Date   

haCohen indicates status, & shtetlseeker to find family names #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 9/15/2003, hazanjo@cogeco.ca writes:

<< I went back and read through some material. . . . . The father's name
was HaCOHEN VERONA . . .

==HaCohen is a status/title, not ever a personal name, and only very
rarely a family name. This man was a Cohen (member of the priestly sect),
the Cohen was not his personal name nor his surname.

I did find a note that VERONA is Polish for Black Crow.

==It very well may be. A better place to look for the possible origin of
many Ashkenazi (and Italian--if only Italy had been included) family names
is in jewishgen's shtettelseeker for all of Central & Eastern Europe:

I found the following in Belarus, alone; I imagine you might find quite a
few Verona sound-alike villages within 50 miles of your ancestor's home in
30 other countries. Remember, spellings will vary with the language of the
government then in power.

Varni (Vorne) 5427 2547
Voron' 5500 2838
Voron' (Kulishki) 5446 2558
Vorone (Voroni) 5150 2649
Voroni 5150 2649
Vorony 5509 3024
Vorony 5503 2705
Vorony 5446 2741
Vorony 5446 2558
Woronie (Voroni) 5150 2649
Worony (Vorony) 5503 2705
Worony (Vorony) 5446 2741

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen haCohen indicates status, & shtetlseeker to find family names #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 9/15/2003, hazanjo@cogeco.ca writes:

<< I went back and read through some material. . . . . The father's name
was HaCOHEN VERONA . . .

==HaCohen is a status/title, not ever a personal name, and only very
rarely a family name. This man was a Cohen (member of the priestly sect),
the Cohen was not his personal name nor his surname.

I did find a note that VERONA is Polish for Black Crow.

==It very well may be. A better place to look for the possible origin of
many Ashkenazi (and Italian--if only Italy had been included) family names
is in jewishgen's shtettelseeker for all of Central & Eastern Europe:

I found the following in Belarus, alone; I imagine you might find quite a
few Verona sound-alike villages within 50 miles of your ancestor's home in
30 other countries. Remember, spellings will vary with the language of the
government then in power.

Varni (Vorne) 5427 2547
Voron' 5500 2838
Voron' (Kulishki) 5446 2558
Vorone (Voroni) 5150 2649
Voroni 5150 2649
Vorony 5509 3024
Vorony 5503 2705
Vorony 5446 2741
Vorony 5446 2558
Woronie (Voroni) 5150 2649
Worony (Vorony) 5503 2705
Worony (Vorony) 5446 2741

Michael Bernet, New York


edition and page numbers for Monitor Polski #general

Marty Meyers <meyers01@...>
 

I've found some family members listed in the Monitor Polski Court Survivor
Proclamations & Family Searches announcements.

In addition to writing to the court for more information (forms will be
available shortly according to a recent post >from Judy Baston), the
following text suggests that we can obtain copies of the relevant Monitor
Polski pages >from the library of congress.

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland 'Search Results page provides
a link to the Monitor Polski project page where the following is stated:

"Researchers with an interest in obtaining photocopies of pages >from
Monitor Polski may obtain them >from the Library of Congress The search
results for each entry will include the edition and page number of the
Monitor Polski."

My searches came back with no indication of edition or page number.
Is there a timetable to provide this information in the search page responses?


Marty Meyers
< meyers01@comcast.net >

researching:
BORDOWITZ >from Przasnysz/Mlawa/Ciechanow/Makow/Pultusk/Wyszkow
ZYLBERMAN/SILVERMAN >from Przasnysz/Chorzele
MEYEROWITZ/POROSHKIN >from Bolshaya Berestovitsa (Belarus)
KIRSHNER/SIDMAN/BAILIN >from Slavuta/Volhynia/Ukraine
LANDSMAN/FINBERG/PEANEN >from Vilna
ZELMANOVICH/ROZENSZTEIN >from Poland (Przasnysz/Mlawa area?)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen edition and page numbers for Monitor Polski #general

Marty Meyers <meyers01@...>
 

I've found some family members listed in the Monitor Polski Court Survivor
Proclamations & Family Searches announcements.

