Date   

seeking advice re: possible visit to ancestral town #poland

Paula & David
 

I have just learned that there is an unexpected chance that I will be in
Eastern Europe this May. I was planning to do a trip there after I had a
chance to do more family research, but now need to figure out how I might
(in the short time between now and late May) be able to take best advantage of
a possible chance to visit my mother's birthplace, Chelm, Poland.

Most of my genealogy work had been on my father's side because there are
few living relatives on my mother's side who survived the war. I do have
the names back to my maternal grandmother's parents, and my maternal
grandfather's father's name, as well as have information >from on line with the
names of my grandmothers siblings who mostly died during the war. Their last
names are not common ones (Flaksman and Waxman).

I will not have a lot of time (husband's patience and our overall time
there is likely limited) to do research, but would at least like to see the
town, and possibly photograph some grave headstones if I can find relevant
ones. I also know that my mother lived on a farm with her grandparents
until she came to the US at a very young age, and wondered if there was a
way to search records to see if I could locate this place; would
any of this be available on line?.

Any suggestions re: getting to/staying in Chelm (>from Warsaw),
historically Jewish sections of town, or how to possibly get information
on where I might find relevant family graves to photograph (in Chelm,
and possibly Warsaw,Lublin), or find records for this farm (I really am
not sure they owned it, but would like to try to find it if feasible).

Thanks for any assistance you can offer. Paula Solomon

(researching WAXMAN, FLAKSMAN, SHULMAN, ROTSHTEIN (ROTHSTEIN), FISZMAN
(FISHMAN), SHALIT of Chelm, Warsaw, Lublin

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


JRI Poland #Poland seeking advice re: possible visit to ancestral town #poland

Paula & David
 

I have just learned that there is an unexpected chance that I will be in
Eastern Europe this May. I was planning to do a trip there after I had a
chance to do more family research, but now need to figure out how I might
(in the short time between now and late May) be able to take best advantage of
a possible chance to visit my mother's birthplace, Chelm, Poland.

Most of my genealogy work had been on my father's side because there are
few living relatives on my mother's side who survived the war. I do have
the names back to my maternal grandmother's parents, and my maternal
grandfather's father's name, as well as have information >from on line with the
names of my grandmothers siblings who mostly died during the war. Their last
names are not common ones (Flaksman and Waxman).

I will not have a lot of time (husband's patience and our overall time
there is likely limited) to do research, but would at least like to see the
town, and possibly photograph some grave headstones if I can find relevant
ones. I also know that my mother lived on a farm with her grandparents
until she came to the US at a very young age, and wondered if there was a
way to search records to see if I could locate this place; would
any of this be available on line?.

Any suggestions re: getting to/staying in Chelm (>from Warsaw),
historically Jewish sections of town, or how to possibly get information
on where I might find relevant family graves to photograph (in Chelm,
and possibly Warsaw,Lublin), or find records for this farm (I really am
not sure they owned it, but would like to try to find it if feasible).

Thanks for any assistance you can offer. Paula Solomon

(researching WAXMAN, FLAKSMAN, SHULMAN, ROTSHTEIN (ROTHSTEIN), FISZMAN
(FISHMAN), SHALIT of Chelm, Warsaw, Lublin

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


ViewMate loose translation request - Polish; Lublin province (GEWIRCMAN, RAJSBAUM, WAGNER) #poland

Tamar Amit <ta.genealogy@...>
 

Hello,

I've posted several vital records in Polish for which I need some help
and at least a loose translation.

All of the documents concern, as far as I can tell, are >from Chelm in
the Lublin area.

I'd appreciate any assistance with exact dates, names of parents,
spouses, occupations, ages, where they came from, if they were still
alive at the time, other relatives etc.

