Date   

Yom HaShoah 2019/5779 #latvia #courland

Avraham Groll
 

Dear JewishGen Community,

For generations, Jewish tradition has associated the ritual of memory
with the lighting of candles. A candle represents the past, for a
flame is only as strong as its fuel source. Yet the light emanating
from the candle also represents a focus on the future. We look to the
candle and remember those who came before us, but do so within the
context of learning >from their experiences, and permitting the values
our ancestors held most dear to illuminate and influence our lives
today.

As we observe Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Memorial Day, JewishGen's mission
of remembrance and preservation becomes more pronounced and urgent.
JewishGen's work is designed to change us. It is supposed to transform
us. And it should inspire us.

Our goal is for people to understand not only who their relatives
were, but how they lived. What was important in their lives? What
challenges did they face? How can their experiences influence and
illuminate our life choices today?

Among JewishGen's most important projects is the translation of Yizkor
Books (memorial books), which offer an insight into communal life
before and during the Shoah.

Take some time to explore these treasure troves of information which,
among other things, provide first-hand accounts of a Jewish communal
life and culture that in many cases no longer exists.

These accounts help us to visualize what life was like in a very
personal way, while providing us the ability to transmit a more
profound legacy for the future.

We also encourage you to explore our Holocaust Collection, which
contains more than 2.75 million records about Holocaust victims and
survivors. This week, we have added more than 30,000 records >from a
variety of sources (a more detailed announcement will be forthcoming).

As with everything on JewishGen, we offer our resources at no charge.

To search the Yizkor Book collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

To search the Holocaust Collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Thank you for your continued support of our important work.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


Yom HaShoah 2019/5779 #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Avraham Groll
 

Dear JewishGen Community,

For generations, Jewish tradition has associated the ritual of memory
with the lighting of candles. A candle represents the past, for a
flame is only as strong as its fuel source. Yet the light emanating
from the candle also represents a focus on the future. We look to the
candle and remember those who came before us, but do so within the
context of learning >from their experiences, and permitting the values
our ancestors held most dear to illuminate and influence our lives
today.

As we observe Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Memorial Day, JewishGen's mission
of remembrance and preservation becomes more pronounced and urgent.
JewishGen's work is designed to change us. It is supposed to transform
us. And it should inspire us.

Our goal is for people to understand not only who their relatives
were, but how they lived. What was important in their lives? What
challenges did they face? How can their experiences influence and
illuminate our life choices today?

Among JewishGen's most important projects is the translation of Yizkor
Books (memorial books), which offer an insight into communal life
before and during the Shoah.

Take some time to explore these treasure troves of information which,
among other things, provide first-hand accounts of a Jewish communal
life and culture that in many cases no longer exists.

These accounts help us to visualize what life was like in a very
personal way, while providing us the ability to transmit a more
profound legacy for the future.

We also encourage you to explore our Holocaust Collection, which
contains more than 2.75 million records about Holocaust victims and
survivors. This week, we have added more than 30,000 records >from a
variety of sources (a more detailed announcement will be forthcoming).

As with everything on JewishGen, we offer our resources at no charge.

To search the Yizkor Book collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

To search the Holocaust Collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Thank you for your continued support of our important work.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


Yom HaShoah 2019/5779 #dna

Avraham Groll
 

Dear JewishGen Community,

For generations, Jewish tradition has associated the ritual of memory
with the lighting of candles. A candle represents the past, for a
flame is only as strong as its fuel source. Yet the light emanating
from the candle also represents a focus on the future. We look to the
candle and remember those who came before us, but do so within the
context of learning >from their experiences, and permitting the values
our ancestors held most dear to illuminate and influence our lives
today.

As we observe Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Memorial Day, JewishGen's mission
of remembrance and preservation becomes more pronounced and urgent.
JewishGen's work is designed to change us. It is supposed to transform
us. And it should inspire us.

Our goal is for people to understand not only who their relatives
were, but how they lived. What was important in their lives? What
challenges did they face? How can their experiences influence and
illuminate our life choices today?

Among JewishGen's most important projects is the translation of Yizkor
Books (memorial books), which offer an insight into communal life
before and during the Shoah.

Take some time to explore these treasure troves of information which,
among other things, provide first-hand accounts of a Jewish communal
life and culture that in many cases no longer exists.

These accounts help us to visualize what life was like in a very
personal way, while providing us the ability to transmit a more
profound legacy for the future.

