Date   

LitvakSIG - New batch of Vilnius household registers is now available #general

Russ Maurer
 

LitvakSIG is pleased to announce that batch 5 of the Vilnius household
registers is now available to qualified donors.

The registers were created between 1919 and 1940 when Wilno (Vilnius)
city and Wilno voivodeship were part of Poland. The registers contain
detailed information about everyone who lived in Wilno at that time,
as well as information about many visitors. They will potentially hold
discoveries for anyone whose family was in that general area, which
today includes parts of Lithuania, Belarus, and northeast Poland. I
urge you to check the free batch previews described below, even if you
don't think your family was ever in Vilnius. There have already been
unexpected discoveries. There are countless mentions of locations
outside the immediate Vilnius area.

As this is a very large project that will go on for years, we are
releasing data in batches of about 5000 lines. Batch 5, 5059 lines,
includes four large apartment buildings located at Zawalna 8 and
Wielka Stefanska 20, 24, and 25. You can find these streets on our
Vilnius interactive street map
(https://www.litvaksig.org/vilnius-map/). To help you determine if
this batch or a previous batch is relevant to your research, you can
review a file containing previews of all five batches to date
(http://tinyurl.com/VHR-previews). The batch preview is a bare-bones
version of the batch spreadsheet containing just the full name and
year of birth (or age) of each person. The previews are presented both
in original order and alphabetically by surname. The previews also
include instructions to qualify to receive the full batch data.

More information about the Vilnius household registers can be found on
the VHR home page,
https://www.litvaksig.org/research/special-projects/vilnius-household-registers .
Any inquiries related to VHR should be directed to me at
vhrproject@litvaksig.org.

Russ Maurer
VHR project coordinator, LitvakSIG


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen LitvakSIG - New batch of Vilnius household registers is now available #general

Russ Maurer
 

LitvakSIG is pleased to announce that batch 5 of the Vilnius household
registers is now available to qualified donors.

The registers were created between 1919 and 1940 when Wilno (Vilnius)
city and Wilno voivodeship were part of Poland. The registers contain
detailed information about everyone who lived in Wilno at that time,
as well as information about many visitors. They will potentially hold
discoveries for anyone whose family was in that general area, which
today includes parts of Lithuania, Belarus, and northeast Poland. I
urge you to check the free batch previews described below, even if you
don't think your family was ever in Vilnius. There have already been
unexpected discoveries. There are countless mentions of locations
outside the immediate Vilnius area.

As this is a very large project that will go on for years, we are
releasing data in batches of about 5000 lines. Batch 5, 5059 lines,
includes four large apartment buildings located at Zawalna 8 and
Wielka Stefanska 20, 24, and 25. You can find these streets on our
Vilnius interactive street map
(https://www.litvaksig.org/vilnius-map/). To help you determine if
this batch or a previous batch is relevant to your research, you can
review a file containing previews of all five batches to date
(http://tinyurl.com/VHR-previews). The batch preview is a bare-bones
version of the batch spreadsheet containing just the full name and
year of birth (or age) of each person. The previews are presented both
in original order and alphabetically by surname. The previews also
include instructions to qualify to receive the full batch data.

More information about the Vilnius household registers can be found on
the VHR home page,
https://www.litvaksig.org/research/special-projects/vilnius-household-registers .
Any inquiries related to VHR should be directed to me at
vhrproject@litvaksig.org.

Russ Maurer
VHR project coordinator, LitvakSIG


Viewmate #general

A Stone
 

Viewmate thank you
I have been working on a project since 2012 when I took my first Jewishgen
genealogy class. The last of my records and documents were submitted this
week for Hungarian translations through Viewmate.

There are just not words to express the thanks to the volunteers that
translate records for me. The detail, clues, and knowledge is outstanding.
The value they have giving me and my extended family is unbelievable. There
are so familiar with abbreviations in records, towns, occupations and pure
history. History that does not make sense in the way we think today but
they know their stuff and they share their knowledge. I am beyond grateful
for their gifts and the gift they give to every person that summits a
record. Of course, I have thanked them a lot but it's just not enough and I
wanted to share with the whole organization the impact this site has and
give my thanks.

My descendants' book is 590 pages to be shared with so many. There is a
credit put in it recognizing Viewmate and its volunteers.

Thank you is not enough!

