Date   

Re: arranged marriages in Ukraine #ukraine

Rebecca Gerber <beccamd@...>
 

My own familial anecdote is this:

My great grandparents were Solomon and Eva ZINKOWETSKY, and were apparently
contented in their marriage.

Eva (nee KLAYMAN) had been married to a Mr. RUBINSTEIN, and had a son with
him. Family lore says that her mother didn't think that Mr. RUBINSTEIN was
religious enough, and broke up the marriage. Eva was then married to
Solomon.

Solomon had been married twice before marrying Eva. His first wife, Jenny
RISNICK, had two children and died in childbirth with the third. His second
wife was a sister to Jenny. She also died in childbirth, with her first
child. The story goes that he then went back to the RISNICK family and
asked to marry a third daughter. The RISNICK's said no - you killed the
first two in childbirth already!

So when Solomon and Eva were married, they already had 3 children from
previous marriages, and they had another 7 that survived childhood.

Just my two cents.

-Rebecca GERBER
Glenview, IL, USA

searching for records >from Teofipol, Zinkov, and Rashkov - Ukraine


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine RE: arranged marriages in Ukraine #ukraine

Rebecca Gerber <beccamd@...>
 

My own familial anecdote is this:

My great grandparents were Solomon and Eva ZINKOWETSKY, and were apparently
contented in their marriage.

Eva (nee KLAYMAN) had been married to a Mr. RUBINSTEIN, and had a son with
him. Family lore says that her mother didn't think that Mr. RUBINSTEIN was
religious enough, and broke up the marriage. Eva was then married to
Solomon.

Solomon had been married twice before marrying Eva. His first wife, Jenny
RISNICK, had two children and died in childbirth with the third. His second
wife was a sister to Jenny. She also died in childbirth, with her first
child. The story goes that he then went back to the RISNICK family and
asked to marry a third daughter. The RISNICK's said no - you killed the
first two in childbirth already!

So when Solomon and Eva were married, they already had 3 children from
previous marriages, and they had another 7 that survived childhood.

Just my two cents.

-Rebecca GERBER
Glenview, IL, USA

searching for records >from Teofipol, Zinkov, and Rashkov - Ukraine


Ekaterinoslav Yiskor Book #ukraine

Flo Elman
 

Dear Members,
We have a cleared copy of the Ekaterinoslav Yiskor Book ready to translate.
I need volunteers to coordinate this project & do translations. This would
be the first Yiskor Book relating to "our" area of the Ukraine.

Would you step forward & do your bit to contribute to our Ukraine data?

Thanks,
Florence Elman
Ukraine SIG Coordinator
haflo@shaw.ca


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Ekaterinoslav Yiskor Book #ukraine

Flo Elman
 

Dear Members,
We have a cleared copy of the Ekaterinoslav Yiskor Book ready to translate.
I need volunteers to coordinate this project & do translations. This would
be the first Yiskor Book relating to "our" area of the Ukraine.

Would you step forward & do your bit to contribute to our Ukraine data?

Thanks,
Florence Elman
Ukraine SIG Coordinator
haflo@shaw.ca


19th Century London Births #general

harold lewin <har_mir@...>
 

While transcribing the Births Registers of the Great Synagogue London, we
came across several declarations of births made by persons who had not
registered the birth of a child/children with the Public Registrar and had
therefore requested the Synagogue Secretary to record a declaration as
evidence of the birth. The relevant LDS film No. is 94657 and the
declarations precede the main body of synagogue registrations in LDS
Vol.112.

The names of the children are:

ABRAHAMS Israel, Bloom, Moses and Michael;

ASCHER Morris;

ASHER Asher, Hannah, Rebecca;

BARNED Harry Israel;

BERGTHEIL Alice Gertrude;

COHEN Catherine;

COHEN Kaufman;

DAVIS Ellis James;

de ROTHSCHILD Anna.