We also encourage you to explore our Holocaust Collection, which
contains more than 2.75 million records about Holocaust victims and
survivors. This week, we have added more than 30,000 records >from a
variety of sources (a more detailed announcement will be forthcoming).

As with everything on JewishGen, we offer our resources at no charge.

To search the Yizkor Book collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

To search the Holocaust Collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Thank you for your continued support of our important work.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


Yom HaShoah 2019/5779 #general

Avraham Groll
 

Dear JewishGen Community,

For generations, Jewish tradition has associated the ritual of memory
with the lighting of candles. A candle represents the past, for a
flame is only as strong as its fuel source. Yet the light emanating
from the candle also represents a focus on the future. We look to the
candle and remember those who came before us, but do so within the
context of learning >from their experiences, and permitting the values
our ancestors held most dear to illuminate and influence our lives
today.

As we observe Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Memorial Day, JewishGen's mission
of remembrance and preservation becomes more pronounced and urgent.
JewishGen's work is designed to change us. It is supposed to transform
us. And it should inspire us.

Our goal is for people to understand not only who their relatives
were, but how they lived. What was important in their lives? What
challenges did they face? How can their experiences influence and
illuminate our life choices today?

Among JewishGen's most important projects is the translation of Yizkor
Books (memorial books), which offer an insight into communal life
before and during the Shoah.

Take some time to explore these treasure troves of information which,
among other things, provide first-hand accounts of a Jewish communal
life and culture that in many cases no longer exists.

These accounts help us to visualize what life was like in a very
personal way, while providing us the ability to transmit a more
profound legacy for the future.

We also encourage you to explore our Holocaust Collection, which
contains more than 2.75 million records about Holocaust victims and
survivors. This week, we have added more than 30,000 records >from a
variety of sources (a more detailed announcement will be forthcoming).

As with everything on JewishGen, we offer our resources at no charge.

To search the Yizkor Book collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

To search the Holocaust Collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Thank you for your continued support of our important work.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


Courland SIG #Courland #Latvia Yom HaShoah 2019/5779 #courland #latvia

Avraham Groll
 

Dear JewishGen Community,

For generations, Jewish tradition has associated the ritual of memory
with the lighting of candles. A candle represents the past, for a
flame is only as strong as its fuel source. Yet the light emanating
from the candle also represents a focus on the future. We look to the
candle and remember those who came before us, but do so within the
context of learning >from their experiences, and permitting the values
our ancestors held most dear to illuminate and influence our lives
today.

As we observe Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Memorial Day, JewishGen's mission
of remembrance and preservation becomes more pronounced and urgent.
JewishGen's work is designed to change us. It is supposed to transform
us. And it should inspire us.

Our goal is for people to understand not only who their relatives
were, but how they lived. What was important in their lives? What
challenges did they face? How can their experiences influence and
illuminate our life choices today?

Among JewishGen's most important projects is the translation of Yizkor
Books (memorial books), which offer an insight into communal life
before and during the Shoah.

Take some time to explore these treasure troves of information which,
among other things, provide first-hand accounts of a Jewish communal
life and culture that in many cases no longer exists.

These accounts help us to visualize what life was like in a very
personal way, while providing us the ability to transmit a more
profound legacy for the future.

We also encourage you to explore our Holocaust Collection, which
contains more than 2.75 million records about Holocaust victims and
survivors. This week, we have added more than 30,000 records >from a
variety of sources (a more detailed announcement will be forthcoming).

As with everything on JewishGen, we offer our resources at no charge.

To search the Yizkor Book collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

To search the Holocaust Collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Thank you for your continued support of our important work.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland Yom HaShoah 2019/5779 #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Avraham Groll
 

Dear JewishGen Community,

For generations, Jewish tradition has associated the ritual of memory
with the lighting of candles. A candle represents the past, for a
flame is only as strong as its fuel source. Yet the light emanating
from the candle also represents a focus on the future. We look to the
candle and remember those who came before us, but do so within the
context of learning >from their experiences, and permitting the values
our ancestors held most dear to illuminate and influence our lives
today.

As we observe Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Memorial Day, JewishGen's mission
of remembrance and preservation becomes more pronounced and urgent.
JewishGen's work is designed to change us. It is supposed to transform
us. And it should inspire us.

Our goal is for people to understand not only who their relatives
were, but how they lived. What was important in their lives? What
challenges did they face? How can their experiences influence and
illuminate our life choices today?

