late 19th-early 20th centuries?

Zelda’s sister Neshke (WASILKOVSKY) FIKSEL [abt 1854-bef. 1893] (who also
lived in Bialystok with her family, but never appears to have emigrated)
married Jankiel FIKSEL whose family owned or managed a theater (name of
theater unknown) in Bialystok around the turn of the 20th century. I don’t
know if it was a Yiddish theater or some other sort of theater. Does anyone
know if there would be surviving Bialystok property tax, sales or lease
records for the theater somewhere to be searched? Does anyone know if any
Bialystok Yiddish newspapers >from the late 19th thru early 20th century are
archived anywhere? My thought is there may be a paid advertisement for the
theater which may list the name of the manager or proprietor.

Many thanks!!

David Slater

Researching

SCHLACHTER, BARON, DROBIS/DROBIZ/DROBES, MORVITZ/MOFTEZ, IOFFE/YAFFE/JAFFE,
SKODOWITZ; – Kavarskas, Lithuania

DROBIS/DROBIZ/DROBES; - Anyksciai, Lithuania

SIMONSOHN/SIMSON, WEINSTEIN, WINBLER, SCHWARTZ; – Riga, Latvia

KRAUZE/KRAUSE, FIKSEL/FIXEL, WASILKOVSKY, WEISS, SPECTOR, KUPER/KOOPER; –
Bialystok, Poland

WASILKOVSKY, SPECTOR, COHEN; – Wasilkow, Poland

TAICH/DAJCZ/DEUTSCH, MOSHKOVSKY, MONTE, ROCKOVITZ, BUCKOVITZKI, MEIROVITZ,
KUZINETZ; – Slonim, Belarus

FUCHS/FOX, PALEYS/PALEY; – Bobruisk, Belarus


ViewMate Translation Requests - Polish #general

Ken Entin
 

I have posted parts of two vital records in Polish for which I need translations.

The first of these is a notation that identifies the parents of the new mother.
I can't identify the names. Are you able to do so?

This item is on ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM61257

The second is a notation placed on a birth record. I believe it refers to a
subsequent marriage ceremony of the mother's parents. A translation of this
note would be appreciated.

It is on ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM61261

Please respond via the forms provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.

Kenneth Entin
JewishGen ID #: 375458


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate Translation Requests - Polish #general

Ken Entin
 

I have posted parts of two vital records in Polish for which I need translations.

The first of these is a notation that identifies the parents of the new mother.
I can't identify the names. Are you able to do so?

This item is on ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM61257

The second is a notation placed on a birth record. I believe it refers to a
subsequent marriage ceremony of the mother's parents. A translation of this
note would be appreciated.

It is on ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM61261

Please respond via the forms provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.

Kenneth Entin
JewishGen ID #: 375458


New Article on IGRA website- “Jewish Life in Bessa #bessarabia

Elena Bazes
 

IGRA (Israel Genealogy Research Association) has posted a new article
on its website entitled Jewish Life in Bessarabia through the Lens of
the Shtetl Kaushany by Yefim A. Kogan.

In this article, Yefim writes about the history of Jews in Bessarabia
by focusing on the shtetl Kaushany. He discusses the general and
Jewish history of the area >from the Ninth Century to 1940, including
how the Jews lived culturally, politically, and religiously. There
are also excerpts >from the family histories of the Kogan, Spivak and
Srulevich families.

Yefim was born in Kishinev. He emigrated to the U.S. in 1989. He has a
Master of Jewish Liberal Studies >from Hebrew College in Boston. He has
done extensive genealogical and historical research. Yefim lectures on
genealogy and has given presentations at several IAJGS conferences. He
founded the Bessarabia SIG. He also leads and coordinates the
Bessarabia Revision List and the Bessarabia Cemetery Project.

Before viewing the article, please register for free on the IGRA website:

http://genealogy.org.il/

The article is available for free for approximately one week, after
which time it can only be accessed by IGRA members.

To view the article go to:

http://genealogy.org.il/2017/10/30/jewish-life-bessarabia-lens-shtetl-kaushany-yefim-kogan/

Elena Biegel Bases
IGRA Publicity Chairperson


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia New Article on IGRA website- “Jewish Life in Bessa #bessarabia

Elena Bazes
 

IGRA (Israel Genealogy Research Association) has posted a new article
on its website entitled Jewish Life in Bessarabia through the Lens of
the Shtetl Kaushany by Yefim A. Kogan.

In this article, Yefim writes about the history of Jews in Bessarabia
by focusing on the shtetl Kaushany. He discusses the general and
Jewish history of the area >from the Ninth Century to 1940, including
how the Jews lived culturally, politically, and religiously. There
are also excerpts >from the family histories of the Kogan, Spivak and
Srulevich families.