They are on ViewMate at the following addresses:

Birth Registration of GIWERCMAN Ita >from Chelm
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=21470

Death Registration of GIWERCMAN Jakob >from Chelm
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=21471

Birth Registration of GIWERCMAN Berek-Lejb >from Chelm
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=21472

Death Registration of RAJSBAUM Sura >from Chelm
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=21473

Death registration of WAGNER Sura Leja >from Chelm
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=21474

Please respond privately or via the form provided in the ViewMate
application.

Thank you very much,

Tamar Amit
ISRAEL
Researching: GEWIRCMAN, WAGNER, RAJSBAUM, BRONFENBRENER, SZPILER,
RACHMAN, FRANK all >from the Lublin area


JRI Poland #Poland ViewMate loose translation request - Polish; Lublin province (GEWIRCMAN, RAJSBAUM, WAGNER) #poland

Tamar Amit <ta.genealogy@...>
 

Hello,

I've posted several vital records in Polish for which I need some help
and at least a loose translation.

All of the documents concern, as far as I can tell, are >from Chelm in
the Lublin area.

I'd appreciate any assistance with exact dates, names of parents,
spouses, occupations, ages, where they came from, if they were still
alive at the time, other relatives etc.

They are on ViewMate at the following addresses:

Birth Registration of GIWERCMAN Ita >from Chelm
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=21470

Death Registration of GIWERCMAN Jakob >from Chelm
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=21471

Birth Registration of GIWERCMAN Berek-Lejb >from Chelm
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=21472

Death Registration of RAJSBAUM Sura >from Chelm
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=21473

Death registration of WAGNER Sura Leja >from Chelm
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=21474

Please respond privately or via the form provided in the ViewMate
application.

Thank you very much,

Tamar Amit
ISRAEL
Researching: GEWIRCMAN, WAGNER, RAJSBAUM, BRONFENBRENER, SZPILER,
RACHMAN, FRANK all >from the Lublin area


The 1897 Dvinsk census. Shosseinaya st.Part 6. Page 1 #latvia

Christine Usdin
 


Latvia SIG #Latvia The 1897 Dvinsk census. Shosseinaya st.Part 6. Page 1 #latvia

Christine Usdin
 


Latvia Archive Material #latvia

Joyaa Antares
 

Hi All,

I am writing in response to Michael Eliastam's comment, "I continue to be
surprised and disappointed by the fact that we have over 800 'members' of
the Latvia SIG list-serve but ... ".

In the latter half of October 2011 this Digest posted a dialogue about
whether we should rely on free/volunteer work to access records >from the
Latvia State Archives, or should adopt a model that involves paying for
these records and their translation in some way. There is a ton of
material at the Archives and this question affects pretty well everyone who
subscribes to this List.

Current information about the content of the Latvia Database seems to be
here: http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/latvia/LatviaDeaths.htm (The
Jewish Vital Records of Latvia Database). And current transcriptions, done
by Christine Usdin here: http://www.premiumorange.com/rigavitalrecords/

Information about what is held at the Archives is also held here:
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/riga/riga_archive_holdingslatest.htm#cp
(The Riga Archives / Latvian State Historical Archives: Jewish Holdings) and
here: http://www.lvva-raduraksti.lv/en.html (Raduraksti). But do either of
these sites contain "complete" catalogues? Definitely not. Also,
Christine Usdin can only do so much, and besides, there is a wealth of
material outside her voluntary remit of the vital records.

The fact that we seem to have four - at least four? - websites to which turn
is confusing to me. I mean no offence to those who work hard on these and
other websites.

Where might we look for a reasonably comprehensive, reasonably up to date
list of:

a) what is held a the Latvian Archives?

Together with:

b) which of these holdings are transcribed?

Is there a single place with a simple spreadsheet that might answer both
these questions? If it is not available, what would it take to put such a
spreadsheet together? What help can we on this List offer? Once
achieved, where should it be kept? Perhaps here?
http://www.jewishgen.org/Latvia/ (The LatviaSIG Home Page).

Secondly, is there anyone on this list who has a good working relationship
with the Archives, someone who might know how to pursue the question: What
records held at the Archives do not appear in any of the above Lists?

