Date   

Kupishok SIG Meeting #lithuania

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

This is a reminder that the Kupishok SIG will have a get-together at the
IAJGS Conference as follows:

WHERE: J.W. Marriott Hotel, 1331 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, DC.,
Dirksen Conference Room, Mezzanine Level

WHEN: Monday, July 21, 2003

TIME: 3:30 - 4:45 P.M.

Please let me know if you will be attending. If you are, remember to bring
any new info you have on your family and any photographs you may want to
contribute to our web site.

Looking forward to seeing you!

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Kupishok SIG Meeting #lithuania

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

This is a reminder that the Kupishok SIG will have a get-together at the
IAJGS Conference as follows:

WHERE: J.W. Marriott Hotel, 1331 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, DC.,
Dirksen Conference Room, Mezzanine Level

WHEN: Monday, July 21, 2003

TIME: 3:30 - 4:45 P.M.

Please let me know if you will be attending. If you are, remember to bring
any new info you have on your family and any photographs you may want to
contribute to our web site.

Looking forward to seeing you!

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


Re: Jewish Farmers in Lithuania - 1881 #lithuania

Carol Baker
 

In response to Howard Margol's message the other day about the 1881 list of
Jewish farmers in Lithuania, LitvakSIG has ordered the translation by the
Kaunas archives. It will be done this Fall and will then be distributed to
all of the district research groups whose towns are mentioned in the list.

An announcement listing those towns will be made on this Digest. If you are currently a contributor to one or more of the districts, have no fear -you will receive the data. If not, it would be a good time to send in your $100 contribution to one of the district research groups within Kaunas gubernia (Kaunas, Panevezys, Raseiniai, Siauliai, Telsiai, Ukmerge and Zarasai) and receive ALL of the records >from ALL of the towns within that uyezd.

This list of 62 Jewish landowners, is just a small part of the information that is regularly being ordered, translated and distributed to the contributors. You can send your check, with the district indicated in the memo field, to:

LITVAKSIG, INC.
Dept. 77-9253
Chicago, Illinois 60678-9253

or, if you prefer to pay by credit card, please go to
http://www.jewishgen.org/litvak/donor.htm

We thank Howard for unearthing this new source and look forward to seeing
you all in Washington!

Carol Coplin Baker
District Research Groups Coordinator


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Jewish Farmers in Lithuania - 1881 #lithuania

Carol Baker
 

In response to Howard Margol's message the other day about the 1881 list of
Jewish farmers in Lithuania, LitvakSIG has ordered the translation by the
Kaunas archives. It will be done this Fall and will then be distributed to
all of the district research groups whose towns are mentioned in the list.

An announcement listing those towns will be made on this Digest. If you are currently a contributor to one or more of the districts, have no fear -you will receive the data. If not, it would be a good time to send in your $100 contribution to one of the district research groups within Kaunas gubernia (Kaunas, Panevezys, Raseiniai, Siauliai, Telsiai, Ukmerge and Zarasai) and receive ALL of the records >from ALL of the towns within that uyezd.

This list of 62 Jewish landowners, is just a small part of the information that is regularly being ordered, translated and distributed to the contributors. You can send your check, with the district indicated in the memo field, to:

LITVAKSIG, INC.
Dept. 77-9253
Chicago, Illinois 60678-9253

or, if you prefer to pay by credit card, please go to
http://www.jewishgen.org/litvak/donor.htm

We thank Howard for unearthing this new source and look forward to seeing
you all in Washington!

Carol Coplin Baker
District Research Groups Coordinator


GROSS MOST:Need help with town location & modern day name #galicia

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Regarding the town identified as Gross Most or Gross Moster...for Jim
Becker:

In scrolling through the YIVO Landsmanshaftn Records posted on the Jewish
Genealogical Society of New York's web site -- www.jgsny.org, I came upon
these two entries:

FIRST GROSS MOSTER LADIES SOCIETY - RG 123, BOX 3

GROSS MOSTER SICK AND BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION - RG 123, BOX 9

Below is information about these records:

This list of 931 organizations includes all landsmanshaftn listed in A Guide
to YIVO's Landsmanshaftn Archive by Rosaline Schwartz and Susan Milamed,
YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, New York, 1986, and Guide to the YIVO
Archives, compiled and edited by Fruma Mohrer and Marek Web, YIVO Institute
for Jewish Research, 1998. The list also includes 46 additional
landsmanshaftn collections that YIVO has acquired since then.  Several
synagogues and other Jewish organizations are also included if their YIVO
file contains records pertaining to burials or if they have a cemetery plot
in the New York metropolitan area. The list further includes 24 societies
having objects or oversized materials listed at the end of Appendix II in A
Guide to YIVO's Landsmanshaftn Archive. The remaining 30 organizations are
listed as sponsors (1), donors (6), contributors (7) and friends (16) in the
introduction to A Guide to YIVO's Landsmanshaftn Archives.

So...now that you have identified the correct town, you might want to
investigate these Yivo holdings as another potential resource for
information about your Galician relatives. Go to the JGSNY website to
discover more details....and, good luck!

