Date   

Orgeyev (Orhei), Moldova Yizkor Book #romania

Terry Lasky <tlasky@...>
 

I am happy to announce that an additional 17 chapters (30 pages) of the
Orhei (Orgeyev), Moldova Yizkor book have been translated and put onto
Jewishgen. We have now translated 39 chapters and 9 inserts (85 pages)
and have also put all 250 pictures and their captions online. We have
now completed over 40% of the book. I would like to thank Jerrold
Landau, Marsha Kayser, Rachel Weitz, Boaz Nadler and Tamar Rachevsky
Milner for all of the work that they have done in support of this effort.

I would also like to thank everyone who contributed money last year, we
couldn’t have done it without your support. If we are to continue having
this kind of success we must have your help again in 2005. If you
contributed in 2004 I ask that you consider contributing again this
year. If you haven’t contributed yet I urge you to join the rest of us
and support this important cause. You can contribute by going to
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.html – make sure
to mark it for the Orhei, Moldova Yizkor book. I would request that you
also send me an email at tlasky@bwn.net <mailto:tlasky@bwn.net> and let
me know how much you contributed.

If you haven’t seen it yet the US Library of Congress has digitized the
1924 Romanian Business directory. It has the names and addresses of all
professional people and their occupations. There are six full pages of
names for Orhei (and of course for all of the other major cities). It is
in Romanian but since they use the Latin alphabet the only item that
would require translation is the occupation. The Orgeyev specific data
can be found at
http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=gdc3&fileName=scd0001_20030122001ropage.db
and then go to Image 2087. The main page is located at
http://www.loc.gov/rr/european/phonero/romdir.html

Terry Lasky
Colorado, USA
Orhei Project Lead


Romania SIG #Romania Orgeyev (Orhei), Moldova Yizkor Book #romania

Terry Lasky <tlasky@...>
 

I am happy to announce that an additional 17 chapters (30 pages) of the
Orhei (Orgeyev), Moldova Yizkor book have been translated and put onto
Jewishgen. We have now translated 39 chapters and 9 inserts (85 pages)
and have also put all 250 pictures and their captions online. We have
now completed over 40% of the book. I would like to thank Jerrold
Landau, Marsha Kayser, Rachel Weitz, Boaz Nadler and Tamar Rachevsky
Milner for all of the work that they have done in support of this effort.

I would also like to thank everyone who contributed money last year, we
couldn’t have done it without your support. If we are to continue having
this kind of success we must have your help again in 2005. If you
contributed in 2004 I ask that you consider contributing again this
year. If you haven’t contributed yet I urge you to join the rest of us
and support this important cause. You can contribute by going to
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.html – make sure
to mark it for the Orhei, Moldova Yizkor book. I would request that you
also send me an email at tlasky@bwn.net <mailto:tlasky@bwn.net> and let
me know how much you contributed.

If you haven’t seen it yet the US Library of Congress has digitized the
1924 Romanian Business directory. It has the names and addresses of all
professional people and their occupations. There are six full pages of
names for Orhei (and of course for all of the other major cities). It is
in Romanian but since they use the Latin alphabet the only item that
would require translation is the occupation. The Orgeyev specific data
can be found at
http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=gdc3&fileName=scd0001_20030122001ropage.db
and then go to Image 2087. The main page is located at
http://www.loc.gov/rr/european/phonero/romdir.html

Terry Lasky
Colorado, USA
Orhei Project Lead


Seeking AGRONIKs currently living in Belarus #belarus

joe agronick <j-dagronick@...>
 

Would be deeply grateful for any assistance in identifying members of the
family AGRONIK now residing in Belarus.

If there are published lists of Belarus families--in such directories as
phone books--that are accessible, please let me know about them.

With thanks and respect,

Joe Agronick
Rancho Palos Verdes, California


Belarus SIG #Belarus Seeking AGRONIKs currently living in Belarus #belarus

joe agronick <j-dagronick@...>
 

Would be deeply grateful for any assistance in identifying members of the
family AGRONIK now residing in Belarus.

If there are published lists of Belarus families--in such directories as
phone books--that are accessible, please let me know about them.

With thanks and respect,

Joe Agronick
Rancho Palos Verdes, California


New Eastern Galician Records Added to JRI-Poland Database #galicia

Mark Halpern
 

Happy New Year to everyone.

Just before the New Year, Stanley Diamond announced that Approximately 125,000 new
entries for 60 towns were added to the JRI-Poland database, which now has more than
2.5 million Polish Jewish records.

I am proud to announce that the AGAD Indexing project of vital records for eastern
Galicia - towns now in Ukraine - contributed over 50,000 new entries >from 22 towns.

