Date   

Chicago Naturalization Records - KOZAR #general

Julia Lombardo <julialombardo@...>
 

Hello,

I have been going nuts trying to find someone >from a 1913 Manifest, on a Chicago
Census. Her name was Beile KOZOR/KOZAR, age 16. She arrived in 1913 >from Romaniv/
Romanow, Ukraine. On the manifest, it lists Naturalization numbers (2-1040306,
5-28-43). She is the next-to-last record on the Manifest and the numbers are
written below her occupation, so I am not sure if they belong to her, or the person
below her. The person below her is not related to her.

Beile Kozar was coming to her uncle in Chicago...B. Goodman 1317 Maplewood Avenue.
I lost track of Beile after the manifest, there is no record of her anywhere after
that. My only assumption is that she got married, but I can't find a record of that
either.

Can someone >from the Chicago area point me in the right direction? Where can I get
a copy of this Naturalization record that might or might not be hers?

Thanks so much!

Julia Lombardo

MODERATOR: Please, we hate sending messages back for editing - to avoid having that
happen to your messages please remember to use proper sentence case and to avoid
having any word in your message typed in all capital letters unless it is someone's
last name.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Chicago Naturalization Records - KOZAR #general

Julia Lombardo <julialombardo@...>
 

Hello,

I have been going nuts trying to find someone >from a 1913 Manifest, on a Chicago
Census. Her name was Beile KOZOR/KOZAR, age 16. She arrived in 1913 >from Romaniv/
Romanow, Ukraine. On the manifest, it lists Naturalization numbers (2-1040306,
5-28-43). She is the next-to-last record on the Manifest and the numbers are
written below her occupation, so I am not sure if they belong to her, or the person
below her. The person below her is not related to her.

Beile Kozar was coming to her uncle in Chicago...B. Goodman 1317 Maplewood Avenue.
I lost track of Beile after the manifest, there is no record of her anywhere after
that. My only assumption is that she got married, but I can't find a record of that
either.

Can someone >from the Chicago area point me in the right direction? Where can I get
a copy of this Naturalization record that might or might not be hers?

Thanks so much!

Julia Lombardo

MODERATOR: Please, we hate sending messages back for editing - to avoid having that
happen to your messages please remember to use proper sentence case and to avoid
having any word in your message typed in all capital letters unless it is someone's
last name.


Tavern keepers #general

Paulette Bronstein
 

Greetings and Happy New Year!

I would appreciate any comments about the fact that there were so many "tavern
keepers" listed in the revision lists. I found many "tavern keepers" in my
grandfather's birth place (Salakas, Lithuania). Why were there so many taverns?
Was alcohol served? Were these restaurants? Who had money to go to such places?
Did our Jewish ancestors frequent these taverns?

Paulette Bronstein
Aventura, Fl

GAMBURG -Salakas (Lithuania), Ekaterinoslav (Ukraine), Brooklyn (NY,USA), Argentina
GAMUS - Disna (Belarus), Brooklyn (NY, USA) PITEL - Salakas (Lithuania) LEVIN -
Salakas (Lithuania) SHAPIR - Salakas (Lithuania) BRONSHTEIN - Ostrug (Ukraine),
Hadera and Kfar Saba (Israel) ROSENSCWEIG - Lodz (Poland), Hadera and Kfar Saba
(Israel)

MODERATOR NOTE: There has been some discussion over the years about taverns and
distilleries. Please look at the JewishGen Discussion Group archives for some of
those discussions


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Tavern keepers #general

Paulette Bronstein
 

Greetings and Happy New Year!

I would appreciate any comments about the fact that there were so many "tavern
keepers" listed in the revision lists. I found many "tavern keepers" in my
grandfather's birth place (Salakas, Lithuania). Why were there so many taverns?
Was alcohol served? Were these restaurants? Who had money to go to such places?
Did our Jewish ancestors frequent these taverns?