Pamela Weisberger
Research Coordinator
Gesher Galicia
Santa Monica, CA


> I recently found a letter in the NARA II Archives >from a relative dated
> April 20, 1915. In the letter the relative was trying to send money to a
> family member in Europe after the outbreak of WWI.
>
> He mentions that the family is trying to send money to a relative in a
town
> called "GROSMOST" located near "LEMBERG", Galicia.


Must read if going to DC2003 Conference, esp. first timers #galicia

Shelley K. Pollero
 

I'm posting this on behalf of the conference co-chairmen:

We've sent the syllabus and family finder to the printer, the cd-rom will
follow shortly.

In just over a week, we'll be greeting you.

Let's cover several areas in this message:

ASK THE EXPERTS
One of the most exciting aspects of the conference are the "Ask the Expert"
tutorial sessions, which will be available free of charge on Monday through
Thursday during the conference week. The tutorials will be offered by an
expert panel including Sallyann Sack, Gary Mokotoff, Eileen Polakoff, Warre=
n
Blatt, and Randy Daitch. These Ask the Expert individual problem-solving
sessions will offer conference attendees personalized assistance with those
hard-to-solve "brick walls" in genealogical research. Six ten-minute Ask th=
e
Expert appointments will be available per hour. Conference attendees will b=
e
able to reserve a ten-minute individual session with one of the experts by
signing up at the conference (at the Registration Desk on Sunday, at the
Hospitality Desk on Monday-Wednesday). People who sign-up for these session=
s
will have the option to remain in the session for an entire hour to listen
and learn >from the tutorial assistance provided to other conference
attendees. A maximum of six people per hour will interact with the expert,
allowing for personalized discussion. Your question/problem must be prepare=
d
in advance (index cards will be provided when you sign up) of your tutorial
session, to allow you and the expert to spend the time working on strategie=
s
to solve your problem.

In addition to individual appointments with the Ask the Expert panelists,
the conference will offer two lecture sessions focusing on strategies for
solving genealogy problems: Hal Bookbinder, IAJGS president, will lead an
interactive session in which he will identify common research problems in
Jewish genealogy and some solutions, and then will engage the audience in
suggesting additional creative strategies for solving these problems. Eilee=
n
Polakoff, Ask the Expert columnist for Avotaynu, will present a lecture
session that describes step-by-step case studies that demonstrate methods t=
o
surmount the basic roadblocks to successful Jewish genealogical research.

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
Many of you forwarded Library of Congress pre-registration Reader
Identification Card forms, these have been forwarded to make your research
there start a little smoother and last a few minutes longer. Please do not
fax or sent any more of these completed forms at this time; other chores
demand my attention. If you arriving in town early, retrieving your reader
identification card should be a breeze. Whether you sent me the pre-reg.
form or not, you must bring a valid driver's license, state-issued
identification card, or passport at the Reader Registration Station in Room
LM 140, on the first floor of the Madison Building
<http://www.loc.gov/loc/maps/images/1-madson.jpg> near the Independence
Avenue entrance. The Reader Registration Station's hours are: 8:30 a.m. to
9:00 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday; 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday,
Friday, and Saturday (closed Sundays). For more details visit the Reading
Registration home page <http://www.loc.gov/rr/security/readerreg.html> . If
you are pre-registered, tell the attendant you are; show your license or
passport, and you should be promoted to the front of the line, where a
digital photo will be taken and your card issued. You are then able to
present this for access to all reading rooms. I recommend you build in some
extra time if you are attending either one of the Library tours (booked
during registraton) or Reading Room orientation sessions (sign up at the
Hospitality Desk; dates/times are listed in the current Day Planner at the
website). Regarding the orientation sessions at the Hebraic Section and
European Reading Room, translators will be available (the schedule will be
in the printed Day Planner) to assist you. We are also assembling a wide
variety of translators that will be stationed in the Resource Room
(featuring over 300 books, magazines, microfilms/microfiche, and other
printed materials). Their schedule will be posted outside this room.

PREPARING FOR THE CONFERENCE (particularly First Time Attendees)

Thirty percent of you, or almost 300 persons, will be attending their first
Jewish genealogy conference. A high percentage of that group may also be
"newcomers" to the field of Jewish genealogy, and you matter to us. We want
you to gain the most you can out of attending your inaugural conference, by
attending sessions that have value to you, using the research materials at
the hotel and at local repositores, and certainly networking with others at
luncheons, meetings, and Birds of a Feather gatherings to increase your
current knowledge about your roots.

With that in mind, we suggest you harness some of the productive ways for
benefiting >from the conference richness that our Public Relations Chair,
Milt Goldsamt, himself a long-time Jewish genealogist, has listed below.

1. Make a list of your family history "research goals"=8BWhat towns,
surnames and actual people do you want to know about? What specific
information do you want to gain about those individuals? For example, this
could include their birth, their marriage, their death, what towns they wer=
e
from, or if certain things >from one vital record don't agree with the same
information >from another data source. Bring a full version of your research
goals list with you (easier if you're bringing a laptop). Don't shorten it,
thinking that you won't have time to get to all of it. You may indeed have
time, especially if one thing you're researching doesn't work out, and you
therefore turn to another goal. Or, someone may help you with something s=
o
that it moves that project along, and you find you do have time for
gathering information in another direction.