HAIL Emma;

HART Stella Adelaide;

HART Edith, Minna Louisa, Alberrt Octavius and Emily;

MONTAGUE Florence Kate;

MOSES Evelyn Kate;

MYERS Joseph and Edward;

NATHAN Adolphus;

OPPENHEIM Annie Isabella and Rosetta Clarissa;

POOL Henry;

SIMONSEN Horrace (sic) Charles; SIMONS Barnet;

Most declarations (covering births during the period 1822-1865) include the
address of the parents, name of mother and patronymics (Hebrew names). We
are happy to furnish additional information for one specific name on
request.
Harold & Miriam Lewin - Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 19th Century London Births #general

harold lewin <har_mir@...>
 

While transcribing the Births Registers of the Great Synagogue London, we
came across several declarations of births made by persons who had not
registered the birth of a child/children with the Public Registrar and had
therefore requested the Synagogue Secretary to record a declaration as
evidence of the birth. The relevant LDS film No. is 94657 and the
declarations precede the main body of synagogue registrations in LDS
Vol.112.

The names of the children are:

ABRAHAMS Israel, Bloom, Moses and Michael;

ASCHER Morris;

ASHER Asher, Hannah, Rebecca;

BARNED Harry Israel;

BERGTHEIL Alice Gertrude;

COHEN Catherine;

COHEN Kaufman;

DAVIS Ellis James;

de ROTHSCHILD Anna.

HAIL Emma;

HART Stella Adelaide;

HART Edith, Minna Louisa, Alberrt Octavius and Emily;

MONTAGUE Florence Kate;

MOSES Evelyn Kate;

MYERS Joseph and Edward;

NATHAN Adolphus;

OPPENHEIM Annie Isabella and Rosetta Clarissa;

POOL Henry;

SIMONSEN Horrace (sic) Charles; SIMONS Barnet;

Most declarations (covering births during the period 1822-1865) include the
address of the parents, name of mother and patronymics (Hebrew names). We
are happy to furnish additional information for one specific name on
request.
Harold & Miriam Lewin - Jerusalem


Re: "I wish you long life" #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Judith Romney Wegner wrote:


< I have just been struck by a completely different possibility for the
source of the English greeting to mourners: "I wish you long life." . . . . a
rough translation of the expression "le-orekh yamim tovim" which is sometimes
placed as an abbreviation: lamed aleph yod tet) directly after the name of a
person in the salutation at the beginning of the letter. . . . The Hebrew
expression means literally "[I wish you] length of good days." So maybe
that's where "I wish you long life" comes from? >
Michael Bernet replied:

==An apparent and common slip of the pen. Yamim is the word for seas (pl.)
The word for days (pl.) is Yomim {pronounced Yowmim in most of
Germany, Yoemim in
England and the USA, and Yoymim or Yeymim in Eastern Europe)
Dear Michael,

Whoops! I am sorry to say that the error here is yours, not mine --
and I hasten to correct it so that JGenners won't end up misspelling
or mispronouncing either of these two Hebrew words.

The plural of yom is indeed yamim as I gave it -- and there is
absolutely NO vav in the plural of yom!!! (Check any biblical
reference to the six days of creation and see for yourself!)

The plural of yom meaning "day" (>from the root yod vav mem) is
yamim spelled with a qamatz. There's no vav in the plural of yom !

The plural of yam meaning "sea" (>from the root yod mem mem) is
yammim spelled with doublled mem (i.e., it has a dagesh hazaq in
the mem to indicate the fact that this is a double mem) and the vowel
is not qamatz but pattah.

Let's not confuse these two common and unrelated Hebrew words!

Judith Romney Wegner

MODERATOR NOTE: Discussion of the fine points of Hebrew language and
grammar are beyond the scope of this forum and should be continued
privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: "I wish you long life" #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Judith Romney Wegner wrote:


< I have just been struck by a completely different possibility for the
source of the English greeting to mourners: "I wish you long life." . . . . a
rough translation of the expression "le-orekh yamim tovim" which is sometimes
placed as an abbreviation: lamed aleph yod tet) directly after the name of a
person in the salutation at the beginning of the letter. . . . The Hebrew
expression means literally "[I wish you] length of good days." So maybe
that's where "I wish you long life" comes from? >
Michael Bernet replied:

==An apparent and common slip of the pen. Yamim is the word for seas (pl.)
The word for days (pl.) is Yomim {pronounced Yowmim in most of
Germany, Yoemim in
England and the USA, and Yoymim or Yeymim in Eastern Europe)
Dear Michael,

Whoops! I am sorry to say that the error here is yours, not mine --
and I hasten to correct it so that JGenners won't end up misspelling
or mispronouncing either of these two Hebrew words.

