Date   

Bukovina and Transnistria #general

Merle Kastner <merlek@...>
 

To those with roots in Bukovina, Transnistria survivors or their families,

We are in the process of compiling data for our special, new Holocaust
section on the Ehpes site: http://czernowitz.ehpes.com/

There currently some photos of Transnistria memorials on the site in
various places which we will gather up and link into the new section.

Would anyone who has a photo of a memorial that is NOT on the Ehpes
site, please send it/them to us. If you are in doubt, send what you have
and we will see if we can use it.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Merle Kastner, Shula Klinger & Jerome Schatten
merlek@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Bukovina and Transnistria #general

Merle Kastner <merlek@...>
 

To those with roots in Bukovina, Transnistria survivors or their families,

We are in the process of compiling data for our special, new Holocaust
section on the Ehpes site: http://czernowitz.ehpes.com/

There currently some photos of Transnistria memorials on the site in
various places which we will gather up and link into the new section.

Would anyone who has a photo of a memorial that is NOT on the Ehpes
site, please send it/them to us. If you are in doubt, send what you have
and we will see if we can use it.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Merle Kastner, Shula Klinger & Jerome Schatten
merlek@...


Revised Aliyah Bet listing #general

Paul Silverstone
 

The listing of Aliyah Bet ships that carried Jewish refugees to Palestine
between 1938 and 1948 has been completely revised, and is now live

http://www.paulsilverstone.com/immigration/Primary/index.html
New information, new pictures and sources are included, together with some
information on where lists of passengers may be found.

Paul Silverstone
New York

please reply to paulh@...
www.paulsilverstone.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Revised Aliyah Bet listing #general

Paul Silverstone
 

The listing of Aliyah Bet ships that carried Jewish refugees to Palestine
between 1938 and 1948 has been completely revised, and is now live

http://www.paulsilverstone.com/immigration/Primary/index.html
New information, new pictures and sources are included, together with some
information on where lists of passengers may be found.

Paul Silverstone
New York

please reply to paulh@...
www.paulsilverstone.com


List of Jewish residents of Sadgora, Bukovina, during 1890-1910 #general

YASO <goaizicgo@...>
 

Shalom,

Does any one know if there exists a list of Jewish residents of Sadgora, Bukovina
between the years 1890-1910. And or if there are any census on line of this
period of Sadgora.

Aizic Sechter
Israel

MODERATOR NOTE: Make sure to check the Sadgora Shtetlinks webpage
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/sadgura/sadgura.html


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen List of Jewish residents of Sadgora, Bukovina, during 1890-1910 #general

YASO <goaizicgo@...>
 

Shalom,

Does any one know if there exists a list of Jewish residents of Sadgora, Bukovina
between the years 1890-1910. And or if there are any census on line of this
period of Sadgora.

Aizic Sechter
Israel

MODERATOR NOTE: Make sure to check the Sadgora Shtetlinks webpage
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/sadgura/sadgura.html


Tukums birth records 1886, marriage records 1887/ 1888/ 1891 #latvia

Christine Usdin
 


Latvia SIG #Latvia Tukums birth records 1886, marriage records 1887/ 1888/ 1891 #latvia

Christine Usdin
 


Help with translations from Yiddish and Russian #romania

epk13@...
 

Last week I posted five documents for translation >from Yiddish
and Hebrew and was amazed by how fast I received translations.
(Thanks again!) However, I discovered that I'd been sent only
the first pages of each document by an archivist. I've just
received the remaining pages of two long documents. Today I
post the remaining three pages of one of them: a handwritten
letter in Yiddish to Israel MILSTEIN >from a friend >from Romania.
(The first page was ViewMate 18046). >from the translation of the
first page, I have learned that the friend appears to have emigrated
first to the US, then to Israel. He writes >from Tel Aviv in July 1923,
in response to some plan Israel's daughter Malkele (Mollie) has
proposed that appears to involve the friend's son Herzl. She may be
proposing to emigrate to Israel with Herzl, who appears to have
remained in the US after his father left for Israel and to be close
to the MILSTEIN family.

The MILSTEINS arrived in the US in January of 1921. The
date of this letter is May 1923. Was Mollie already thinking
of leaving the US? I hope the remaining three pages will help
me understand the story (it sounds like a good one).

Page two: http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18150

Page three: http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18151

On the fourth and final page, there's a scribble that looks like a spider--
is it a signature? Can anyone tell me what it says?