Thanks to the efforts of the AGAD indexing team in Warsaw and Michael Tobias, there
are now more than 550,000 vital record indices for 78 eastern Galician towns in the
JRI-Poland database.

To find information about the status of indexing for the 87 Administrative towns that
are part of the AGAD project, please go to
http://www.jri-poland.org/agad/agadtowns.html.

If your ancestral town was near one of the towns noted below, your town's records
could have been registered in one of these Administrative towns. The Jewish
communities in these Administrative towns collected the vital records for all the
towns in its district. The indices in the database include reference to the town in
which the vital event occurred. Search the database for your surname and set
"Province" to "Ukraine." This will result in only AGAD record indices being displayed
in your search results.

The indices do not have all the genealogical relevant information. You can order the
actual record >from the AGAD Archives using the new Shopping Basket ordering system.

Here are the details.

Brzezany/Berezhany (4927, 2456)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 2,158 records
Births 1898-1900
Deaths 1877-1882, 1896-1900
Fundraising to index 1901-1903 births and 1899-1902 deaths continues. See below for
how you can donate to this project.

Budzanow/Budanov (4910, 2543)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 3,905 records
Births 1867-1896
Deaths 1877-1889
All available Budzanow records have now been indexed.

Grodek Jagiellonski/Gorodok (4947, 2339)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 1,846 records
Births 1893-1901
All available Grodek Jagiellonski records have now been indexed.
Please note that the 1893-1901 birth register is in very poor condition and cannot be
microfilmed or copied. Many entries cannot be read. Some names or towns were not
discernable. These records are not available for ordering through the JRI-Poland
Order System.

Jagielnica/Yagelnitsa (4857 2544)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 415 records
Births 1898-1901
All available Jagielnica records have now been indexed.

Jaryczow Nowy/ Novyy Yarychev (4955, 2418)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 184 records
Births 1900
Deaths 1900-01
Fundraising to index 1902-1903 births and 1902-1903 deaths continues. See below for
how you can donate to this project.

Kamionka Strumilowa/ Kamenka Bugskaya (5006, 2421)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 1,210 records
Births 1900-1903
Deaths 1899-1902
All available Kamionka Strumilowa records have now been indexed.

Kolomyja/ Kolomyya (4832, 2502)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 2,609 records
Births 1900-1901
Marriages 1899-1901
Deaths 1900-1901
Fundraising to index 1902-1903 births, 1901-1902 marriages and 1902 deaths continues.
See below for how you can donate to this project.

Kozlow/Kozlov (4933, 2521)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 406 records
Births 1899-1902
All available Kozlow records have now been indexed.

Lubycza Krolewska (5020, 2332)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 442 records
Deaths 1844-1876
All available Lubycza Krolewska records have now been indexed.

Lwow/Lviv (4950, 2400)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 11,268 records
Births 1888
Marriages 1870-1899
Fundraising to index 1814-1837, 1862-1876, 1900-1903 births, 1900-1903 marriages and
1864-1903 deaths continues. See below for how you can donate to this project. Your
contribution to the Lwow indexing project will be matched by a fund contributed by an
anonymous donor.

Nawarya/ Navariya (4945, 2356)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 487 records
Births 1878, 1883-1887, 1889-1895, 1901
Marriages 1878-1879, 1894, 1899-1901
Deaths 1877, 1901
Fundraising to index 1902-1903 marriages and 1902-1903 deaths continues. See below
for how you can donate to this project.

Podhajce/ Podgaytsy (4916, 2508)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 176 records
Births 1902
All available Podhajce records have now been indexed.

Podwoloczyska/ Podvolochisk (4932, 2609)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 353 records
Births 1897-1900
All available Podwoloczyska records have now been indexed.

Rawa Ruska/Rava Russkaya (5015, 2337)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 13,951 records
Births 1816-1870, 1877-1900
Deaths 1844-1870, 1877-1900
Fundraising to index 1871-1876 births continues. See below for how you can donate to
this project.

Sambor (4931, 2312)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 698 records
Births 1900-1901
Fundraising to index 1902-1903 births, 1899-1903 marriages, and 1899-1903 deaths
continues. See below for how you can donate to this project.

Stanislawow/Ivano Frankovsk (4856 2443)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 1,745 records
Births 1899-1900
Fundraising to index 1901-1903 births and 1900-1903 deaths continues. See below for
how you can donate to this project.

Stryj/Stryy (4915, 2351)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 1,439 records
Births 1900-1901
Marriages 1900-1901
Deaths 1900-1901
Fundraising to index 1902-1903 births, 1902-1903 marriages, and 1902-1903 deaths
continues. See below for how you can donate to this project.