April Stone


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Viewmate #general

A Stone
 

Viewmate thank you
I have been working on a project since 2012 when I took my first Jewishgen
genealogy class. The last of my records and documents were submitted this
week for Hungarian translations through Viewmate.

There are just not words to express the thanks to the volunteers that
translate records for me. The detail, clues, and knowledge is outstanding.
The value they have giving me and my extended family is unbelievable. There
are so familiar with abbreviations in records, towns, occupations and pure
history. History that does not make sense in the way we think today but
they know their stuff and they share their knowledge. I am beyond grateful
for their gifts and the gift they give to every person that summits a
record. Of course, I have thanked them a lot but it's just not enough and I
wanted to share with the whole organization the impact this site has and
give my thanks.

My descendants' book is 590 pages to be shared with so many. There is a
credit put in it recognizing Viewmate and its volunteers.

Thank you is not enough!

April Stone


Khotin Yizkor Book Translation Project #bessarabia

Judi Wagner
 

Please consider donating to the Yizkor book translation project for the town of
Khotin/Khotyn, also called Hotin

On the JewishGen website, go to the upper right corner on the donate button, on the
right is a list of Active JewishGen projects, and the last one is Yizkor Book Translations,
please scroll down the list until you come to Khotyn

Project Name: Khotyn Yizkor Book, original title Sefer kehilat Khotyn Bessarabia

Project Coordinator: Judith Wagner, judi@judiwagner.net Florida and NYC

Liaison/Advisor: Lance Ackerfeld, Project Manager, Yizkor Book Project


Project Synopsis: This project is being initiated in order to fund the translation of the
over 300 page Yizkor book of Khotin/ Hotin, Ukraine. It was originally published in
Hebrew and Yiddish in Israel, and the editor was Shlomo Shitnovitzer, and was
published in Tel Aviv in 1974 by the Khotin (Bessarabia) Society and has 339 pages.
The Table of Contents was translated by Yocheved Klausner.


Khotin is a city in Chernivtsi Oblast of western Ukraine. It is south-west of
Kamianets-Podilsk Khotin, is first chronicled in 1001, and is located on the right
(southwestern) bank of the Dniester River, and is part of the historical region of
Bessarabia. An important architectural landmark within the city is the Khotin Fortress,
constructed in he 13-15th centuries. During some of itâ??s history, the city was part
of the principality of Moldavia. Jewish merchants traveling >from Constantinople to
Lvov in the 15th and 16th centuries used to pass through Khotin, then an important
customs station on the Polish-Moldavian border on the commercial route between
Turkey and Poland. Jewish merchants >from Poland used to visit Khotin for the fairs
held there, evidence which dates >from 1541. The residence of Jews in Khotin is first
mentioned in documents in 1741. There were 340 Jewish families in 1808. After this
time the community grew as a result of the large Jewish immigration into the region.
In 1897 the community totaled 9227 which was over 50% of the population. A Jewish
government school was established in 1847, and a private school for girls was opened
in 1857. In the first half of the 19th century, Isaiah Schorr, one of the most important
rabbis in Bessarabia, officiated in Khotin. Later, Grand Rabbi Israel Twersky served
the community of Khotin.

The goal is to provide a complete English translation of the text and make it available
online to JewishGen.

Key Audiences: Descendants of Khotin and other Jewish genealogists who have
ancestors in Khotin and Bessarabia will be interested in learning more of the community,
traditions, and lost relatives. This project will also be of interest to non-Jewish residents
of Khotin that are learning and researching the history of the Jewish Community of
Khotin, Ukraine.


Project Importance: Yizkor books are unique sources of information on once vibrant
towns, primarily in Central and Eastern Europe, whose Jewish populations were
destroyed in the Holocaust. Written after WW11 by emigres and Holocaust survivors,
Yizkor books contain narratives of the history of the town, details of daily life, religious
and political figures and movements, religious and secular education, and gripping
stories of the major intellectual movements in 20th Century Europe. The necrologies
and lists of residents are of tremendous genealogical value, as often the names of
individuals who were taken to extermination camps or died in the forests are not
recorded elsewhere. Usually written in Hebrew and/or Yiddish, these books are not
accessible to a wider audience. The translation will unlock this information to many
more researchers all over the world. This project will result in the creation of a primary
English language source of information for anyone doing research on the town and its
Jewish community.