2. Bring along COPIES (not originals) of data sources to the conference=8Bo=
f
family trees, addresses of relatives and other key documents (including
those needing translation). Bring them in an easy to use style (perhaps a
multi-section loose leaf binder) to the conference EACH day you're there.
Have the information in a format that makes easy for YOU to refer to it, an=
d
to share with others researching similar objectives or having possibly
helpful information.

3. BEFORE the conference or during the first night you're there, study th=
e
conference Family Finder that lists virtually all registrants. Mark in your
copy who's researching the same towns, the same or similar surnames, etc.
Make it your business to track them down during the conference, wherever yo=
u
can, since they may be looking for you too! Bulletin board will be availabl=
e
in the foyer for you to post messages.

4. Decide if there's anything so insurmountable in your research that
you'd like to "ask an expert" and discuss it with them. Sign up for a
session.

5. Bring the following supplies to the conference: a small pad to write
down persons' names, e-mail addresses, and a full-size pad for writing down
detailed or extensive information you learn. Bring pencils, and perhaps a
highlighter marking pen to mark photocopies that you make to keep. Bring
along a reasonably good magnifying glass to help you more easily read small
or illegible writing on documents.

6. Bring business cards to give others for exchanging information and
contacts with them. Although all registrants will be provided 10 business
cards courtesy of the conference, it's a good idea to have extras. Make sur=
e
the cards include your e-mail address (ours will, plus address, phone, and,
space permitting, some of your family finder information). If you don't hav=
e
business cards, then make up 3x5 or 4x6 filing cards, with your preprinted
contact info (including towns and surnames you're researching), to easily
give to others. Bring more cards than you think you'll need!

DURING THE CONFERENCE

7. When gathering information and whenever possible, photocopy the
document or pages you've decided is useful. More insight may come when
studying it the second time, during one the conference evenings or at home
after the conference. Don't write down an abstract of the info, that takes
more time and you could leave out something possibly useful later. A copier
machine will be available in the Resource Room.

8. Be sure to always write down (perhaps on the back of the photocopy), a
full description of the page you've photocopied, including relevant details=
,
such as: the title page of the book it's from, its year of publication,
author(s); microfilm reel number, document number, page number, or what
records repository it came from. This certainly can help, should you need t=
o
return to the full data source, or need to cite this information in a famil=
y
history, family tree, or reconcile conflicting information >from various
sources. (For example, if dates of birth for the same person differ in
census and social security records.)

9. EACH NIGHT of the conference, review what new information you've
gathered that day, and see if there's still some loopholes that warrant a
further visit to the Resource Room, going back to a website on the
conference computers, or tracking down the same lead for clearer/more
information. Keep trying to close up your loopholes and the research
objectives list you brought along.

AFTER THE CONFERENCE

10. Follow-up on all the new information you've gathered. Contact any fello=
w
researchers (by e-mail or postal mail) that attended the conference and you
weren't quite able to reach them. Use the contact information >from the
conference Family Finder. Contact any persons who exchanged cards with you.
Follow-up on some of the Internet sites or other data sources that you
learned about during the conference. Review the documents to see if
something else still was needed, and attempt to obtain that (now that you
know the source, that should be easier!). Add any new information into your
ongoing data files, folders, and family trees. Check to see if the new
information is consistent with what you already have, or are revisions
needed.

DURING THE CONFERENCE AND AFTERWARDS

11. BE PATIENT!! Some information you think may not be useful may indeed
become useful, as other facts come along. Don't despair. When in doubt,
it's easy to gather the information right then and there (rather than
passing it up), label its source. Sooner or later it may help you clear a
"brickwall" in your family research. (This "loose fact" might be someone
with the same surname that you've never heard of, etc.)

Last minute questions? If you are an America Online subscriber, I should be
available in the Golden Gates chat room for the weekly Jewish genealogy
chat, Thursday (tonight) at 10 PM EDT. The internal AOL address is
aol://2719:3-241-Golden%20Gates.

On behalf of my co-chairs Sheri Meisel and Ben Okner have an enjoyable
conference!

Elias Savada
Co-Chair, 23rd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
July 20-25, 2003
JW Marriott Hotel, Washington DC
www.jewishgen.org/dc2003
301-365-3456
Reply to esavada@mac.com


Re: Need help with town location & modern day name #galicia

Peter Zavon <PZavon@...>
 

On Wed, 9 Jul 2003 jbecker130@comcast.net> said to the Galicia List:

I recently found a letter in the NARA II Archives >from a relative dated
April 20, 1915. In the letter the relative was trying to send money to a
family member in Europe after the outbreak of WWI.

He mentions that the family is trying to send money to a relative in a town
called "GROSMOST" located near "LEMBERG", Galicia.

QUESTIONS: What is the modern day name of this town and where is it
located?

That would be Gross Mosty, called Mosty Wielkie by the Austrians. It is now
called Velikiye Mosty and is in modern Ukraine 45 km north northeast of Lviv
(the modern name for what the Austrians called Lemberg).