Tarnopol/Ternopol (4933, 2535)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 1,982 records
Births 1902-1903
Marriages 1902-1903
Deaths 1902-1903
All available Tarnopol records have now been indexed.

Zabie/ Verkhovina (4809, 2447)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 908 records
Births 1877-1892
Marriages 1891, 1893, 1895-1896, 1898-1904 (These are INDEX ONLY entries. No actual
records are available >from the AGAD Archives)
All available Zabie records have now been indexed.

Zbaraz/Zbarazh (4940, 2547)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 519 records
Births 1902-1903
Deaths 1900-1903
All available Zbaraz records have now been indexed.

Zloczow/ Zolochev (4948, 2454)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 786 records
Births 1898-1900
Fundraising to index 1900-1903 deaths continues. See below for how you can donate to
this project.

Zydaczow/ Zhidachov (4923, 2408)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 2,843 records
Births 1877-1880, 1882, 1885, 1887-1898, 1900-1901, 1903
Marriages 1878, 1881, 1890-1891, 1899-1901
Deaths 1877-1883, 1887-1888, 1890-1895, 1897-1900, 1903
All available Zydaczow records have now been indexed.

All these records, except the newly added Grodek Jagiellonski records can be ordered
from the AGAD Archives using the JRI-Poland Shopping Basket Order System
http://www.jri-poland.org/psa/neworder.htm.

You can help ensure the indexing of your Galician town's records. Please consider a
contribution to the AGAD project. Information on contributing is available at
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadcontrib.htm.

The AGAD record indices contained in the JRI-Poland database would not be accessible
to researchers without our host, JewishGen. In addition to your contribution to the
JRI- Poland AGAD Project that supports indexing of the records, we hope you will also
give to JewishGen to help defray the cost of maintaining these records. An easily
accessible contribution form is available at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/AGAD.html.

Mark Halpern
AGAD Archive Coordinator
JRI-Poland


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia New Eastern Galician Records Added to JRI-Poland Database #galicia

Mark Halpern
 

Happy New Year to everyone.

Just before the New Year, Stanley Diamond announced that Approximately 125,000 new
entries for 60 towns were added to the JRI-Poland database, which now has more than
2.5 million Polish Jewish records.

I am proud to announce that the AGAD Indexing project of vital records for eastern
Galicia - towns now in Ukraine - contributed over 50,000 new entries >from 22 towns.

Thanks to the efforts of the AGAD indexing team in Warsaw and Michael Tobias, there
are now more than 550,000 vital record indices for 78 eastern Galician towns in the
JRI-Poland database.

To find information about the status of indexing for the 87 Administrative towns that
are part of the AGAD project, please go to
http://www.jri-poland.org/agad/agadtowns.html.

If your ancestral town was near one of the towns noted below, your town's records
could have been registered in one of these Administrative towns. The Jewish
communities in these Administrative towns collected the vital records for all the
towns in its district. The indices in the database include reference to the town in
which the vital event occurred. Search the database for your surname and set
"Province" to "Ukraine." This will result in only AGAD record indices being displayed
in your search results.

The indices do not have all the genealogical relevant information. You can order the
actual record >from the AGAD Archives using the new Shopping Basket ordering system.

Here are the details.

Brzezany/Berezhany (4927, 2456)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 2,158 records
Births 1898-1900
Deaths 1877-1882, 1896-1900
Fundraising to index 1901-1903 births and 1899-1902 deaths continues. See below for
how you can donate to this project.

Budzanow/Budanov (4910, 2543)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 3,905 records
Births 1867-1896
Deaths 1877-1889
All available Budzanow records have now been indexed.

Grodek Jagiellonski/Gorodok (4947, 2339)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 1,846 records
Births 1893-1901
All available Grodek Jagiellonski records have now been indexed.
Please note that the 1893-1901 birth register is in very poor condition and cannot be
microfilmed or copied. Many entries cannot be read. Some names or towns were not
discernable. These records are not available for ordering through the JRI-Poland
Order System.

Jagielnica/Yagelnitsa (4857 2544)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 415 records
Births 1898-1901
All available Jagielnica records have now been indexed.

Jaryczow Nowy/ Novyy Yarychev (4955, 2418)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 184 records
Births 1900
Deaths 1900-01
Fundraising to index 1902-1903 births and 1902-1903 deaths continues. See below for
how you can donate to this project.

Kamionka Strumilowa/ Kamenka Bugskaya (5006, 2421)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 1,210 records
Births 1900-1903
Deaths 1899-1902
All available Kamionka Strumilowa records have now been indexed.