Paulette Bronstein
Aventura, Fl

GAMBURG -Salakas (Lithuania), Ekaterinoslav (Ukraine), Brooklyn (NY,USA), Argentina
GAMUS - Disna (Belarus), Brooklyn (NY, USA) PITEL - Salakas (Lithuania) LEVIN -
Salakas (Lithuania) SHAPIR - Salakas (Lithuania) BRONSHTEIN - Ostrug (Ukraine),
Hadera and Kfar Saba (Israel) ROSENSCWEIG - Lodz (Poland), Hadera and Kfar Saba
(Israel)

MODERATOR NOTE: There has been some discussion over the years about taverns and
distilleries. Please look at the JewishGen Discussion Group archives for some of
those discussions


Seeking Sheila Foreman Beeman and stephen D. Foreman in California #general

WALTER SPECTOR
 

Dear Genners,

I am seeking Sheila Froeman Beeman in Perris California. She married Davis Beeman
in 1977. Shelia is connected to the Bogatin Family Atlantic City and Philadelphia)
that I have been researching for the last few years. Shelia has a brother Stephen
D. Foreman also living in San Diego CA. Their mother was originally Zelda Bogatin
who married Joseph Foreman.

Please reply privately,
Walter Spector
Philadelphia

SPECTOR- Zaslov (Izyaslov) Volhynia Gub. Ukraine-Woodbine NJ-Phila. PA EBY (AB)
Rushany, Grodno Gub. Belarus-Woodbine NJ- Phila.PA :CELAIN/CELIAN Phila. BECKER-
Klevan, Rovno Phila. PA Brooklyn NY GREENSTEIN/SPECTOR-Boston MA SELTZER (ZELTZER)
Rovno, Klevan, Alexandria; -Brooklyn : ROTHSTEIN (Rotjstein) Phila. PA; LONDE,
LANDAU, LONDON, LANDER, Proskrov- Phila. PA: MOZENTER Monroeville NJ; PITKOWSKI
Rushany, Grodno Gub. STEINBERG Phila.: BOGATIN Lida, Phila., Atlantic City


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking Sheila Foreman Beeman and stephen D. Foreman in California #general

WALTER SPECTOR
 

Dear Genners,

I am seeking Sheila Froeman Beeman in Perris California. She married Davis Beeman
in 1977. Shelia is connected to the Bogatin Family Atlantic City and Philadelphia)
that I have been researching for the last few years. Shelia has a brother Stephen
D. Foreman also living in San Diego CA. Their mother was originally Zelda Bogatin
who married Joseph Foreman.

Please reply privately,
Walter Spector
Philadelphia

SPECTOR- Zaslov (Izyaslov) Volhynia Gub. Ukraine-Woodbine NJ-Phila. PA EBY (AB)
Rushany, Grodno Gub. Belarus-Woodbine NJ- Phila.PA :CELAIN/CELIAN Phila. BECKER-
Klevan, Rovno Phila. PA Brooklyn NY GREENSTEIN/SPECTOR-Boston MA SELTZER (ZELTZER)
Rovno, Klevan, Alexandria; -Brooklyn : ROTHSTEIN (Rotjstein) Phila. PA; LONDE,
LANDAU, LONDON, LANDER, Proskrov- Phila. PA: MOZENTER Monroeville NJ; PITKOWSKI
Rushany, Grodno Gub. STEINBERG Phila.: BOGATIN Lida, Phila., Atlantic City


New Montefiore Cem - NY. - anyone visiting? #general

nigel wilson <wilsonettess@...>
 

Dear friends,Should anyone be visiting the New Montefiore Cemetery in NY pls. contact
me privately, as all I wish to know is the inscription on the headstone of a family
member, no hebrew involved, just beloved, missed by etc., no photograph needed either
Thank you.
Patricia Wilson
(Israel)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New Montefiore Cem - NY. - anyone visiting? #general

nigel wilson <wilsonettess@...>
 

Dear friends,Should anyone be visiting the New Montefiore Cemetery in NY pls. contact
me privately, as all I wish to know is the inscription on the headstone of a family
member, no hebrew involved, just beloved, missed by etc., no photograph needed either
Thank you.
Patricia Wilson
(Israel)


Benjamin and Anna Gottlieb #galicia

Reuven Bleich <reuvenbleich@...>
 

Dear Friends,

May we all see a year of peace and good health. My father's uncle
Benjamin Gottlieb shows up on the SSN 061 03 1683 as born
5 Nov. 1892. Death Jan. 1973, age 80.