Should we, as a Group organise a private researcher to answer this question?
Or can it be reliably answered by someone working at the Archives, given
that for some reason some records/Lists are omitted >from all the above
sites?

My warmest regards and encouragement to all

Joyaa
Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
___________________________
Researching ZAUSMER, ZOUSMER, ZESMER, CHOUSMER, CHAUSMER, TSOUZMER etc,
MARCUS, DAVIDOFF in Polangen, Kretinga, Darbenai, Libau, Riga, Memel
SCHORR, SCHERZER, JURIS and DAWID in Buckaczowce, Ottynia, Nadworna, and
Kolomyya
ZUNDER in Buckaczowce and Ivano-Frankivsk
KEMPNER in Berlin, Lodz, Warszawa and London
and GERSON, SIDERSKY in Gumbinnen, Koenigsberg, Danzig, Berlin and South
Africa


Volunteering/Facebook page #latvia

Jan Rabinowitz <janrab@...>
 

Thanks for setting up the FB page! I don't have a huge amount of extra time and few
usable skills, but I'm willing to help with whatever I can. I'm good at Word and Excel,
can't read Russian or Yiddish. But if you let me know what types of things need to be
done, I'll happily pick one or two out!

Jan Rabinowitz
Atlanta, GA

Searching in Latvia: SELIGSOHN, HIRSCH


Latvia SIG #Latvia Latvia Archive Material #latvia

Joyaa Antares
 

Hi All,

I am writing in response to Michael Eliastam's comment, "I continue to be
surprised and disappointed by the fact that we have over 800 'members' of
the Latvia SIG list-serve but ... ".

In the latter half of October 2011 this Digest posted a dialogue about
whether we should rely on free/volunteer work to access records >from the
Latvia State Archives, or should adopt a model that involves paying for
these records and their translation in some way. There is a ton of
material at the Archives and this question affects pretty well everyone who
subscribes to this List.

Current information about the content of the Latvia Database seems to be
here: http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/latvia/LatviaDeaths.htm (The
Jewish Vital Records of Latvia Database). And current transcriptions, done
by Christine Usdin here: http://www.premiumorange.com/rigavitalrecords/

Information about what is held at the Archives is also held here:
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/riga/riga_archive_holdingslatest.htm#cp
(The Riga Archives / Latvian State Historical Archives: Jewish Holdings) and
here: http://www.lvva-raduraksti.lv/en.html (Raduraksti). But do either of
these sites contain "complete" catalogues? Definitely not. Also,
Christine Usdin can only do so much, and besides, there is a wealth of
material outside her voluntary remit of the vital records.

The fact that we seem to have four - at least four? - websites to which turn
is confusing to me. I mean no offence to those who work hard on these and
other websites.

Where might we look for a reasonably comprehensive, reasonably up to date
list of:

a) what is held a the Latvian Archives?

Together with:

b) which of these holdings are transcribed?

Is there a single place with a simple spreadsheet that might answer both
these questions? If it is not available, what would it take to put such a
spreadsheet together? What help can we on this List offer? Once
achieved, where should it be kept? Perhaps here?
http://www.jewishgen.org/Latvia/ (The LatviaSIG Home Page).

Secondly, is there anyone on this list who has a good working relationship
with the Archives, someone who might know how to pursue the question: What
records held at the Archives do not appear in any of the above Lists?

Should we, as a Group organise a private researcher to answer this question?
Or can it be reliably answered by someone working at the Archives, given
that for some reason some records/Lists are omitted >from all the above
sites?