Kolomyja/ Kolomyya (4832, 2502)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 2,609 records
Births 1900-1901
Marriages 1899-1901
Deaths 1900-1901
Fundraising to index 1902-1903 births, 1901-1902 marriages and 1902 deaths continues.
See below for how you can donate to this project.

Kozlow/Kozlov (4933, 2521)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 406 records
Births 1899-1902
All available Kozlow records have now been indexed.

Lubycza Krolewska (5020, 2332)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 442 records
Deaths 1844-1876
All available Lubycza Krolewska records have now been indexed.

Lwow/Lviv (4950, 2400)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 11,268 records
Births 1888
Marriages 1870-1899
Fundraising to index 1814-1837, 1862-1876, 1900-1903 births, 1900-1903 marriages and
1864-1903 deaths continues. See below for how you can donate to this project. Your
contribution to the Lwow indexing project will be matched by a fund contributed by an
anonymous donor.

Nawarya/ Navariya (4945, 2356)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 487 records
Births 1878, 1883-1887, 1889-1895, 1901
Marriages 1878-1879, 1894, 1899-1901
Deaths 1877, 1901
Fundraising to index 1902-1903 marriages and 1902-1903 deaths continues. See below
for how you can donate to this project.

Podhajce/ Podgaytsy (4916, 2508)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 176 records
Births 1902
All available Podhajce records have now been indexed.

Podwoloczyska/ Podvolochisk (4932, 2609)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 353 records
Births 1897-1900
All available Podwoloczyska records have now been indexed.

Rawa Ruska/Rava Russkaya (5015, 2337)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 13,951 records
Births 1816-1870, 1877-1900
Deaths 1844-1870, 1877-1900
Fundraising to index 1871-1876 births continues. See below for how you can donate to
this project.

Sambor (4931, 2312)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 698 records
Births 1900-1901
Fundraising to index 1902-1903 births, 1899-1903 marriages, and 1899-1903 deaths
continues. See below for how you can donate to this project.

Stanislawow/Ivano Frankovsk (4856 2443)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 1,745 records
Births 1899-1900
Fundraising to index 1901-1903 births and 1900-1903 deaths continues. See below for
how you can donate to this project.

Stryj/Stryy (4915, 2351)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 1,439 records
Births 1900-1901
Marriages 1900-1901
Deaths 1900-1901
Fundraising to index 1902-1903 births, 1902-1903 marriages, and 1902-1903 deaths
continues. See below for how you can donate to this project.

Tarnopol/Ternopol (4933, 2535)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 1,982 records
Births 1902-1903
Marriages 1902-1903
Deaths 1902-1903
All available Tarnopol records have now been indexed.

Zabie/ Verkhovina (4809, 2447)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 908 records
Births 1877-1892
Marriages 1891, 1893, 1895-1896, 1898-1904 (These are INDEX ONLY entries. No actual
records are available >from the AGAD Archives)
All available Zabie records have now been indexed.

Zbaraz/Zbarazh (4940, 2547)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 519 records
Births 1902-1903
Deaths 1900-1903
All available Zbaraz records have now been indexed.

Zloczow/ Zolochev (4948, 2454)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 786 records
Births 1898-1900
Fundraising to index 1900-1903 deaths continues. See below for how you can donate to
this project.

Zydaczow/ Zhidachov (4923, 2408)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Added 2,843 records
Births 1877-1880, 1882, 1885, 1887-1898, 1900-1901, 1903
Marriages 1878, 1881, 1890-1891, 1899-1901
Deaths 1877-1883, 1887-1888, 1890-1895, 1897-1900, 1903
All available Zydaczow records have now been indexed.

All these records, except the newly added Grodek Jagiellonski records can be ordered
from the AGAD Archives using the JRI-Poland Shopping Basket Order System
http://www.jri-poland.org/psa/neworder.htm.

You can help ensure the indexing of your Galician town's records. Please consider a
contribution to the AGAD project. Information on contributing is available at
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadcontrib.htm.

The AGAD record indices contained in the JRI-Poland database would not be accessible
to researchers without our host, JewishGen. In addition to your contribution to the
JRI- Poland AGAD Project that supports indexing of the records, we hope you will also
give to JewishGen to help defray the cost of maintaining these records. An easily
accessible contribution form is available at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/AGAD.html.

Mark Halpern
AGAD Archive Coordinator
JRI-Poland


Re: Drohobycz:King Wladyslaw Jagiello Gymnasium Photo #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Pamela Weisberger wrote

I've posted a photograph, taken in Drohobycz, Poland (Galicia) today,
Ukraine, circa 1934 to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the King
Wladyslaw Jagiello Gymnasium on JG's Viewmate.

The image can be viewed at:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5295

If you can identify any of the teachers or students in this picture,
please contact me privately. However, if you have information about this
school, students or teachers that might be of interest to the entire
group, please respond to the list.