Gross Mosty was in the Zolkiew Administrative District under the Austrians,
and was the seat of a Judicial and a Jewish District. So records, where
ever they are stored now, are probably tied to that place name.

Many years ago I was told that the word Gros meant "BIG" therefore "Big
Most". Does this mean that there was a town called "Big Most" and perhaps
a
"Most" and then another town known as "Small Most"?
"Gross" is German for "big," "large," or "great". Wielkie is a Polish word
with the same meaning. My dictionary says that "most" is Polish for
"bridge" and I presume "Mosty" is a grammatical variant of that. So the
place name seems to translate as "Big Bridge."

Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY 14526

PZavon@Rochester.RR.Com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia GROSS MOST:Need help with town location & modern day name #galicia

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Regarding the town identified as Gross Most or Gross Moster...for Jim
Becker:

In scrolling through the YIVO Landsmanshaftn Records posted on the Jewish
Genealogical Society of New York's web site -- www.jgsny.org, I came upon
these two entries:

FIRST GROSS MOSTER LADIES SOCIETY - RG 123, BOX 3

GROSS MOSTER SICK AND BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION - RG 123, BOX 9

Below is information about these records:

This list of 931 organizations includes all landsmanshaftn listed in A Guide
to YIVO's Landsmanshaftn Archive by Rosaline Schwartz and Susan Milamed,
YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, New York, 1986, and Guide to the YIVO
Archives, compiled and edited by Fruma Mohrer and Marek Web, YIVO Institute
for Jewish Research, 1998. The list also includes 46 additional
landsmanshaftn collections that YIVO has acquired since then.  Several
synagogues and other Jewish organizations are also included if their YIVO
file contains records pertaining to burials or if they have a cemetery plot
in the New York metropolitan area. The list further includes 24 societies
having objects or oversized materials listed at the end of Appendix II in A
Guide to YIVO's Landsmanshaftn Archive. The remaining 30 organizations are
listed as sponsors (1), donors (6), contributors (7) and friends (16) in the
introduction to A Guide to YIVO's Landsmanshaftn Archives.

So...now that you have identified the correct town, you might want to
investigate these Yivo holdings as another potential resource for
information about your Galician relatives. Go to the JGSNY website to
discover more details....and, good luck!

Pamela Weisberger
Research Coordinator
Gesher Galicia
Santa Monica, CA


> I recently found a letter in the NARA II Archives >from a relative dated
> April 20, 1915. In the letter the relative was trying to send money to a
> family member in Europe after the outbreak of WWI.
>
> He mentions that the family is trying to send money to a relative in a
town
> called "GROSMOST" located near "LEMBERG", Galicia.


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Must read if going to DC2003 Conference, esp. first timers #galicia

Shelley K. Pollero
 

I'm posting this on behalf of the conference co-chairmen:

We've sent the syllabus and family finder to the printer, the cd-rom will
follow shortly.

In just over a week, we'll be greeting you.

Let's cover several areas in this message:

ASK THE EXPERTS
One of the most exciting aspects of the conference are the "Ask the Expert"
tutorial sessions, which will be available free of charge on Monday through
Thursday during the conference week. The tutorials will be offered by an
expert panel including Sallyann Sack, Gary Mokotoff, Eileen Polakoff, Warre=
n
Blatt, and Randy Daitch. These Ask the Expert individual problem-solving
sessions will offer conference attendees personalized assistance with those
hard-to-solve "brick walls" in genealogical research. Six ten-minute Ask th=
e
Expert appointments will be available per hour. Conference attendees will b=
e
able to reserve a ten-minute individual session with one of the experts by
signing up at the conference (at the Registration Desk on Sunday, at the
Hospitality Desk on Monday-Wednesday). People who sign-up for these session=
s
will have the option to remain in the session for an entire hour to listen
and learn >from the tutorial assistance provided to other conference
attendees. A maximum of six people per hour will interact with the expert,
allowing for personalized discussion. Your question/problem must be prepare=
d
in advance (index cards will be provided when you sign up) of your tutorial
session, to allow you and the expert to spend the time working on strategie=
s
to solve your problem.

In addition to individual appointments with the Ask the Expert panelists,
the conference will offer two lecture sessions focusing on strategies for
solving genealogy problems: Hal Bookbinder, IAJGS president, will lead an
interactive session in which he will identify common research problems in
Jewish genealogy and some solutions, and then will engage the audience in
suggesting additional creative strategies for solving these problems. Eilee=
n
Polakoff, Ask the Expert columnist for Avotaynu, will present a lecture
session that describes step-by-step case studies that demonstrate methods t=
o
surmount the basic roadblocks to successful Jewish genealogical research.

