Date   

Search ViewMate archives #general

bik <kooshb9341@...>
 

ViewMate has received over 7000 interesting images in need of some
identification. You can browse the images in the ViewMate archives at:
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/index.html Click "Archives"

Perhaps you will find individuals, documents or structures that are
significant to your own research.
--
Bernard Kouchel
bkouchel@jewishgen.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Search ViewMate archives #general

bik <kooshb9341@...>
 

ViewMate has received over 7000 interesting images in need of some
identification. You can browse the images in the ViewMate archives at:
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/index.html Click "Archives"

Perhaps you will find individuals, documents or structures that are
significant to your own research.
--
Bernard Kouchel
bkouchel@jewishgen.org


Polish Translation needed #poland

Javier Gueiler
 

I have posted my great great grandparents marriage act at:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7447

I will appreciate if someone could translate it.
Regards,


Javier Gueiler
Rosario
Argentina

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


JRI Poland #Poland Polish Translation needed #poland

Javier Gueiler
 

I have posted my great great grandparents marriage act at:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7447

I will appreciate if someone could translate it.
Regards,


Javier Gueiler
Rosario
Argentina

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


Milankowski was a blacksmith #poland

E
 

Information has come to me that the family name was Milanowski. Three
of the children were Rachel (Levine) , Sam and Fannie (my great
grandmother), aka Fraidka (Price). They livedin Lomza gubernia

The father and a brother who came here and then returned were
blacksmiths. The last brother was killed in the Shoah

Rabbi Ed Goldstein, Woodmere NY

Milanowki/MIller, Price.

MODERATOR'S NOTE: If you search the JRI-Poland database at
www.jri-poland.org for your surname, choosing Lomza Gubernia
as a geographic search area, you will find 64 results for the
surname MALINOWSKI.


JRI Poland #Poland Milankowski was a blacksmith #poland

E
 

Information has come to me that the family name was Milanowski. Three
of the children were Rachel (Levine) , Sam and Fannie (my great
grandmother), aka Fraidka (Price). They livedin Lomza gubernia

The father and a brother who came here and then returned were
blacksmiths. The last brother was killed in the Shoah

Rabbi Ed Goldstein, Woodmere NY

Milanowki/MIller, Price.

MODERATOR'S NOTE: If you search the JRI-Poland database at
www.jri-poland.org for your surname, choosing Lomza Gubernia
as a geographic search area, you will find 64 results for the
surname MALINOWSKI.


Searching relatives: SEGAL/ROSEN #lithuania

Mark Budman <budman@...>
 

Hello,

I am trying to locate some long lost relatives. I am not certain who is
still alive, but the following is the limited information that I have:

I am looking for family related to the late Alex Segal, who passed away as a
young man around the age of 28 (I believe sometime in the 1940's or even
late 30's) in California.

Alex's wife was named Jen, and, when she remarried, her last name became
Rosen. The two daughters were Roseann (who we called "Punkie") and Susan
("Suzie"). As I say, I have no idea where they are now.

Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

Best Regards,

Mark
--------------------------------------------------
Mark J. Budman
Researching SOLOMIN/SOLOMINAS/SEGAL
from Lithuania
budman@generation.net
-------------------------------------------------


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Searching relatives: SEGAL/ROSEN #lithuania

Mark Budman <budman@...>
 

Hello,

I am trying to locate some long lost relatives. I am not certain who is
still alive, but the following is the limited information that I have:

I am looking for family related to the late Alex Segal, who passed away as a
young man around the age of 28 (I believe sometime in the 1940's or even
late 30's) in California.

Alex's wife was named Jen, and, when she remarried, her last name became
Rosen. The two daughters were Roseann (who we called "Punkie") and Susan
("Suzie"). As I say, I have no idea where they are now.

Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

Best Regards,

Mark
--------------------------------------------------
Mark J. Budman
Researching SOLOMIN/SOLOMINAS/SEGAL
from Lithuania
budman@generation.net
-------------------------------------------------


Re: Thanks (Solomon-Zalman) #lithuania

Zalman <zall@...>
 

With all due respect for Prof. Esterson:
A question was if Zalman and Solomon are the same names. And the answer
is Yes. The fact that name Zalman was given to jews in Lithuania in
conjunction with other names, as pairs, is non-related.
The fact is that Zalman has derived >from Solomon/Salomon/Salman.
And the root of these names is one and the same: Shlomo.
How the name Zalman was given and to who, is a different story and not
related to the origins of this name.

Zalman Lazkovich
Toronto

Nathalie RIED of Paris posted as follows:

"Shalom to all and many thanks for your interesting answers : the
overwhelming consensus is that Zalman and Shlomo are two versions of
the
same name, but I wanted to check this out specially because I have
seen
Zalman being one of the possible variants for Meshulam in the Given
Names Database....which is quite possible too, but apparantly less
frequent!"