This photograph was provided by David Einsiedler, who was a student there
for six years, graduating in 1937. He is the student in the fourth row
back--dead center with a v-neck white-collared shirt.)

There are also some partial surnames written at the bottom which may be
familiar to you.

Thank you.
Dear Pamela,

Amongst the teachers, second >from the right at the bottom row is Bruno
Schultz (Brunon Szulc in Polish), who was the drawing teacher and world
famous writer and painter.

See his other photograph:

http://motlc.wiesenthal.com/pages/t069/t06912.html

Born in Drogobycz, Galicia, Schultz trained as an architect and during the
years 1924-39 taught art in the high school of his home town. In his novels,
he set his tales in a small town, much like his own, though bereft of local
color, combining authenticity with fantasy and myth. Schultz was a pioneer
of the magical and absurd and he mingled his personal recollections with
visionary fantasies. In 1938 Schultz was awarded a prize by the Polish
Academy of Literature for his two published works. During the Nazi
occupation he was murdered by the SS.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab.


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Drohobycz:King Wladyslaw Jagiello Gymnasium Photo #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Pamela Weisberger wrote

I've posted a photograph, taken in Drohobycz, Poland (Galicia) today,
Ukraine, circa 1934 to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the King
Wladyslaw Jagiello Gymnasium on JG's Viewmate.

The image can be viewed at:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5295

If you can identify any of the teachers or students in this picture,
please contact me privately. However, if you have information about this
school, students or teachers that might be of interest to the entire
group, please respond to the list.

This photograph was provided by David Einsiedler, who was a student there
for six years, graduating in 1937. He is the student in the fourth row
back--dead center with a v-neck white-collared shirt.)

There are also some partial surnames written at the bottom which may be
familiar to you.

Thank you.
Dear Pamela,

Amongst the teachers, second >from the right at the bottom row is Bruno
Schultz (Brunon Szulc in Polish), who was the drawing teacher and world
famous writer and painter.

See his other photograph:

http://motlc.wiesenthal.com/pages/t069/t06912.html

Born in Drogobycz, Galicia, Schultz trained as an architect and during the
years 1924-39 taught art in the high school of his home town. In his novels,
he set his tales in a small town, much like his own, though bereft of local
color, combining authenticity with fantasy and myth. Schultz was a pioneer
of the magical and absurd and he mingled his personal recollections with
visionary fantasies. In 1938 Schultz was awarded a prize by the Polish
Academy of Literature for his two published works. During the Nazi
occupation he was murdered by the SS.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab.


HOCHAUSER/MANDELBOIM from Piwniszna (near Nowy Sasz) #galicia

Pnina Meislish <pniname@...>
 

Dear friends,
I try to find the origins of the family of my father Moshe MANDELBOIM, ben
Aharon Yoseph.
My father was born in Piwniszna, near Nowy Sasz, Feb. 1905. He came to
Israel at April 1934 and died in Jerusalem at Feb. 1957.
His Brother Wolf - Abraham Zeev -some years younger- immigrated to Antwerp
and was murdered in Auswitz.
Does any one know something about him?

My grandfather Aharon Yoseph ben Shmuel died in the Ghetto of Krakow May
1942.
My Grandmother Golda Zussel MANDELBOIM bat Shmuel HOCHAUSER was born in
Piwniszna and was murdered in Belzecz.
Does anyone know about this branch of HOCHAUSER ?

Lots of thanks,
Dr. Pnina Meislish, Jerusalem


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia HOCHAUSER/MANDELBOIM from Piwniszna (near Nowy Sasz) #galicia

Pnina Meislish <pniname@...>
 

Dear friends,
I try to find the origins of the family of my father Moshe MANDELBOIM, ben
Aharon Yoseph.
My father was born in Piwniszna, near Nowy Sasz, Feb. 1905. He came to
Israel at April 1934 and died in Jerusalem at Feb. 1957.
His Brother Wolf - Abraham Zeev -some years younger- immigrated to Antwerp
and was murdered in Auswitz.
Does any one know something about him?

My grandfather Aharon Yoseph ben Shmuel died in the Ghetto of Krakow May
1942.
My Grandmother Golda Zussel MANDELBOIM bat Shmuel HOCHAUSER was born in
Piwniszna and was murdered in Belzecz.
Does anyone know about this branch of HOCHAUSER ?

Lots of thanks,
Dr. Pnina Meislish, Jerusalem


HOROWITZ from Rudnik #galicia

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

I am looking for information about Isaac HOROWITZ (b. 1873, Rudnik), son of
Leib HOROWITZ and Alte KALTER, who married Neche EICHNER in Sieniawa in
1898. If you have any information about this HOROWITZ family, please
contact me.