In addition to writing to the court for more information (forms will be
available shortly according to a recent post >from Judy Baston), the
following text suggests that we can obtain copies of the relevant Monitor
Polski pages >from the library of congress.

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland 'Search Results page provides
a link to the Monitor Polski project page where the following is stated:

"Researchers with an interest in obtaining photocopies of pages >from
Monitor Polski may obtain them >from the Library of Congress The search
results for each entry will include the edition and page number of the
Monitor Polski."

My searches came back with no indication of edition or page number.
Is there a timetable to provide this information in the search page responses?


Marty Meyers
< meyers01@comcast.net >

researching:
BORDOWITZ >from Przasnysz/Mlawa/Ciechanow/Makow/Pultusk/Wyszkow
ZYLBERMAN/SILVERMAN >from Przasnysz/Chorzele
MEYEROWITZ/POROSHKIN >from Bolshaya Berestovitsa (Belarus)
KIRSHNER/SIDMAN/BAILIN >from Slavuta/Volhynia/Ukraine
LANDSMAN/FINBERG/PEANEN >from Vilna
ZELMANOVICH/ROZENSZTEIN >from Poland (Przasnysz/Mlawa area?)


Bialystok cemetery #poland

Joyce Field
 

I would like to reiterate that the photographing and indexing of the
Bialystok cemetery is a JewishGen Research Division project, being
coordinated by Mark Halpern. Funds were raised in the past, before this
group was formed, for the purchase of a digital camera to permit the
university group to photograph the tombstones. Help is currently needed
for transliteration of the inscriptions on the tombstones.

Mark Halpern previously explained the project in great detail. To have the cemetery project listed in the group's priorities certainly does not
imply, I hope, that a duplicative effort should be started.

Joyce Field
jfield@jewishgen.org


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Bialystok cemetery #poland

Joyce Field
 

I would like to reiterate that the photographing and indexing of the
Bialystok cemetery is a JewishGen Research Division project, being
coordinated by Mark Halpern. Funds were raised in the past, before this
group was formed, for the purchase of a digital camera to permit the
university group to photograph the tombstones. Help is currently needed
for transliteration of the inscriptions on the tombstones.

Mark Halpern previously explained the project in great detail. To have the cemetery project listed in the group's priorities certainly does not
imply, I hope, that a duplicative effort should be started.

Joyce Field
jfield@jewishgen.org


Betar #poland

earthscapeinc <earthscapeinc@...>
 

I have a couple of Betar pictures taken either in Sokolka or Bialystok
sometime in the 1930s. Anyone know about this organization? Anyone
interested in seeing the pictures?

Amy Degen
earthscapeinc@charter.net

NEIFACH, Sokolka and Bialystok
ALISHCOVSKY, Sokolka
SCHRIBMAN, Sokolka


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Betar #poland

earthscapeinc <earthscapeinc@...>
 

I have a couple of Betar pictures taken either in Sokolka or Bialystok
sometime in the 1930s. Anyone know about this organization? Anyone
interested in seeing the pictures?

Amy Degen
earthscapeinc@charter.net

NEIFACH, Sokolka and Bialystok
ALISHCOVSKY, Sokolka
SCHRIBMAN, Sokolka


Re: Jewish Cemeteries in Bialystok Region #poland

bartmant@earthlink.net <bartmant@...>
 

<< If anyone knows of any preservation activities in these
Cemeteries, please share them with the group

In the last two years I have been to Eastern Poland twice and
have taken some photographs of the cemeteries in Bialystok,
Grodek, Krynki, Michalowo, Sokolka, and Tykocin

I will place these photos on the Internet and provide links to
the group later today or tomorrow

Mark Halpern >>


Hi,

This is the situation with cemeteries in Zabludow.

