Date   

Re: Database Inclusion #latvia

Michael Waas
 

Arlene Says

I think members would rather have a complete Index of names than no names at
all and as I have pointed out once you have the names you can pursue your research
on the Raduraksti site and Christine's site.
You cannot call it complete because that is what lies at the heart of
the problem. I think that if it were advertised as incomplete, we
would not be complaining. But the fact is, you cannot call it complete
when it is not. You talk of privileging those who can afford it on
LitvakSIG; I agree, it sucks terribly for someone like me who can't
afford it at this time. But you are also privileging information
elsewhere. It's not just Dvinsk. You write that the links are
included, which is simply not true. Talsen doesn't have it beyond a
link to the first page of the census records. I was lucky enough to
find two families I was looking for yesterday because I selected pages
at every 50 pages to see if I could find the street because I could,
in some cases, recognize what was written. It is worth remembering too
that knowing other languages in archaic scripts is also privileged and
not all of us even know what we are looking at.

I can only speak for myself but I am tremendously appreciative of the
hard work done. But I can tell you that until yesterday, in my Latvian
family research, we had no idea one family had children and that could
have been easily rectified with a note for each family that children
exist. A notice costs nothing and in fact, may have even brought money
into the SIG or even directly to the wonderful States Archivists in
Latvia.

Best,

Michael Waas
Miami, FL


Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: Database Inclusion #latvia

Michael Waas
 

Arlene Says

I think members would rather have a complete Index of names than no names at
all and as I have pointed out once you have the names you can pursue your research
on the Raduraksti site and Christine's site.
You cannot call it complete because that is what lies at the heart of
the problem. I think that if it were advertised as incomplete, we
would not be complaining. But the fact is, you cannot call it complete
when it is not. You talk of privileging those who can afford it on
LitvakSIG; I agree, it sucks terribly for someone like me who can't
afford it at this time. But you are also privileging information
elsewhere. It's not just Dvinsk. You write that the links are
included, which is simply not true. Talsen doesn't have it beyond a
link to the first page of the census records. I was lucky enough to
find two families I was looking for yesterday because I selected pages
at every 50 pages to see if I could find the street because I could,
in some cases, recognize what was written. It is worth remembering too
that knowing other languages in archaic scripts is also privileged and
not all of us even know what we are looking at.

I can only speak for myself but I am tremendously appreciative of the
hard work done. But I can tell you that until yesterday, in my Latvian
family research, we had no idea one family had children and that could
have been easily rectified with a note for each family that children
exist. A notice costs nothing and in fact, may have even brought money
into the SIG or even directly to the wonderful States Archivists in
Latvia.

Best,

Michael Waas
Miami, FL


New database title #latvia

Arlene Beare
 

I received a really appreciative and constructive email >from a member of the
newsgroup living in California. He pointed out that although I had explained
how the database was constructed on the newsgroup it was not clear on the
Jewishgen Latvia Database site. Many researchers are not members of the
newsgroup so I have decided to make the following change to the information
as it appears on the JewishGen Latvia Database front page. As Rita pointed
out in her email the information is clearly stated if you click on the name
of the database and read the Introduction to the 1897 database written by
Constance Whippman .

Almost half way down the page there is a large heading
"What is in the Database and What is Not".

Most researchers do not read the details of how each database on Jewishgen
is constructed and would be well advised to do so.

What will now appear on the front page for the 1897 database with Jewishgen
webmasters help is-

Surname Index for 25,000 individuals living in Riga,Rezekne,Krustpils and
Daugavpils and five towns in Courland as recorded in the All Russian Census
of 1897.

The Index concentrates on the head of the family, his spouse and adult
children. It does not include the full details of every family unit.
Occasionally there is a record of younger children but not all siblings are
consistently extracted.

All names are linked to the Archive database(Raduraksti) where the original
documents can be read.

If you are researching and your family name is missing then probably it is
not in the Census. I cannot guarantee that mistakes are never made but if
they do occur they are few. Please do not immediately lay the blame on the
person extracting the data. My grandfather is missing >from the USA census of
1930 but was in the 1920 census. He died in 1935 so he should be there but
he is not. The same goes for my grandparents missing >from the 1901 UK census
when I know they were here. There are many reasons such as they could have
been out of the Country, they did not want to be listed and made themselves
scarce at the time, the census taker omitted their names or they were left
out when it was transcribed. There are so many pitfalls when pursuing
these ancestors and genealogists know this. My grandfather Benjamin appears
as Banjamin in the 1920 census.

The Paris Conference starts Sunday so the changes may take a while as the
Webmasters will away at the Conference.

I hope this will finally clarify matters and we can cease to have complaints
when all we are trying to do is help one another.

I would like to thank all those who have written such supportive emails to
me. I have really appreciated it.

Arlene Beare UK


Latvia SIG #Latvia New database title #latvia

Arlene Beare
 

I received a really appreciative and constructive email >from a member of the
newsgroup living in California. He pointed out that although I had explained
how the database was constructed on the newsgroup it was not clear on the
Jewishgen Latvia Database site. Many researchers are not members of the
newsgroup so I have decided to make the following change to the information
as it appears on the JewishGen Latvia Database front page. As Rita pointed
out in her email the information is clearly stated if you click on the name
of the database and read the Introduction to the 1897 database written by
Constance Whippman .

Almost half way down the page there is a large heading
"What is in the Database and What is Not".

Most researchers do not read the details of how each database on Jewishgen
is constructed and would be well advised to do so.

What will now appear on the front page for the 1897 database with Jewishgen
webmasters help is-

Surname Index for 25,000 individuals living in Riga,Rezekne,Krustpils and
Daugavpils and five towns in Courland as recorded in the All Russian Census
of 1897.

The Index concentrates on the head of the family, his spouse and adult
children. It does not include the full details of every family unit.
Occasionally there is a record of younger children but not all siblings are
consistently extracted.

All names are linked to the Archive database(Raduraksti) where the original
documents can be read.

If you are researching and your family name is missing then probably it is
not in the Census. I cannot guarantee that mistakes are never made but if
they do occur they are few. Please do not immediately lay the blame on the
person extracting the data. My grandfather is missing >from the USA census of
1930 but was in the 1920 census. He died in 1935 so he should be there but
he is not. The same goes for my grandparents missing >from the 1901 UK census
when I know they were here. There are many reasons such as they could have
been out of the Country, they did not want to be listed and made themselves
scarce at the time, the census taker omitted their names or they were left
out when it was transcribed. There are so many pitfalls when pursuing
these ancestors and genealogists know this. My grandfather Benjamin appears
as Banjamin in the 1920 census.

The Paris Conference starts Sunday so the changes may take a while as the
Webmasters will away at the Conference.

I hope this will finally clarify matters and we can cease to have complaints
when all we are trying to do is help one another.

I would like to thank all those who have written such supportive emails to
me. I have really appreciated it.

Arlene Beare UK


Courland Translation Request #latvia

Ben Forman
 

Hi Genners

I have posted on Viewmate three exceprts >from an 1811 housing list for
Hazenpoth in Courland relating to my Benson family, I would be really
appreciative of a translation of each of these documents if possible.

The URLs are:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23572
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23571
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23573

Many thanks as always in advance for your time

Ben
Ben Forman
Manchester UK,(currently exiled in London)

searching: BENSON: Hasenpoth/Courland;
BERNSTEIN/WEINER: Ylakai;
CAHN/CAHEN/WOLF: Zuendorf/Bruhl/Lechenich/Ahrweiler;
FURMAN: Kaluszyn;
GEVER: Daugavpils/Dvinsk;
SAWADY: Zavadi,Posen;
STILLMAN: Pilica/Ogrodzieniec/Czestechowa;
ZEYDER/SEIDER: Kursan,Lithuania


Latvia SIG #Latvia Courland Translation Request #latvia

Ben Forman
 

Hi Genners

I have posted on Viewmate three exceprts >from an 1811 housing list for
Hazenpoth in Courland relating to my Benson family, I would be really
appreciative of a translation of each of these documents if possible.