Thanks very much and best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


Archives #galicia

Tomer Brunner <tomerbr@...>
 

Dear friend,

I wish to get documents >from some archives in Poland and have
Some questions about that.

What would be the best: writing to archives or hiring a researcher
to do that?

If I write to an archive - will they supply all available material?
If I hire a researcher – will he have access to all materials?

Did anyone wrote to an archive and got limited number of documents
But later, with the help of a researcher got more >from the same archive?

Should I write to each archive where information might be or, if I
write only to the regional archive, will my request be sent to the smaller,
local archive, in case relevant documents are found there?

I had experience with the war archive in Vienna. When I first wrote
They replied with just a little information but after few months I got
another letter with extra information! so it might be an advantage to
write directly to an archive, but still, it depends on which archive.

Should I write in English or “must” I write in Polish?

If I write to an archive asking to get copies of a *complete* record,
Like census records of a town, will it be possible or my request is limited
only to families which I specify?
Can a researcher do better in such a case?

I would greatly appreciate any answer or relevant information
on other aspects like which way is faster, more expensive etc…

Thanks for any help,
Tomer Brunner, Israel

[MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately]


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia HOROWITZ from Rudnik #galicia

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

I am looking for information about Isaac HOROWITZ (b. 1873, Rudnik), son of
Leib HOROWITZ and Alte KALTER, who married Neche EICHNER in Sieniawa in
1898. If you have any information about this HOROWITZ family, please
contact me.

Thanks very much and best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Archives #galicia

Tomer Brunner <tomerbr@...>
 

Dear friend,

I wish to get documents >from some archives in Poland and have
Some questions about that.

What would be the best: writing to archives or hiring a researcher
to do that?

If I write to an archive - will they supply all available material?
If I hire a researcher – will he have access to all materials?

Did anyone wrote to an archive and got limited number of documents
But later, with the help of a researcher got more >from the same archive?

Should I write to each archive where information might be or, if I
write only to the regional archive, will my request be sent to the smaller,
local archive, in case relevant documents are found there?

I had experience with the war archive in Vienna. When I first wrote
They replied with just a little information but after few months I got
another letter with extra information! so it might be an advantage to
write directly to an archive, but still, it depends on which archive.

Should I write in English or “must” I write in Polish?

If I write to an archive asking to get copies of a *complete* record,
Like census records of a town, will it be possible or my request is limited
only to families which I specify?
Can a researcher do better in such a case?

I would greatly appreciate any answer or relevant information
on other aspects like which way is faster, more expensive etc…

Thanks for any help,
Tomer Brunner, Israel

[MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately]


Re: deported or fled to Bukhara? #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Marion Hattenbach Bernstein wrote

In Yad VaShem's pages of Testimony, I found relatives of my maternal
grandfather's >from the Zarszyn-Rymanow-Sanok area. The mother, Chava
TELLER, the only survivor of that family, filed pages of testimony for her
husband and two eldest sons noting that they died in Bukhara, Russia in
1942 of hunger. Does anyone know if there was an organized effort to flee
to Soviet Central Asia, or if a deportation of Jewish males occurred
during World War II?
Both, Marion.

On September 17, 1939 Soviets have joined Germans to start WWII by occupying
eastern parts of Poland (Eastern Galicia, Belarus (Polesie) and part of
Polish Lithuania (Wilno and Nowogrodek Provinces). During 1940 Soviets have
also occupied and incorporated within USSR structure Baltic States
(Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia) and chunk of Romania (Bessarabia). On those
territories were also Jews >from escaping the Nazi occupied western part
Poland

Deportation of the "capitalists" (land and business owners, military and
police personnel, religious leaders, members of the political parties,
intelligentsia, school teachers, wealthy peasants, and so on) have started
immediately after Soviets have enter the occupied territories.

In April 1940 Soviets have secretly shot more than 20,000 Polish POW
officer, amongst them Jewish doctors and lawyers, called for the reserve
duties at the beginning of WWII

How many were arrested and deported?

108, 000 people were arrested in the eastern territories of Poland and send
to the labor camps, mostly located in the Russian Arctic, 320,000 people
were deported to the exile villages of Kazakhstan. To this one should also
add 96,000 arrested and 160,000 people deported >from the Baltic states as
well as 36,000 Moldavians. Amongst the arrested and deported were many Jews.

On June 22, 1941 Germany have launched the attack on its former ally, the
USSR, and many ex Polish citizens have been evacuated or have escaped to the
East. About a month later, Polish General Sikorsky and Soviet USSR
Ambassador to UK, Maisky have signed a truce which has freed all pre 1939
Polish citizens form the Soviet labor camps and exiled places.