Before the war there were at least four. Two were very small with just a
handful of very, very old stones, and were located right next to the wooden
synagogue, built in 1638. A young couple were buried there together after
they both died of "plague" after collapsing right under the wedding canopy.

This occurred in late 1600s. Many superstitions arose in the community
from this incident. Both these very small cemeteries were blown to pieces
where the synagogue was blown up on June 26th 1941.

There was also a much larger "old" cemetery. Many Rabbs and righteous
ones were buried here. This cemetery doesn't exist at all. I haven't even
been able to figure out exactly where it was located. Eber Perelgut in
Chicago visited this cemetery right after the war when he returned from
service in the Soviet Army. He told me that he spent several hours there
looking for Matzevahs but found none. He did however find many bones.
On the grounds of the cemetery cows were grazing. After this he left and
told himself that he would never again return to Zabludow where he was born and raised.

The next cemetery was the "New" cemetery. I think the first burial there
was in the late 1800s. Many of my family members were buried there
including my grandfather, and two uncles who died very young. This
cemetery has no Matzevahs at all, just the stones upon which they sat which are now partly covered by weeds. There is a small stone wall around the cemetery which is in poor condition. Towering over this scene is a monument to Rabbi Avraham Akiva Subotnik, Rabbi in Zabludow 1904-24. It also is very damaged.

Next to this "new" cemetery are large farming fields. In 1940 the Soviets
built a small military airport there. In June 20 of 1941 the Soviet
Commissar of Zabludow named Margolin (a Jew, not >from Zabludow, and whose
father was a religious scholar) announced that he was going to take part of
this cemetery and plow it under to expand the military airport. A
delegation of mostly elderly Jews >from the community went to speak to him
He listened to them and told them to come back to see him again on June
27th. They left feeling that they were likely going to now be sent to
Siberia. Of course the war broke out and the town was burned on June 26th.

Early in the German occupation the Germans made a group of Jews including
a relative of mine by marriage take apart the statue of Lenin that the
Russians had built in the market square. They made them take it to this
Jewish cemetery for a "Jewish" burial. On the way they were abused and
beaten. On the way back a group of Poles had assembled and came at them
with pitchforks, axes, etc, and tore some of them to pieces while they
made them pray to god to save them. During the period of the Zabludow
Ghetto Jewish slave laborers were made to remove the Matzevahs >from the
Zabludow cemeteries. They were taken by the Germans crushed and used to
widen the road out of Bialystok toward Moscow. A German company called
Cercov (best translation >from Yiddish) had the contract for this work. I
spent a lot of time trying to trace this company but without success. As
of a couple of years ago one of these slave laborers was still alive in a
nursing home in Texas but in very poor shape. He gave his video testimony
to his grand daughter several years earlier, but won't let his story be
told to anyone outside the family. Turned down Shoa Visual History
Foundation, etc, and also won't let any information be given to me.


It appears that at the end of the war there were a small number of
Matzevahs left in this cemetery that the Germans had not removed. They
appear to have been removed by Poles. When I was in Zabludow one of my
Polish friends offered to show me where one of them was and had been used
as a knife sharpener, but I was already pretty overwhelmed and refused.
Tomasz Wisniewski a number of years ago located a Matzevah that was in a
pile of old concrete. It is >from somewhere in Zabludow, and is as far as
I can tell the only one left >from Zabludow that can be read. I have it on
my website.

It's very hard to figure out emotionally and also physically how to best
deal with this remaining almost totally wrecked cemetery in Zabludow. A
young Polish farmer across the street offered to mow it and apply a weed
killer a couple of times a year for $300. Someday I'd like to plant a row
of shrubs around its perimeter (approx cost 2,000) and also put up a
historical marker on it's grounds explaining what it is and memorializing
the community. I've probably spent $20,000 of my own money on all my
Zabludow projects, and for the time being am pretty tapped out. Maybe
someday I'll find someone who can help, but there are actually higher
priorities. Below are links to some of my webpages about Zabludow
cemeteries.