Yefim was born in Kishinev. He emigrated to the U.S. in 1989. He has a
Master of Jewish Liberal Studies >from Hebrew College in Boston. He has
done extensive genealogical and historical research. Yefim lectures on
genealogy and has given presentations at several IAJGS conferences. He
founded the Bessarabia SIG. He also leads and coordinates the
Bessarabia Revision List and the Bessarabia Cemetery Project.

Before viewing the article, please register for free on the IGRA website:

http://genealogy.org.il/

The article is available for free for approximately one week, after
which time it can only be accessed by IGRA members.

To view the article go to:

http://genealogy.org.il/2017/10/30/jewish-life-bessarabia-lens-shtetl-kaushany-yefim-kogan/

Elena Biegel Bases
IGRA Publicity Chairperson


Re: Holocaust Database: Volunteers Needed #general

Lande
 

I am impressed, but not surprised, by the global flood of responses I
received for my request for 12 volunteers. There were far more, >from all
over the world. Please, and thanks, but no more.

I will reply to all I have received so far.

Peter Lande
Washington, D.C.

MODERATOR NOTE: If you are motivated to help, consider the plethora of
volunteer opportunities on other JewishGen projects. See the list of possibilities
(including JOWBR, Yizkor Books, and SIG projects) at
https://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Holocaust Database: Volunteers Needed #general

Lande
 

I am impressed, but not surprised, by the global flood of responses I
received for my request for 12 volunteers. There were far more, >from all
over the world. Please, and thanks, but no more.

I will reply to all I have received so far.

Peter Lande
Washington, D.C.

MODERATOR NOTE: If you are motivated to help, consider the plethora of
volunteer opportunities on other JewishGen projects. See the list of possibilities
(including JOWBR, Yizkor Books, and SIG projects) at
https://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/


Re: Dr. Doron Behar's new paper on R1a1a (R-Y2619) Ashkenazi Levites #dna

Adam Cherson
 

Dear Mr. Wexler,

Thanks so much for co-writing and sharing this fascinating paper. I have
two comments stemming >from my reading of the work.

It just so happens I am exploring my own ancestry >from Iberia to Lida
(today in Belarus), under the auspices of JB Royal, Rachel Unkefer, and
Wim Penninx via their FTDNA R-FGC20747 Project (their paper is here:
https://www.academia.edu/25638614/Y-DNA_Evidence_for_an_Ashkenazi_Lineages_Iberian_Origin). This project suggests a migration trajectory for
certain R1b subclades which parallels the Horovits' migration from
Girona to Horiwcz described in your paper. At first I concluded that the
geographic origin of R-FGC20759 (a subclade of FGC20747) in Iberia circa
900CE, suggested by Royal/Unkefer/Penniz, must mean that my ancestors
came to Europe via the Arab expansion into Iberia in the 8th century.
But now I am fascinated by the notion raised in your paper that certain
Ashkenazim, after entering Europe via Italy and then moving northward,
may have migrated into Iberia >from mid-Europe and then migrated again
back across Europe to Poland and Lithuania.

The social and historical context of this possible migration of
Ashkenazim into Iberia remains unclear to me. While it is difficult to
believe, given current socio-political paradigms, that significant
numbers of Ashkenazim may have found it beneficial to migrate towards
Arab-held territories in Iberia I suppose this is one historical
possibility, considering the fact that the expulsion >from Spain included
Jews as well as Arabs. It would be interesting to learn more about this
possible westward and then eastward migration of Ashkenazim in Europe.
Perhaps the work being done by Royal/Unkefer/Penninx, and other such
studies, may someday give us a clearer view of when, and why, this
westward migration occurred.

The other comment is >from way further back in time: there is an apparent
anomaly in the fact that Levi is purported to be Aaron's g-grandfather
and yet the predominant Levi haplogroup (>from this study's sample) is
R1a-M198 (65%) while the predominant Cohen haplogroup is J1-P58 (46.1%);
Behar's 2003 data suggest very few Ashkenazi Cohanim are >from the R1a
haplogroup. So, it is clear that somehow or other the descendants of
Levi and of Aaron seem to have become predominantly associated with
different haplogroups. This in turn suggests that either the
Levi-to-Aaron family tree as described in the Bible is inaccurate, or
that perhaps very early on in Jewish history, for some reason or
another, a non-direct descendant of either Levi or Aaron became the
progenitor of the majority of future Levites or Cohanim. This raises an
interesting question: which of the haplogroups was the true Levi-Aaron
haplogroup? My guess is that the answer is more likely to be the J1
haplogroup, but that is only an uneducated intuition.

Once again many thanks for the mind-blowing work you and others are
doing.