The URLs are:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23572
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23571
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23573

Many thanks as always in advance for your time

Ben
Ben Forman
Manchester UK,(currently exiled in London)

searching: BENSON: Hasenpoth/Courland;
BERNSTEIN/WEINER: Ylakai;
CAHN/CAHEN/WOLF: Zuendorf/Bruhl/Lechenich/Ahrweiler;
FURMAN: Kaluszyn;
GEVER: Daugavpils/Dvinsk;
SAWADY: Zavadi,Posen;
STILLMAN: Pilica/Ogrodzieniec/Czestechowa;
ZEYDER/SEIDER: Kursan,Lithuania


Translations - Sam Yurik & Charles Nemeroff, Jewish soldiers' letters home from WWI: Jewish Legion #ukraine

epk13@...
 

I need translations >from Yiddish for these letters >from Sam YURIK, a Russian Jewish immigrant to the US who volunteered for the Jewish Legion in World War I. The logo of two flags crossed, plus the return address on the first of these letters, suggests that Sam was training in Canada, which squares with information I found online about how volunteers for the Jewish Legion would have been trained--first in Canada, then in the UK, before being deployed again the Ottoman Turks in the defense of Palestine.

Each image below includes two pages of letters.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23537

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23538

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23544

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23546

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23545

I have also found a record for Sam Yurik, "British Army WWI Medal Rolls" index, which reads: Sam Yurik, Royal Fusiliers, Regimental number J/6474. I can't tell >from the British card what medal Sam received or for what actions. This suggests that he did, in fact, serve in combat, perhaps in the defense of Palestine. How do I find out where he served? How do I learn what his medal was for? I have found Sam's ship manifest for his return journey to New York, via Glasgow, in 1919.

from records I've found online I know that Sam Yurik emigrated to the US >from Podolia, Russia in 1914. I've found his WWI draft card, dated 5 June 1917, which shows that he was single, 22 years old, working as a hat maker. He was a resident alien at the time. Sam's letters, like the letters of Charles NEMEROFF, which I posted last month, were most likely written to Lena CHILENSKY also a Russian Jewish immigrant and a fellow-worker in the hat and cap makers trade in Manhattan. There were all left wing labor union organizers.
All of these letters have been sent to me by Lena Chilensky's daughter in California (a member of the extended SPIWAK clan), who has no idea what they say or who they're from. It would be a great gift to the family to have these translated.

These letters were found together with letters I posted last month, >from Charles Nemeroff, a labor organizer in the cap and hat makers union, who wrote to his women co-workers while in training at Camp Upton (now the home of Brookhaven labs), and later, >from France, on Foyer du Soldat stationery. Charlie was in France when the war ended. And did not return home to New York for some time.

Would anyone be interested in translating the rest of Charlie's letters, too? I also have more letters >from Charles Nemeroff, six >from his training experience at Camp Upton, and one more >from France at the end of the war. It would be interesting to know what this left wing Russian Jewish immigrant to the US thought of the war. He implied, in letters >from France translated last month that what he'd witnessed changed his mind about war.

If anyone becomes interested in these letters and would like to help further, I have more letters >from Sam Yurik, including one that is 8 pages long. I'd like to know who he's writing to (is it Lena, or, as Charles Nemeroff did, did Sam address himself to his co-workers at the hat making factory?), and what dates, if any, are on each letter. In at least one letter, Sam appears to be sending the recipient information about someone to contact in Brooklyn--who and why?

Finally, how common or uncommon are these examples of stationery? Have many members of Jewish Gen seen (or found) letters home in Yiddish >from new immigrants drafted or who volunteered during WWI? Have others found letters >from kin who served with the Jewish Legion in World War I? What archives might be interested in these letters?

I would be happy to provide legible scans of the letters to anyone who wished to help translate and interpret them.

Thank you.


Patricia Klindienst

Guilford, CT USA


SPIWAK /SPIVAK, BURD, KALIK, MILSTEIN, GOLDENBERG of Orgeyev, Kishinev, and Capresti; Mendoza, Argentina. SCHAPOSCHNIK / ZAPOSNEK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Elisavetgrad, or Mendoza, Argentina; and their related names, SHAPIN, SHAPIRO. BELINKSY, SCHOCHETMAN of Odessa (who became SCHACHT in the US). VOLMAN, LICHT of Briceva, Capresti. TSAREVKAN/ CIRIFCAN/ SARAFCONN of Orgeyev, Teleneshti, Argentina, Uruguay, becoming COHEN in the US.

Moderator's Note - Please respond on Viewmate or privately


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Translations - Sam Yurik & Charles Nemeroff, Jewish soldiers' letters home from WWI: Jewish Legion #ukraine

epk13@...
 

I need translations >from Yiddish for these letters >from Sam YURIK, a Russian Jewish immigrant to the US who volunteered for the Jewish Legion in World War I. The logo of two flags crossed, plus the return address on the first of these letters, suggests that Sam was training in Canada, which squares with information I found online about how volunteers for the Jewish Legion would have been trained--first in Canada, then in the UK, before being deployed again the Ottoman Turks in the defense of Palestine.

Each image below includes two pages of letters.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23537

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23538

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23544

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23546

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23545

I have also found a record for Sam Yurik, "British Army WWI Medal Rolls" index, which reads: Sam Yurik, Royal Fusiliers, Regimental number J/6474. I can't tell >from the British card what medal Sam received or for what actions. This suggests that he did, in fact, serve in combat, perhaps in the defense of Palestine. How do I find out where he served? How do I learn what his medal was for? I have found Sam's ship manifest for his return journey to New York, via Glasgow, in 1919.

from records I've found online I know that Sam Yurik emigrated to the US >from Podolia, Russia in 1914. I've found his WWI draft card, dated 5 June 1917, which shows that he was single, 22 years old, working as a hat maker. He was a resident alien at the time. Sam's letters, like the letters of Charles NEMEROFF, which I posted last month, were most likely written to Lena CHILENSKY also a Russian Jewish immigrant and a fellow-worker in the hat and cap makers trade in Manhattan. There were all left wing labor union organizers.
All of these letters have been sent to me by Lena Chilensky's daughter in California (a member of the extended SPIWAK clan), who has no idea what they say or who they're from. It would be a great gift to the family to have these translated.

These letters were found together with letters I posted last month, >from Charles Nemeroff, a labor organizer in the cap and hat makers union, who wrote to his women co-workers while in training at Camp Upton (now the home of Brookhaven labs), and later, >from France, on Foyer du Soldat stationery. Charlie was in France when the war ended. And did not return home to New York for some time.

Would anyone be interested in translating the rest of Charlie's letters, too? I also have more letters >from Charles Nemeroff, six >from his training experience at Camp Upton, and one more >from France at the end of the war. It would be interesting to know what this left wing Russian Jewish immigrant to the US thought of the war. He implied, in letters >from France translated last month that what he'd witnessed changed his mind about war.

If anyone becomes interested in these letters and would like to help further, I have more letters >from Sam Yurik, including one that is 8 pages long. I'd like to know who he's writing to (is it Lena, or, as Charles Nemeroff did, did Sam address himself to his co-workers at the hat making factory?), and what dates, if any, are on each letter. In at least one letter, Sam appears to be sending the recipient information about someone to contact in Brooklyn--who and why?

Finally, how common or uncommon are these examples of stationery? Have many members of Jewish Gen seen (or found) letters home in Yiddish >from new immigrants drafted or who volunteered during WWI? Have others found letters >from kin who served with the Jewish Legion in World War I? What archives might be interested in these letters?

I would be happy to provide legible scans of the letters to anyone who wished to help translate and interpret them.

Thank you.


Patricia Klindienst

Guilford, CT USA


SPIWAK /SPIVAK, BURD, KALIK, MILSTEIN, GOLDENBERG of Orgeyev, Kishinev, and Capresti; Mendoza, Argentina. SCHAPOSCHNIK / ZAPOSNEK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Elisavetgrad, or Mendoza, Argentina; and their related names, SHAPIN, SHAPIRO. BELINKSY, SCHOCHETMAN of Odessa (who became SCHACHT in the US). VOLMAN, LICHT of Briceva, Capresti. TSAREVKAN/ CIRIFCAN/ SARAFCONN of Orgeyev, Teleneshti, Argentina, Uruguay, becoming COHEN in the US.