The plural of yom is indeed yamim as I gave it -- and there is
absolutely NO vav in the plural of yom!!! (Check any biblical
reference to the six days of creation and see for yourself!)

The plural of yom meaning "day" (>from the root yod vav mem) is
yamim spelled with a qamatz. There's no vav in the plural of yom !

The plural of yam meaning "sea" (>from the root yod mem mem) is
yammim spelled with doublled mem (i.e., it has a dagesh hazaq in
the mem to indicate the fact that this is a double mem) and the vowel
is not qamatz but pattah.

Let's not confuse these two common and unrelated Hebrew words!

Judith Romney Wegner

MODERATOR NOTE: Discussion of the fine points of Hebrew language and
grammar are beyond the scope of this forum and should be continued
privately.


Re: Understanding arranged marriages in the Ukraine #ukraine

Moshe & Esther Davis <davis@...>
 

Also, if a wife was widowed, it was the obligation of her deceased
husband's unmarried brother to marry her. if she wanted to refuse
his offer, she had the right to refuse it by following a prescribed
ritual...
Correction: if a wife is widowed, *and her husband died childless*,
there is a biblical obligation for a brother of the deceased husband
either to marry her ("Yibum"), or for the couple to perform the
"Chalitza" ceremony. Since at least the middle ages, the Chalitza
ceremony has been the preferred option.

In the very distant past, the engagement or kiddushim which was a
contract, during which the two parties to the contract lived apart,
could last as mush as a year or more.
Other corrections: "Kiddushin" is the actual marriage ceremony. A
Jewish wedding includes the signing of a "ketubah" or wedding
contract, which is a legal contract. The engagement, on the other
hand, is usually performed by making a "Tenoyim" agreement,
which is also a legal contract and can take place quite a long time
before the actual marriage. These aspects of Jewish marriage
were not only >from "the very distant past", rather they take place
by observant Jews world-wide to this day.

And yes, often couples did not see each other until the day they
were betrothed or even until the day of the marriage, although the
betrothal could occur a day or two before the couple was "doomed."
Sometimes the day of betrothal was the same day as the marriage. If
a boy or girl did not want to marry the designated groom, there was
still time to refuse to go through the marriage ceremony, but those
who did not dare deny the wishes of their parents, did not take
advantage of their "right to refuse." Being entirely dependent on
their parents, and usually uneducated girls in particular rarely
refused to marry the boy her parents had chosen. Neither could
young boys easily refuse, because they were so imbued with the
notion that they must honor their parents, and because they too
needed their parents financial support.
There are many anecdotal stories of such "doomed" couples being
married off against their will. However, I think that this account
should be balanced by the rather less cynical observation that we
all tend to view other societies through the tinted glasses of the
preconceptions of our own society and upbringing. The strength of
the traditional Jewish family structure is legendary. I don't think
that that would be the case if the majority of the marriages were of
such "doomed" couples.

For illustrative purposes, once I (myself brought up imbued in
contemporary western values) was discussing the issue of
arranged marriages with a Yerushalmi. He described to me what
his own experience was. His marriage had been arranged by his
parents. He had met his bride once (for about half an hour) before
becoming engaged, and a year later they were married. During the
year-long engagement, he didn't see her very often, but the women
of the two families got together often, as did (separately) the men
on various occasions over the course of the year. I know the
couple well (now 20 years after their marriage and recently having
engaged their oldest daughter), and I can testify to the love and
solidity that emanates >from the entire household. The same holds
true of the households of his many siblings. I have seen similar
stability in countless other religiously observant homes. The
Yerushalmi summarized his experience with the simple, if revealing
statement, "If I can't trust my parents with helping me with my
most important life decisions, who can I trust?" I think that this is
a telling statement, of which we of western upbringing should be
quite envious.

In observant Jewish circles to this day, arranged marriages of
various kinds are the rule rather than the exception, and take place
constantly. The range might be anywhere >from what the the
extreme of what the Yerushalmi above described as his
experience, to something similar to what westerners might call
simply a "blind date" (which the parents arrange, and then it's up to
the couple to date until they are able make the actual decision yes
or no). I think that the experience of our ancestors in the Ukraine
was probably closer to that of the Yerushalmi.