In the Italian Groom records, I found a Benjamin Gottlieb married
to an Anna Broder, Dec. 1920, Kings County. There were 2 others
-- Annie Ecker, June 1910 Manhattan, and Anna Kaplan, June
1918 Bronx.

They had a daughter, Gloria, married to Rubin Fain, who owned a
hardware store in Rockville Centre, Long Island, New York. Their
niece Ronna Sue (Sosman) married to Robert Schneider, lived in
Staten Island and may have moved to New Jersey.

Benjamin's parents, Louis (Leib) and Rose (Roza), are buried in
Mount Zion Cemetery but I can't find him and his wife there.
Louis died 8 Feb. 1919, Rose 1 Dec. 1934.

I would appreciate if anyone could supply me with further
information, especially burial plots. Please reply directly to
email reuvenbleich@aol.com.

Thank You
Reuven Bleich


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Benjamin and Anna Gottlieb #galicia

Reuven Bleich <reuvenbleich@...>
 

Dear Friends,

May we all see a year of peace and good health. My father's uncle
Benjamin Gottlieb shows up on the SSN 061 03 1683 as born
5 Nov. 1892. Death Jan. 1973, age 80.

In the Italian Groom records, I found a Benjamin Gottlieb married
to an Anna Broder, Dec. 1920, Kings County. There were 2 others
-- Annie Ecker, June 1910 Manhattan, and Anna Kaplan, June
1918 Bronx.

They had a daughter, Gloria, married to Rubin Fain, who owned a
hardware store in Rockville Centre, Long Island, New York. Their
niece Ronna Sue (Sosman) married to Robert Schneider, lived in
Staten Island and may have moved to New Jersey.

Benjamin's parents, Louis (Leib) and Rose (Roza), are buried in
Mount Zion Cemetery but I can't find him and his wife there.
Louis died 8 Feb. 1919, Rose 1 Dec. 1934.

I would appreciate if anyone could supply me with further
information, especially burial plots. Please reply directly to
email reuvenbleich@aol.com.

Thank You
Reuven Bleich


Broshniv-Osada or Broshnev-Osada. #bessarabia

Laura Steiman <cantata150@...>
 

Hello
A jewishgenner help to me with my viewmate about the death certificate (in
spanish) of my grand father Salomon
STEIMAN STEINMAN SHTEIMAN.

I knew that he was born in Bessarabia...now could be Broshniv-Osada or
Broshnev-Osada. (in spanish wrote like Bersuenata)

Any suggestion please for my research?

Regards
Laura Steiman

STEIMAN, GENDLER, BENDERSKY, GOLOV,ISRAELEVICH: Russia to Argentina


Moderator's note: See image at http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/responselist.asp?key=21172
Please reply privately or via Viewmate.


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Broshniv-Osada or Broshnev-Osada. #bessarabia

Laura Steiman <cantata150@...>
 

Hello
A jewishgenner help to me with my viewmate about the death certificate (in
spanish) of my grand father Salomon
STEIMAN STEINMAN SHTEIMAN.

I knew that he was born in Bessarabia...now could be Broshniv-Osada or
Broshnev-Osada. (in spanish wrote like Bersuenata)

Any suggestion please for my research?

Regards
Laura Steiman

STEIMAN, GENDLER, BENDERSKY, GOLOV,ISRAELEVICH: Russia to Argentina


Moderator's note: See image at http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/responselist.asp?key=21172
Please reply privately or via Viewmate.


Please help identify a place in Eastern Europe - document on ViewMate #bessarabia

Yossi Yagur <yagury@...>
 

Hi,

This is portion of an immigration form, as written by a French-speaking
official on August 1914 in Belgium.
This part relates to the immigrant's parents:
Father - Litman (Jurgrau / Yourgrau), born in _____ on 1854, alive.
Mother - Orentlicher Luba, born in Grosny on 1862, alive.