Best Wishes,
Adam Cherson

---

From: jeffwexler@ca.rr.com
Date: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 13:51:43 +0000

Dr. Doron Behar's new paper on R1a1a Ashkenazi Levites, The genetic
variation in the R1a clade among the Ashkenazi Levites' Y chromosome,
was published this morning.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-14761-7
...


DNA Research #DNA RE: Dr. Doron Behar's new paper on R1a1a (R-Y2619) Ashkenazi Levites #dna

Adam Cherson
 

Dear Mr. Wexler,

Thanks so much for co-writing and sharing this fascinating paper. I have
two comments stemming >from my reading of the work.

It just so happens I am exploring my own ancestry >from Iberia to Lida
(today in Belarus), under the auspices of JB Royal, Rachel Unkefer, and
Wim Penninx via their FTDNA R-FGC20747 Project (their paper is here:
https://www.academia.edu/25638614/Y-DNA_Evidence_for_an_Ashkenazi_Lineages_Iberian_Origin). This project suggests a migration trajectory for
certain R1b subclades which parallels the Horovits' migration from
Girona to Horiwcz described in your paper. At first I concluded that the
geographic origin of R-FGC20759 (a subclade of FGC20747) in Iberia circa
900CE, suggested by Royal/Unkefer/Penniz, must mean that my ancestors
came to Europe via the Arab expansion into Iberia in the 8th century.
But now I am fascinated by the notion raised in your paper that certain
Ashkenazim, after entering Europe via Italy and then moving northward,
may have migrated into Iberia >from mid-Europe and then migrated again
back across Europe to Poland and Lithuania.

The social and historical context of this possible migration of
Ashkenazim into Iberia remains unclear to me. While it is difficult to
believe, given current socio-political paradigms, that significant
numbers of Ashkenazim may have found it beneficial to migrate towards
Arab-held territories in Iberia I suppose this is one historical
possibility, considering the fact that the expulsion >from Spain included
Jews as well as Arabs. It would be interesting to learn more about this
possible westward and then eastward migration of Ashkenazim in Europe.
Perhaps the work being done by Royal/Unkefer/Penninx, and other such
studies, may someday give us a clearer view of when, and why, this
westward migration occurred.

The other comment is >from way further back in time: there is an apparent
anomaly in the fact that Levi is purported to be Aaron's g-grandfather
and yet the predominant Levi haplogroup (>from this study's sample) is
R1a-M198 (65%) while the predominant Cohen haplogroup is J1-P58 (46.1%);
Behar's 2003 data suggest very few Ashkenazi Cohanim are >from the R1a
haplogroup. So, it is clear that somehow or other the descendants of
Levi and of Aaron seem to have become predominantly associated with
different haplogroups. This in turn suggests that either the
Levi-to-Aaron family tree as described in the Bible is inaccurate, or
that perhaps very early on in Jewish history, for some reason or
another, a non-direct descendant of either Levi or Aaron became the
progenitor of the majority of future Levites or Cohanim. This raises an
interesting question: which of the haplogroups was the true Levi-Aaron
haplogroup? My guess is that the answer is more likely to be the J1
haplogroup, but that is only an uneducated intuition.

Once again many thanks for the mind-blowing work you and others are
doing.

Best Wishes,
Adam Cherson

---

From: jeffwexler@ca.rr.com
Date: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 13:51:43 +0000

Dr. Doron Behar's new paper on R1a1a Ashkenazi Levites, The genetic
variation in the R1a clade among the Ashkenazi Levites' Y chromosome,
was published this morning.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-14761-7
...


Early 1800s Kruty records #ukraine

Adam Peters
 

Hello,

I'm new to researching Ukrainian records. I'm looking for any vital or community records for the town of Kruty (Krata, Krutnoye) >from the early 1800s, if such things exist. Feel free to email me at adampeters@gmail.com.

Best regards,

Adam peters

PETRUSHKA (Zambrow, szumowo, Ostrow Mazowiecka, Warsaw, Dlugosiodlo)
ROZENBERG (Brok, Wyzkow)
BOYER (antopol, kobryn)
DUBIN (Antopol, Kobryn)
CHERNETZKY (Kobryn, Brisk)


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Early 1800s Kruty records #ukraine

Adam Peters
 

Hello,

I'm new to researching Ukrainian records. I'm looking for any vital or community records for the town of Kruty (Krata, Krutnoye) >from the early 1800s, if such things exist. Feel free to email me at adampeters@gmail.com.

Best regards,

Adam peters

PETRUSHKA (Zambrow, szumowo, Ostrow Mazowiecka, Warsaw, Dlugosiodlo)
ROZENBERG (Brok, Wyzkow)
BOYER (antopol, kobryn)
DUBIN (Antopol, Kobryn)
CHERNETZKY (Kobryn, Brisk)

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