Among JewishGen's most important projects is the translation of Yizkor
Books (memorial books), which offer an insight into communal life
before and during the Shoah.

Take some time to explore these treasure troves of information which,
among other things, provide first-hand accounts of a Jewish communal
life and culture that in many cases no longer exists.

These accounts help us to visualize what life was like in a very
personal way, while providing us the ability to transmit a more
profound legacy for the future.

We also encourage you to explore our Holocaust Collection, which
contains more than 2.75 million records about Holocaust victims and
survivors. This week, we have added more than 30,000 records >from a
variety of sources (a more detailed announcement will be forthcoming).

As with everything on JewishGen, we offer our resources at no charge.

To search the Yizkor Book collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

To search the Holocaust Collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Thank you for your continued support of our important work.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


DNA Research #DNA Yom HaShoah 2019/5779 #dna

Avraham Groll
 

Dear JewishGen Community,

For generations, Jewish tradition has associated the ritual of memory
with the lighting of candles. A candle represents the past, for a
flame is only as strong as its fuel source. Yet the light emanating
from the candle also represents a focus on the future. We look to the
candle and remember those who came before us, but do so within the
context of learning >from their experiences, and permitting the values
our ancestors held most dear to illuminate and influence our lives
today.

As we observe Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Memorial Day, JewishGen's mission
of remembrance and preservation becomes more pronounced and urgent.
JewishGen's work is designed to change us. It is supposed to transform
us. And it should inspire us.

Our goal is for people to understand not only who their relatives
were, but how they lived. What was important in their lives? What
challenges did they face? How can their experiences influence and
illuminate our life choices today?

Among JewishGen's most important projects is the translation of Yizkor
Books (memorial books), which offer an insight into communal life
before and during the Shoah.

Take some time to explore these treasure troves of information which,
among other things, provide first-hand accounts of a Jewish communal
life and culture that in many cases no longer exists.

These accounts help us to visualize what life was like in a very
personal way, while providing us the ability to transmit a more
profound legacy for the future.

We also encourage you to explore our Holocaust Collection, which
contains more than 2.75 million records about Holocaust victims and
survivors. This week, we have added more than 30,000 records >from a
variety of sources (a more detailed announcement will be forthcoming).

As with everything on JewishGen, we offer our resources at no charge.

To search the Yizkor Book collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

To search the Holocaust Collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Thank you for your continued support of our important work.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yom HaShoah 2019/5779 #general

Avraham Groll
 

Dear JewishGen Community,

For generations, Jewish tradition has associated the ritual of memory
with the lighting of candles. A candle represents the past, for a
flame is only as strong as its fuel source. Yet the light emanating
from the candle also represents a focus on the future. We look to the
candle and remember those who came before us, but do so within the
context of learning >from their experiences, and permitting the values
our ancestors held most dear to illuminate and influence our lives
today.

As we observe Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Memorial Day, JewishGen's mission
of remembrance and preservation becomes more pronounced and urgent.
JewishGen's work is designed to change us. It is supposed to transform
us. And it should inspire us.

Our goal is for people to understand not only who their relatives
were, but how they lived. What was important in their lives? What
challenges did they face? How can their experiences influence and
illuminate our life choices today?

Among JewishGen's most important projects is the translation of Yizkor
Books (memorial books), which offer an insight into communal life
before and during the Shoah.

Take some time to explore these treasure troves of information which,
among other things, provide first-hand accounts of a Jewish communal
life and culture that in many cases no longer exists.

These accounts help us to visualize what life was like in a very
personal way, while providing us the ability to transmit a more
profound legacy for the future.

We also encourage you to explore our Holocaust Collection, which
contains more than 2.75 million records about Holocaust victims and
survivors. This week, we have added more than 30,000 records >from a
variety of sources (a more detailed announcement will be forthcoming).

As with everything on JewishGen, we offer our resources at no charge.