Project Description: As the funds become available, the Hebrew and Yiddish pages
will be translated into English according to importance, by a professional translator.
The project coordinator will review the translation and work closely with the translators.
The project coordinator with solicit funds >from family members, friends, genealogists,
descendants of Khotin, Ukraine, and others interested in the history of this area.

Estimated cost: A full translation is currently estimated at $17,000-$18,000.


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Khotin Yizkor Book Translation Project #bessarabia

Judi Wagner
 

Please consider donating to the Yizkor book translation project for the town of
Khotin/Khotyn, also called Hotin

On the JewishGen website, go to the upper right corner on the donate button, on the
right is a list of Active JewishGen projects, and the last one is Yizkor Book Translations,
please scroll down the list until you come to Khotyn

Project Name: Khotyn Yizkor Book, original title Sefer kehilat Khotyn Bessarabia

Project Coordinator: Judith Wagner, judi@judiwagner.net Florida and NYC

Liaison/Advisor: Lance Ackerfeld, Project Manager, Yizkor Book Project


Project Synopsis: This project is being initiated in order to fund the translation of the
over 300 page Yizkor book of Khotin/ Hotin, Ukraine. It was originally published in
Hebrew and Yiddish in Israel, and the editor was Shlomo Shitnovitzer, and was
published in Tel Aviv in 1974 by the Khotin (Bessarabia) Society and has 339 pages.
The Table of Contents was translated by Yocheved Klausner.


Khotin is a city in Chernivtsi Oblast of western Ukraine. It is south-west of
Kamianets-Podilsk Khotin, is first chronicled in 1001, and is located on the right
(southwestern) bank of the Dniester River, and is part of the historical region of
Bessarabia. An important architectural landmark within the city is the Khotin Fortress,
constructed in he 13-15th centuries. During some of itâ??s history, the city was part
of the principality of Moldavia. Jewish merchants traveling >from Constantinople to
Lvov in the 15th and 16th centuries used to pass through Khotin, then an important
customs station on the Polish-Moldavian border on the commercial route between
Turkey and Poland. Jewish merchants >from Poland used to visit Khotin for the fairs
held there, evidence which dates >from 1541. The residence of Jews in Khotin is first
mentioned in documents in 1741. There were 340 Jewish families in 1808. After this
time the community grew as a result of the large Jewish immigration into the region.
In 1897 the community totaled 9227 which was over 50% of the population. A Jewish
government school was established in 1847, and a private school for girls was opened
in 1857. In the first half of the 19th century, Isaiah Schorr, one of the most important
rabbis in Bessarabia, officiated in Khotin. Later, Grand Rabbi Israel Twersky served
the community of Khotin.

The goal is to provide a complete English translation of the text and make it available
online to JewishGen.

Key Audiences: Descendants of Khotin and other Jewish genealogists who have
ancestors in Khotin and Bessarabia will be interested in learning more of the community,
traditions, and lost relatives. This project will also be of interest to non-Jewish residents
of Khotin that are learning and researching the history of the Jewish Community of
Khotin, Ukraine.


Project Importance: Yizkor books are unique sources of information on once vibrant
towns, primarily in Central and Eastern Europe, whose Jewish populations were
destroyed in the Holocaust. Written after WW11 by emigres and Holocaust survivors,
Yizkor books contain narratives of the history of the town, details of daily life, religious
and political figures and movements, religious and secular education, and gripping
stories of the major intellectual movements in 20th Century Europe. The necrologies
and lists of residents are of tremendous genealogical value, as often the names of
individuals who were taken to extermination camps or died in the forests are not
recorded elsewhere. Usually written in Hebrew and/or Yiddish, these books are not
accessible to a wider audience. The translation will unlock this information to many
more researchers all over the world. This project will result in the creation of a primary
English language source of information for anyone doing research on the town and its
Jewish community.

Project Description: As the funds become available, the Hebrew and Yiddish pages
will be translated into English according to importance, by a professional translator.
The project coordinator will review the translation and work closely with the translators.
The project coordinator with solicit funds >from family members, friends, genealogists,
descendants of Khotin, Ukraine, and others interested in the history of this area.

Estimated cost: A full translation is currently estimated at $17,000-$18,000.


Translation needed #romania

Alan Greenberg
 

I have posted two Bessarabian birth records with annotations in, I
think, Romanian.