Moderator's Note - Please respond on Viewmate or privately


Maramaros megye (county), Hungary -- most common surnames #ukraine

Asparagirl
 

The following is a list of the most common family surnames in
Maramaros megye, as pulled >from the more than 12,200 19th century
records that have now been completely transcribed and added to
JewishGen, and the more than 30,000 records that are still in progress
of being transcribed. This is not a list of every single surname that
shows up in the county, but it does represent the most commonly seen
ones so far, and some of their common spelling variants. Some of
these names are not commonly seen elsewhere in Europe. (My personal
favorite on the list is INDIK / INDIG, which means "turkey" in Yiddish
even though a turkey is a North American bird.)

Note that most surnames in the county tended to use the suffix -OVITS
or -OVICS rather than -OWITZ or -OWICZ while the county was in
Hungary, and then switched to spelling the suffix as -OVICI when part
of the county became Romanian. Furthermore, some spellings that ended
in -Z or -TZ or -CZ switched to a -TI spelling when part of the county
became Romanian. For example, MARKOWITZ and MARKOVITS and MARKOVICS
and MARKOVICI are actually all spellings for the same family in these
records, as are GANZ, GANCZ, GANTZ, and GANTI. You are more likely to
see the Romanian version of the surnames show up in the marriage
records, many of which had late registrations in the 1920's and 1930's
and were found at the end of many of these "19th century" register
books.

Finally, note that a number of these surnames (and the families that
carried them) actually come >from the southern part of Galicia, just
over the Carpathian mountains, in the area of what was once
Stanislawow powiat, Poland and is now Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine.
The vital records indicate that number of people >from towns in that
area of Galicia ended up settling in Maramaros megye in the mid-19th
century, including Kolomyya (Kolomea), Nadvirna (Nadworna), Kalush
(Kalusz), etc. So if you know you had relatives in southern Galicia,
it might be worth taking a peek at the records >from Maramaros to see
if any branches of your family moved south to Hungary.

Here's the surname list:

ABLAKOS (OBLOKOS)
ABRAHAMOVICS (ABRAHAMOVITS)
ADLER
APPEL (APEL, APFEL, APIL)
APTER
ASZTALOS
AVICS (AVITS, OVICS, OVITS)
BAS (BASS, BASCH)
BAK (BACH)
BERGER
BERKOVICS (BERKOVITS)
BIDERMAN
BISTRITZ (BISTRIZ, BISTRICZ)
BLOCH
BREBAN
CHAIMOVICS (CHAIMOVITS)
CZEICHNER
CZIG (ZIG)
CZIMERMAN
CZSOBAN
CZUKER
DASZKAL (DASKAL, DASCAL)
DAVIDOVICS (DAVIDOVITS)
DEBLINGER
DEUTSCH (DEITS, DEUTS)
DIKER (DIKKER)
DRATLER
DREIZINGER
DUB (DUBB)
EIDELSTEIN (AIDELSTEIN, ODELSTEIN)
EINHORN (EINHOREN)
EISENBERGER (EIZENBERGER)
ELEFANT
ENGELMAN
FARKAS (FORKOS)
FARKOVITS
FEDER
FEIERVERGER (FAJERVERGER, FEJERVERKER)
FEIG (FAIG)
FEINTUCH
FESZTINGER (FESTINGER)
FISCH (FISH, FIS, FISCHER, FISER, FISSER, FUSCHER)
FISMAN (FISHMAN, FISCHMAN)
FOGEL (FOGIL, VOGEL)
FRIED (FRID)
FRIEDMAN
FRUCHTER
FUCHS (FUKSZ, FUCHSZ, FUX)
FUXLER
GANZ (GANCZ, GANTZ)
GELER (GELLER)
GENUT (GENUD, GENUTH)
GLAZER (GLUZER, GLASER)
GLIK (GLICK, GLUCK, GLUK)
GOLDSMIED
GOLDSTEIN
GREIF
GRIFEL (GRIFFEL)
GROSZ (GRUSZ)
GRUBER
GRUN
GRUNFELD (GRINFELD)
GUTMAN (GUTTMAN)
HAGER
HANZ
HARFENISZ
HECHT
HELLER
HERSHOVICS (HERSCHOVITS, HERSKOVICS, HERSKOVITS)
HERSTIG (HERSTIK)
HOCH
HOCHMAN
HOFFMAN (HOFMAN)
HONIG (HONIK)
HORN (HOREN)
HUBER
HUSZ (HUZ, HUSCH)
ICKOVICS (ICKOVITS, ICKAVICS, ICKAVITS)
INDIG (INDIK)
INGBER
ITZAKOVICS (ITZAKOVITS)
IZKOVICS (IZKOVITS)
JACOBOVICS (JACOBOVITS, JACOBAVITS, JACOBAVICS)
JAGER (JEGER, JAEGER)
JASZTRAP
JOSZEPOVICS (JOZSEPOVITS)
JUNGER
KAHAN
KAMINER (KOMINER)
KARO
KATZ (KACZ)
KASTNER (KASZNER, KASZTNER, KASZIRER, KASSIRER, KAZINER, KASZIR)
KAUFMAN (KOFFMAN)
KIEF (KEAFE)
KIND
KIPPER (KIPER, KUPPER, KUPER, KUPFER)
KIZELNIK (KIZELNICK)
KLEIN
KOFLER (KOFFLER, KOFFELER)
KREINDLER (KREINER)
LANDESMAN (LANDESZMAN)
LANG (LUNG, LUNK)
LANKSZNER (LANXNER)
LAX (LAKSZ)
LEBOVICS (LEBOVITS)
LEMPERT (LEMPART)
LENGYER
LERNER
LUSTIG (LUSZTIK)
MAJEROVICS (MAJEROVITS)
MALLEK (MALEK, MALIK, MALLIK, MALEC)
MARKOVICS (MARKOVITS)
MARMOR (MARMER, MARMAROS)
MEIZLER
MENDELOVICS (MENDELOVITS)
MENSCHENFREUND
MOLDOVAN (MOLDIVAN, MALDIVAN)
MOSKOVICS (MOSKOVITS)
MOSZKAL (MOSZKALY, MUSZKAL, MUSZKALY)
MULER (MULLER)
NEUFELD
NEULANDER
NEUMAN (NEIMAN)
OXENBERG
PAPOVICS (PAPOVITS)
PASZTERNAK
PERL (PERIL)
PIKEL
POLLAK (POLLACK, POLAK)
PREISZ
PREIZLER (PREISZLER)
RATNER (ROTNER, RUDNER)
REIZNER (REISZNER)
REZMANOVICS (REZMANOVITS, REZMOVICS, REZMOVITS)
RIZEL (RIZ)
ROTH (RAT, RATH)
ROZENBERG (ROSENBERG)
RUB
RUBINSTEIN
SACHTER
SAJOVICS (SAJOVITS)
SCHNEIDER
SCHWARCZ (SVARCZ, SCHWARTZ)
SIMON
SLOMOVICS (SLOMOVITS)
SNITZER (SNICZER)
SOHL
SPICZER (SPITZER, SPRITZER)
SREIBER
STAHL (STUHL, STUL)
STEIN
STEINBERGER
STEINER
STEINMETZ
STERN
STOBER (STOIBER)
STRIKBERG (STRIKBERGER)
SZABO (SZOBO)
SZAPLANCZAN
SZAKS (SZAKSZ, SZAX, SAX)
SZALAMAN (SZALAMON)
SZMUK
TABAK (TABACK, TOBAK)
TAVEL (TUVEL)
TEITELBAUM
TESZLER (TESLER)
TOB (TOBB, TAUB)
TRAUB (TROPP)
URL (UHRL)
WALDMAN
WALLERSTEIN (VOLLERSTEIN)
WAX (VAX, WAKSZ, VAKSZ)
WAREM (WARM, WARUM, VAREM, VARM, VARUM)
WEIDER (WIDER, VIEDER, VIDER)
WEISEL (WISEL, WIZEL, VIESEL, VIEZEL, VIZEL)
WEISZNER (VEISZNER, VIEZNER)
WERTZBERGER (VERTZBERGER, VERCZBERGER)
WEGH (WEG, WIG, VEG, VEGH, VIG)
WEISZ (VEISZ)
WIGDEROVICS (VIGDEROVICS, WIGDEROVITS, VIGDEROVITS)
WOLF (VOLF)
ZELIGKOVICS (ZELIGKOVITS)
ZELMANOVICS (ZELMANOVITS)
ZIM


- Brooke Schreier Ganz
Los Angeles, California


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Maramaros megye (county), Hungary -- most common surnames #ukraine

Asparagirl
 

The following is a list of the most common family surnames in
Maramaros megye, as pulled >from the more than 12,200 19th century
records that have now been completely transcribed and added to
JewishGen, and the more than 30,000 records that are still in progress
of being transcribed. This is not a list of every single surname that
shows up in the county, but it does represent the most commonly seen
ones so far, and some of their common spelling variants. Some of
these names are not commonly seen elsewhere in Europe. (My personal
favorite on the list is INDIK / INDIG, which means "turkey" in Yiddish
even though a turkey is a North American bird.)