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
Many of you forwarded Library of Congress pre-registration Reader
Identification Card forms, these have been forwarded to make your research
there start a little smoother and last a few minutes longer. Please do not
fax or sent any more of these completed forms at this time; other chores
demand my attention. If you arriving in town early, retrieving your reader
identification card should be a breeze. Whether you sent me the pre-reg.
form or not, you must bring a valid driver's license, state-issued
identification card, or passport at the Reader Registration Station in Room
LM 140, on the first floor of the Madison Building
<http://www.loc.gov/loc/maps/images/1-madson.jpg> near the Independence
Avenue entrance. The Reader Registration Station's hours are: 8:30 a.m. to
9:00 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday; 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday,
Friday, and Saturday (closed Sundays). For more details visit the Reading
Registration home page <http://www.loc.gov/rr/security/readerreg.html> . If
you are pre-registered, tell the attendant you are; show your license or
passport, and you should be promoted to the front of the line, where a
digital photo will be taken and your card issued. You are then able to
present this for access to all reading rooms. I recommend you build in some
extra time if you are attending either one of the Library tours (booked
during registraton) or Reading Room orientation sessions (sign up at the
Hospitality Desk; dates/times are listed in the current Day Planner at the
website). Regarding the orientation sessions at the Hebraic Section and
European Reading Room, translators will be available (the schedule will be
in the printed Day Planner) to assist you. We are also assembling a wide
variety of translators that will be stationed in the Resource Room
(featuring over 300 books, magazines, microfilms/microfiche, and other
printed materials). Their schedule will be posted outside this room.

PREPARING FOR THE CONFERENCE (particularly First Time Attendees)

Thirty percent of you, or almost 300 persons, will be attending their first
Jewish genealogy conference. A high percentage of that group may also be
"newcomers" to the field of Jewish genealogy, and you matter to us. We want
you to gain the most you can out of attending your inaugural conference, by
attending sessions that have value to you, using the research materials at
the hotel and at local repositores, and certainly networking with others at
luncheons, meetings, and Birds of a Feather gatherings to increase your
current knowledge about your roots.

With that in mind, we suggest you harness some of the productive ways for
benefiting >from the conference richness that our Public Relations Chair,
Milt Goldsamt, himself a long-time Jewish genealogist, has listed below.

1. Make a list of your family history "research goals"=8BWhat towns,
surnames and actual people do you want to know about? What specific
information do you want to gain about those individuals? For example, this
could include their birth, their marriage, their death, what towns they wer=
e
from, or if certain things >from one vital record don't agree with the same
information >from another data source. Bring a full version of your research
goals list with you (easier if you're bringing a laptop). Don't shorten it,
thinking that you won't have time to get to all of it. You may indeed have
time, especially if one thing you're researching doesn't work out, and you
therefore turn to another goal. Or, someone may help you with something s=
o
that it moves that project along, and you find you do have time for
gathering information in another direction.

2. Bring along COPIES (not originals) of data sources to the conference=8Bo=
f
family trees, addresses of relatives and other key documents (including
those needing translation). Bring them in an easy to use style (perhaps a
multi-section loose leaf binder) to the conference EACH day you're there.
Have the information in a format that makes easy for YOU to refer to it, an=
d
to share with others researching similar objectives or having possibly
helpful information.

3. BEFORE the conference or during the first night you're there, study th=
e
conference Family Finder that lists virtually all registrants. Mark in your
copy who's researching the same towns, the same or similar surnames, etc.
Make it your business to track them down during the conference, wherever yo=
u
can, since they may be looking for you too! Bulletin board will be availabl=
e
in the foyer for you to post messages.

4. Decide if there's anything so insurmountable in your research that
you'd like to "ask an expert" and discuss it with them. Sign up for a
session.

5. Bring the following supplies to the conference: a small pad to write
down persons' names, e-mail addresses, and a full-size pad for writing down
detailed or extensive information you learn. Bring pencils, and perhaps a
highlighter marking pen to mark photocopies that you make to keep. Bring
along a reasonably good magnifying glass to help you more easily read small
or illegible writing on documents.

6. Bring business cards to give others for exchanging information and
contacts with them. Although all registrants will be provided 10 business
cards courtesy of the conference, it's a good idea to have extras. Make sur=
e
the cards include your e-mail address (ours will, plus address, phone, and,
space permitting, some of your family finder information). If you don't hav=
e
business cards, then make up 3x5 or 4x6 filing cards, with your preprinted
contact info (including towns and surnames you're researching), to easily
give to others. Bring more cards than you think you'll need!

DURING THE CONFERENCE

7. When gathering information and whenever possible, photocopy the
document or pages you've decided is useful. More insight may come when
studying it the second time, during one the conference evenings or at home
after the conference. Don't write down an abstract of the info, that takes
more time and you could leave out something possibly useful later. A copier
machine will be available in the Resource Room.

8. Be sure to always write down (perhaps on the back of the photocopy), a
full description of the page you've photocopied, including relevant details=
,
such as: the title page of the book it's from, its year of publication,
author(s); microfilm reel number, document number, page number, or what
records repository it came from. This certainly can help, should you need t=
o
return to the full data source, or need to cite this information in a famil=
y
history, family tree, or reconcile conflicting information >from various
sources. (For example, if dates of birth for the same person differ in
census and social security records.)

9. EACH NIGHT of the conference, review what new information you've
gathered that day, and see if there's still some loopholes that warrant a
further visit to the Resource Room, going back to a website on the
conference computers, or tracking down the same lead for clearer/more
information. Keep trying to close up your loopholes and the research
objectives list you brought along.