The question is: Can you identify Litman's birth place somewhere in
Eastern-Europe of those days? Please bear in mind that the clerk wrote what
he heard, probably using French-based spelling rules...
It is on ViewMate at the following address
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=21174

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application, or
directly to me.

Yossi Yagur
Petah-Tiqwa, Israel


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Please help identify a place in Eastern Europe - document on ViewMate #bessarabia

Yossi Yagur <yagury@...>
 

Hi,

This is portion of an immigration form, as written by a French-speaking
official on August 1914 in Belgium.
This part relates to the immigrant's parents:
Father - Litman (Jurgrau / Yourgrau), born in _____ on 1854, alive.
Mother - Orentlicher Luba, born in Grosny on 1862, alive.

The question is: Can you identify Litman's birth place somewhere in
Eastern-Europe of those days? Please bear in mind that the clerk wrote what
he heard, probably using French-based spelling rules...
It is on ViewMate at the following address
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=21174

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application, or
directly to me.

Yossi Yagur
Petah-Tiqwa, Israel


Free Genetic Genealogy Webinar (Jan 5) & Family Tree DNA Extends Holiday Sale (Jan 7) #general

Elise
 

JewishGenners,

Happy New Year!

Family Tree DNA has extended its holiday sale through January 7, so if you didn't
get a chance to look into it during the busy holiday season, you still have time.

Attend the next free monthly Introduction to Genetic Genealogy webinar to learn all
about DNA testing for genealogy and what types of tests are available.

What: Introduction to Genetic Genealogy at Family Tree DNA
Date: Thursday, January 5, 2012
Time: 1pm Eastern (U.S. (10am Pacific, 11am Mountain, 12pm Central, 6pm GMT, 8pm
Israel)
Where: Your computer!

Register at http://www.relativeroots.net/webinars/intro-ftdna/

A recording of this webinar will also be available for those who cannot attend
live.

*Introduction to Genetic Genealogy at Family Tree DNA*
What is Genetic Genealogy?=A0 What tests are available and which one should I
order? How much does a Genetic Genealogy test cost? Do I need to be a geneticist to
understand my results?

If you're a complete beginner to Genetic Genealogy and want the answers to these
questions and more, then this webinar is for you! Attendees will learn about the
history of genetic genealogy, be introduced to DNA basics, learn about the
different types of DNA tests available for genealogy, and learn about resources
that will help you make the most of your genetic genealogy experience. Focus will
be on the genetic genealogy tests offered by JewishGen's DNA testing partner,
Family Tree DNA.

*Registration*
Advance registration recommended. To register for either the live session or
recording of this webinar, please visit:
http://relativeroots.net/webinars/intro-ftdna/
*Discount >from Family Tree DNA* Attendees of this webinar receive an exclusive,
limited-time discount on select new test kits and upgrades >from Family Tree DNA.

*What is a Webinar?* Webinars are "web-based seminars" -- presentations given via
the internet. You attend >from the comfort of your own home, see and hear the
presentation via your own computer (or you can listen by phone if your computer
doesn't have speakers), and you can ask questions just like you can at an in-person
presentation.

Regards,

Elise Friedman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Free Genetic Genealogy Webinar (Jan 5) & Family Tree DNA Extends Holiday Sale (Jan 7) #general

Elise
 

JewishGenners,

Happy New Year!

Family Tree DNA has extended its holiday sale through January 7, so if you didn't
get a chance to look into it during the busy holiday season, you still have time.

Attend the next free monthly Introduction to Genetic Genealogy webinar to learn all
about DNA testing for genealogy and what types of tests are available.

What: Introduction to Genetic Genealogy at Family Tree DNA
Date: Thursday, January 5, 2012
Time: 1pm Eastern (U.S. (10am Pacific, 11am Mountain, 12pm Central, 6pm GMT, 8pm
Israel)
Where: Your computer!