Note that most surnames in the county tended to use the suffix -OVITS
or -OVICS rather than -OWITZ or -OWICZ while the county was in
Hungary, and then switched to spelling the suffix as -OVICI when part
of the county became Romanian. Furthermore, some spellings that ended
in -Z or -TZ or -CZ switched to a -TI spelling when part of the county
became Romanian. For example, MARKOWITZ and MARKOVITS and MARKOVICS
and MARKOVICI are actually all spellings for the same family in these
records, as are GANZ, GANCZ, GANTZ, and GANTI. You are more likely to
see the Romanian version of the surnames show up in the marriage
records, many of which had late registrations in the 1920's and 1930's
and were found at the end of many of these "19th century" register
books.

Finally, note that a number of these surnames (and the families that
carried them) actually come >from the southern part of Galicia, just
over the Carpathian mountains, in the area of what was once
Stanislawow powiat, Poland and is now Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine.
The vital records indicate that number of people >from towns in that
area of Galicia ended up settling in Maramaros megye in the mid-19th
century, including Kolomyya (Kolomea), Nadvirna (Nadworna), Kalush
(Kalusz), etc. So if you know you had relatives in southern Galicia,
it might be worth taking a peek at the records >from Maramaros to see
if any branches of your family moved south to Hungary.

Here's the surname list:

ABLAKOS (OBLOKOS)
ABRAHAMOVICS (ABRAHAMOVITS)
ADLER
APPEL (APEL, APFEL, APIL)
APTER
ASZTALOS
AVICS (AVITS, OVICS, OVITS)
BAS (BASS, BASCH)
BAK (BACH)
BERGER
BERKOVICS (BERKOVITS)
BIDERMAN
BISTRITZ (BISTRIZ, BISTRICZ)
BLOCH
BREBAN
CHAIMOVICS (CHAIMOVITS)
CZEICHNER
CZIG (ZIG)
CZIMERMAN
CZSOBAN
CZUKER
DASZKAL (DASKAL, DASCAL)
DAVIDOVICS (DAVIDOVITS)
DEBLINGER
DEUTSCH (DEITS, DEUTS)
DIKER (DIKKER)
DRATLER
DREIZINGER
DUB (DUBB)
EIDELSTEIN (AIDELSTEIN, ODELSTEIN)
EINHORN (EINHOREN)
EISENBERGER (EIZENBERGER)
ELEFANT
ENGELMAN
FARKAS (FORKOS)
FARKOVITS
FEDER
FEIERVERGER (FAJERVERGER, FEJERVERKER)
FEIG (FAIG)
FEINTUCH
FESZTINGER (FESTINGER)
FISCH (FISH, FIS, FISCHER, FISER, FISSER, FUSCHER)
FISMAN (FISHMAN, FISCHMAN)
FOGEL (FOGIL, VOGEL)
FRIED (FRID)
FRIEDMAN
FRUCHTER
FUCHS (FUKSZ, FUCHSZ, FUX)
FUXLER
GANZ (GANCZ, GANTZ)
GELER (GELLER)
GENUT (GENUD, GENUTH)
GLAZER (GLUZER, GLASER)
GLIK (GLICK, GLUCK, GLUK)
GOLDSMIED
GOLDSTEIN
GREIF
GRIFEL (GRIFFEL)
GROSZ (GRUSZ)
GRUBER
GRUN
GRUNFELD (GRINFELD)
GUTMAN (GUTTMAN)
HAGER
HANZ
HARFENISZ
HECHT
HELLER
HERSHOVICS (HERSCHOVITS, HERSKOVICS, HERSKOVITS)
HERSTIG (HERSTIK)
HOCH
HOCHMAN
HOFFMAN (HOFMAN)
HONIG (HONIK)
HORN (HOREN)
HUBER
HUSZ (HUZ, HUSCH)
ICKOVICS (ICKOVITS, ICKAVICS, ICKAVITS)
INDIG (INDIK)
INGBER
ITZAKOVICS (ITZAKOVITS)
IZKOVICS (IZKOVITS)
JACOBOVICS (JACOBOVITS, JACOBAVITS, JACOBAVICS)
JAGER (JEGER, JAEGER)
JASZTRAP
JOSZEPOVICS (JOZSEPOVITS)
JUNGER
KAHAN
KAMINER (KOMINER)
KARO
KATZ (KACZ)
KASTNER (KASZNER, KASZTNER, KASZIRER, KASSIRER, KAZINER, KASZIR)
KAUFMAN (KOFFMAN)
KIEF (KEAFE)
KIND
KIPPER (KIPER, KUPPER, KUPER, KUPFER)
KIZELNIK (KIZELNICK)
KLEIN
KOFLER (KOFFLER, KOFFELER)
KREINDLER (KREINER)
LANDESMAN (LANDESZMAN)
LANG (LUNG, LUNK)
LANKSZNER (LANXNER)
LAX (LAKSZ)
LEBOVICS (LEBOVITS)
LEMPERT (LEMPART)
LENGYER
LERNER
LUSTIG (LUSZTIK)
MAJEROVICS (MAJEROVITS)
MALLEK (MALEK, MALIK, MALLIK, MALEC)
MARKOVICS (MARKOVITS)
MARMOR (MARMER, MARMAROS)
MEIZLER
MENDELOVICS (MENDELOVITS)
MENSCHENFREUND
MOLDOVAN (MOLDIVAN, MALDIVAN)
MOSKOVICS (MOSKOVITS)
MOSZKAL (MOSZKALY, MUSZKAL, MUSZKALY)
MULER (MULLER)
NEUFELD
NEULANDER
NEUMAN (NEIMAN)
OXENBERG
PAPOVICS (PAPOVITS)
PASZTERNAK
PERL (PERIL)
PIKEL
POLLAK (POLLACK, POLAK)
PREISZ
PREIZLER (PREISZLER)
RATNER (ROTNER, RUDNER)
REIZNER (REISZNER)
REZMANOVICS (REZMANOVITS, REZMOVICS, REZMOVITS)
RIZEL (RIZ)
ROTH (RAT, RATH)
ROZENBERG (ROSENBERG)
RUB
RUBINSTEIN
SACHTER
SAJOVICS (SAJOVITS)
SCHNEIDER
SCHWARCZ (SVARCZ, SCHWARTZ)
SIMON
SLOMOVICS (SLOMOVITS)
SNITZER (SNICZER)
SOHL
SPICZER (SPITZER, SPRITZER)
SREIBER
STAHL (STUHL, STUL)
STEIN
STEINBERGER
STEINER
STEINMETZ
STERN
STOBER (STOIBER)
STRIKBERG (STRIKBERGER)
SZABO (SZOBO)
SZAPLANCZAN
SZAKS (SZAKSZ, SZAX, SAX)
SZALAMAN (SZALAMON)
SZMUK
TABAK (TABACK, TOBAK)
TAVEL (TUVEL)
TEITELBAUM
TESZLER (TESLER)
TOB (TOBB, TAUB)
TRAUB (TROPP)
URL (UHRL)
WALDMAN
WALLERSTEIN (VOLLERSTEIN)
WAX (VAX, WAKSZ, VAKSZ)
WAREM (WARM, WARUM, VAREM, VARM, VARUM)
WEIDER (WIDER, VIEDER, VIDER)
WEISEL (WISEL, WIZEL, VIESEL, VIEZEL, VIZEL)
WEISZNER (VEISZNER, VIEZNER)
WERTZBERGER (VERTZBERGER, VERCZBERGER)
WEGH (WEG, WIG, VEG, VEGH, VIG)
WEISZ (VEISZ)
WIGDEROVICS (VIGDEROVICS, WIGDEROVITS, VIGDEROVITS)
WOLF (VOLF)
ZELIGKOVICS (ZELIGKOVITS)
ZELMANOVICS (ZELMANOVITS)
ZIM


- Brooke Schreier Ganz
Los Angeles, California


Russian Translation Help Needed for Tashkent Refugee Cards #ukraine

Linda Shefler
 

I just stumbled upon Tashkent Refugee Cards for some cousins >from Belaya
Tserkov and would greatly appreciate help translating them.