My warmest regards and encouragement to all

Joyaa
Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
___________________________
Researching ZAUSMER, ZOUSMER, ZESMER, CHOUSMER, CHAUSMER, TSOUZMER etc,
MARCUS, DAVIDOFF in Polangen, Kretinga, Darbenai, Libau, Riga, Memel
SCHORR, SCHERZER, JURIS and DAWID in Buckaczowce, Ottynia, Nadworna, and
Kolomyya
ZUNDER in Buckaczowce and Ivano-Frankivsk
KEMPNER in Berlin, Lodz, Warszawa and London
and GERSON, SIDERSKY in Gumbinnen, Koenigsberg, Danzig, Berlin and South
Africa


Latvia SIG #Latvia Volunteering/Facebook page #latvia

Jan Rabinowitz <janrab@...>
 

Thanks for setting up the FB page! I don't have a huge amount of extra time and few
usable skills, but I'm willing to help with whatever I can. I'm good at Word and Excel,
can't read Russian or Yiddish. But if you let me know what types of things need to be
done, I'll happily pick one or two out!

Jan Rabinowitz
Atlanta, GA

Searching in Latvia: SELIGSOHN, HIRSCH


United Nations Holocaust Outreach Programme #poland #lodz

Roni S. Liebowitz
 

Attended the screening of "The Last Flight of Petr Ginz" at the U.N.
last night and also saw the following exhibits. If you're in New York
area, the following are worth seeing. Note the "Faces of the Ghetto"
(Lodz Ghetto).

Check the UN website for information about
programs and tickets. Links at the bottom of this post.
24 January - 29 February 2012

Children and the Holocaust: International Day of Commemoration
in memory of the victims of the Holocaust

DESCRIPTION
Three exhibitions on the Holocaust will open to the public in the Main
Gallery of the Visitors Lobby, as part of a week-long series of
Holocaust remembrance activities at the United Nations.

The Face of the Ghetto: Pictures Taken by Jewish Photographers in the
Lodz Ghetto (Litzmannstadt Ghetto), 1940-1944 The exhibit presents new
photographs of community life in the Lodz Ghetto, taken by Jewish
inhabitants.

While researching in the National Archives in Lodz, historian Dr. Ingo
Loose and curator Dr. Thomas Lutz came across 27 photo albums; inside
were about 12,000 contact prints in small format, sorted thematically and
taken by Jewish photographers at the request of the ghetto's Jewish Council.
This collection of images - accessible to the public for the very first
time - shows a decisive step in the persecution of Jews in the Lizmannstadt
Ghetto.

A Monument of Good Deeds: Dreams and Hopes of Children during the
Holocaust. Curated by Yad Vashem, The Holocaust Martyrs' and Heroes'
Remembrance Authority, it features the stories of 13 children during
the Holocaust. Through their portraits, toys and artwork, visitors to
this exhibition will learn how these children lived their daily lives
as the war was raging around them.

Holocaust - Keeping the Memories Alive. The 16 top entries of the
Design Student Poster Contest. The exhibition is supported by the Task
Force for International Cooperation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance
and Research (ITF) and held in partnership with Yad Vashem, le Memorial
de la Shoah, the European Shoah Legacy Institute and the UN Holocaust
Programme.

WHERE
United Nations Headquarters, Visitors Lobby, Main Gallery.

SPONSORED BY
Holocaust remembrance activities at the United Nations are led by the
Holocaust and the United Nations Outreach Programme of the Department
of Public Information. The Programme, as established by General Assembly
resolution 60/7, aims to mobilize civil society for Holocaust remembrance
and education, in order to help prevent future acts of genocide.

PRESS RELEASE
http://www.un.org/News/Press/docs//2012/note6333.doc.htm

Holocaust and the United Nations Outreach Programme
http://www.un.org/en/holocaustremembrance/index.shtml
2012 Calendar of Holocaust Remembrance Events
http://www.un.org/en/holocaustremembrance/2012/calendar2012.html

Roni Seibel Liebowitz
New York


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland United Nations Holocaust Outreach Programme #lodz #poland

Roni S. Liebowitz
 

Attended the screening of "The Last Flight of Petr Ginz" at the U.N.
last night and also saw the following exhibits. If you're in New York
area, the following are worth seeing. Note the "Faces of the Ghetto"
(Lodz Ghetto).