To the extent that contemporary secular western values have
infiltrated observant Jewish society, the strength of the Jewish
family has been weakened. I think that we should be a bit more
aware of the strength and resilience of the society of our ancestors
offered and not be quite so quick to cynically dismiss it as archaic
and irrelevant.

Moshe Davis
Jerusalem

Moshe Davis <davis@sefer.org> Jerusalem
DAVIS/DAVIDOVICS >from Szeleslonka(Leh),Maramaros,Austro-Hungary; OH;CA.
HAYFER/CHAIMOVICS >from Kovesliget(Drahiv),Maramaros,Austro-Hungary;OH;NJ;CA.
WINARD/WINARSKY and METKOP >from Kiev;Argentina;NY;CA.
BRACKER/BRECHER >from Bucharest/Iasi,Romania;NY;CA;AZ.
ABRAMSON >from Zvil (Novograd-Volinsky),Ukraine;Cuba;MI;MA;NH.
YAHIA/YICHYA >from Istanbul;Cuba;MI;CA.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Understanding arranged marriages in the Ukraine #ukraine

Moshe & Esther Davis <davis@...>
 

Also, if a wife was widowed, it was the obligation of her deceased
husband's unmarried brother to marry her. if she wanted to refuse
his offer, she had the right to refuse it by following a prescribed
ritual...
Correction: if a wife is widowed, *and her husband died childless*,
there is a biblical obligation for a brother of the deceased husband
either to marry her ("Yibum"), or for the couple to perform the
"Chalitza" ceremony. Since at least the middle ages, the Chalitza
ceremony has been the preferred option.

In the very distant past, the engagement or kiddushim which was a
contract, during which the two parties to the contract lived apart,
could last as mush as a year or more.
Other corrections: "Kiddushin" is the actual marriage ceremony. A
Jewish wedding includes the signing of a "ketubah" or wedding
contract, which is a legal contract. The engagement, on the other
hand, is usually performed by making a "Tenoyim" agreement,
which is also a legal contract and can take place quite a long time
before the actual marriage. These aspects of Jewish marriage
were not only >from "the very distant past", rather they take place
by observant Jews world-wide to this day.

And yes, often couples did not see each other until the day they
were betrothed or even until the day of the marriage, although the
betrothal could occur a day or two before the couple was "doomed."
Sometimes the day of betrothal was the same day as the marriage. If
a boy or girl did not want to marry the designated groom, there was
still time to refuse to go through the marriage ceremony, but those
who did not dare deny the wishes of their parents, did not take
advantage of their "right to refuse." Being entirely dependent on
their parents, and usually uneducated girls in particular rarely
refused to marry the boy her parents had chosen. Neither could
young boys easily refuse, because they were so imbued with the
notion that they must honor their parents, and because they too
needed their parents financial support.
There are many anecdotal stories of such "doomed" couples being
married off against their will. However, I think that this account
should be balanced by the rather less cynical observation that we
all tend to view other societies through the tinted glasses of the
preconceptions of our own society and upbringing. The strength of
the traditional Jewish family structure is legendary. I don't think
that that would be the case if the majority of the marriages were of
such "doomed" couples.

For illustrative purposes, once I (myself brought up imbued in
contemporary western values) was discussing the issue of
arranged marriages with a Yerushalmi. He described to me what
his own experience was. His marriage had been arranged by his
parents. He had met his bride once (for about half an hour) before
becoming engaged, and a year later they were married. During the
year-long engagement, he didn't see her very often, but the women
of the two families got together often, as did (separately) the men
on various occasions over the course of the year. I know the
couple well (now 20 years after their marriage and recently having
engaged their oldest daughter), and I can testify to the love and
solidity that emanates >from the entire household. The same holds
true of the households of his many siblings. I have seen similar
stability in countless other religiously observant homes. The
Yerushalmi summarized his experience with the simple, if revealing
statement, "If I can't trust my parents with helping me with my
most important life decisions, who can I trust?" I think that this is
a telling statement, of which we of western upbringing should be
quite envious.