To search the Yizkor Book collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

To search the Holocaust Collection, please click here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Thank you for your continued support of our important work.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


(UK) Wiener Library Holocaust Explained Republished its Online Resource Life in Nazi Controlled Europe #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The United Kingdom's Wiener Library is a world-renowned Holocaust and
Genocide research library. In 2017, they relaunched and redesigned their
The Holocaust Explained, an online educational resource developed with the
British school curriculum in mind https://www.theholocaustexplained.org/

The Wiener Library announced they republished the "Life in Nazi Controlled
Europe" section of The Holocaust Explained. The new features focus on
everyday life in Nazi Germany and occupation cases >from across Europe, Nazi
economic and foreign policy and the Second World War. These are included on
the website url given above.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (UK) Wiener Library Holocaust Explained Republished its Online Resource Life in Nazi Controlled Europe #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The United Kingdom's Wiener Library is a world-renowned Holocaust and
Genocide research library. In 2017, they relaunched and redesigned their
The Holocaust Explained, an online educational resource developed with the
British school curriculum in mind https://www.theholocaustexplained.org/

The Wiener Library announced they republished the "Life in Nazi Controlled
Europe" section of The Holocaust Explained. The new features focus on
everyday life in Nazi Germany and occupation cases >from across Europe, Nazi
economic and foreign policy and the Second World War. These are included on
the website url given above.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


APOTHEKER Family Galicia and in the USA #general

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

Dear Genners and Siggers,

I am researching my wife's family APOTHEKER. Her grandfather Lazar
APOTHEKER (1858-1942) was born in Nowy Sacz (Tzanz) and had at least 7
siblings: Baruch Markus, Dawid Alexander, Mojzesz, Marjem,Jochewed,
Ester, Eidel. The oldest was Barukh Markus(b.1853). They were the only
APOTHEKERs there according to a document >from 1870. The head of the
family was Saul Isaak APOTHEKER(1831-1893) married to Lea Landau. All
his children named one of their boys Shaul. Recently I had several
breakthroughs and found out that Shaul's children lived in Krakow lived
later in their life in Bardejov(Slovakia), Przemysl and the nearby
shtetl Nizankowice, Dobromyl, Lesko and Krakow. All the Apothekers I
found at JRI-PL in Galician locations are offsprings of Shaul. Ellis
Island DB lists some of them as coming >from Lemberg(Lwow) and Bobrka
(Bibrka) not too far >from there. I managed to locate Rabbi Leib APTHEKER
who was Rabbi in NY(apparently the son of Barukh Markus mentioned above).
Alexander Beider mentions also Stanislawow, Borszczow and Kolomyja as
places where members of the family lived in. My wife's father Dawid
APOTHEKER(1908-1995) was on the Sugihara list and stayed during the War
in Shanghai. We found on the Sugihara list another Dawid APOTHEKER. We
thought at the beginning that it was a technical mistake but later found
out that this one indicated to the JDC that he had a cousin in NY( the
son of Rabbi Leib Apotheker). But as far as we know he never made it to
Shanghai and have no idea what happened to him. The given names Dawid,
Leib(Leo), Meshulam have also strong presence in the family. We know of
another Dawid APOTHEKER who was in NYC in 1892 through this scandalous
story,but have on idea who he was but that he was >from Galicia.
https://www.newspapers.com/clip/23123171/david_apotheker_bigamist/

There was also an APOTHEKER family in Iassi, Romania but they are
probably not connected.

If any of those names ring a bell,mainly for those who live around NY,
or any one >from Galicia who has them on his tree we would be glad to
hear >from you.

Regards >from Jerusalem

Jacob Rosen


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen APOTHEKER Family Galicia and in the USA #general

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

Dear Genners and Siggers,

I am researching my wife's family APOTHEKER. Her grandfather Lazar
APOTHEKER (1858-1942) was born in Nowy Sacz (Tzanz) and had at least 7
siblings: Baruch Markus, Dawid Alexander, Mojzesz, Marjem,Jochewed,
Ester, Eidel. The oldest was Barukh Markus(b.1853). They were the only
APOTHEKERs there according to a document >from 1870. The head of the
family was Saul Isaak APOTHEKER(1831-1893) married to Lea Landau. All
his children named one of their boys Shaul. Recently I had several
breakthroughs and found out that Shaul's children lived in Krakow lived
later in their life in Bardejov(Slovakia), Przemysl and the nearby
shtetl Nizankowice, Dobromyl, Lesko and Krakow. All the Apothekers I
found at JRI-PL in Galician locations are offsprings of Shaul. Ellis
Island DB lists some of them as coming >from Lemberg(Lwow) and Bobrka
(Bibrka) not too far >from there. I managed to locate Rabbi Leib APTHEKER
who was Rabbi in NY(apparently the son of Barukh Markus mentioned above).
Alexander Beider mentions also Stanislawow, Borszczow and Kolomyja as
places where members of the family lived in. My wife's father Dawid
APOTHEKER(1908-1995) was on the Sugihara list and stayed during the War
in Shanghai. We found on the Sugihara list another Dawid APOTHEKER. We
thought at the beginning that it was a technical mistake but later found
out that this one indicated to the JDC that he had a cousin in NY( the
son of Rabbi Leib Apotheker). But as far as we know he never made it to
Shanghai and have no idea what happened to him. The given names Dawid,
Leib(Leo), Meshulam have also strong presence in the family. We know of
another Dawid APOTHEKER who was in NYC in 1892 through this scandalous
story,but have on idea who he was but that he was >from Galicia.
https://www.newspapers.com/clip/23123171/david_apotheker_bigamist/