I do not have access to the original posting, so I am not aware of
exactly
what questions were asked. But I will address the "consensus" that
"Zalman
and Shlomo are two versions of the same name."

This statement is not correct. Shlomo is a Hebrew given name,
originally
used in the Bible for King David's son. The *Yiddish given name*
Zalman
comes >from a different language, Yiddish, and is not the same thing as
the
Hebrew name Shlomo, although there is a linkage between these two
names.

Yiddish was the new language created by Jews beginning about 1000
years=2
ago, and defined by them as "Mama Lashon" -- "Mother language". It
was
always a warm, family language used in the home, between friends, and
in
the Jewish community, different >from the Hebrew language which was
created
much earlier, about 4,000 years ago. Hebrew was and is the language
of
Jewish law, prayer, writing of contracts, and other formal usages by
Jews,
and has always been called "Lashon Kodesh" -- "the holy language".
Two
different languages, belonging to one people, one "loved" by them, the

other treated with great respect and honor.

Some male Jews in Lithuania were given the Yiddish name Zalman for use

within the family and with other Jews. These same Jews were also
given a
Hebrew name, because Jewish custom states that a Jewish man's *legal*
Jewish name consists at least of a Hebrew name, perhaps secondarily
also a
Yiddish and/or secular name. Among Jews, it became customary to
prefer
certain Yiddish names if one was given at his Brit Mila a certain
legal
Hebrew name -- some Yiddish names seemed to "go" with certain Hebrew
names.

The Hebrew names Avraham, Efrayim, Elyaqim, Meshulam, Shlomo, Shmarya,

Shneyur, and Yekusieyl were found by expert Lithuanian rabbis using
statistical studies of names, to be the ones for which the Yiddish
name
Zalman was a "favorite". Therefor, authorized by their respected
positions
as the writers of Jewish law for how Jewish names were to be defined
and
written in Gitin (Jewish divorce contracts) and other contracts, and
to be
called to an aliya in shul, they defined the Yiddish name Zalman to be
a
kinui (Jewish legal alias) of the above Hebrew names. Accordingly, in
a
Get, a man having one of these Hebrew names and also the name Zalman
must
be identified in the Get as (say) Shlomo haMechune Zalman, and he
would be
called to the Tora in an aliya as Shlomo Zalman ben Ploni (Ploni being
the
Legal Jewish given name of his father). The Hebrew word "haMechune"
means
"known as" and is one of two such legal terms used to identify the
Legal
Jewish Name of a male Jew -- the other legal term is "demitkari".

So, we see that these two names Shlomo and Zalman are not the "same
name",
but rather are linked names which together define a Jewish man's Legal

Jewish Name -- one that he usually carries with him during his whole
lifetime, and uses for the important Jewish events and contracts in
his
lifetime.

Jewish women were not called to the Tora, and therefor had no need for
a
legal Jewish name. So, it was quite common for women to be given only
a
Hebrew name, only a Yiddish name, or only a secular name (e.g.,
Augusta, a
German secular name used in Lithuania).

These Hebrew and Yiddish names can be seen by visiting the JewishGen
Given=
Names Data Base for Lithuania at:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/ >

and searching for the name "Zalman" (without the quotation marks).

Shabbat shalom,

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Discussions of onomastics on this list are published
so that researchers can understand name relationships for family history.
The question of Solomon/Zalman has been fully discussed in that light.
Please continue any scholarly debate on this issue privately.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Thanks (Solomon-Zalman) #lithuania

Zalman <zall@...>
 

With all due respect for Prof. Esterson:
A question was if Zalman and Solomon are the same names. And the answer
is Yes. The fact that name Zalman was given to jews in Lithuania in
conjunction with other names, as pairs, is non-related.
The fact is that Zalman has derived >from Solomon/Salomon/Salman.
And the root of these names is one and the same: Shlomo.
How the name Zalman was given and to who, is a different story and not
related to the origins of this name.

Zalman Lazkovich
Toronto

Nathalie RIED of Paris posted as follows:

"Shalom to all and many thanks for your interesting answers : the
overwhelming consensus is that Zalman and Shlomo are two versions of
the
same name, but I wanted to check this out specially because I have
seen
Zalman being one of the possible variants for Meshulam in the Given
Names Database....which is quite possible too, but apparantly less
frequent!"


I do not have access to the original posting, so I am not aware of
exactly
what questions were asked. But I will address the "consensus" that
"Zalman
and Shlomo are two versions of the same name."

This statement is not correct. Shlomo is a Hebrew given name,
originally
used in the Bible for King David's son. The *Yiddish given name*
Zalman
comes >from a different language, Yiddish, and is not the same thing as
the
Hebrew name Shlomo, although there is a linkage between these two
names.