In observant Jewish circles to this day, arranged marriages of
various kinds are the rule rather than the exception, and take place
constantly. The range might be anywhere >from what the the
extreme of what the Yerushalmi above described as his
experience, to something similar to what westerners might call
simply a "blind date" (which the parents arrange, and then it's up to
the couple to date until they are able make the actual decision yes
or no). I think that the experience of our ancestors in the Ukraine
was probably closer to that of the Yerushalmi.

To the extent that contemporary secular western values have
infiltrated observant Jewish society, the strength of the Jewish
family has been weakened. I think that we should be a bit more
aware of the strength and resilience of the society of our ancestors
offered and not be quite so quick to cynically dismiss it as archaic
and irrelevant.

Moshe Davis
Jerusalem

Moshe Davis <davis@sefer.org> Jerusalem
DAVIS/DAVIDOVICS >from Szeleslonka(Leh),Maramaros,Austro-Hungary; OH;CA.
HAYFER/CHAIMOVICS >from Kovesliget(Drahiv),Maramaros,Austro-Hungary;OH;NJ;CA.
WINARD/WINARSKY and METKOP >from Kiev;Argentina;NY;CA.
BRACKER/BRECHER >from Bucharest/Iasi,Romania;NY;CA;AZ.
ABRAMSON >from Zvil (Novograd-Volinsky),Ukraine;Cuba;MI;MA;NH.
YAHIA/YICHYA >from Istanbul;Cuba;MI;CA.


Rabbis of Chaslavitz #rabbinic

Lainey Melnick <lmelnick@...>
 

Does anyone know anything about the rabbis of Chaslavitz >from the
1800s? I am looking for anything on Rabbi Meir MAIZELS/MEISELS who
died around 1904 in Jerusalem. He had been a rabbi in Chaslavitz
when he arrived in Jerusalem and was known there as the Chaslavitzer
Rov. His father was Rabbi Yaakov MAIZELS/MEISELS assumed also from
Chaslavitz. One of them was born around 1819. Meir had married
Fegeh Esther in Belarus, and she and her family died there.

Thanks in advance for any info!

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=laineym

--Lainey

Lainey Melnic
Austin, Texas


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Rabbis of Chaslavitz #rabbinic

Lainey Melnick <lmelnick@...>
 

Does anyone know anything about the rabbis of Chaslavitz >from the
1800s? I am looking for anything on Rabbi Meir MAIZELS/MEISELS who
died around 1904 in Jerusalem. He had been a rabbi in Chaslavitz
when he arrived in Jerusalem and was known there as the Chaslavitzer
Rov. His father was Rabbi Yaakov MAIZELS/MEISELS assumed also from
Chaslavitz. One of them was born around 1819. Meir had married
Fegeh Esther in Belarus, and she and her family died there.

Thanks in advance for any info!

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=laineym

--Lainey

Lainey Melnic
Austin, Texas


January 2005 Yizkor Book Report #galicia

Joyce Field
 

To begin the year of 2005, the Yizkor Book Project put online two new
books, three new entries ,and 16 updates during January. All are
available at the Index page,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. Included is a
Russian translation of a book that has been online for some time, To
Survive and Tell. The Russian version can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lipkany/lipr001.html.

New Books:

-Brest, Belarus : volume 2
-Ryki, Poland

New Entries:

-Bukowina: Tragedy of the Bukowina Jews (volume 2), History of
Massada (volume 1) , and The Massada in Israel (volume 1)
-Frumisca, Romania: Pinkas Hakehillot Romania, volume 1
-Radzyn Podlaski, Kehila List

Updates:

-Bedzin, Poland
-Belzec: Prototype of the Final Solution, Chapters 7-9
-Belchatow, Poland
-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland: The Jews of Czestochowa
-Czestochowa, Poland: supplement
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Druzhkopol, Ukraine
-Gorodets, Belarus
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Lipkany, Moldova: translation into Russian of Survive and Tell.
-Lita, volume 1
-Rejowiec, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Svisloch, Belarus
-Zloczew, Poland


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia January 2005 Yizkor Book Report #galicia

Joyce Field
 

To begin the year of 2005, the Yizkor Book Project put online two new
books, three new entries ,and 16 updates during January. All are
available at the Index page,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. Included is a
Russian translation of a book that has been online for some time, To
Survive and Tell. The Russian version can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lipkany/lipr001.html.