Register at http://www.relativeroots.net/webinars/intro-ftdna/

A recording of this webinar will also be available for those who cannot attend
live.

*Introduction to Genetic Genealogy at Family Tree DNA*
What is Genetic Genealogy?=A0 What tests are available and which one should I
order? How much does a Genetic Genealogy test cost? Do I need to be a geneticist to
understand my results?

If you're a complete beginner to Genetic Genealogy and want the answers to these
questions and more, then this webinar is for you! Attendees will learn about the
history of genetic genealogy, be introduced to DNA basics, learn about the
different types of DNA tests available for genealogy, and learn about resources
that will help you make the most of your genetic genealogy experience. Focus will
be on the genetic genealogy tests offered by JewishGen's DNA testing partner,
Family Tree DNA.

*Registration*
Advance registration recommended. To register for either the live session or
recording of this webinar, please visit:
http://relativeroots.net/webinars/intro-ftdna/
*Discount >from Family Tree DNA* Attendees of this webinar receive an exclusive,
limited-time discount on select new test kits and upgrades >from Family Tree DNA.

*What is a Webinar?* Webinars are "web-based seminars" -- presentations given via
the internet. You attend >from the comfort of your own home, see and hear the
presentation via your own computer (or you can listen by phone if your computer
doesn't have speakers), and you can ask questions just like you can at an in-person
presentation.

Regards,

Elise Friedman


Interpreting Lviv information in GG Database #galicia

Eric M. Bloch
 

In response to Ellen Korpi's excellent questions regarding the
Lviv database, let me briefly explain the transcription process.

We have a dedicated group of transcribers who are oftentimes
dealing with poor images and even poorer handwriting. Their
transcriptions go through a thorough review process by
experienced validators who double check each and every entry.
When uncertain of an entry on the original document, the
validators review names in the existing database as well as a list
of surnames >from the Dictionary of Jewish Surnames in Galicia
by Alexander Beider. After validation, I review the changes made
by the validators to resolve any differences. Through this process,
I believe we have achieved a transcription accuracy of over 95
percent.

As to why a surname may be spelled differently in different
records for the same person, there may be several reasons. We
have seen such differences even within a given entry where, for
example, a baby's surname may be spelled slightly differently
than the father's surname, or even the mother's married surname
is sometimes slightly different than her husband's surname; or a
marriage record where a bride's or groom's surname was slightly
different than the father's surname.

It should also be noted that we have transcribed some records
that have been duplicated in multiple books. It is not easy to
determine which is the primary source and which is the copy.
There are often spelling differences for the same record between
one book and the other. In most cases, the difference appears to
be a German spelling versus a Polish spelling, even though the
language used is German.

My observation is that a combination of careless entry by
registrars, lack of spelling convention at that time (thus spelling
it the way it sounds), conversion >from Hebrew characters to Latin
characters, the time period of the record, and whether the
record was held by the Jewish community or civil authorities
(perhaps affecting whether German or Polish spellings were used)
were the main reasons for such spelling differences. As an
example of how politics might affect spelling, my Hungarian
ancestors were originally WEINBERG, but around the 1860s when
Hungarians wished to Magyarize their names and distance
themselves >from the German influence they began to use the
name WEINBERGER instead.

No doubt over time some people may have intentionally changed
their name to differentiate themselves >from relatives. I've seen
this in my own family (WITTELS vs. WITTLES, KERNES vs. KERNIS).
In one case it was to avoid confusion in bank accounts and the
other we speculate had to do with avoiding mispronunciation of
the name in America.

Regarding transcription of house numbers, reading the
numerators in the fractions has been extremely difficult,
resulting in a slightly higher source of error than with surnames.
Some of the differences you noted may have occurred when
originally recorded.

As we all know, in genealogy answers are not always easy to
come by. Is, for example, Itzik ORECH, Isak ORUCH and Isaac
URECH the same person? You have to use other cues to help
decide, such as house numbers, community (congregational)
family numbers, spousal names, date ranges of children, etc. to
help you decide.