http://www.zabludow.com/cemeteries.htm

Tilford Bartman


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland RE: Jewish Cemeteries in Bialystok Region #poland

bartmant@earthlink.net <bartmant@...>
 

<< If anyone knows of any preservation activities in these
Cemeteries, please share them with the group

In the last two years I have been to Eastern Poland twice and
have taken some photographs of the cemeteries in Bialystok,
Grodek, Krynki, Michalowo, Sokolka, and Tykocin

I will place these photos on the Internet and provide links to
the group later today or tomorrow

Mark Halpern >>


Hi,

This is the situation with cemeteries in Zabludow.

Before the war there were at least four. Two were very small with just a
handful of very, very old stones, and were located right next to the wooden
synagogue, built in 1638. A young couple were buried there together after
they both died of "plague" after collapsing right under the wedding canopy.

This occurred in late 1600s. Many superstitions arose in the community
from this incident. Both these very small cemeteries were blown to pieces
where the synagogue was blown up on June 26th 1941.

There was also a much larger "old" cemetery. Many Rabbs and righteous
ones were buried here. This cemetery doesn't exist at all. I haven't even
been able to figure out exactly where it was located. Eber Perelgut in
Chicago visited this cemetery right after the war when he returned from
service in the Soviet Army. He told me that he spent several hours there
looking for Matzevahs but found none. He did however find many bones.
On the grounds of the cemetery cows were grazing. After this he left and
told himself that he would never again return to Zabludow where he was born and raised.

The next cemetery was the "New" cemetery. I think the first burial there
was in the late 1800s. Many of my family members were buried there
including my grandfather, and two uncles who died very young. This
cemetery has no Matzevahs at all, just the stones upon which they sat which are now partly covered by weeds. There is a small stone wall around the cemetery which is in poor condition. Towering over this scene is a monument to Rabbi Avraham Akiva Subotnik, Rabbi in Zabludow 1904-24. It also is very damaged.

Next to this "new" cemetery are large farming fields. In 1940 the Soviets
built a small military airport there. In June 20 of 1941 the Soviet
Commissar of Zabludow named Margolin (a Jew, not >from Zabludow, and whose
father was a religious scholar) announced that he was going to take part of
this cemetery and plow it under to expand the military airport. A
delegation of mostly elderly Jews >from the community went to speak to him
He listened to them and told them to come back to see him again on June
27th. They left feeling that they were likely going to now be sent to
Siberia. Of course the war broke out and the town was burned on June 26th.

Early in the German occupation the Germans made a group of Jews including
a relative of mine by marriage take apart the statue of Lenin that the
Russians had built in the market square. They made them take it to this
Jewish cemetery for a "Jewish" burial. On the way they were abused and
beaten. On the way back a group of Poles had assembled and came at them
with pitchforks, axes, etc, and tore some of them to pieces while they
made them pray to god to save them. During the period of the Zabludow
Ghetto Jewish slave laborers were made to remove the Matzevahs >from the
Zabludow cemeteries. They were taken by the Germans crushed and used to
widen the road out of Bialystok toward Moscow. A German company called
Cercov (best translation >from Yiddish) had the contract for this work. I
spent a lot of time trying to trace this company but without success. As
of a couple of years ago one of these slave laborers was still alive in a
nursing home in Texas but in very poor shape. He gave his video testimony
to his grand daughter several years earlier, but won't let his story be
told to anyone outside the family. Turned down Shoa Visual History
Foundation, etc, and also won't let any information be given to me.


It appears that at the end of the war there were a small number of
Matzevahs left in this cemetery that the Germans had not removed. They
appear to have been removed by Poles. When I was in Zabludow one of my
Polish friends offered to show me where one of them was and had been used
as a knife sharpener, but I was already pretty overwhelmed and refused.
Tomasz Wisniewski a number of years ago located a Matzevah that was in a
pile of old concrete. It is >from somewhere in Zabludow, and is as far as
I can tell the only one left >from Zabludow that can be read. I have it on
my website.