There was also an APOTHEKER family in Iassi, Romania but they are
probably not connected.

If any of those names ring a bell,mainly for those who live around NY,
or any one >from Galicia who has them on his tree we would be glad to
hear >from you.

Regards >from Jerusalem

Jacob Rosen


New JewishGen Class - Writing Short Reports May 10-May 31 #latinamerica

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen will again offer a class in publishing your research. This
class concentrates on writing short reports.

Time to get your data out of the shoebox and arrange it in a summary
report? A quick, short report is great to send to relatives or other
researchers and to remind you just where your last project left off.

In this class we will practice writing 3 styles of reports:
* a list style,
* a lineage style report
* a longer Genealogical Summary Report.

The instructor will offer directions for using your genealogical
software "publishing features," organizing your files and folders,
citing your sources and making decisions about media snips and images.

Requirements: Students must have done enough research to be ready to
write. Students should have access to a genealogical software program
and be comfortable with computers.

Students must have 8-10 hours per week to study the assignments, write
their reports and interact with the instructor. To meet the needs of
international students this course is open 24/7.

Tuition is $150 for this 3 week class and includes editing suggestions
upon request. Enrollment is limited to 10 students.

Address questions to:
Nancy Holden
JewishGen-Education@lyris.JewishGen.org

If you have questions, I will be glad to review your project before you
enroll.

Nancy Holden


Latin America #LatinAmerica New JewishGen Class - Writing Short Reports May 10-May 31 #latinamerica

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen will again offer a class in publishing your research. This
class concentrates on writing short reports.

Time to get your data out of the shoebox and arrange it in a summary
report? A quick, short report is great to send to relatives or other
researchers and to remind you just where your last project left off.

In this class we will practice writing 3 styles of reports:
* a list style,
* a lineage style report
* a longer Genealogical Summary Report.

The instructor will offer directions for using your genealogical
software "publishing features," organizing your files and folders,
citing your sources and making decisions about media snips and images.

Requirements: Students must have done enough research to be ready to
write. Students should have access to a genealogical software program
and be comfortable with computers.

Students must have 8-10 hours per week to study the assignments, write
their reports and interact with the instructor. To meet the needs of
international students this course is open 24/7.

Tuition is $150 for this 3 week class and includes editing suggestions
upon request. Enrollment is limited to 10 students.

Address questions to:
Nancy Holden
JewishGen-Education@lyris.JewishGen.org

If you have questions, I will be glad to review your project before you
enroll.

Nancy Holden


ViewMate translation request - Russian #general

Sandra B Landers
 

Dear fellow genners,
I've posted a vital record in Russian for which I need a translation.
It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM73065

It is the 1882 marriage record of my great-grandparents Izrael and
Necha FURMANOWICZ who were cousins. I am only interested in the city/
town where this event took place and where they were from. I have
all the other information >from previous translations.

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

Thank you so very much,
Best regards,
Sandy SHECHTMAN LANDERS
Tamarac, FL

Searching:
FURMANOWICZ/FOREMAN, Lomza, Glasgow, Scotland,
KHAIT/KYTE/TAYLOR, Lithuania, Glasgow, Scotland,
SHECHTMAN/SCHECHTMAN, Belarus,
MOSKOWITZ various spellings Belarus,


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation request - Russian #general

Sandra B Landers
 

Dear fellow genners,
I've posted a vital record in Russian for which I need a translation.
It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM73065

It is the 1882 marriage record of my great-grandparents Izrael and
Necha FURMANOWICZ who were cousins. I am only interested in the city/
town where this event took place and where they were from. I have
all the other information >from previous translations.