New Books:

-Brest, Belarus : volume 2
-Ryki, Poland

New Entries:

-Bukowina: Tragedy of the Bukowina Jews (volume 2), History of
Massada (volume 1) , and The Massada in Israel (volume 1)
-Frumisca, Romania: Pinkas Hakehillot Romania, volume 1
-Radzyn Podlaski, Kehila List

Updates:

-Bedzin, Poland
-Belzec: Prototype of the Final Solution, Chapters 7-9
-Belchatow, Poland
-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland: The Jews of Czestochowa
-Czestochowa, Poland: supplement
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Druzhkopol, Ukraine
-Gorodets, Belarus
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Lipkany, Moldova: translation into Russian of Survive and Tell.
-Lita, volume 1
-Rejowiec, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Svisloch, Belarus
-Zloczew, Poland


Polisuik from Tarnopol Gubernia #galicia

Billie Stein <billie@...>
 

I am trying to track the genealogy of my uncle-by-marriage, Meir
Zeev (Wolf) SELZER born in 1907 in Trembowla in the Tarnopol
Guberina, then Poland, now Ukraine. I've done fairly well with
the SELZER side of the family, and am now working on his mother's
side. She was Jette Perl POLISIUK, and she had 3 sisters and 1
brother: Jochewed, married to Hersh HAMMER (I found records of
the births of 4 of their children in the Kozlow PSA AGAD births
on JRI-Poland database); Yehudit, married to Yitzchok Zvi
ZLOCHOWER, and a third sister who's name I don't know, but who
married a POSTMAN (first name also unknown). The families of the
sisters (HAMMER, ZLOCHOWER & POSTMAN) moved to America at some
time before World War 2, and as far as I know, all survived the
holocaust. The brother was Pinchus POLISIUK, and he emigrated to
Palestine in the 1930's. The SELZERs remained in Trembowla and
unfortunately, my uncle Meir was his family's sole survivor. He
emigrated to Palestine in 1943 and died in Bnai Brak in 1985.

The 5 siblings were the children of Meir Wolf POLISIUK, who,
according to undocumented family tradition was a descendent of
the MaHarSha (Harav Shlomo Eliezer Halevi), and each of the
children in turn had a son named Meir Wolf (Max in English).

I am in touch with the ZLOWCHOWER and POLISIUK families, but
they don't know much about the past. I am trying to track down
the HAMMERs and the POSTMANs, as well as any information that can
connect them to the MaHarSha.

Please reply privately unless your answer is of interest to the
entire list.

Many thanks,

Billie Stein
President, IGS-Tel Aviv

Researching >from Belarus: DINNIN (Mogilev), PLOTKIN
(Bobruisk/Mogilev), RUBENSTEIN (Bobruisk)
from Galicia : LAMM, GLANTZ (Sieniawa) STEIN, JAKOB (Tarnow/Nowe
Zukowice) SELZER (Trembowla, Tarnopol), POLISIUK (Tarnopol
Gubernia)
from Ukraine: HOFFMAN (Yashin)


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Polisuik from Tarnopol Gubernia #galicia

Billie Stein <billie@...>
 

I am trying to track the genealogy of my uncle-by-marriage, Meir
Zeev (Wolf) SELZER born in 1907 in Trembowla in the Tarnopol
Guberina, then Poland, now Ukraine. I've done fairly well with
the SELZER side of the family, and am now working on his mother's
side. She was Jette Perl POLISIUK, and she had 3 sisters and 1
brother: Jochewed, married to Hersh HAMMER (I found records of
the births of 4 of their children in the Kozlow PSA AGAD births
on JRI-Poland database); Yehudit, married to Yitzchok Zvi
ZLOCHOWER, and a third sister who's name I don't know, but who
married a POSTMAN (first name also unknown). The families of the
sisters (HAMMER, ZLOCHOWER & POSTMAN) moved to America at some
time before World War 2, and as far as I know, all survived the
holocaust. The brother was Pinchus POLISIUK, and he emigrated to
Palestine in the 1930's. The SELZERs remained in Trembowla and
unfortunately, my uncle Meir was his family's sole survivor. He
emigrated to Palestine in 1943 and died in Bnai Brak in 1985.

The 5 siblings were the children of Meir Wolf POLISIUK, who,
according to undocumented family tradition was a descendent of
the MaHarSha (Harav Shlomo Eliezer Halevi), and each of the
children in turn had a son named Meir Wolf (Max in English).