In all cases you will probably want to examine the source
documents on microfilm to satisfy yourself about the
transcription accuracy. An added benefit will be the additional
information you may find that was not transcribed, such as
occupations and notations added years later.

Good luck!

Eric M. Bloch, Coordinator
Lviv Vital Records Transcription Project
Milwaukee, WI


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Interpreting Lviv information in GG Database #galicia

Eric M. Bloch
 

In response to Ellen Korpi's excellent questions regarding the
Lviv database, let me briefly explain the transcription process.

We have a dedicated group of transcribers who are oftentimes
dealing with poor images and even poorer handwriting. Their
transcriptions go through a thorough review process by
experienced validators who double check each and every entry.
When uncertain of an entry on the original document, the
validators review names in the existing database as well as a list
of surnames >from the Dictionary of Jewish Surnames in Galicia
by Alexander Beider. After validation, I review the changes made
by the validators to resolve any differences. Through this process,
I believe we have achieved a transcription accuracy of over 95
percent.

As to why a surname may be spelled differently in different
records for the same person, there may be several reasons. We
have seen such differences even within a given entry where, for
example, a baby's surname may be spelled slightly differently
than the father's surname, or even the mother's married surname
is sometimes slightly different than her husband's surname; or a
marriage record where a bride's or groom's surname was slightly
different than the father's surname.

It should also be noted that we have transcribed some records
that have been duplicated in multiple books. It is not easy to
determine which is the primary source and which is the copy.
There are often spelling differences for the same record between
one book and the other. In most cases, the difference appears to
be a German spelling versus a Polish spelling, even though the
language used is German.

My observation is that a combination of careless entry by
registrars, lack of spelling convention at that time (thus spelling
it the way it sounds), conversion >from Hebrew characters to Latin
characters, the time period of the record, and whether the
record was held by the Jewish community or civil authorities
(perhaps affecting whether German or Polish spellings were used)
were the main reasons for such spelling differences. As an
example of how politics might affect spelling, my Hungarian
ancestors were originally WEINBERG, but around the 1860s when
Hungarians wished to Magyarize their names and distance
themselves >from the German influence they began to use the
name WEINBERGER instead.

No doubt over time some people may have intentionally changed
their name to differentiate themselves >from relatives. I've seen
this in my own family (WITTELS vs. WITTLES, KERNES vs. KERNIS).
In one case it was to avoid confusion in bank accounts and the
other we speculate had to do with avoiding mispronunciation of
the name in America.

Regarding transcription of house numbers, reading the
numerators in the fractions has been extremely difficult,
resulting in a slightly higher source of error than with surnames.
Some of the differences you noted may have occurred when
originally recorded.

As we all know, in genealogy answers are not always easy to
come by. Is, for example, Itzik ORECH, Isak ORUCH and Isaac
URECH the same person? You have to use other cues to help
decide, such as house numbers, community (congregational)
family numbers, spousal names, date ranges of children, etc. to
help you decide.

In all cases you will probably want to examine the source
documents on microfilm to satisfy yourself about the
transcription accuracy. An added benefit will be the additional
information you may find that was not transcribed, such as
occupations and notations added years later.

Good luck!

Eric M. Bloch, Coordinator
Lviv Vital Records Transcription Project
Milwaukee, WI


descendants of Grigory/Gregorio (Hirsch) Rabinovich from Russia in Argentina #latinamerica

Nathalie Ried <nathalieried@...>
 

Shalom to all,
I'm a new member of this Sig so please forgive my lack of
knowledge/experience in Latin American Jewish genealogy.
I'm looking for some information about the descendants of Grigory /Gregorio
/Hirsch ben Shimon ben Girsh Berko RABINOVICH, who was my grandmother's
half-brother : her mother Rozalia Bat Yakov DAICHES married Shimon
RABINOVICH in Riga in 1888 and Grigory was born in Vilnius on Dec 20th 1892.