The first
(http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM72866) is
the 1899 birth of Elisha Geisman with a notation that seems to date
to 1938. I would like to know what the notations says.

The second
(http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM72867) is
the 1877 birth record of Bayla Fuksman. Bayla married Volco Geisman
in 1895. The English translation of the record includes what I
presume to be the translation. Typically a notation on a birth record
would be about the marriage or death of the person. In this case the
provided translation SEEMS to be reporting the death of Bayla's
husband. Or perhaps it is recording her marriage and then her death.
I found a 1964 tombstone that SEEMS to be Bayla's.

So the question is whether this notation is reporting Bayla's death,
or Volco's?

Thanks for any help,

Alan Greenberg, Montreal


Romania SIG #Romania Translation needed #romania

Alan Greenberg
 

I have posted two Bessarabian birth records with annotations in, I
think, Romanian.

The first
(http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM72866) is
the 1899 birth of Elisha Geisman with a notation that seems to date
to 1938. I would like to know what the notations says.

The second
(http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM72867) is
the 1877 birth record of Bayla Fuksman. Bayla married Volco Geisman
in 1895. The English translation of the record includes what I
presume to be the translation. Typically a notation on a birth record
would be about the marriage or death of the person. In this case the
provided translation SEEMS to be reporting the death of Bayla's
husband. Or perhaps it is recording her marriage and then her death.
I found a 1964 tombstone that SEEMS to be Bayla's.

So the question is whether this notation is reporting Bayla's death,
or Volco's?

Thanks for any help,

Alan Greenberg, Montreal


Liebes family #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Trying to find out the married family name of Rav Yitzchok Eizik
Liebes of the Rabbinical Alliance of America's sister, Frieda (married
Eliyahu Zvi son of Yitzchak Zeev - I believe should be Soloveitchik -
who perished). Who was the father of Yitzchak Zeev and where was he a
Rav?

Neil Rosenstein


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Liebes family #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Trying to find out the married family name of Rav Yitzchok Eizik
Liebes of the Rabbinical Alliance of America's sister, Frieda (married
Eliyahu Zvi son of Yitzchak Zeev - I believe should be Soloveitchik -
who perished). Who was the father of Yitzchak Zeev and where was he a
Rav?

Neil Rosenstein


Encyclopedia of Jewish Women Call for Entries for New Edition #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Jewish Women's Archive (JWA) announces the upcoming edition of the
Encyclopedia of Jewish Women. The encyclopedia will be renamed Shalvi/Hyman
Encyclopedia of Jewish Women in honor of Israeli feminist Alice Shalvi and
in memory of pioneering Jewish historian Paula Hyman and publisher Moshe
Shalvi.

The Encyclopedia is the world's largest source of information on Jewish
women. While they plan to include women in all fields they are particularly
interested in Sephardi and Mizrahi women, LGBTQ Jews and others not
previously noticed.

They are inviting all to suggest a woman or a topic to be featured in the
new edition of the Encyclopedia. To suggest an entry go to:
https://jwa.org/encyclopedia/suggest

To view the Encyclopedia see: https://jwa.org/encyclopedia It is free on
the website of the Jewish Women's Archive.

To read more about the project see:
https://britishjewishstudies.org/2019/04/10/encyclopedia-of-jewish-women-call-for-entries-for-new-edition/

Thank you to Saul Issroff for sharing the information with us.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Encyclopedia of Jewish Women Call for Entries for New Edition #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Jewish Women's Archive (JWA) announces the upcoming edition of the
Encyclopedia of Jewish Women. The encyclopedia will be renamed Shalvi/Hyman
Encyclopedia of Jewish Women in honor of Israeli feminist Alice Shalvi and
in memory of pioneering Jewish historian Paula Hyman and publisher Moshe
Shalvi.

The Encyclopedia is the world's largest source of information on Jewish
women. While they plan to include women in all fields they are particularly
interested in Sephardi and Mizrahi women, LGBTQ Jews and others not
previously noticed.

They are inviting all to suggest a woman or a topic to be featured in the
new edition of the Encyclopedia. To suggest an entry go to:
https://jwa.org/encyclopedia/suggest

To view the Encyclopedia see: https://jwa.org/encyclopedia It is free on
the website of the Jewish Women's Archive.