I am in touch with the ZLOWCHOWER and POLISIUK families, but
they don't know much about the past. I am trying to track down
the HAMMERs and the POSTMANs, as well as any information that can
connect them to the MaHarSha.

Please reply privately unless your answer is of interest to the
entire list.

Many thanks,

Billie Stein
President, IGS-Tel Aviv

Researching >from Belarus: DINNIN (Mogilev), PLOTKIN
(Bobruisk/Mogilev), RUBENSTEIN (Bobruisk)
from Galicia : LAMM, GLANTZ (Sieniawa) STEIN, JAKOB (Tarnow/Nowe
Zukowice) SELZER (Trembowla, Tarnopol), POLISIUK (Tarnopol
Gubernia)
from Ukraine: HOFFMAN (Yashin)


Re: Ekaterinoslav Yiskor Book #ukraine

Hilary Henkin <hilary@...>
 

Dear group,
A couple of years ago, I was able to obtain a copy of the book, and was
told to wait on beginning a translation project for a while. While I
"waited", Ivan and Pearl Krupit volunteered to translate the index of
names, which I am sending to Flo. So we've got one part done already!

I've also already scanned all the photos in the book, and would be glad to
send those to Flo or whoever as well.

The book isn't very big - about 158 pages. If I knew Hebrew, I'd have
tgranslated it by now --.

Volunteers??

Hilary Henkin
Atlanta, Georgia USA

Researching:
Mogilev - BERLIN; BELIISKI; HENKIN - GENKIN; MESCENOKOV; POZ - POZE
Ekaterinoslav - KATZ; LAPIDUS; LAVROTIN - LAVRUTIN; PESACHINSKY;
SHIMERNITSKY; STEINHART
Roumania: DONNENFIELD; RINCOVER - HARINCOVER; DOLLINGER
Harbin, China: SREBERK - SCHRIEBER; LITEBSK; SCHON --


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Ekaterinoslav Yiskor Book #ukraine

Hilary Henkin <hilary@...>
 

Dear group,
A couple of years ago, I was able to obtain a copy of the book, and was
told to wait on beginning a translation project for a while. While I
"waited", Ivan and Pearl Krupit volunteered to translate the index of
names, which I am sending to Flo. So we've got one part done already!

I've also already scanned all the photos in the book, and would be glad to
send those to Flo or whoever as well.

The book isn't very big - about 158 pages. If I knew Hebrew, I'd have
tgranslated it by now --.

Volunteers??

Hilary Henkin
Atlanta, Georgia USA

Researching:
Mogilev - BERLIN; BELIISKI; HENKIN - GENKIN; MESCENOKOV; POZ - POZE
Ekaterinoslav - KATZ; LAPIDUS; LAVROTIN - LAVRUTIN; PESACHINSKY;
SHIMERNITSKY; STEINHART
Roumania: DONNENFIELD; RINCOVER - HARINCOVER; DOLLINGER
Harbin, China: SREBERK - SCHRIEBER; LITEBSK; SCHON --


Understanding Arranged Marriages in Galicia #galicia

Terri <terrib@...>
 

My great grandparents met on the day of their wedding engagement party,
sometime in the 1870s, in Poland. Does anyone know if this practice was
common in Galicia, during the 19th century? Or in the 19th century did most
Galician couples get to choose their future mates?

Were there Jewish dowries'?

Were Jewish spouses usually distant cousins? Or were they selected for
financial reason?

Were most Jewish marriages, arranged marriages, in Galicia?

Understanding the process, might help all of us with our research.

Thanks,
Tom Erribe
CA, USA


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Understanding Arranged Marriages in Galicia #galicia

Terri <terrib@...>
 

My great grandparents met on the day of their wedding engagement party,
sometime in the 1870s, in Poland. Does anyone know if this practice was
common in Galicia, during the 19th century? Or in the 19th century did most
Galician couples get to choose their future mates?

Were there Jewish dowries'?

Were Jewish spouses usually distant cousins? Or were they selected for
financial reason?

Were most Jewish marriages, arranged marriages, in Galicia?

Understanding the process, might help all of us with our research.

Thanks,
Tom Erribe
CA, USA