Here are the direct links:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23543
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23541
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23540
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23539
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23542

There is not a lot of information on each of the cards, but I am sure
whatever is there will be helpful.

Many thanks,
Linda Silverman Shefler
Formerly of Hod HaSharon, recently relocated to Dublin, CA
linda.shefler@gmail.com


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Russian Translation Help Needed for Tashkent Refugee Cards #ukraine

Linda Shefler
 

I just stumbled upon Tashkent Refugee Cards for some cousins >from Belaya
Tserkov and would greatly appreciate help translating them.

Here are the direct links:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23543
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23541
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23540
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23539
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23542

There is not a lot of information on each of the cards, but I am sure
whatever is there will be helpful.

Many thanks,
Linda Silverman Shefler
Formerly of Hod HaSharon, recently relocated to Dublin, CA
linda.shefler@gmail.com


New BMD databases online for Maramaros megye (county), Hungary, now northern Romania and sub-Carpathian Ukraine #ukraine

Asparagirl
 

JewishGen's Hungarian Special Interest Group (H-SIG) is excited to
announce that more than 12,200 birth, marriage, and death records from
the former Hungarian county of Maramaros have just been released as
three new databases on JewishGen. This represents the first live
searchable data >from the Maramaros/Maramures Jewish Records Project
(www.MaramarosJewishRecords.com).

Maramaros megye (county) was located in far northeastern Hungary until
1920, but the territory is today split up between Zakarpattiya
(sub-Carpathian) oblast in southwestern Ukraine and Maramures judet
(county) in northern Romania. Because the official languages and
spellings used in the area have changed dramatically over time, as did
the borders, all of the town names in these databases include both
their original Hungarian town names and their modern-day Romanian or
Ukrainian town names, to make searching the data much easier.

These books were kept by rabbis in the Jewish community from
approximately 1851 until October 1895, at which time the Hungarian
government started keeping new civil records that recorded the events
of everyone in each town, regardless of their religion. A few of
these solely-Jewish record books continued being kept after 1895, but
only unofficially. And a few record books, not yet online, actually
date back to the late 18th Century, predating the Hungarian
government's requirements (and in some cases predating local Jews
having surnames).

These record books are today stored in a regional branch of the
Romanian National Archives in the city of Baia Mare, Maramures county,
Romania. Between 2009 and 2011, the books were digitally photographed
by a fabulous Romanian photographer and researcher named Dan Jurca,
who traveled to Baia Mare -- first on behalf of Maramaros researcher
Brooke Schreier Ganz and then on behalf of this newly-formed H-SIG
project -- to digitally photograph every surviving Jewish record book
stored at the archives, all 113 of them.

The photographs he took are being transcribed by a host of volunteers,
and these three new databases represent approximately one quarter of
the eventual record total -- more than 12,200 completed records out of
an eventual estimated 52,000 records. Given that each record has at
least three to six names in it (parents, spouses, the Sendak at each
Bris (!), witnesses, etc.), we think there will be about 200,000
indexed names when the project is eventually completed.

Because the borders of this area have changed so much over the past
century, there are even some records in these databases >from a few
towns that were formerly located in Szatmar (Satmar) megye, Hungary
but which are now located in Maramures county, Romania.

But unfortunately, most records for the towns >from the northwestern
part of Maramaros megye -- the areas in and near the city of Huszt
(now Khust, Ukraine) and westwards -- were not found in the Baia Mare
archives and therefore are not in this records set. We assume that
those records, if they still exist, are stored in one of the Ukrainian
archives.

You can search these three new Maramaros databases in their entirety
from JewishGen's Hungary Database, here:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary/

Furthermore, for the record books where the "town of registration" is
today in Ukraine, you can also search those as part of JewishGen's
Ukraine Database, and for the record books where the "town of
registration" is today in Romania, you can also search those as part
of JewishGen's Romania Database. But if you want to make sure you can
see all of the data, regardless of the town's modern location, use the
Hungary Database interface.

To see which towns and which years are included in this first release,
you can check out the data table here:

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary/Maramaros.htm

That link also has a few sample photos of what the old record books look like.

Finally, for the most up-to-date project updates and listing of what
records survived >from which towns and which years, and which ones are
available for transcribers, or have a transcription in progress, or
have a transcription completed, the project's official website is
located here:

http://www.MaramarosJewishRecords.com/

Much thanks and gratitude go to our tireless volunteers who have
worked on these old records for quite a while now, and to the more
than thirty volunteers still working on indexing books at the moment.
(We're always looking for more volunteers, so if you like pretty
pictures of old vital records, feel free to join!) Thanks also go to
project co-coordinator Sandy Malek and to H-SIG leader Vivian Kahn for
their help and forbearance. And thanks also go to Romanian researcher
Dan Jurca for photographing all the records, to Budapest-based
researcher Beth Long for originally putting me in touch with Dan and
for all her good advice, to all the generous people who made donations
to the project's fund at JewishGen to help pay for the photography,
and to Warren Blatt and Michael Tobias and everyone at JewishGen for
helping to make this possible.


- Brooke Schreier Ganz
Los Angeles, California


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine New BMD databases online for Maramaros megye (county), Hungary, now northern Romania and sub-Carpathian Ukraine #ukraine

Asparagirl
 

JewishGen's Hungarian Special Interest Group (H-SIG) is excited to
announce that more than 12,200 birth, marriage, and death records from
the former Hungarian county of Maramaros have just been released as
three new databases on JewishGen. This represents the first live
searchable data >from the Maramaros/Maramures Jewish Records Project
(www.MaramarosJewishRecords.com).

Maramaros megye (county) was located in far northeastern Hungary until
1920, but the territory is today split up between Zakarpattiya
(sub-Carpathian) oblast in southwestern Ukraine and Maramures judet
(county) in northern Romania. Because the official languages and
spellings used in the area have changed dramatically over time, as did
the borders, all of the town names in these databases include both
their original Hungarian town names and their modern-day Romanian or
Ukrainian town names, to make searching the data much easier.

These books were kept by rabbis in the Jewish community from
approximately 1851 until October 1895, at which time the Hungarian
government started keeping new civil records that recorded the events
of everyone in each town, regardless of their religion. A few of
these solely-Jewish record books continued being kept after 1895, but
only unofficially. And a few record books, not yet online, actually
date back to the late 18th Century, predating the Hungarian
government's requirements (and in some cases predating local Jews
having surnames).

These record books are today stored in a regional branch of the
Romanian National Archives in the city of Baia Mare, Maramures county,
Romania. Between 2009 and 2011, the books were digitally photographed
by a fabulous Romanian photographer and researcher named Dan Jurca,
who traveled to Baia Mare -- first on behalf of Maramaros researcher
Brooke Schreier Ganz and then on behalf of this newly-formed H-SIG
project -- to digitally photograph every surviving Jewish record book
stored at the archives, all 113 of them.

The photographs he took are being transcribed by a host of volunteers,
and these three new databases represent approximately one quarter of
the eventual record total -- more than 12,200 completed records out of
an eventual estimated 52,000 records. Given that each record has at
least three to six names in it (parents, spouses, the Sendak at each
Bris (!), witnesses, etc.), we think there will be about 200,000
indexed names when the project is eventually completed.

Because the borders of this area have changed so much over the past
century, there are even some records in these databases >from a few
towns that were formerly located in Szatmar (Satmar) megye, Hungary
but which are now located in Maramures county, Romania.

But unfortunately, most records for the towns >from the northwestern
part of Maramaros megye -- the areas in and near the city of Huszt
(now Khust, Ukraine) and westwards -- were not found in the Baia Mare
archives and therefore are not in this records set. We assume that
those records, if they still exist, are stored in one of the Ukrainian
archives.