It's very hard to figure out emotionally and also physically how to best
deal with this remaining almost totally wrecked cemetery in Zabludow. A
young Polish farmer across the street offered to mow it and apply a weed
killer a couple of times a year for $300. Someday I'd like to plant a row
of shrubs around its perimeter (approx cost 2,000) and also put up a
historical marker on it's grounds explaining what it is and memorializing
the community. I've probably spent $20,000 of my own money on all my
Zabludow projects, and for the time being am pretty tapped out. Maybe
someday I'll find someone who can help, but there are actually higher
priorities. Below are links to some of my webpages about Zabludow
cemeteries.

http://www.zabludow.com/cemeteries.htm

Tilford Bartman


Tea and sugar - sometimes #lithuania

Carlos Glikson
 

Bruce Sanders' theory is that having the sugar cube visible for all to see,
while drinking tea, was a sign that you could afford sugar. I'd like to
expand this with some nice info in an eMail which I kept an year ago - but
could not find on-line now.

I had to do some research for a friend. His family is related to the
Weizmanns >from Motol. Chaim Weizmann, the first president of modern Israel,
was born in Motol, in today's Belarus. Searching for Weizmanns and Motol, I
came across this. The author of the eMail.mentioned quoted his uncle Aaron.

Aaron - believed to live across >from the Weizmanns in Motol - said that

"the Weizmanns were so rich" that....
"they had sugar in their tea every day." !!

Certainly many of us take some things for granted nowadays - sugar, for
example. Extracting and refining sugar >from sugar beet was the activity of
some of my family members. Probably, the Weizmann's sugar came >from sugar
beet, too.

By the way, I remember the tradition of cube-in-teeth and tea- in- tall-
glasses (with and without handles) for family members originating as North
as Vilna Gubernia and as South as Kremenchug, Ukraine. Who copied whom?

Carlos GLIKSON
Buenos Aires, Argentina
e-Mail cglikson@ciudad.com.ar

Searching for

GLIKSON, GLICKSON, GLUCKSOHN, GLUECKSOHN: Marijampole, Suwalki, Augustow,
Sejny,Sopotkin,Koenigsberg. POKROISKY, POKROJSKI, POKROY: Suwalki, Seirijai. Lomza. ALPEROVICH, ALPEROWICZ: Kremenchug, Vilnius. HOLLANDERSKY,
HOLLENDERSKI, HOLLANDER: Suwalki, Seirijai, Lomza. TARNOPOLSKY, TARNOPOL:
Kremenchug, Kharkov. FELCHINSKY: Kremenchug, Vilnius, Felschtin?. KARP:
Grodno. SMELIENSKY(?),KRASNAPOLSKY(?), BLUMIGDAL (?), GOLUMBIEWSKY,
GOLOMB(?)


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Tea and sugar - sometimes #lithuania

Carlos Glikson
 

Bruce Sanders' theory is that having the sugar cube visible for all to see,
while drinking tea, was a sign that you could afford sugar. I'd like to
expand this with some nice info in an eMail which I kept an year ago - but
could not find on-line now.

I had to do some research for a friend. His family is related to the
Weizmanns >from Motol. Chaim Weizmann, the first president of modern Israel,
was born in Motol, in today's Belarus. Searching for Weizmanns and Motol, I
came across this. The author of the eMail.mentioned quoted his uncle Aaron.

Aaron - believed to live across >from the Weizmanns in Motol - said that

"the Weizmanns were so rich" that....
"they had sugar in their tea every day." !!

Certainly many of us take some things for granted nowadays - sugar, for
example. Extracting and refining sugar >from sugar beet was the activity of
some of my family members. Probably, the Weizmann's sugar came >from sugar
beet, too.

By the way, I remember the tradition of cube-in-teeth and tea- in- tall-
glasses (with and without handles) for family members originating as North
as Vilna Gubernia and as South as Kremenchug, Ukraine. Who copied whom?