Check the UN website for information about
programs and tickets. Links at the bottom of this post.
24 January - 29 February 2012

Children and the Holocaust: International Day of Commemoration
in memory of the victims of the Holocaust

DESCRIPTION
Three exhibitions on the Holocaust will open to the public in the Main
Gallery of the Visitors Lobby, as part of a week-long series of
Holocaust remembrance activities at the United Nations.

The Face of the Ghetto: Pictures Taken by Jewish Photographers in the
Lodz Ghetto (Litzmannstadt Ghetto), 1940-1944 The exhibit presents new
photographs of community life in the Lodz Ghetto, taken by Jewish
inhabitants.

While researching in the National Archives in Lodz, historian Dr. Ingo
Loose and curator Dr. Thomas Lutz came across 27 photo albums; inside
were about 12,000 contact prints in small format, sorted thematically and
taken by Jewish photographers at the request of the ghetto's Jewish Council.
This collection of images - accessible to the public for the very first
time - shows a decisive step in the persecution of Jews in the Lizmannstadt
Ghetto.

A Monument of Good Deeds: Dreams and Hopes of Children during the
Holocaust. Curated by Yad Vashem, The Holocaust Martyrs' and Heroes'
Remembrance Authority, it features the stories of 13 children during
the Holocaust. Through their portraits, toys and artwork, visitors to
this exhibition will learn how these children lived their daily lives
as the war was raging around them.

Holocaust - Keeping the Memories Alive. The 16 top entries of the
Design Student Poster Contest. The exhibition is supported by the Task
Force for International Cooperation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance
and Research (ITF) and held in partnership with Yad Vashem, le Memorial
de la Shoah, the European Shoah Legacy Institute and the UN Holocaust
Programme.

WHERE
United Nations Headquarters, Visitors Lobby, Main Gallery.

SPONSORED BY
Holocaust remembrance activities at the United Nations are led by the
Holocaust and the United Nations Outreach Programme of the Department
of Public Information. The Programme, as established by General Assembly
resolution 60/7, aims to mobilize civil society for Holocaust remembrance
and education, in order to help prevent future acts of genocide.

PRESS RELEASE
http://www.un.org/News/Press/docs//2012/note6333.doc.htm

Holocaust and the United Nations Outreach Programme
http://www.un.org/en/holocaustremembrance/index.shtml
2012 Calendar of Holocaust Remembrance Events
http://www.un.org/en/holocaustremembrance/2012/calendar2012.html

Roni Seibel Liebowitz
New York


BOWER #latvia

tracy sutherland <tracysutherland5@...>
 

Hi,

I am researching my grandfather, Simon Bower, who was born in
Manchester, UK. His parents, Max(well) and Leah were born in 1881 in
'Russia' (I don't know what part, or what year they moved to the UK).
Simon's siblings included Minnie, Barnett, Harry and Manuel. Some
moved in the 1940s/50s to South Africa, Australia and possibly New
York. They may have then gone onto other countries, but we have no
details of any of them.

Love to hear any advice on the above - and on where in 'Russia'
(Latvia?Other?) Leah and Max might have been born. Thanks, Tracy


Latvia SIG #Latvia BOWER #latvia

tracy sutherland <tracysutherland5@...>
 

Hi,

I am researching my grandfather, Simon Bower, who was born in
Manchester, UK. His parents, Max(well) and Leah were born in 1881 in
'Russia' (I don't know what part, or what year they moved to the UK).
Simon's siblings included Minnie, Barnett, Harry and Manuel. Some
moved in the 1940s/50s to South Africa, Australia and possibly New
York. They may have then gone onto other countries, but we have no
details of any of them.

Love to hear any advice on the above - and on where in 'Russia'
(Latvia?Other?) Leah and Max might have been born. Thanks, Tracy


birth dates #lithuania

Jonathan Alcantara <jba@...>
 

Dear All,

This is the first time I am writing to the list. I have been doing
family genealogy seriously for more than four years but have only
been looking at the Litvak records for little more than one year. I
am still finding my feet when it comes to the assumptions and leaps
of logic that are acceptable when doing Litvak genealogy.