Page four: http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18152


Among the papers of the SPIWAK family I just found this handwritten
document in Russian created by friends in Bessarabia testifying to
Gitel SPIWAK's good behavior and strong morals. It may be dated
September 1910. The document bears several signatures. It seems
to have been written to help Gitel get a passport in preparation
for her emigration to America. Though Gitel got a passport, she
didn't use it in 1910. Her sister, Chava, used it instead, traveling
to New York using Gitel's name and age, arriving in October 1910.
I would like a full translation, and the names of those who signed
are especially important to me. Can anyone confirm the purpose of
the document? Was it common to need such a testament >from neighbors
and friends to get a passport? And to whom would such a document be
given? What kind of risk was Chava running to use her sister's
passport to leave Russia in 1910? Was there much risk involved for
Gitel in giving her sister her passport? (Gitel came to the US in
1923, having married, traveling on a passport for her husband, herself
and her child.) According to the family, Chava lived in fear that
she'd be deported if US officials discovered she'd come here illegally.


http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18153

The last item is a postcard in Yiddish dated 1917 >from a friend
in Detroit to Eva COHEN (Chava Spiwak SARAFCONN / COHEN). I'd
be grateful for a full translation.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18154

Thank you,
Patricia Kleindienst
Guilford, CT


Romania SIG #Romania Help with translations from Yiddish and Russian #romania

epk13@...
 

Last week I posted five documents for translation >from Yiddish
and Hebrew and was amazed by how fast I received translations.
(Thanks again!) However, I discovered that I'd been sent only
the first pages of each document by an archivist. I've just
received the remaining pages of two long documents. Today I
post the remaining three pages of one of them: a handwritten
letter in Yiddish to Israel MILSTEIN >from a friend >from Romania.
(The first page was ViewMate 18046). >from the translation of the
first page, I have learned that the friend appears to have emigrated
first to the US, then to Israel. He writes >from Tel Aviv in July 1923,
in response to some plan Israel's daughter Malkele (Mollie) has
proposed that appears to involve the friend's son Herzl. She may be
proposing to emigrate to Israel with Herzl, who appears to have
remained in the US after his father left for Israel and to be close
to the MILSTEIN family.

The MILSTEINS arrived in the US in January of 1921. The
date of this letter is May 1923. Was Mollie already thinking
of leaving the US? I hope the remaining three pages will help
me understand the story (it sounds like a good one).

Page two: http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18150

Page three: http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18151

On the fourth and final page, there's a scribble that looks like a spider--
is it a signature? Can anyone tell me what it says?

Page four: http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18152


Among the papers of the SPIWAK family I just found this handwritten
document in Russian created by friends in Bessarabia testifying to
Gitel SPIWAK's good behavior and strong morals. It may be dated
September 1910. The document bears several signatures. It seems
to have been written to help Gitel get a passport in preparation
for her emigration to America. Though Gitel got a passport, she
didn't use it in 1910. Her sister, Chava, used it instead, traveling
to New York using Gitel's name and age, arriving in October 1910.
I would like a full translation, and the names of those who signed
are especially important to me. Can anyone confirm the purpose of
the document? Was it common to need such a testament >from neighbors
and friends to get a passport? And to whom would such a document be
given? What kind of risk was Chava running to use her sister's
passport to leave Russia in 1910? Was there much risk involved for
Gitel in giving her sister her passport? (Gitel came to the US in
1923, having married, traveling on a passport for her husband, herself
and her child.) According to the family, Chava lived in fear that
she'd be deported if US officials discovered she'd come here illegally.


http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18153

The last item is a postcard in Yiddish dated 1917 >from a friend
in Detroit to Eva COHEN (Chava Spiwak SARAFCONN / COHEN). I'd
be grateful for a full translation.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18154

Thank you,
Patricia Kleindienst
Guilford, CT


Mahknovka #ukraine

Joan S. Gross
 

Are you certain of the spelling of this town? My Spector and Sandler
relatives came >from Vahknovka. Perhaps they are the same town. If you
think so, I could share what little info I have with you.

Joan S. Gross


Mogilev-Podolsky in 1898: history question #ukraine

geselocohen@...
 

Was there a particular event in September 1898 that might have
precipitated my family's emigration >from Mogilev-Podolsky?
My great-grandfather Moishe DARMAN (or DORMAN) arrived in
Philadelphia on Nov. 9, 1898, having sailed >from Hamburg on Oct. 20,
1898. His arrival manifest contains an interesting notation that a
relative in Philadelphia had "invited him 6 weeks ago," that is, late
September 1898, probably about the time of the High Holidays.
Apparently, in only 4 weeks >from receiving this invitation, my g-g-f
closed up shop in Mogilev-Podolsky, moved his pregnant wife and children
to another town, and was on the boat to the USA.
Does anyone know of any particular event, e.g., pogrom, tsarist
edict, etc., that might have led to this rapid departure? Thank you!