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

Thank you so very much,
Best regards,
Sandy SHECHTMAN LANDERS
Tamarac, FL

Searching:
FURMANOWICZ/FOREMAN, Lomza, Glasgow, Scotland,
KHAIT/KYTE/TAYLOR, Lithuania, Glasgow, Scotland,
SHECHTMAN/SCHECHTMAN, Belarus,
MOSKOWITZ various spellings Belarus,


ViewMate short translation request - Polish or possibly Russian #general

Rivka Ben-Shochet
 

I am requesting a translation of a handwritten statement on the back
of a picture taken in Lyakhovichi. The ink portion is clear. There is
also faint pencil writing.
It is on ViewMate at
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM73062

Please respond using the online ViewMate form.

The picture itself is of a 1910 funeral of a Zionist activist. It also
appears at
https://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/lyakhovichi/ZionistFuneral1910.htm

Our copy belonged to my grandmother Henie Cymielinsky Isakof but I
think she inherited it >from one of her sisters, Goldie Leos or Rae
Dashevsky, granddaughters of Leib Loss of Lyakhovichi.

I have posted to two groups (Belarus and JewishGen). I hope that is
acceptable.

Thank you so much,
Rivka Ben-Shochet
Jerusalem, Israel

MODERATOR NOTE: The handwriting may be in Russian rather than Polish.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate short translation request - Polish or possibly Russian #general

Rivka Ben-Shochet
 

I am requesting a translation of a handwritten statement on the back
of a picture taken in Lyakhovichi. The ink portion is clear. There is
also faint pencil writing.
It is on ViewMate at
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM73062

Please respond using the online ViewMate form.

The picture itself is of a 1910 funeral of a Zionist activist. It also
appears at
https://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/lyakhovichi/ZionistFuneral1910.htm

Our copy belonged to my grandmother Henie Cymielinsky Isakof but I
think she inherited it >from one of her sisters, Goldie Leos or Rae
Dashevsky, granddaughters of Leib Loss of Lyakhovichi.

I have posted to two groups (Belarus and JewishGen). I hope that is
acceptable.

Thank you so much,
Rivka Ben-Shochet
Jerusalem, Israel

MODERATOR NOTE: The handwriting may be in Russian rather than Polish.


Ancestry New Ethnicity Estimates -- Everyone Gets Moved Over on May 30 #dna

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Last fall, Ancestry announced their new ethnicity estimates for new and
existing customers. Due to a new algorithm and five times more reference
samples, Ancestry believes the estimates are more accurate. Effective May
30, 2019 all AncestryDNAR customers will be transitioned to their new
ethnicity estimates. To keep prior results, download them by July 20, 2019.

To read more see the Ancestry Blog: https://tinyurl.com/y2txpete
Original url:
https://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2019/05/02/understanding-your-new-ethnicity-estimate/

A personal observation. When I received my new ethnicity estimate I was
concerned as I "lost" my 2% Iberian. But when I looked at the new Ancestry
map and compared it to the old one, I saw that half of Spain was now
included in my "new" estimate's geography. By the way I went >from 96%
Ashkenazi Jewish to 100% Ashkenazi and the geography fits perfectly with my
own genealogical research and family knowledge. Do look at the new maps if
you have any concerns about differences.

I have no affiliation with Ancestry or AncestryDNA and am posting this
solely for the information of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


DNA Research #DNA Ancestry New Ethnicity Estimates -- Everyone Gets Moved Over on May 30 #dna

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Last fall, Ancestry announced their new ethnicity estimates for new and
existing customers. Due to a new algorithm and five times more reference
samples, Ancestry believes the estimates are more accurate. Effective May
30, 2019 all AncestryDNAR customers will be transitioned to their new
ethnicity estimates. To keep prior results, download them by July 20, 2019.

To read more see the Ancestry Blog: https://tinyurl.com/y2txpete
Original url:
https://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2019/05/02/understanding-your-new-ethnicity-estimate/

A personal observation. When I received my new ethnicity estimate I was
concerned as I "lost" my 2% Iberian. But when I looked at the new Ancestry
map and compared it to the old one, I saw that half of Spain was now
included in my "new" estimate's geography. By the way I went >from 96%
Ashkenazi Jewish to 100% Ashkenazi and the geography fits perfectly with my
own genealogical research and family knowledge. Do look at the new maps if
you have any concerns about differences.

I have no affiliation with Ancestry or AncestryDNA and am posting this
solely for the information of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

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