AFTER THE CONFERENCE

10. Follow-up on all the new information you've gathered. Contact any fello=
w
researchers (by e-mail or postal mail) that attended the conference and you
weren't quite able to reach them. Use the contact information >from the
conference Family Finder. Contact any persons who exchanged cards with you.
Follow-up on some of the Internet sites or other data sources that you
learned about during the conference. Review the documents to see if
something else still was needed, and attempt to obtain that (now that you
know the source, that should be easier!). Add any new information into your
ongoing data files, folders, and family trees. Check to see if the new
information is consistent with what you already have, or are revisions
needed.

DURING THE CONFERENCE AND AFTERWARDS

11. BE PATIENT!! Some information you think may not be useful may indeed
become useful, as other facts come along. Don't despair. When in doubt,
it's easy to gather the information right then and there (rather than
passing it up), label its source. Sooner or later it may help you clear a
"brickwall" in your family research. (This "loose fact" might be someone
with the same surname that you've never heard of, etc.)

Last minute questions? If you are an America Online subscriber, I should be
available in the Golden Gates chat room for the weekly Jewish genealogy
chat, Thursday (tonight) at 10 PM EDT. The internal AOL address is
aol://2719:3-241-Golden%20Gates.

On behalf of my co-chairs Sheri Meisel and Ben Okner have an enjoyable
conference!

Elias Savada
Co-Chair, 23rd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
July 20-25, 2003
JW Marriott Hotel, Washington DC
www.jewishgen.org/dc2003
301-365-3456
Reply to esavada@mac.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Need help with town location & modern day name #galicia

Peter Zavon <PZavon@...>
 

On Wed, 9 Jul 2003 jbecker130@comcast.net> said to the Galicia List:

I recently found a letter in the NARA II Archives >from a relative dated
April 20, 1915. In the letter the relative was trying to send money to a
family member in Europe after the outbreak of WWI.

He mentions that the family is trying to send money to a relative in a town
called "GROSMOST" located near "LEMBERG", Galicia.

QUESTIONS: What is the modern day name of this town and where is it
located?

That would be Gross Mosty, called Mosty Wielkie by the Austrians. It is now
called Velikiye Mosty and is in modern Ukraine 45 km north northeast of Lviv
(the modern name for what the Austrians called Lemberg).

Gross Mosty was in the Zolkiew Administrative District under the Austrians,
and was the seat of a Judicial and a Jewish District. So records, where
ever they are stored now, are probably tied to that place name.

Many years ago I was told that the word Gros meant "BIG" therefore "Big
Most". Does this mean that there was a town called "Big Most" and perhaps
a
"Most" and then another town known as "Small Most"?
"Gross" is German for "big," "large," or "great". Wielkie is a Polish word
with the same meaning. My dictionary says that "most" is Polish for
"bridge" and I presume "Mosty" is a grammatical variant of that. So the
place name seems to translate as "Big Bridge."

Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY 14526

PZavon@Rochester.RR.Com


URGENT if you have not yet registered for Conference or Galicia Luncheon #galicia

Shelley K. Pollero
 

I post this on behalf of Elias Savada, Conference co-chair:

Our registration company, deep into the packet preparation cycle for the
forthcoming conference, has closed off all phone registrations and additions
to pre-existing registrations. Do not contact them at this time.
Faxed/mailed registrations received at this time forward will be held for
processing at the hotel.

If you procrastinated for an early week SIG luncheon (not available for
purchase at the hotel during the conference because of a 72-hour catering
commitment), I will offer ONE LAST MINUTE SOLUTION, but it will cost you a
little more for this personalized service. If you notify me no later than
next WEDNESDAY NOON that you want to attend any of the luncheons to be held
on Monday (Belarus and Germany) or Tuesday (Galicia and Latvia) during the
conference week, tickets, at $30 each, will be reserved.

Incomplete or erroneous emails will not be processed; specify exactly which
luncheon and which day and which type of meal (kosher or non-kosher). Make
sure you get it right the first time. Also, and most important, you will be
held liable for payment, even if you do not attend. By sending me a request,
we expect and demand that you honor your commitment. You should email credit
card information to me (number/exp. date/name on card) to reserve your
spot(s). This will be processed as an add-on item when you receive your
conference credentials. If you wish to pay by cash or check, payment will be
required at the time you arrive to pick up your registration packet. This
offer does not include SIG luncheons for Wednesday or Thursday, which can be
purchased at the hotel no later than Sunday or Monday conference week.

Elias Savada
Co-Chair, 23rd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
July 20-25, 2003
JW Marriott Hotel, Washington DC
www.jewishgen.org/dc2003
Reply to esavada@mac.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia URGENT if you have not yet registered for Conference or Galicia Luncheon #galicia

Shelley K. Pollero
 

I post this on behalf of Elias Savada, Conference co-chair:

Our registration company, deep into the packet preparation cycle for the
forthcoming conference, has closed off all phone registrations and additions
to pre-existing registrations. Do not contact them at this time.
Faxed/mailed registrations received at this time forward will be held for
processing at the hotel.