Yiddish was the new language created by Jews beginning about 1000
years=2
ago, and defined by them as "Mama Lashon" -- "Mother language". It
was
always a warm, family language used in the home, between friends, and
in
the Jewish community, different >from the Hebrew language which was
created
much earlier, about 4,000 years ago. Hebrew was and is the language
of
Jewish law, prayer, writing of contracts, and other formal usages by
Jews,
and has always been called "Lashon Kodesh" -- "the holy language".
Two
different languages, belonging to one people, one "loved" by them, the

other treated with great respect and honor.

Some male Jews in Lithuania were given the Yiddish name Zalman for use

within the family and with other Jews. These same Jews were also
given a
Hebrew name, because Jewish custom states that a Jewish man's *legal*
Jewish name consists at least of a Hebrew name, perhaps secondarily
also a
Yiddish and/or secular name. Among Jews, it became customary to
prefer
certain Yiddish names if one was given at his Brit Mila a certain
legal
Hebrew name -- some Yiddish names seemed to "go" with certain Hebrew
names.

The Hebrew names Avraham, Efrayim, Elyaqim, Meshulam, Shlomo, Shmarya,

Shneyur, and Yekusieyl were found by expert Lithuanian rabbis using
statistical studies of names, to be the ones for which the Yiddish
name
Zalman was a "favorite". Therefor, authorized by their respected
positions
as the writers of Jewish law for how Jewish names were to be defined
and
written in Gitin (Jewish divorce contracts) and other contracts, and
to be
called to an aliya in shul, they defined the Yiddish name Zalman to be
a
kinui (Jewish legal alias) of the above Hebrew names. Accordingly, in
a
Get, a man having one of these Hebrew names and also the name Zalman
must
be identified in the Get as (say) Shlomo haMechune Zalman, and he
would be
called to the Tora in an aliya as Shlomo Zalman ben Ploni (Ploni being
the
Legal Jewish given name of his father). The Hebrew word "haMechune"
means
"known as" and is one of two such legal terms used to identify the
Legal
Jewish Name of a male Jew -- the other legal term is "demitkari".

So, we see that these two names Shlomo and Zalman are not the "same
name",
but rather are linked names which together define a Jewish man's Legal

Jewish Name -- one that he usually carries with him during his whole
lifetime, and uses for the important Jewish events and contracts in
his
lifetime.

Jewish women were not called to the Tora, and therefor had no need for
a
legal Jewish name. So, it was quite common for women to be given only
a
Hebrew name, only a Yiddish name, or only a secular name (e.g.,
Augusta, a
German secular name used in Lithuania).

These Hebrew and Yiddish names can be seen by visiting the JewishGen
Given=
Names Data Base for Lithuania at:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/ >

and searching for the name "Zalman" (without the quotation marks).

Shabbat shalom,

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Discussions of onomastics on this list are published
so that researchers can understand name relationships for family history.
The question of Solomon/Zalman has been fully discussed in that light.
Please continue any scholarly debate on this issue privately.


"Comments" column in database #lithuania

Debra Price <dsprice@...>
 

The following appears in the Comments column of the All-Lithuania
Revision List database:

"transferred >from Ramygala society on 19 November 1880"

I assume that this means that the family moved >from one town to
another. Does anyone know of any other meaning?

Debra Price
Plainview, NY


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania "Comments" column in database #lithuania

Debra Price <dsprice@...>
 

The following appears in the Comments column of the All-Lithuania
Revision List database:

"transferred >from Ramygala society on 19 November 1880"

I assume that this means that the family moved >from one town to
another. Does anyone know of any other meaning?

Debra Price
Plainview, NY


San Diego Jewish Genealogical Society #general

enalibof@...
 

From: Ellen Naliboff enalibof@netscape.net
San Diego Jewish Genealogical Society
Next meeting: Sunday, Feb 12, 1:00 P.M.
Lawrence Family Jewish Community Center 2nd Floor Sr. Activity Room
4126 Executive Drive in La Jolla
Program Join us for a video of interest for those researching Eastern Europe.
"Echoes That Remain" produced by Arnold Schwartzman and Rabbi Hier,
Simon Wiesenthal Center.

A poignant, nostalgic study of the Jewish shtetl life before the
Holocaust. This video combines hundreds of rare archival photos and
previously unseen film footage with live action sequences shot on
location at the sites of former Jewish communities in Czechoslovakia,
Hungary, Poland and Romania. Dramatizes the folk stories, parables and
anecdotes and brings tears and laughter to the viewer. Covers the
traditions: Bar Mitzvahs, weddings, etc., and the poverty and hardships
and pogroms, the humor, laughter and traditional family life that
prevailed in the shtetl in the "Jewish Old Worlds."