Daniel GESELOWITZ
Bethesda, Maryland, USA


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Mahknovka #ukraine

Joan S. Gross
 

Are you certain of the spelling of this town? My Spector and Sandler
relatives came >from Vahknovka. Perhaps they are the same town. If you
think so, I could share what little info I have with you.

Joan S. Gross


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Mogilev-Podolsky in 1898: history question #ukraine

geselocohen@...
 

Was there a particular event in September 1898 that might have
precipitated my family's emigration >from Mogilev-Podolsky?
My great-grandfather Moishe DARMAN (or DORMAN) arrived in
Philadelphia on Nov. 9, 1898, having sailed >from Hamburg on Oct. 20,
1898. His arrival manifest contains an interesting notation that a
relative in Philadelphia had "invited him 6 weeks ago," that is, late
September 1898, probably about the time of the High Holidays.
Apparently, in only 4 weeks >from receiving this invitation, my g-g-f
closed up shop in Mogilev-Podolsky, moved his pregnant wife and children
to another town, and was on the boat to the USA.
Does anyone know of any particular event, e.g., pogrom, tsarist
edict, etc., that might have led to this rapid departure? Thank you!

Daniel GESELOWITZ
Bethesda, Maryland, USA


Bessarabian Holocaust survivor video testimonies #romania

watersjd@...
 

ROMSIGERS:

Greetings. I just wanted to make you all aware of some new material
on the Leova Shtetlinks site. Recently I posted video testimonies of
two Holocaust survivors >from Leova.

Even if you have no connection with Leova, these survivors' accounts
of their Holocaust experience in Bessarabia are fascinating.

These videos can be viewed online at:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/leova/

Regards,
Joel D. Waters


Romania SIG #Romania Bessarabian Holocaust survivor video testimonies #romania

watersjd@...
 

ROMSIGERS:

Greetings. I just wanted to make you all aware of some new material
on the Leova Shtetlinks site. Recently I posted video testimonies of
two Holocaust survivors >from Leova.

Even if you have no connection with Leova, these survivors' accounts
of their Holocaust experience in Bessarabia are fascinating.

These videos can be viewed online at:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/leova/

Regards,
Joel D. Waters


Bukovina & Transnistria #romania

merlek@...
 

To those with roots in Bukovina, Transnistria survivors or their families,

We are in the process of compiling data for our special, new Holocaust
section on the Ehpes site: http://czernowitz.ehpes.com/

There currently some photos of Transnistria memorials on the site in
various places which we will gather up and link into the new section.

Would anyone who has a photo of a memorial that is NOT on the Ehpes
site, please send it/them to us. If you are in doubt, send what you have
and we will see if we can use it.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Merle Kastner, Shula Klinger & Jerome Schatten
merlek@...


Romania SIG #Romania Bukovina & Transnistria #romania

merlek@...
 

To those with roots in Bukovina, Transnistria survivors or their families,

We are in the process of compiling data for our special, new Holocaust
section on the Ehpes site: http://czernowitz.ehpes.com/

There currently some photos of Transnistria memorials on the site in
various places which we will gather up and link into the new section.

Would anyone who has a photo of a memorial that is NOT on the Ehpes
site, please send it/them to us. If you are in doubt, send what you have
and we will see if we can use it.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Merle Kastner, Shula Klinger & Jerome Schatten
merlek@...


two marriage records #latvia

Herbert Lazerow
 

Researching records published by Crisitine Usdin I found 2 records of the same marriage
Marriages in Varaklani in 1885, 1887, 1888, 1897, 1895, 1897, 1901 and 1902 .
Year 1897, Date 01/1, Place Varaklanu
Groom: MANEVICH Yosel, age 33, Father Yudel, place of origin: Varklianski
Bride: MINKIN Tzira-Frada, age 27, Father not stated, place of origin: Rezekne
Marriages in Rezekne in 1897.
Year 1897, Date 01/2, Place Rezekne
Groom: MANEVICH Yosel, age 32, Father Yudel, place of origin: Varaklanu
Bride: MINKIN Frada-Tzira, age 24, Father Sabsa, place of origin: Drissa
Different witnesses, different age, place of origin.
True.

It is possible that there actually were two marriage ceremonies, one at the
home of the bride, and the other at the home of the groom. I have never
heard of this as being customary among our eastern European forebears, but
it is possible.