Many have moved to the South but being exposed to the extremely harsh
conditions at the camps and constant lack of food and medical assistance
following the amnesty, many of them have died.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: deported or fled to Bukhara? #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Marion Hattenbach Bernstein wrote

In Yad VaShem's pages of Testimony, I found relatives of my maternal
grandfather's >from the Zarszyn-Rymanow-Sanok area. The mother, Chava
TELLER, the only survivor of that family, filed pages of testimony for her
husband and two eldest sons noting that they died in Bukhara, Russia in
1942 of hunger. Does anyone know if there was an organized effort to flee
to Soviet Central Asia, or if a deportation of Jewish males occurred
during World War II?
Both, Marion.

On September 17, 1939 Soviets have joined Germans to start WWII by occupying
eastern parts of Poland (Eastern Galicia, Belarus (Polesie) and part of
Polish Lithuania (Wilno and Nowogrodek Provinces). During 1940 Soviets have
also occupied and incorporated within USSR structure Baltic States
(Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia) and chunk of Romania (Bessarabia). On those
territories were also Jews >from escaping the Nazi occupied western part
Poland

Deportation of the "capitalists" (land and business owners, military and
police personnel, religious leaders, members of the political parties,
intelligentsia, school teachers, wealthy peasants, and so on) have started
immediately after Soviets have enter the occupied territories.

In April 1940 Soviets have secretly shot more than 20,000 Polish POW
officer, amongst them Jewish doctors and lawyers, called for the reserve
duties at the beginning of WWII

How many were arrested and deported?

108, 000 people were arrested in the eastern territories of Poland and send
to the labor camps, mostly located in the Russian Arctic, 320,000 people
were deported to the exile villages of Kazakhstan. To this one should also
add 96,000 arrested and 160,000 people deported >from the Baltic states as
well as 36,000 Moldavians. Amongst the arrested and deported were many Jews.

On June 22, 1941 Germany have launched the attack on its former ally, the
USSR, and many ex Polish citizens have been evacuated or have escaped to the
East. About a month later, Polish General Sikorsky and Soviet USSR
Ambassador to UK, Maisky have signed a truce which has freed all pre 1939
Polish citizens form the Soviet labor camps and exiled places.

Many have moved to the South but being exposed to the extremely harsh
conditions at the camps and constant lack of food and medical assistance
following the amnesty, many of them have died.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab


Re: Galician Birth Records #galicia

HJB <hjb@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: "Margaret Thornhill" <clarinetstudio@comcast.net>

Hazel Boon wrote:
If one finds a birth to parents where the given names as well
as surnames are the same as other registrations, could one
assume that both births are in the same family unit?
It's likely, but I would say it depends on how common the names
are. If the names is rare and there's only one couple that
matches like this, your assumption is probably correct, but to
be absolutely sure, get the documents.
You make a good point. I have the documents for the individuals
being questioned. I believe that this is the only way I'd have
the house number.


So I always try to reconstruct as much of the entire family
unit (mother and father's siblings, aunts, uncles, etc.)>from
these records to see any patterns where a relative has died, a
baby with the same name is born, or if there is some third
piece of information, such as mother's town, less than a 12
month spread between births, or registrations (especially in
the 1870's) under a different surname, such as that of the
mother's mother.
In the big scheme I haven't ordered many records, yet I already
have a few which didn't give me enough information to connect
with specific individuals with any certainty. That, in
combination with the difficulty of translation and the fact that
I haven't found records for all the children I know of makes this
reconstruction difficult.


I've found some births to my Haber line on JRI-Poland and some
of
my dear cousins can't be convinced that they belong to our
family.
My experience is that most of our families had many more
children than we realized, including a large number who died
young.
It isn't siblings dying young who are causing the
dissention--there's one child who seems to have lived and came to
the US who no one has heard of. There are ways to check up on
him. It's mostly about my Great Grandmother and my Great
Grandfather's 1st wife where the discussion centers on this
issue. I guess more research is needed. One relative told me
recently that the past should be left as people remember it no
matter how innacurate it is.

Hazel Sandow Boon
Hamilton, ON, Canada
Researching: HABER - Zurów, Galicia (now Zhuriv, Ukraine), NYC;
STARK - Bobrka, Galicia (now Ukraine), NYC;
SADOVSKI/SADOWSKY - Belchatów & Lodz, Poland, NYC;
KANET/KANNETT/KANNATT - Czyzewo, Poland, NYC


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Re:Galician Birth Records #galicia

HJB <hjb@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: "Margaret Thornhill" <clarinetstudio@comcast.net>

Hazel Boon wrote:
If one finds a birth to parents where the given names as well
as surnames are the same as other registrations, could one
assume that both births are in the same family unit?
It's likely, but I would say it depends on how common the names
are. If the names is rare and there's only one couple that
matches like this, your assumption is probably correct, but to
be absolutely sure, get the documents.
You make a good point. I have the documents for the individuals
being questioned. I believe that this is the only way I'd have
the house number.