When working (for example) on 20th century New York City genealogy,
one looks for very precise information before assuming a record
matches one's ancestor, because there were so many people in New York
with similar names, and records were usually quite accurate and
consistent. However, it seems to me that with the Litvak records, one
can have a situation where zero data points (e.g., names, dates,
places) correspond entirely to family histories or official US
records, and yet the match can be correct. I'm wondering whether the
experienced hands here can provide me with a better feeling for what
kinds of assumptions fall into the range of acceptability when trying
to find matching records.

My first question of this kind has to do with birth dates. It seems
to me that the birth dates in the Litvak records can differ wildly
from the dates later claimed on official documents in the country of
emigration, e.g. the USA. Not just the year, but the actual birth
date used in the US can fail to correspond at all to the date in the
Litvak birth records, which presumably are accurate and recorded just
after the actual birth. "Normally", I would take this discrepancy as
evidence of a false match, given that many people had the same names.
But I have the impression that the Litvaks just made up birthdays for
themselves in their adopted countries. I'm hoping others can share
their own experiences with this subject. My example:

My great-grandmother Bessie Henderson Gordon seems to originally have
been Hoda Bosha Gindes >from Pumpenai, born May 1, 1876 according to
the Litvak records. Her tombstone in New York records her birth date
as October 19,1881. This means she was claiming she was 5 years
younger than she actually was. I imagine my family would have
celebrated her birthday on October 19, since that is what ended up on
her tombstone - but how did they arrive at this date, especially if
her "real" birthdate was May 1?

There is more evidence that she liked to claim a false younger age.
On the 1920 US census, she claimed she was 36, when she would have
been 38 (1881 date) or 43 (Litvak 1876 date). On the 1930 census, she
claimed she was 42, so she shifted her birth year even four years
earlier. She was either 48 or 53 in reality, i.e. 10+ years older.
Her "official" date of 1881 made her one year younger than her
husband. She claimed to be two years younger than him in 1920 and
1930, when he was actually likely to have been 3 or 4 years younger
than she. One wonders if he knew her true age; but they may have both
been >from Pumpenai, and presumably he would have known her age if
they were >from the same town.

Her Litvak records were pointed out to me by a more experienced
genealogist, and the Gindes family seemed to match what was known
about her Henderson family (of Baltimore, MD), with no other record
in Lithuania matching at all; except, of course, for Bessie's
birthdate, which seemed to me too far apart >from what was on her
grave. These doubts led to a year of research on death certificates,
family graves, census records and ship manifests, which all matched
up and now seems to confirm 99.9% that the Gindes family of Pumpenai
are in fact my Hendersons, and my great-grandmother fiddled her
official age by 5 years and made up an entirely new birth date, for
whatever reason.

Thanks in advance for any insights you can offer on this subject.

Jonathan Alcantara
Oxfordshire, UK


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania birth dates #lithuania

Jonathan Alcantara <jba@...>
 

Dear All,

This is the first time I am writing to the list. I have been doing
family genealogy seriously for more than four years but have only
been looking at the Litvak records for little more than one year. I
am still finding my feet when it comes to the assumptions and leaps
of logic that are acceptable when doing Litvak genealogy.

When working (for example) on 20th century New York City genealogy,
one looks for very precise information before assuming a record
matches one's ancestor, because there were so many people in New York
with similar names, and records were usually quite accurate and
consistent. However, it seems to me that with the Litvak records, one
can have a situation where zero data points (e.g., names, dates,
places) correspond entirely to family histories or official US
records, and yet the match can be correct. I'm wondering whether the
experienced hands here can provide me with a better feeling for what
kinds of assumptions fall into the range of acceptability when trying
to find matching records.