You can search these three new Maramaros databases in their entirety
from JewishGen's Hungary Database, here:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary/

Furthermore, for the record books where the "town of registration" is
today in Ukraine, you can also search those as part of JewishGen's
Ukraine Database, and for the record books where the "town of
registration" is today in Romania, you can also search those as part
of JewishGen's Romania Database. But if you want to make sure you can
see all of the data, regardless of the town's modern location, use the
Hungary Database interface.

To see which towns and which years are included in this first release,
you can check out the data table here:

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary/Maramaros.htm

That link also has a few sample photos of what the old record books look like.

Finally, for the most up-to-date project updates and listing of what
records survived >from which towns and which years, and which ones are
available for transcribers, or have a transcription in progress, or
have a transcription completed, the project's official website is
located here:

http://www.MaramarosJewishRecords.com/

Much thanks and gratitude go to our tireless volunteers who have
worked on these old records for quite a while now, and to the more
than thirty volunteers still working on indexing books at the moment.
(We're always looking for more volunteers, so if you like pretty
pictures of old vital records, feel free to join!) Thanks also go to
project co-coordinator Sandy Malek and to H-SIG leader Vivian Kahn for
their help and forbearance. And thanks also go to Romanian researcher
Dan Jurca for photographing all the records, to Budapest-based
researcher Beth Long for originally putting me in touch with Dan and
for all her good advice, to all the generous people who made donations
to the project's fund at JewishGen to help pay for the photography,
and to Warren Blatt and Michael Tobias and everyone at JewishGen for
helping to make this possible.


- Brooke Schreier Ganz
Los Angeles, California


Maramaros megye (county), Hungary -- most common surnames #romania

Asparagirl
 

The following is a list of the most common family surnames in
Maramaros megye, as pulled >from the more than 12,200 19th century
records that have now been completely transcribed and added to
JewishGen, and the more than 30,000 records that are still in progress
of being transcribed. This is not a list of every single surname that
shows up in the county, but it does represent the most commonly seen
ones so far, and some of their common spelling variants. Some of
these names are not commonly seen elsewhere in Europe. (My personal
favorite on the list is INDIK / INDIG, which means "turkey" in Yiddish
even though a turkey is a North American bird.)

Note that most surnames in the county tended to use the suffix -OVITS
or -OVICS rather than -OWITZ or -OWICZ while the county was in
Hungary, and then switched to spelling the suffix as -OVICI when part
of the county became Romanian. Furthermore, some spellings that ended
in -Z or -TZ or -CZ switched to a -TI spelling when part of the county
became Romanian. For example, MARKOWITZ and MARKOVITS and MARKOVICS
and MARKOVICI are actually all spellings for the same family in these
records, as are GANZ, GANCZ, GANTZ, and GANTI. You are more likely to
see the Romanian version of the surnames show up in the marriage
records, many of which had late registrations in the 1920's and 1930's
and were found at the end of many of these "19th century" register
books.

Finally, note that a number of these surnames (and the families that
carried them) actually come >from the southern part of Galicia, just
over the Carpathian mountains, in the area of what was once
Stanislawow powiat, Poland and is now Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine.
The vital records indicate that number of people >from towns in that
area of Galicia ended up settling in Maramaros megye in the mid-19th
century, including Kolomyya (Kolomea), Nadvirna (Nadworna), Kalush
(Kalusz), etc. So if you know you had relatives in southern Galicia,
it might be worth taking a peek at the records >from Maramaros to see
if any branches of your family moved south to Hungary.

Here's the surname list:

ABLAKOS (OBLOKOS)
ABRAHAMOVICS (ABRAHAMOVITS)
ADLER
APPEL (APEL, APFEL, APIL)
APTER
ASZTALOS
AVICS (AVITS, OVICS, OVITS)
BAS (BASS, BASCH)
BAK (BACH)
BERGER
BERKOVICS (BERKOVITS)
BIDERMAN
BISTRITZ (BISTRIZ, BISTRICZ)
BLOCH
BREBAN
CHAIMOVICS (CHAIMOVITS)
CZEICHNER
CZIG (ZIG)
CZIMERMAN
CZSOBAN
CZUKER
DASZKAL (DASKAL, DASCAL)
DAVIDOVICS (DAVIDOVITS)
DEBLINGER
DEUTSCH (DEITS, DEUTS)
DIKER (DIKKER)
DRATLER
DREIZINGER
DUB (DUBB)
EIDELSTEIN (AIDELSTEIN, ODELSTEIN)
EINHORN (EINHOREN)
EISENBERGER (EIZENBERGER)
ELEFANT
ENGELMAN
FARKAS (FORKOS)
FARKOVITS
FEDER
FEIERVERGER (FAJERVERGER, FEJERVERKER)
FEIG (FAIG)
FEINTUCH
FESZTINGER (FESTINGER)
FISCH (FISH, FIS, FISCHER, FISER, FISSER, FUSCHER)
FISMAN (FISHMAN, FISCHMAN)
FOGEL (FOGIL, VOGEL)
FRIED (FRID)
FRIEDMAN
FRUCHTER
FUCHS (FUKSZ, FUCHSZ, FUX)
FUXLER
GANZ (GANCZ, GANTZ)
GELER (GELLER)
GENUT (GENUD, GENUTH)
GLAZER (GLUZER, GLASER)
GLIK (GLICK, GLUCK, GLUK)
GOLDSMIED
GOLDSTEIN
GREIF
GRIFEL (GRIFFEL)
GROSZ (GRUSZ)
GRUBER
GRUN
GRUNFELD (GRINFELD)
GUTMAN (GUTTMAN)
HAGER
HANZ
HARFENISZ
HECHT
HELLER
HERSHOVICS (HERSCHOVITS, HERSKOVICS, HERSKOVITS)
HERSTIG (HERSTIK)
HOCH
HOCHMAN
HOFFMAN (HOFMAN)
HONIG (HONIK)
HORN (HOREN)
HUBER
HUSZ (HUZ, HUSCH)
ICKOVICS (ICKOVITS, ICKAVICS, ICKAVITS)
INDIG (INDIK)
INGBER
ITZAKOVICS (ITZAKOVITS)
IZKOVICS (IZKOVITS)
JACOBOVICS (JACOBOVITS, JACOBAVITS, JACOBAVICS)
JAGER (JEGER, JAEGER)
JASZTRAP
JOSZEPOVICS (JOZSEPOVITS)
JUNGER
KAHAN
KAMINER (KOMINER)
KARO
KATZ (KACZ)
KASTNER (KASZNER, KASZTNER, KASZIRER, KASSIRER, KAZINER, KASZIR)
KAUFMAN (KOFFMAN)
KIEF (KEAFE)
KIND
KIPPER (KIPER, KUPPER, KUPER, KUPFER)
KIZELNIK (KIZELNICK)
KLEIN
KOFLER (KOFFLER, KOFFELER)
KREINDLER (KREINER)
LANDESMAN (LANDESZMAN)
LANG (LUNG, LUNK)
LANKSZNER (LANXNER)
LAX (LAKSZ)
LEBOVICS (LEBOVITS)
LEMPERT (LEMPART)
LENGYER
LERNER
LUSTIG (LUSZTIK)
MAJEROVICS (MAJEROVITS)
MALLEK (MALEK, MALIK, MALLIK, MALEC)
MARKOVICS (MARKOVITS)
MARMOR (MARMER, MARMAROS)
MEIZLER
MENDELOVICS (MENDELOVITS)
MENSCHENFREUND
MOLDOVAN (MOLDIVAN, MALDIVAN)
MOSKOVICS (MOSKOVITS)
MOSZKAL (MOSZKALY, MUSZKAL, MUSZKALY)
MULER (MULLER)
NEUFELD
NEULANDER
NEUMAN (NEIMAN)
OXENBERG
PAPOVICS (PAPOVITS)
PASZTERNAK
PERL (PERIL)
PIKEL
POLLAK (POLLACK, POLAK)
PREISZ
PREIZLER (PREISZLER)
RATNER (ROTNER, RUDNER)
REIZNER (REISZNER)
REZMANOVICS (REZMANOVITS, REZMOVICS, REZMOVITS)
RIZEL (RIZ)
ROTH (RAT, RATH)
ROZENBERG (ROSENBERG)
RUB
RUBINSTEIN
SACHTER
SAJOVICS (SAJOVITS)
SCHNEIDER
SCHWARCZ (SVARCZ, SCHWARTZ)
SIMON
SLOMOVICS (SLOMOVITS)
SNITZER (SNICZER)
SOHL
SPICZER (SPITZER, SPRITZER)
SREIBER
STAHL (STUHL, STUL)
STEIN
STEINBERGER
STEINER
STEINMETZ
STERN
STOBER (STOIBER)
STRIKBERG (STRIKBERGER)
SZABO (SZOBO)
SZAPLANCZAN
SZAKS (SZAKSZ, SZAX, SAX)
SZALAMAN (SZALAMON)
SZMUK
TABAK (TABACK, TOBAK)
TAVEL (TUVEL)
TEITELBAUM
TESZLER (TESLER)
TOB (TOBB, TAUB)
TRAUB (TROPP)
URL (UHRL)
WALDMAN
WALLERSTEIN (VOLLERSTEIN)
WAX (VAX, WAKSZ, VAKSZ)
WAREM (WARM, WARUM, VAREM, VARM, VARUM)
WEIDER (WIDER, VIEDER, VIDER)
WEISEL (WISEL, WIZEL, VIESEL, VIEZEL, VIZEL)
WEISZNER (VEISZNER, VIEZNER)
WERTZBERGER (VERTZBERGER, VERCZBERGER)
WEGH (WEG, WIG, VEG, VEGH, VIG)
WEISZ (VEISZ)
WIGDEROVICS (VIGDEROVICS, WIGDEROVITS, VIGDEROVITS)
WOLF (VOLF)
ZELIGKOVICS (ZELIGKOVITS)
ZELMANOVICS (ZELMANOVITS)
ZIM