If you procrastinated for an early week SIG luncheon (not available for
purchase at the hotel during the conference because of a 72-hour catering
commitment), I will offer ONE LAST MINUTE SOLUTION, but it will cost you a
little more for this personalized service. If you notify me no later than
next WEDNESDAY NOON that you want to attend any of the luncheons to be held
on Monday (Belarus and Germany) or Tuesday (Galicia and Latvia) during the
conference week, tickets, at $30 each, will be reserved.

Incomplete or erroneous emails will not be processed; specify exactly which
luncheon and which day and which type of meal (kosher or non-kosher). Make
sure you get it right the first time. Also, and most important, you will be
held liable for payment, even if you do not attend. By sending me a request,
we expect and demand that you honor your commitment. You should email credit
card information to me (number/exp. date/name on card) to reserve your
spot(s). This will be processed as an add-on item when you receive your
conference credentials. If you wish to pay by cash or check, payment will be
required at the time you arrive to pick up your registration packet. This
offer does not include SIG luncheons for Wednesday or Thursday, which can be
purchased at the hotel no later than Sunday or Monday conference week.

Elias Savada
Co-Chair, 23rd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
July 20-25, 2003
JW Marriott Hotel, Washington DC
www.jewishgen.org/dc2003
Reply to esavada@mac.com


Re: Looking for Info re: Hawthorne School in Mt. Pleasant, NY #general

Barbara S Mannlein <bsmannlein@...>
 

Subject: Re: Looking for Information re: Hawthorne School in Mt. Pleasant,
NY

Using Google's advanced search features:

"Hawthorne School" Westchester resulted in several hits.
JCCA
... 1935: 1)Hawthorne School, 44 delinquent dependent Jewish boys; 2 ...
York City and Nassau and Westchester Counties. ... Operates 2 group
residences in White Plains, NY. ...
shell4.bayarea.net/~elias/hnoh/JCCA6.html - 75k - Cached - Similar pages

Summary of info:
1980 Located at 226 Linda Ave., Hawthorne, NY, residential treatment center
(22 buildings) for 179 disturbed and problem children (including 18 girls),
ages 8-19 under auspices of Jewish Board of Family and Children's Services,
NYC. Elementary and High School education on premises. Under Union Free
School District #3. Opened in 1906, for delinquent boys. Coed since 1935.

These may be possible sources of info:
JCCA -Jewish Child Care Association serving children & families since 1822
120 Wall Street
New York, NY 10005
Tel: (212)425-3333 * Fax: (212)425-9397
Attn: Leona M. Ferrer, Disclosure Coordinator
JCCA or http://www.jewishchildcareny.org/
OR:
HNOHAlumni@aol.com.

Barbara S. Mannlein
Tucson, AZ .... waiting for the monsoons!

Has anyone any knowledge concerning a Hawthorne School in Mt Pleasant,
NY? I discovered a member of the family I am researching listed as an
"inmate" there in the 1910 Census. He was 9 years old at the time. I
checked the Discussion Group Archives and found nothing. |


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Looking for Info re: Hawthorne School in Mt. Pleasant, NY #general

Barbara S Mannlein <bsmannlein@...>
 

Subject: Re: Looking for Information re: Hawthorne School in Mt. Pleasant,
NY

Using Google's advanced search features:

"Hawthorne School" Westchester resulted in several hits.
JCCA
... 1935: 1)Hawthorne School, 44 delinquent dependent Jewish boys; 2 ...
York City and Nassau and Westchester Counties. ... Operates 2 group
residences in White Plains, NY. ...
shell4.bayarea.net/~elias/hnoh/JCCA6.html - 75k - Cached - Similar pages

Summary of info:
1980 Located at 226 Linda Ave., Hawthorne, NY, residential treatment center
(22 buildings) for 179 disturbed and problem children (including 18 girls),
ages 8-19 under auspices of Jewish Board of Family and Children's Services,
NYC. Elementary and High School education on premises. Under Union Free
School District #3. Opened in 1906, for delinquent boys. Coed since 1935.

These may be possible sources of info:
JCCA -Jewish Child Care Association serving children & families since 1822
120 Wall Street
New York, NY 10005
Tel: (212)425-3333 * Fax: (212)425-9397
Attn: Leona M. Ferrer, Disclosure Coordinator
JCCA or http://www.jewishchildcareny.org/
OR:
HNOHAlumni@aol.com.

Barbara S. Mannlein
Tucson, AZ .... waiting for the monsoons!

Has anyone any knowledge concerning a Hawthorne School in Mt Pleasant,
NY? I discovered a member of the family I am researching listed as an
"inmate" there in the 1910 Census. He was 9 years old at the time. I
checked the Discussion Group Archives and found nothing. |


Re: Need help in locating a town & modern day name #general

m.steinberg@...
 

Hello All,

Using JewishGen's ShtetlSeeker - Radius Search, I came up with:

Zubov Most 5009 2419 N Ukraine 26.0 miles NNE >from Lemberg

I hope this helps.