My first question of this kind has to do with birth dates. It seems
to me that the birth dates in the Litvak records can differ wildly
from the dates later claimed on official documents in the country of
emigration, e.g. the USA. Not just the year, but the actual birth
date used in the US can fail to correspond at all to the date in the
Litvak birth records, which presumably are accurate and recorded just
after the actual birth. "Normally", I would take this discrepancy as
evidence of a false match, given that many people had the same names.
But I have the impression that the Litvaks just made up birthdays for
themselves in their adopted countries. I'm hoping others can share
their own experiences with this subject. My example:

My great-grandmother Bessie Henderson Gordon seems to originally have
been Hoda Bosha Gindes >from Pumpenai, born May 1, 1876 according to
the Litvak records. Her tombstone in New York records her birth date
as October 19,1881. This means she was claiming she was 5 years
younger than she actually was. I imagine my family would have
celebrated her birthday on October 19, since that is what ended up on
her tombstone - but how did they arrive at this date, especially if
her "real" birthdate was May 1?

There is more evidence that she liked to claim a false younger age.
On the 1920 US census, she claimed she was 36, when she would have
been 38 (1881 date) or 43 (Litvak 1876 date). On the 1930 census, she
claimed she was 42, so she shifted her birth year even four years
earlier. She was either 48 or 53 in reality, i.e. 10+ years older.
Her "official" date of 1881 made her one year younger than her
husband. She claimed to be two years younger than him in 1920 and
1930, when he was actually likely to have been 3 or 4 years younger
than she. One wonders if he knew her true age; but they may have both
been >from Pumpenai, and presumably he would have known her age if
they were >from the same town.

Her Litvak records were pointed out to me by a more experienced
genealogist, and the Gindes family seemed to match what was known
about her Henderson family (of Baltimore, MD), with no other record
in Lithuania matching at all; except, of course, for Bessie's
birthdate, which seemed to me too far apart >from what was on her
grave. These doubts led to a year of research on death certificates,
family graves, census records and ship manifests, which all matched
up and now seems to confirm 99.9% that the Gindes family of Pumpenai
are in fact my Hendersons, and my great-grandmother fiddled her
official age by 5 years and made up an entirely new birth date, for
whatever reason.

Thanks in advance for any insights you can offer on this subject.

Jonathan Alcantara
Oxfordshire, UK


Copy of book? #bessarabia

Carla Brauer-Lalezari <cblalezari@...>
 

Hi all,

Does anyone know how I can get a copy of the translated book:

Brichany:
Its Jewry in the first half of our century

Thanks,

Carla Brauer- Lalezari


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Copy of book? #bessarabia

Carla Brauer-Lalezari <cblalezari@...>
 

Hi all,

Does anyone know how I can get a copy of the translated book:

Brichany:
Its Jewry in the first half of our century

Thanks,

Carla Brauer- Lalezari


Attention All Samordikers #ukraine

uy9p1@...
 

June 4th, 2012 will mark the 70th anniversary of the murder of
our families by the Nazis in Samgorodok, Vinnitsa Oblast, Ukraine.
I intend to be there, hopefully with a cousin, to walk the approximately
2 kilometers >from the ghetto to the mass grave.

To all of my landsleit who intend to be in Samgorodok on June 4th, 2012
for that purpose I suggest that we coordinate our commemoration of the event.

Thank you,

Nathen Gabriel (grandson of Ruchel Dekhtyar)
North Vancouver, BC


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Attention All Samordikers #ukraine

uy9p1@...
 

June 4th, 2012 will mark the 70th anniversary of the murder of
our families by the Nazis in Samgorodok, Vinnitsa Oblast, Ukraine.
I intend to be there, hopefully with a cousin, to walk the approximately
2 kilometers >from the ghetto to the mass grave.

To all of my landsleit who intend to be in Samgorodok on June 4th, 2012
for that purpose I suggest that we coordinate our commemoration of the event.

Thank you,

Nathen Gabriel (grandson of Ruchel Dekhtyar)
North Vancouver, BC

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