- Brooke Schreier Ganz
Los Angeles, California


Romania SIG #Romania Maramaros megye (county), Hungary -- most common surnames #romania

Asparagirl
 

The following is a list of the most common family surnames in
Maramaros megye, as pulled >from the more than 12,200 19th century
records that have now been completely transcribed and added to
JewishGen, and the more than 30,000 records that are still in progress
of being transcribed. This is not a list of every single surname that
shows up in the county, but it does represent the most commonly seen
ones so far, and some of their common spelling variants. Some of
these names are not commonly seen elsewhere in Europe. (My personal
favorite on the list is INDIK / INDIG, which means "turkey" in Yiddish
even though a turkey is a North American bird.)

Note that most surnames in the county tended to use the suffix -OVITS
or -OVICS rather than -OWITZ or -OWICZ while the county was in
Hungary, and then switched to spelling the suffix as -OVICI when part
of the county became Romanian. Furthermore, some spellings that ended
in -Z or -TZ or -CZ switched to a -TI spelling when part of the county
became Romanian. For example, MARKOWITZ and MARKOVITS and MARKOVICS
and MARKOVICI are actually all spellings for the same family in these
records, as are GANZ, GANCZ, GANTZ, and GANTI. You are more likely to
see the Romanian version of the surnames show up in the marriage
records, many of which had late registrations in the 1920's and 1930's
and were found at the end of many of these "19th century" register
books.

Finally, note that a number of these surnames (and the families that
carried them) actually come >from the southern part of Galicia, just
over the Carpathian mountains, in the area of what was once
Stanislawow powiat, Poland and is now Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine.
The vital records indicate that number of people >from towns in that
area of Galicia ended up settling in Maramaros megye in the mid-19th
century, including Kolomyya (Kolomea), Nadvirna (Nadworna), Kalush
(Kalusz), etc. So if you know you had relatives in southern Galicia,
it might be worth taking a peek at the records >from Maramaros to see
if any branches of your family moved south to Hungary.

Here's the surname list:

ABLAKOS (OBLOKOS)
ABRAHAMOVICS (ABRAHAMOVITS)
ADLER
APPEL (APEL, APFEL, APIL)
APTER
ASZTALOS
AVICS (AVITS, OVICS, OVITS)
BAS (BASS, BASCH)
BAK (BACH)
BERGER
BERKOVICS (BERKOVITS)
BIDERMAN
BISTRITZ (BISTRIZ, BISTRICZ)
BLOCH
BREBAN
CHAIMOVICS (CHAIMOVITS)
CZEICHNER
CZIG (ZIG)
CZIMERMAN
CZSOBAN
CZUKER
DASZKAL (DASKAL, DASCAL)
DAVIDOVICS (DAVIDOVITS)
DEBLINGER
DEUTSCH (DEITS, DEUTS)
DIKER (DIKKER)
DRATLER
DREIZINGER
DUB (DUBB)
EIDELSTEIN (AIDELSTEIN, ODELSTEIN)
EINHORN (EINHOREN)
EISENBERGER (EIZENBERGER)
ELEFANT
ENGELMAN
FARKAS (FORKOS)
FARKOVITS
FEDER
FEIERVERGER (FAJERVERGER, FEJERVERKER)
FEIG (FAIG)
FEINTUCH
FESZTINGER (FESTINGER)
FISCH (FISH, FIS, FISCHER, FISER, FISSER, FUSCHER)
FISMAN (FISHMAN, FISCHMAN)
FOGEL (FOGIL, VOGEL)
FRIED (FRID)
FRIEDMAN
FRUCHTER
FUCHS (FUKSZ, FUCHSZ, FUX)
FUXLER
GANZ (GANCZ, GANTZ)
GELER (GELLER)
GENUT (GENUD, GENUTH)
GLAZER (GLUZER, GLASER)
GLIK (GLICK, GLUCK, GLUK)
GOLDSMIED
GOLDSTEIN
GREIF
GRIFEL (GRIFFEL)
GROSZ (GRUSZ)
GRUBER
GRUN
GRUNFELD (GRINFELD)
GUTMAN (GUTTMAN)
HAGER
HANZ
HARFENISZ
HECHT
HELLER
HERSHOVICS (HERSCHOVITS, HERSKOVICS, HERSKOVITS)
HERSTIG (HERSTIK)
HOCH
HOCHMAN
HOFFMAN (HOFMAN)
HONIG (HONIK)
HORN (HOREN)
HUBER
HUSZ (HUZ, HUSCH)
ICKOVICS (ICKOVITS, ICKAVICS, ICKAVITS)
INDIG (INDIK)
INGBER
ITZAKOVICS (ITZAKOVITS)
IZKOVICS (IZKOVITS)
JACOBOVICS (JACOBOVITS, JACOBAVITS, JACOBAVICS)
JAGER (JEGER, JAEGER)
JASZTRAP
JOSZEPOVICS (JOZSEPOVITS)
JUNGER
KAHAN
KAMINER (KOMINER)
KARO
KATZ (KACZ)
KASTNER (KASZNER, KASZTNER, KASZIRER, KASSIRER, KAZINER, KASZIR)
KAUFMAN (KOFFMAN)
KIEF (KEAFE)
KIND
KIPPER (KIPER, KUPPER, KUPER, KUPFER)
KIZELNIK (KIZELNICK)
KLEIN
KOFLER (KOFFLER, KOFFELER)
KREINDLER (KREINER)
LANDESMAN (LANDESZMAN)
LANG (LUNG, LUNK)
LANKSZNER (LANXNER)
LAX (LAKSZ)
LEBOVICS (LEBOVITS)
LEMPERT (LEMPART)
LENGYER
LERNER
LUSTIG (LUSZTIK)
MAJEROVICS (MAJEROVITS)
MALLEK (MALEK, MALIK, MALLIK, MALEC)
MARKOVICS (MARKOVITS)
MARMOR (MARMER, MARMAROS)
MEIZLER
MENDELOVICS (MENDELOVITS)
MENSCHENFREUND
MOLDOVAN (MOLDIVAN, MALDIVAN)
MOSKOVICS (MOSKOVITS)
MOSZKAL (MOSZKALY, MUSZKAL, MUSZKALY)
MULER (MULLER)
NEUFELD
NEULANDER
NEUMAN (NEIMAN)
OXENBERG
PAPOVICS (PAPOVITS)
PASZTERNAK
PERL (PERIL)
PIKEL
POLLAK (POLLACK, POLAK)
PREISZ
PREIZLER (PREISZLER)
RATNER (ROTNER, RUDNER)
REIZNER (REISZNER)
REZMANOVICS (REZMANOVITS, REZMOVICS, REZMOVITS)
RIZEL (RIZ)
ROTH (RAT, RATH)
ROZENBERG (ROSENBERG)
RUB
RUBINSTEIN
SACHTER
SAJOVICS (SAJOVITS)
SCHNEIDER
SCHWARCZ (SVARCZ, SCHWARTZ)
SIMON
SLOMOVICS (SLOMOVITS)
SNITZER (SNICZER)
SOHL
SPICZER (SPITZER, SPRITZER)
SREIBER
STAHL (STUHL, STUL)
STEIN
STEINBERGER
STEINER
STEINMETZ
STERN
STOBER (STOIBER)
STRIKBERG (STRIKBERGER)
SZABO (SZOBO)
SZAPLANCZAN
SZAKS (SZAKSZ, SZAX, SAX)
SZALAMAN (SZALAMON)
SZMUK
TABAK (TABACK, TOBAK)
TAVEL (TUVEL)
TEITELBAUM
TESZLER (TESLER)
TOB (TOBB, TAUB)
TRAUB (TROPP)
URL (UHRL)
WALDMAN
WALLERSTEIN (VOLLERSTEIN)
WAX (VAX, WAKSZ, VAKSZ)
WAREM (WARM, WARUM, VAREM, VARM, VARUM)
WEIDER (WIDER, VIEDER, VIDER)
WEISEL (WISEL, WIZEL, VIESEL, VIEZEL, VIZEL)
WEISZNER (VEISZNER, VIEZNER)
WERTZBERGER (VERTZBERGER, VERCZBERGER)
WEGH (WEG, WIG, VEG, VEGH, VIG)
WEISZ (VEISZ)
WIGDEROVICS (VIGDEROVICS, WIGDEROVITS, VIGDEROVITS)
WOLF (VOLF)
ZELIGKOVICS (ZELIGKOVITS)
ZELMANOVICS (ZELMANOVITS)
ZIM