To read more about the project see:
https://britishjewishstudies.org/2019/04/10/encyclopedia-of-jewish-women-call-for-entries-for-new-edition/

Thank you to Saul Issroff for sharing the information with us.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Ancestry Announces Two Improved Features #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

IAJGS was invited to participate in an invitation-only conference call with
Ancestry staff and other genealogical reporters where they introduced two
improved features: new member profile and new messenger. While both are in
Beta they are 100 percent available to users.

New Profile

As with the "old" profile to access it go where it says account (upper
right) and on the drop box click on profile. Under your name is a green BETA
sign. If it is gray then it is off, and switch it to on. Make certain it
is on. On the same "ribbon" it will say "You're viewing the new profile". On
the left it will say "personal profile".

Similar to the "old" profile it will have your name, location, websites,
language(s) spoken, research interests. There is a place for a photo.
Ancestry has researched and found any photo and location filled in will
result in an increase three-fold your responses. It can be a photo of you,
your pet or anything, as long as there is a photo there the response rate is
higher. Crista Cowen , the Barefoot Genealogist, uses a photo of her feet!

On the new profile are also your DNA estimates along with matches. These
only appear in on your private profile not your public profile. Displaying
the name of private searchable trees, people, records one still has to grant
permission for others to access this on your profile. There is also the
opportunity to add a link to a personal website that you would like to share
with others-see the paper clip just below it lists the date you have been an
Ancestry member.

On your public tree the personal profile is on the upper left. The public
profile does not contain your ethnicity estimates. However, if you want
your ethnicity matches on your public profile you can chose everyone on
Ancestry or only you on your personal profile. The public profile has your
photograph, name, location, since you were a member, the last time you
logged in, the language(s) you speak, and your research interests. If you
have a family tree uploaded it will also display your family tree if you
have designated it as a public tree.

For privacy concerns "new DNA Matches" cannot be shown to anyone.

Messaging

For those of us who have been wondering if someone actually received our
emails through Ancestry this is a big improvement. This has been rolled out
as a Beta and not all subscribers and guests will get it immediately-but
will in a short period of time. Worldwide it will be available by June. What
is a big positive is that it is in real time! This will tell us if our
messages were read and more.

We were advised that the "folders' capability will not be migrated over and
there was some discussion among the invited guests about this. Whether
Ancestry will reconsider this at a later date was not discussed.

Another enhancement is one can send attachments or copy a link in the new
messaging system.

One can search the body and content of the message.

At the time of writing this posting there is nothing on the Ancestry website
about these new changes. Watch for them I am certain they will be
forthcoming.

Their most recent blog post is about the new features they introduced at
RootsTech last month on ThruLines , MyTreeTags and improved DNA Matching
https://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2019/04/09/you-asked-we-answered-new-upd
ates-to-our-latest-innovations/

I have no relationship with Ancestry and am posting this solely for the
information of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Ancestry Announces Two Improved Features #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

IAJGS was invited to participate in an invitation-only conference call with
Ancestry staff and other genealogical reporters where they introduced two
improved features: new member profile and new messenger. While both are in
Beta they are 100 percent available to users.

New Profile

As with the "old" profile to access it go where it says account (upper
right) and on the drop box click on profile. Under your name is a green BETA
sign. If it is gray then it is off, and switch it to on. Make certain it
is on. On the same "ribbon" it will say "You're viewing the new profile". On
the left it will say "personal profile".

Similar to the "old" profile it will have your name, location, websites,
language(s) spoken, research interests. There is a place for a photo.
Ancestry has researched and found any photo and location filled in will
result in an increase three-fold your responses. It can be a photo of you,
your pet or anything, as long as there is a photo there the response rate is
higher. Crista Cowen , the Barefoot Genealogist, uses a photo of her feet!

On the new profile are also your DNA estimates along with matches. These
only appear in on your private profile not your public profile. Displaying
the name of private searchable trees, people, records one still has to grant
permission for others to access this on your profile. There is also the
opportunity to add a link to a personal website that you would like to share
with others-see the paper clip just below it lists the date you have been an
Ancestry member.

On your public tree the personal profile is on the upper left. The public
profile does not contain your ethnicity estimates. However, if you want
your ethnicity matches on your public profile you can chose everyone on
Ancestry or only you on your personal profile. The public profile has your
photograph, name, location, since you were a member, the last time you
logged in, the language(s) you speak, and your research interests. If you
have a family tree uploaded it will also display your family tree if you
have designated it as a public tree.