Alternatively, there might have been only one marriage, but it was recorded
in two places. I believe that the witnesses were not persons who saw the
event occur. They are witnessing the fact that the person providing the
information to the recording court rabbi actually provided that information.

Had the two marriages been separated by a year or two in time, I would suggest
that the couple might have been divorced and re-married. Were that the
case, the second marriage record should reflect that they were both divorced,
rather than a bachelor and a maiden.

As to the differences in the bride's location, that is probably not her place
of origin, but her place of registration, and it is usually preceded by
her classification as (usually) a townsperson or (occasionally) a merchant.

Both the designation and the town are hereditary. Nonetheless, in theory,
the town should be the same because it was part of the bride's personal
status. But I have seen multiple records for a person with different registrations.
Most frequently, one registration is more precise than another.

One might list the uyezd (district), while another might specify the town
within the district. Both Drissa and Rezekne were sufficiently large that
I would not think this would occur, but it might.

The difference in names is quite common. A person might be Tzira-Frada in
one record, Tzira in another, and Frada in a third. It is less common to
see the names reversed, but I have seen that >from time to time also. The more
time that has elapsed between the two records, the more likely these name
me variations are. What is puzzling about this is that the records are a day
apart.

Finally, you might look again at the bride's ages. With the crossbar on the
European 7 and the unusual (to Americans) way that some Europeans write
their fours, it is possible that the bride's age was 24 or 27 in both records
This should be clear in the Hebrew language version of the records, though
I have certainly seen some script dolids that resemble zayins and vice-versa.

Bert
Herbert Lazerow
Professor of Law and Director,
Institute on Int'l & Comparative Law
University of San Diego
5998 Alcala Park
San Diego CA 92110-2492 U.S.A.
lazer@...


Latvia SIG #Latvia two marriage records #latvia

Herbert Lazerow
 

Researching records published by Crisitine Usdin I found 2 records of the same marriage
Marriages in Varaklani in 1885, 1887, 1888, 1897, 1895, 1897, 1901 and 1902 .
Year 1897, Date 01/1, Place Varaklanu
Groom: MANEVICH Yosel, age 33, Father Yudel, place of origin: Varklianski
Bride: MINKIN Tzira-Frada, age 27, Father not stated, place of origin: Rezekne
Marriages in Rezekne in 1897.
Year 1897, Date 01/2, Place Rezekne
Groom: MANEVICH Yosel, age 32, Father Yudel, place of origin: Varaklanu
Bride: MINKIN Frada-Tzira, age 24, Father Sabsa, place of origin: Drissa
Different witnesses, different age, place of origin.
True.

It is possible that there actually were two marriage ceremonies, one at the
home of the bride, and the other at the home of the groom. I have never
heard of this as being customary among our eastern European forebears, but
it is possible.

Alternatively, there might have been only one marriage, but it was recorded
in two places. I believe that the witnesses were not persons who saw the
event occur. They are witnessing the fact that the person providing the
information to the recording court rabbi actually provided that information.

Had the two marriages been separated by a year or two in time, I would suggest
that the couple might have been divorced and re-married. Were that the
case, the second marriage record should reflect that they were both divorced,
rather than a bachelor and a maiden.

As to the differences in the bride's location, that is probably not her place
of origin, but her place of registration, and it is usually preceded by
her classification as (usually) a townsperson or (occasionally) a merchant.

Both the designation and the town are hereditary. Nonetheless, in theory,
the town should be the same because it was part of the bride's personal
status. But I have seen multiple records for a person with different registrations.
Most frequently, one registration is more precise than another.

One might list the uyezd (district), while another might specify the town
within the district. Both Drissa and Rezekne were sufficiently large that
I would not think this would occur, but it might.

The difference in names is quite common. A person might be Tzira-Frada in
one record, Tzira in another, and Frada in a third. It is less common to
see the names reversed, but I have seen that >from time to time also. The more
time that has elapsed between the two records, the more likely these name
me variations are. What is puzzling about this is that the records are a day
apart.

Finally, you might look again at the bride's ages. With the crossbar on the
European 7 and the unusual (to Americans) way that some Europeans write
their fours, it is possible that the bride's age was 24 or 27 in both records
This should be clear in the Hebrew language version of the records, though
I have certainly seen some script dolids that resemble zayins and vice-versa.

Bert
Herbert Lazerow
Professor of Law and Director,
Institute on Int'l & Comparative Law
University of San Diego
5998 Alcala Park
San Diego CA 92110-2492 U.S.A.
lazer@...

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