- Brooke Schreier Ganz
Los Angeles, California


IAJGS Paris2012 - Newsletter 14 #ciechanow #poland

Congrès Paris 2012 Généaloj
 

JULY 15-18 2012
32nd IAJGS INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE on JEWISH GENEALOGY hosted by The
French Cercle de Genealogie Juive
(www.paris2012.eu – contact@paris2012.eu )
Newsletter # 14 – July 06, 2012

***ONLY ONE WEEK LEFT UNTIL THE D-DAY***

Quickly join the Conference nearly 700 attendees – Sign-up and make your
friends sign-up

***
EARLY REGISTRATION for the delegates and speakers

You will find information about the Conference and about Paris in the
documents that will be given to you in your conference bag.

A short paper guide of the Conference will be given to all attendees. A
complete guide including abstracts and biographies of all speakers, guides,
exhibitors... will be given on a flashdrive to delegates who registered for
the whole Conference.
Others can acquire it for 10 €, at CGJ stand.

***
The registration will be possible on Saturday July 14 >from 4pm to 10pm; on
Sunday and other days, >from 7:30 am in the Hall of the Conference Centre
(ground floor).
IN ORDER TO SAVE TIME, REGISTER ON SATURDAY

***

ONLINE CONFERENCE REGISTRATION AND FAMILY FINDER

After TUESDAY JULY 10, your registration will not be taken online anymore.
from now on, the names that you enter are no longer considered for the
Family Finder. They will be taken into account for your badge UNTIL TUESDAY
NIGHT July 10.

***
REMIND

----> There are still some places in the WORKSHOPS and TOURS
(www.paris2012.eu/products)
Registration is still possible online UNTIL TUESDAY NIGHT July 10.
In the availability of places, it will still be possible to sign up at CGJ
stand until the date of the workshop and / or the tour.
There are still some places to visit the Louvre: classic tour or biblical
theme tour.

----> Sign for MEALS and the GALA:
It is still possible to register online UNTIL TUESDAY NIGHT July 10
(including kosher lunches out of SIGs).
We will – as an exception - accept few registrations at CGJ stand, EXCEPT
FOR SUNDAY LUNCH.

----> Sign up for the exceptional post-conference TRIP to NORMANDY
Giverny (made famous by Claude Monet), Elbeuf and a rare visit to the
Factory of Knowledges (former textile factory "Blin & Blin "), and to the
synagogue, Rouen where we will be authorized - and only us - for special
tour of the Sublime Abode (11th century Yeshiva), Caen Memorial and the
landing beaches.
€ 350; information: Joubert-Voyages, 01 48 74 December 30

----> Buy all AUDIO FILES OF THE CONFERENCE
You can order now – with reduced prices - an audio recording of lectures on
a single USB flash drive, by visiting the website of Conference Resource:
http://www.myconferenceresource.com/products/32-iajgs-international-conference-on-jewish-genealogy-2012.aspx


#Ciechanow #Poland IAJGS Paris2012 - Newsletter 14 #ciechanow #poland

Congrès Paris 2012 Généaloj
 

JULY 15-18 2012
32nd IAJGS INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE on JEWISH GENEALOGY hosted by The
French Cercle de Genealogie Juive
(www.paris2012.eu – contact@paris2012.eu )
Newsletter # 14 – July 06, 2012

***ONLY ONE WEEK LEFT UNTIL THE D-DAY***

Quickly join the Conference nearly 700 attendees – Sign-up and make your
friends sign-up

***
EARLY REGISTRATION for the delegates and speakers

You will find information about the Conference and about Paris in the
documents that will be given to you in your conference bag.

A short paper guide of the Conference will be given to all attendees. A
complete guide including abstracts and biographies of all speakers, guides,
exhibitors... will be given on a flashdrive to delegates who registered for
the whole Conference.
Others can acquire it for 10 €, at CGJ stand.

***
The registration will be possible on Saturday July 14 >from 4pm to 10pm; on
Sunday and other days, >from 7:30 am in the Hall of the Conference Centre
(ground floor).
IN ORDER TO SAVE TIME, REGISTER ON SATURDAY

***

ONLINE CONFERENCE REGISTRATION AND FAMILY FINDER

After TUESDAY JULY 10, your registration will not be taken online anymore.
from now on, the names that you enter are no longer considered for the
Family Finder. They will be taken into account for your badge UNTIL TUESDAY
NIGHT July 10.

***
REMIND

----> There are still some places in the WORKSHOPS and TOURS
(www.paris2012.eu/products)
Registration is still possible online UNTIL TUESDAY NIGHT July 10.
In the availability of places, it will still be possible to sign up at CGJ
stand until the date of the workshop and / or the tour.
There are still some places to visit the Louvre: classic tour or biblical
theme tour.

----> Sign for MEALS and the GALA:
It is still possible to register online UNTIL TUESDAY NIGHT July 10
(including kosher lunches out of SIGs).
We will – as an exception - accept few registrations at CGJ stand, EXCEPT
FOR SUNDAY LUNCH.

----> Sign up for the exceptional post-conference TRIP to NORMANDY
Giverny (made famous by Claude Monet), Elbeuf and a rare visit to the
Factory of Knowledges (former textile factory "Blin & Blin "), and to the
synagogue, Rouen where we will be authorized - and only us - for special
tour of the Sublime Abode (11th century Yeshiva), Caen Memorial and the
landing beaches.
€ 350; information: Joubert-Voyages, 01 48 74 December 30

----> Buy all AUDIO FILES OF THE CONFERENCE
You can order now – with reduced prices - an audio recording of lectures on
a single USB flash drive, by visiting the website of Conference Resource:
http://www.myconferenceresource.com/products/32-iajgs-international-conference-on-jewish-genealogy-2012.aspx


ViewMate translation request - Hebrew #general

Patrick Baudoin <patbaudoin@...>
 

Hello

I've posted five vital records for which I need a loose translation of the
hebrew text , and german It is on ViewMate at the following address :

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23521
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23522
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23523
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23524
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23525


Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.

Patrick Baudoin


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation request - Hebrew #general

Patrick Baudoin <patbaudoin@...>
 

Hello

I've posted five vital records for which I need a loose translation of the
hebrew text , and german It is on ViewMate at the following address :

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23521
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23522
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23523
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23524
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23525


Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.

Patrick Baudoin

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