For privacy concerns "new DNA Matches" cannot be shown to anyone.

Messaging

For those of us who have been wondering if someone actually received our
emails through Ancestry this is a big improvement. This has been rolled out
as a Beta and not all subscribers and guests will get it immediately-but
will in a short period of time. Worldwide it will be available by June. What
is a big positive is that it is in real time! This will tell us if our
messages were read and more.

We were advised that the "folders' capability will not be migrated over and
there was some discussion among the invited guests about this. Whether
Ancestry will reconsider this at a later date was not discussed.

Another enhancement is one can send attachments or copy a link in the new
messaging system.

One can search the body and content of the message.

At the time of writing this posting there is nothing on the Ancestry website
about these new changes. Watch for them I am certain they will be
forthcoming.

Their most recent blog post is about the new features they introduced at
RootsTech last month on ThruLines , MyTreeTags and improved DNA Matching
https://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2019/04/09/you-asked-we-answered-new-upd
ates-to-our-latest-innovations/

I have no relationship with Ancestry and am posting this solely for the
information of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


LitvakSIG - New batch of Vilnius household registers is now available #lithuania

Russ Maurer
 

LitvakSIG is pleased to announce that batch 5 of the Vilnius household
registers is now available to qualified donors.

The registers were created between 1919 and 1940 when Wilno (Vilnius)
city and Wilno voivodeship were part of Poland. The registers contain
detailed information about everyone who lived in Wilno at that time,
as well as information about many visitors. They will potentially hold
discoveries for anyone whose family was in that general area, which
today includes parts of Lithuania, Belarus, and northeast Poland. I
urge you to check the free batch previews described below, even if you
don't think your family was ever in Vilnius. There have already been
unexpected discoveries. There are countless mentions of locations
outside the immediate Vilnius area.

As this is a very large project that will go on for years, we are
releasing data in batches of about 5000 lines. Batch 5, 5059 lines,
includes four large apartment buildings located at Zawalna 8 and
Wielka Stefanska 20, 24, and 25. You can find these streets on our
Vilnius interactive street map
(https://www.litvaksig.org/vilnius-map/). To help you determine if
this batch or a previous batch is relevant to your research, you can
review a file containing previews of all five batches to date
(http://tinyurl.com/VHR-previews). The batch preview is a bare-bones
version of the batch spreadsheet containing just the full name and
year of birth (or age) of each person. The previews are presented both
in original order and alphabetically by surname. The previews also
include instructions to qualify to receive the full batch data.

More information about the Vilnius household registers can be found on
the VHR home page,
https://www.litvaksig.org/research/special-projects/vilnius-household-regis
ters.
Any inquiries related to VHR should be directed to me at
vhrproject@litvaksig.org.

Russ Maurer
VHR project coordinator, LitvakSIG


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania LitvakSIG - New batch of Vilnius household registers is now available #lithuania

Russ Maurer
 

LitvakSIG is pleased to announce that batch 5 of the Vilnius household
registers is now available to qualified donors.

The registers were created between 1919 and 1940 when Wilno (Vilnius)
city and Wilno voivodeship were part of Poland. The registers contain
detailed information about everyone who lived in Wilno at that time,
as well as information about many visitors. They will potentially hold
discoveries for anyone whose family was in that general area, which
today includes parts of Lithuania, Belarus, and northeast Poland. I
urge you to check the free batch previews described below, even if you
don't think your family was ever in Vilnius. There have already been
unexpected discoveries. There are countless mentions of locations
outside the immediate Vilnius area.

As this is a very large project that will go on for years, we are
releasing data in batches of about 5000 lines. Batch 5, 5059 lines,
includes four large apartment buildings located at Zawalna 8 and
Wielka Stefanska 20, 24, and 25. You can find these streets on our
Vilnius interactive street map
(https://www.litvaksig.org/vilnius-map/). To help you determine if
this batch or a previous batch is relevant to your research, you can
review a file containing previews of all five batches to date
(http://tinyurl.com/VHR-previews). The batch preview is a bare-bones
version of the batch spreadsheet containing just the full name and
year of birth (or age) of each person. The previews are presented both
in original order and alphabetically by surname. The previews also
include instructions to qualify to receive the full batch data.

More information about the Vilnius household registers can be found on
the VHR home page,
https://www.litvaksig.org/research/special-projects/vilnius-household-regis
ters.
Any inquiries related to VHR should be directed to me at
vhrproject@litvaksig.org.