Carlos GLIKSON
Buenos Aires, Argentina
e-Mail cglikson@ciudad.com.ar

Searching for

GLIKSON, GLICKSON, GLUCKSOHN, GLUECKSOHN: Marijampole, Suwalki, Augustow,
Sejny,Sopotkin,Koenigsberg. POKROISKY, POKROJSKI, POKROY: Suwalki, Seirijai. Lomza. ALPEROVICH, ALPEROWICZ: Kremenchug, Vilnius. HOLLANDERSKY,
HOLLENDERSKI, HOLLANDER: Suwalki, Seirijai, Lomza. TARNOPOLSKY, TARNOPOL:
Kremenchug, Kharkov. FELCHINSKY: Kremenchug, Vilnius, Felschtin?. KARP:
Grodno. SMELIENSKY(?),KRASNAPOLSKY(?), BLUMIGDAL (?), GOLUMBIEWSKY,
GOLOMB(?)


Dentist Speaks re Sugar and Tea #lithuania

Deb Katz
 

Jerry Hoffman, DDS emailed me to ask that I warn everyone on this list that
drinking tea through a sugar cube promotes tooth decay. So he discourages
us >from imitating this honored tradition. Another email pointed out that
modern sugar cubes are too soft, anyway, so there's no way to re-live the
tea drinking experience of our ancestors. Oh, shucks.....

Debbie Katz
Los Altos CA

----- Original Message -----
From: "Katz and Klein" <dkbk@sbcglobal.net>


Wow...drinking tea through a sugar cube seems to have been as pervasive
and
linking amongst Jews as the Yiddish language! I learned of the ritual
from
a relative of my family that hails >from a shtetl outside Berdicev
(Ukraine)
and when I told the tale to my mom, she said, "Oh, yes! My grandparents
on
both sides used to do that!" Well, one set of those grandparents came
from
the Brest area (Belarus) and the other >from the Siauliai and Riga areas.

Gosh, I'm thinking maybe I should try it!

Debbie Katz
Los Altos CA
dkbk@sbcglobal.net


Re: Tea in a glass #lithuania

Hedzel@...
 

My father drank tea in a glass but sometimes put strawberry or cherry
preserves in it instead of the lump sugar.

Harriette Hirsch
Fairfield, CT

Researching: HALPER Smolien, Minsk, Belarus
LUKSHEN Smolien, Minsk, Belarus
RUDOMIN Michalishek, Vilna
BLIAKER, BLYAKHER Michalishek, Vilna


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Dentist Speaks re Sugar and Tea #lithuania

Deb Katz
 

Jerry Hoffman, DDS emailed me to ask that I warn everyone on this list that
drinking tea through a sugar cube promotes tooth decay. So he discourages
us >from imitating this honored tradition. Another email pointed out that
modern sugar cubes are too soft, anyway, so there's no way to re-live the
tea drinking experience of our ancestors. Oh, shucks.....

Debbie Katz
Los Altos CA

----- Original Message -----
From: "Katz and Klein" <dkbk@sbcglobal.net>


Wow...drinking tea through a sugar cube seems to have been as pervasive
and
linking amongst Jews as the Yiddish language! I learned of the ritual
from
a relative of my family that hails >from a shtetl outside Berdicev
(Ukraine)
and when I told the tale to my mom, she said, "Oh, yes! My grandparents
on
both sides used to do that!" Well, one set of those grandparents came
from
the Brest area (Belarus) and the other >from the Siauliai and Riga areas.

Gosh, I'm thinking maybe I should try it!

Debbie Katz
Los Altos CA
dkbk@sbcglobal.net


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Tea in a glass #lithuania

Hedzel@...
 

My father drank tea in a glass but sometimes put strawberry or cherry
preserves in it instead of the lump sugar.