Regards,
Moshe Steinberg
Vancouver Canada

SANG, NAGLER, FISCHER(FISZER, FISCHER), HELMAN
Zaleshchiki, Borszczow, New York City, Israel
GRANIRER, GRANIERER, SALCMAN, ARONOWICZ, KRONENFELD, FUHRMAN,GOLDSCMIDT,
SANDLER Czernowitz, Israel, USA

----- Original Message -----
From: <jbecker130@comcast.net>
To: "JewishGen Discussion Group" <jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Wednesday, July 09, 2003 8:22 PM
Subject: Need help in locating a town & modern day name

I recently found a letter in the NARA II Archives >from a relative dated
April 20, 1915. In the letter the relative was trying to send money to a
family member in Europe after the outbreak of WWI.

He mentions that the family is trying to send money to a relative in a
town called "Grosmost" located near "Lemberg", Galicia.

Questions: What is the modern day name of this town and where is it
located?

Many years ago I was told that the word Gros meant "Big" therefore "Big
Most". Does this mean that there was a town called "Big Most" and
perhaps a "Most" and then another town known as "Small Most"?

Please help.

Thanks

Jim Becker
jbecker130@comcast.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Need help in locating a town & modern day name #general

m.steinberg@...
 

Hello All,

Using JewishGen's ShtetlSeeker - Radius Search, I came up with:

Zubov Most 5009 2419 N Ukraine 26.0 miles NNE >from Lemberg

I hope this helps.

Regards,
Moshe Steinberg
Vancouver Canada

SANG, NAGLER, FISCHER(FISZER, FISCHER), HELMAN
Zaleshchiki, Borszczow, New York City, Israel
GRANIRER, GRANIERER, SALCMAN, ARONOWICZ, KRONENFELD, FUHRMAN,GOLDSCMIDT,
SANDLER Czernowitz, Israel, USA

----- Original Message -----
From: <jbecker130@comcast.net>
To: "JewishGen Discussion Group" <jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Wednesday, July 09, 2003 8:22 PM
Subject: Need help in locating a town & modern day name

I recently found a letter in the NARA II Archives >from a relative dated
April 20, 1915. In the letter the relative was trying to send money to a
family member in Europe after the outbreak of WWI.

He mentions that the family is trying to send money to a relative in a
town called "Grosmost" located near "Lemberg", Galicia.

Questions: What is the modern day name of this town and where is it
located?

Many years ago I was told that the word Gros meant "Big" therefore "Big
Most". Does this mean that there was a town called "Big Most" and
perhaps a "Most" and then another town known as "Small Most"?

Please help.

Thanks

Jim Becker
jbecker130@comcast.net


Software Recommendations #general

seforimlover
 

I am in the midst of trying to recreate the Lorberbaum genealogy and find
that I lack a suitable software program with which to suitably order all
the information. I would like to hear people's recommendations for a
software program.

My needs are as follows:

Fully Hebrew and English compatible, that means I can enter data and
search in both Hebrew and English. Easy to comprehend interface. The
option of adding notes and sources to each name.

Thank you any and all for answers.

Yehuda Herskowitz


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Software Recommendations #general

seforimlover
 

I am in the midst of trying to recreate the Lorberbaum genealogy and find
that I lack a suitable software program with which to suitably order all
the information. I would like to hear people's recommendations for a
software program.

My needs are as follows:

Fully Hebrew and English compatible, that means I can enter data and
search in both Hebrew and English. Easy to comprehend interface. The
option of adding notes and sources to each name.

Thank you any and all for answers.

Yehuda Herskowitz


Belarus SIG Members in DC/Northern VA Area #belarus

David M. Fox <davefox73@...>
 

If anyone in the DC/Northern Virginia area is available on July 18 or 19 to
pick up Oleg Perzashkevich at Dulles Airport and bring him to the J W
Marriott Hotel (Conference hotel) in DC, please contact me ASAP by private
email and include phone numbers where you can be reached day/night/cell.

I am awaiting exact fight number and arrival time >from Oleg and expect this
info in a few days. He is supposed to pick up his visa at the US Embassy in
Minsk on July 15. As you all must know Oleg is speaking at the Conference.

This may be a great opportunity to have some private one on one contact with
Oleg to talk about your own research efforts.

Dave

David Fox
Belarus SIG Coordinator
Arnold, MD
mail to: davefox73@earthlink.net


Belarus SIG #Belarus Belarus SIG Members in DC/Northern VA Area #belarus

David M. Fox <davefox73@...>
 

If anyone in the DC/Northern Virginia area is available on July 18 or 19 to
pick up Oleg Perzashkevich at Dulles Airport and bring him to the J W
Marriott Hotel (Conference hotel) in DC, please contact me ASAP by private
email and include phone numbers where you can be reached day/night/cell.

I am awaiting exact fight number and arrival time >from Oleg and expect this
info in a few days. He is supposed to pick up his visa at the US Embassy in
Minsk on July 15. As you all must know Oleg is speaking at the Conference.

This may be a great opportunity to have some private one on one contact with
Oleg to talk about your own research efforts.

Dave

David Fox
Belarus SIG Coordinator
Arnold, MD
mail to: davefox73@earthlink.net