So I always try to reconstruct as much of the entire family
unit (mother and father's siblings, aunts, uncles, etc.)>from
these records to see any patterns where a relative has died, a
baby with the same name is born, or if there is some third
piece of information, such as mother's town, less than a 12
month spread between births, or registrations (especially in
the 1870's) under a different surname, such as that of the
mother's mother.
In the big scheme I haven't ordered many records, yet I already
have a few which didn't give me enough information to connect
with specific individuals with any certainty. That, in
combination with the difficulty of translation and the fact that
I haven't found records for all the children I know of makes this
reconstruction difficult.


I've found some births to my Haber line on JRI-Poland and some
of
my dear cousins can't be convinced that they belong to our
family.
My experience is that most of our families had many more
children than we realized, including a large number who died
young.
It isn't siblings dying young who are causing the
dissention--there's one child who seems to have lived and came to
the US who no one has heard of. There are ways to check up on
him. It's mostly about my Great Grandmother and my Great
Grandfather's 1st wife where the discussion centers on this
issue. I guess more research is needed. One relative told me
recently that the past should be left as people remember it no
matter how innacurate it is.

Hazel Sandow Boon
Hamilton, ON, Canada
Researching: HABER - Zurów, Galicia (now Zhuriv, Ukraine), NYC;
STARK - Bobrka, Galicia (now Ukraine), NYC;
SADOVSKI/SADOWSKY - Belchatów & Lodz, Poland, NYC;
KANET/KANNETT/KANNATT - Czyzewo, Poland, NYC


Re: Name Changes #general

Mike Posnick
 

In her Litvak SIG message of Sat, 1 Jan 2005, Cindy Gerstl
<cindygerstl@juno.com> wrote:

I'd like to suggest that despite -- or because of -- their instructions,
some officials made similar "suggestions". Unfortunately, those of us
who have worked for bureaucracies know how officials can sometimes bend
rules and regulations.

It may be that some immigration officers made such suggestions, although I
believe that Dick Plotz's explanation is closer to the truth. If I
remember Marian Smith correctly, federal law, and not rules or regulations,
prohibited alteration of the passenger manifests by the immigration officers.

And in his Litvak SIG message of Sun, 02 Jan 2005, Mike Berger
<smberg@erols.com> wrote:
[T]he U.S. Government passenger arrival records (found via the Ellis
Island web site for example) were completed on the "rag ships" en route
to America . . . .

My recollection is that the manifests were prepared at the time of
embarkation and not after departure. The steamship companies were
responsible for the cost of returning ineligible immigrants to the ports
from which they departed. Their practice, therefore, was to examine the
passengers before permitting them on board.

German-speaking ship's officers likely would have understood
Yiddish-speaking passengers. They would, however, have transcribed names
that were originally rendered in Cyrillic or Hebrew script into Latin
characters according to the phonetic usage common in German.

Mike Posnick
Minneapolis, Minnesota


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Name Changes #lithuania

Mike Posnick
 

In her Litvak SIG message of Sat, 1 Jan 2005, Cindy Gerstl
<cindygerstl@juno.com> wrote:

I'd like to suggest that despite -- or because of -- their instructions,
some officials made similar "suggestions". Unfortunately, those of us
who have worked for bureaucracies know how officials can sometimes bend
rules and regulations.

It may be that some immigration officers made such suggestions, although I
believe that Dick Plotz's explanation is closer to the truth. If I
remember Marian Smith correctly, federal law, and not rules or regulations,
prohibited alteration of the passenger manifests by the immigration officers.

And in his Litvak SIG message of Sun, 02 Jan 2005, Mike Berger
<smberg@erols.com> wrote:
[T]he U.S. Government passenger arrival records (found via the Ellis
Island web site for example) were completed on the "rag ships" en route
to America . . . .

My recollection is that the manifests were prepared at the time of
embarkation and not after departure. The steamship companies were
responsible for the cost of returning ineligible immigrants to the ports
from which they departed. Their practice, therefore, was to examine the
passengers before permitting them on board.

German-speaking ship's officers likely would have understood
Yiddish-speaking passengers. They would, however, have transcribed names
that were originally rendered in Cyrillic or Hebrew script into Latin
characters according to the phonetic usage common in German.

Mike Posnick
Minneapolis, Minnesota