Harriette Hirsch
Fairfield, CT

Researching: HALPER Smolien, Minsk, Belarus
LUKSHEN Smolien, Minsk, Belarus
RUDOMIN Michalishek, Vilna
BLIAKER, BLYAKHER Michalishek, Vilna


Mozyr Excavation Causes Controversy in Belarus #belarus

David M. Fox <davefox73@...>
 

For those of you with roots in Mozyr, you might want to read this AP article
which appeared in the "Washington Post" on September 14, 2003.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A9173-2003Sep14.html

[Moderator Note: When writing URLs please do not enclose them in
<> because Lyris thinks that is a blank!]
Thanks to Saul Issroff for bringing this to my attention.

Dave
--
David Fox
Mail to: davefox@jewishgen.org
Belarus SIG Coordinator
Arnold, MD USA
http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus


Belarus SIG #Belarus Mozyr Excavation Causes Controversy in Belarus #belarus

David M. Fox <davefox73@...>
 

For those of you with roots in Mozyr, you might want to read this AP article
which appeared in the "Washington Post" on September 14, 2003.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A9173-2003Sep14.html

[Moderator Note: When writing URLs please do not enclose them in
<> because Lyris thinks that is a blank!]
Thanks to Saul Issroff for bringing this to my attention.

Dave
--
David Fox
Mail to: davefox@jewishgen.org
Belarus SIG Coordinator
Arnold, MD USA
http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus


Re: Tea in a Glass - origin of Russian custom #lithuania

Kovitz, Sonia <Sonia.Kovitz@...>
 

Having our "tea" holiday on Litvaksig is great!
The tea with sugar detail _stirs_ up many memories...
I learned the origin of the custom >from a Russian-Jewish emigre.
Sugar was sold not as we are used to it, loose in a sack
or in neat prefab cubes, but in large solidified chunks.
People chipped pieces >from it. The big chunk of sugar was called
a "head of sugar" (_golovA SAKHara_), which my Russian-Yiddish dictionary
translates into Yiddish as _a hitl tsuker_. Hitl generally means hat/cap
but in this phrase it means "loaf", maybe because the chunk looked like a
hat?
I have forgotten exactly why the sugar chip was put into one's mouth
rather than into the glass, but I'll try to find my notes on this BEFORE
Thursday. If anyone has saved all the memories of tea and sugar cubes, I'd love to have them--it makes a wonderful collection when taken "in a lump."

Sonia Kovitz

Seems this must have been a Russian custom but who really
knows the reasons.
Maurine Starr
MODERATOR'S NOTE: Messages to the LitvakSIG Discussion Group are searchable in the SIGs Message List Archives, linked to the JewishGen homepage. Wait a week or so after the thread has ended on Thursday evening and search the the LitvakSIG list for "tea" in this Archive.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania RE: Tea in a Glass - origin of Russian custom #lithuania

Kovitz, Sonia <Sonia.Kovitz@...>
 

Having our "tea" holiday on Litvaksig is great!
The tea with sugar detail _stirs_ up many memories...
I learned the origin of the custom >from a Russian-Jewish emigre.
Sugar was sold not as we are used to it, loose in a sack
or in neat prefab cubes, but in large solidified chunks.
People chipped pieces >from it. The big chunk of sugar was called
a "head of sugar" (_golovA SAKHara_), which my Russian-Yiddish dictionary
translates into Yiddish as _a hitl tsuker_. Hitl generally means hat/cap
but in this phrase it means "loaf", maybe because the chunk looked like a
hat?
I have forgotten exactly why the sugar chip was put into one's mouth
rather than into the glass, but I'll try to find my notes on this BEFORE
Thursday. If anyone has saved all the memories of tea and sugar cubes, I'd love to have them--it makes a wonderful collection when taken "in a lump."

Sonia Kovitz

Seems this must have been a Russian custom but who really
knows the reasons.
Maurine Starr
MODERATOR'S NOTE: Messages to the LitvakSIG Discussion Group are searchable in the SIGs Message List Archives, linked to the JewishGen homepage. Wait a week or so after the thread has ended on Thursday evening and search the the LitvakSIG list for "tea" in this Archive.