My mother has always told me that her mother Alice Amalia bat Benyamin Boris
WITKIND had a half-brother who had emigrated to Argentina. Unfortunately I
have no idea of the exact year of his departure, probably around 1912 or
possibly later.
Rozalia 's other children were my grandmother (Alice) Amalia (born in
Vilnius in 1897), Vera, and Tamara (born in St Petersburg in 1907.)

Apparently there are many Rabinoviches in Buenos Aires only, and the problem
is that I can understand Spanish a little but I don't speak it.

That's all I know, I hope to find some descendants or at least traces of
Grigory's trip to and life in Argentina, so I'm trying my luck here, many
thanks in advance for any tips or information,
Happy Chanukah,

Nathalie Ried (Marseille, FRANCE)


Moderator Note: You should check the CEMLA database. There are 63 Rabinoviches listed. Use the Spanish interface. http://www.cemla.com/busqueda.php#


Holocaust Database Update Announcement #latinamerica

bounce-2344348-772964@...
 

JewishGen is pleased to present the 2011 recap of
JewishGen's Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Since our last announcement, JewishGen's Holocaust Database has added
36 databases, accounting for more than 200,000 records. Ten databases
were added during 2011, comprising more than 120,000 records.
JewishGen's Holocaust Database now includes more than 2.4 million
records, >from more than 190 component databases. Some of the component
datasets added in 2011 are listed below.

When you perform your searches at the address above, you automatically
search all of the component databases. A listing of the component
databases with a description and link to each databases introduction
can be found by scrolling down the main search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to partnerships
with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Yad Vashem.
In addition to these two institutions, we have begun to receive
interesting original research by JewishGen users and academics.
We believe JewishGen is an ideal location for the 'publishing' of
these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The introduction
will give you further information about the historical background of
the data, location of the original source document, fields used in the
database, translation aides where applicable, and acknowledgements to
those that helped with data entry, validation and online preparation
of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component databases:

* Assorted Romanian Lists. >from hundreds of source documents, these
lists range >from under ten handwritten names to pages of typed lists
for various Romanian towns during the Holocaust period. The project
introduction will explain how to find original source documents >from
the US Holocaust Memorial Museum -- approximately 73,000 records.

* Dutch Lists. A compilation of over 40 different source documents.
The lists include victims and survivors who were either Dutch by
nationality or were relocated to Holland after the war. The lists
were originally prepared by the Jewish Historical Museum in Amsterdam
-- more than 24,000 records.

* Miskolc, Hungary (and surrounding towns) Victims. John J. Kovacs
(a Miskolc survivor) undertook a project to commemorate the victims from
Miskolc and the surrounding area by creating this data set. The source
for this data set is the Jewish Community of Miskolc, which supplied the
lists to John. John's introduction includes the names of all the towns
included, information about Miskolc and a photo of his 4th grade class!
-- approximately 11,000 records.

* Piotrkow Trybunalski Ghetto Tax List. Larry Freund compiled the
data of almost 11,000 records representing those who paid taxes >from
1940 through early 1942. A copy of the lists were donated to the YIVO
Institute for Jewish Research by Ben Giladi, who received copies >from
the Piotrkow Trybunalski branch of the Polish National Archives --
approximately 11,000 records.

* Various Other Data Sets. Other 2011 data sets include Joel Waters'
work compiling victims >from Leova and the Cahul Camp, Kupiskis victims
primarily documented in 1946 by the midwife >from the Jewish Maternity
Hospital in Ponevezh, and Paul Silverstone's latest maritime data set
of Czech subjects interned in Mauritius.

--
More to come! In addition to these sets, we already have in
for review more than 29,000 records >from the Bergen-Belsen Book of
Remembrance, and close to 5,000 records for two Lublin, Poland
databases compiled by Robinn Magid. These sets should be processed
and go live after the first of the year.

To see all the added material, please see JewishGen's Holocaust
Database home page at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

We would also like to extend our thanks to all of the volunteers
who have assisted in making this data available to you. Their
names are listed in the individual project introductions. If
you are interested in assisting with data entry, or have a
database you think would be appropriate for JewishGen's Holocaust
Database, please contact me directly at naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
December 2011

171661 - 171680 of 661974