Russ Maurer
VHR project coordinator, LitvakSIG


LitvakSIG - New batch of Vilnius household registers is now available #poland

Russ Maurer
 

LitvakSIG is pleased to announce that batch 5 of the Vilnius household
registers is now available to qualified donors.

The registers were created between 1919 and 1940 when Wilno (Vilnius)
city and Wilno voivodeship were part of Poland. The registers contain
detailed information about everyone who lived in Wilno at that time,
as well as information about many visitors. They will potentially hold
discoveries for anyone whose family was in that general area, which
today includes parts of Lithuania, Belarus, and northeast Poland. I
urge you to check the free batch previews described below, even if you
don't think your family was ever in Vilnius. There have already been
unexpected discoveries. There are countless mentions of locations
outside the immediate Vilnius area.

As this is a very large project that will go on for years, we are
releasing data in batches of about 5000 lines. Batch 5, 5059 lines,
includes four large apartment buildings located at Zawalna 8 and
Wielka Stefanska 20, 24, and 25. You can find these streets on our
Vilnius interactive street map
(https://www.litvaksig.org/vilnius-map/). To help you determine if
this batch or a previous batch is relevant to your research, you can
review a file containing previews of all five batches to date
(http://tinyurl.com/VHR-previews). The batch preview is a bare-bones
version of the batch spreadsheet containing just the full name and
year of birth (or age) of each person. The previews are presented both
in original order and alphabetically by surname. The previews also
include instructions to qualify to receive the full batch data.

More information about the Vilnius household registers can be found on
the VHR home page,
https://www.litvaksig.org/research/special-projects/vilnius-household-regis
ters.
Any inquiries related to VHR should be directed to me at
vhrproject@litvaksig.org.

Russ Maurer
VHR project coordinator, LitvakSIG


JRI Poland #Poland LitvakSIG - New batch of Vilnius household registers is now available #poland

Russ Maurer
 

LitvakSIG is pleased to announce that batch 5 of the Vilnius household
registers is now available to qualified donors.

The registers were created between 1919 and 1940 when Wilno (Vilnius)
city and Wilno voivodeship were part of Poland. The registers contain
detailed information about everyone who lived in Wilno at that time,
as well as information about many visitors. They will potentially hold
discoveries for anyone whose family was in that general area, which
today includes parts of Lithuania, Belarus, and northeast Poland. I
urge you to check the free batch previews described below, even if you
don't think your family was ever in Vilnius. There have already been
unexpected discoveries. There are countless mentions of locations
outside the immediate Vilnius area.

As this is a very large project that will go on for years, we are
releasing data in batches of about 5000 lines. Batch 5, 5059 lines,
includes four large apartment buildings located at Zawalna 8 and
Wielka Stefanska 20, 24, and 25. You can find these streets on our
Vilnius interactive street map
(https://www.litvaksig.org/vilnius-map/). To help you determine if
this batch or a previous batch is relevant to your research, you can
review a file containing previews of all five batches to date
(http://tinyurl.com/VHR-previews). The batch preview is a bare-bones
version of the batch spreadsheet containing just the full name and
year of birth (or age) of each person. The previews are presented both
in original order and alphabetically by surname. The previews also
include instructions to qualify to receive the full batch data.

More information about the Vilnius household registers can be found on
the VHR home page,
https://www.litvaksig.org/research/special-projects/vilnius-household-regis
ters.
Any inquiries related to VHR should be directed to me at
vhrproject@litvaksig.org.

Russ Maurer
VHR project coordinator, LitvakSIG


ViewMate #VM 72696 translation request - Portuguese #latinamerica

Margarita Lacko
 

Hello Latam-siggers,

I have posted an immigration card of Folmer FAURING to Sao Paulo, Brazil.
Looks like he entered permanently on 18-sept-1945. But the back side of the
card confuses me.

1) It says that he landed on 25-sep-1946. Did he go back to Copenhagen
13-feb-1946 to obtain another passport with a visa?
2) What does "carteira modelo" mean?
3) Looks like he made a round trip to Buenos Aires.
4) On 17-aug-1948 he needed a visa for Denmark? Why would he need a visa for
Denmark if he is Danish?

I would greatly appreciate a translation as accurate as possible. Thank you.

The record is on ViewMate number 72696 at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM72696

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.

Margarita Lacko
Hollywood, Florida


Yizkor Book Project, March 2019 #latinamerica

bounce-3668522-772964@...
 

Shalom,

As it is quite likely that this finds you in the midst of preparations
for the Pesach/Passover holiday, I will try not to take up to much of
your time. I would, however, like to let you know about the highlight
activities of the Yizkor Book Project during March.

During last month I was pleasantly surprised and delighted to receive
donations of complete books that we have now placed online. The books are:

- " My Survival" written by Israel Stern z"l, a survivor of the community
of Mielnice, now Melnytsya-Podilska, Ukraine was kindly presented to the
YB Project by his grandson, David Stern.
- " Frampol in the memory of its descendants" is a book in Russian about
the community of Frampol, Ukraine which is now called Kosohirka. It was
written by Mikhail Freyder and Roman Geller in order to preserve the
memory of their ancestor's community of Frampol and has been gratefully
been made available to our project.

I am always pleased to see the addition of material written in languages
other than English as it enables the exposure of this important material
to an even wider audience. The material we do have in other languages
appears in our Translations Index (link below) under the category "Other
languages" and includes material in Hebrew, Spanish, French, Polish,
Russian and even, Lithuanian.

Further good news is that in March we completed uploading the "Preserving
Our Litvak Heritage" book abut various communities in Lithuania, kindly
presented to us by Joel Alpert. For your information, this book is also
available for purchase under the auspices of our Yizkor Books in Print
Project.

And on the YBIP Project, last month yet another new book hit the shelves
- "Memorial book of the Ritavas Community" about the community of
Rietavas, Lithuania. Once again, the wheels of this project continue to
roll and present us with new books on a regular basis and we have Joel
Alpert and his dedicated and talented team of volunteers to thank for that.

Now, all that is left for me before our list of new and updated projects,
is to wish you dear readers and your families a most enjoyable Pesach/
Passover holiday.

And now for the additions and updates are what we've carried out during
March:

We have added in 6 new entries:

- Crocmaz, Moldova (Akkerman and the Towns of its District; Memorial Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Akkerman/akk374.html

- Jieznas, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania6/lit6_055.html

- Krekenava, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania6/lit6_089.html

- Luts'k, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Lutsk)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lutsk1/lutskh.html [Hebrew]

- Ramygala, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Lithuania6/lit6_221.html

- Zelva, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland - Volume
VII) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol8_00346.html

And two new books:

- Kosohirka (Frampol), Ukraine (Frampol in the memory of its descendants)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kosohirka/Kosohirkar.html [Russian]

- Melnytsya-Podilska, Ukraine (My Survival)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Mielnice/Mielnice.html

And we have continued to update 23 of our existing projects:

- Biala Podlaska, Poland (Book of Biala Podlaska)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Biala_Podlaska/Biala_Podlaska.html

- Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy (Akkerman), Ukraine (Akkerman and the Towns of
its District; Memorial Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Akkerman/Akkerman.html

- Braslaw, Belarus (Darkness and desolation)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Braslaw/Braslaw.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of Dubno,
Wolyn) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dubno/dubno.html

- Grabowiec, Poland (Memorial Book Grabowitz)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Grabowiec/Grabowiec.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Lithuania (Lite) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lita/lita.html

- Miskolc, Hungary (The martyrs of Miskolc and vicinity)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miskolc/Miskolc.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Ozeryany, Ukraine (Memorial book, Jezierzany and surroundings)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ozeryany/ozeryany.html

- Przemysl, Poland (Przemysl memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/przemysl/przemysl.html

- Raciaz, Poland (Memorial book of the community of Racionz)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Raciaz/Raciaz.html

- Radekhov, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Radikhov)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Radekhov/Radekhov.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk - Memorial book of the Martyrs of Szumsk)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Slutsk, Belarus (Slutsk and vicinity memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Slutsk/Slutsk.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the
neighboring villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23
communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- Turobin, Poland (The Turobin book; in memory of the Jewish community)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Turobin/Turobin.html

- Voranava, Belarus (Voronovo: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of Voronovo)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/voronovo/voronovo.html

- Wolomin, Poland (Volomin; a memorial to the Jewish community of Volomin)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/wolomin/wolomin.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

Happy Passover/Pesach Sameach,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager

27901 - 27920 of 657886