There is a $3 fee for non-members; this fee will be waived for those
choosing to join at the meeting

Don't forget to check SDJGS's Web site at www.sdjgs.org for the latest
details on upcoming events and SDJGS news.
http://www.homestead.com/sdjgs/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen San Diego Jewish Genealogical Society #general

enalibof@...
 

From: Ellen Naliboff enalibof@netscape.net
San Diego Jewish Genealogical Society
Next meeting: Sunday, Feb 12, 1:00 P.M.
Lawrence Family Jewish Community Center 2nd Floor Sr. Activity Room
4126 Executive Drive in La Jolla
Program Join us for a video of interest for those researching Eastern Europe.
"Echoes That Remain" produced by Arnold Schwartzman and Rabbi Hier,
Simon Wiesenthal Center.

A poignant, nostalgic study of the Jewish shtetl life before the
Holocaust. This video combines hundreds of rare archival photos and
previously unseen film footage with live action sequences shot on
location at the sites of former Jewish communities in Czechoslovakia,
Hungary, Poland and Romania. Dramatizes the folk stories, parables and
anecdotes and brings tears and laughter to the viewer. Covers the
traditions: Bar Mitzvahs, weddings, etc., and the poverty and hardships
and pogroms, the humor, laughter and traditional family life that
prevailed in the shtetl in the "Jewish Old Worlds."

There is a $3 fee for non-members; this fee will be waived for those
choosing to join at the meeting

Don't forget to check SDJGS's Web site at www.sdjgs.org for the latest
details on upcoming events and SDJGS news.
http://www.homestead.com/sdjgs/


JGSLA Screens "My Grandfather's House: The Journey Home" - Feb. 9th #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles is please to present a
screening of Eileen Douglas's acclaimed film, "My Grandfather's House: The
Journey Home," co-sponsored by the Jewish Community Library of Los Angeles.

Date: Thursday, February 9, 2006
Time: 7:30PM
Location: Jewish Federation Building, 6505 Wilshire Boulevard, Los
Angeles 90048

Program:

This personal documentary follows Eileen Douglas’s determined search to find
her grandfather’s house in Lithuania--the home he lived in and left behind
in 1911 when he fled, at 16, >from Kovno to America. Four decades after his
death, with only fragments to guide the way, the documentary is Douglas’s
attempt to lift the veil of darkness and discover "where it all began."

Eileen travels >from New York City to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in
Washington, to her mother’s attic in Syracuse, to the homes of relatives,
and, finally, with her daughter at her side, to the block in Kovno where her
grandfather once lived. Along the way she unexpectedly unlocks the mystery
of stories he never told, discovers the fate of family members lost in the
war, learns of the glory that once was Lithuanian Jewry, finds living
relatives missing for years in Siberia, and resurrects a family shattered by
the traumas of the 20th Century.

Before the screening, filmmaker Eileen Douglas’ daughter, Rachel Zients,
will discuss the making of the documentary, and, in particular, what
compelled this personal quest. The film will be followed by Q & A with
Zients.

There is no charge for this meeting but due to limited seating, please
reserve space by email – resource@jclla.org or by phone – (323)761-8644

Location: Board Room, Jewish Federation Building, 6505 Wilshire Boulevard,
Los Angeles 90048. Free parking will be available in the building’s garage
(just west of the building entrance). Since parking is limited, attendees
are encouraged to carpool. Street parking should be available if the garage
is full.

If you have any questions, please contact me.

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair, JGSLA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSLA Screens "My Grandfather's House: The Journey Home" - Feb. 9th #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles is please to present a
screening of Eileen Douglas's acclaimed film, "My Grandfather's House: The
Journey Home," co-sponsored by the Jewish Community Library of Los Angeles.

Date: Thursday, February 9, 2006
Time: 7:30PM
Location: Jewish Federation Building, 6505 Wilshire Boulevard, Los
Angeles 90048

Program:

This personal documentary follows Eileen Douglas’s determined search to find
her grandfather’s house in Lithuania--the home he lived in and left behind
in 1911 when he fled, at 16, >from Kovno to America. Four decades after his
death, with only fragments to guide the way, the documentary is Douglas’s
attempt to lift the veil of darkness and discover "where it all began."

Eileen travels >from New York City to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in
Washington, to her mother’s attic in Syracuse, to the homes of relatives,
and, finally, with her daughter at her side, to the block in Kovno where her
grandfather once lived. Along the way she unexpectedly unlocks the mystery
of stories he never told, discovers the fate of family members lost in the
war, learns of the glory that once was Lithuanian Jewry, finds living
relatives missing for years in Siberia, and resurrects a family shattered by
the traumas of the 20th Century.

Before the screening, filmmaker Eileen Douglas’ daughter, Rachel Zients,
will discuss the making of the documentary, and, in particular, what
compelled this personal quest. The film will be followed by Q & A with
Zients.

There is no charge for this meeting but due to limited seating, please
reserve space by email – resource@jclla.org or by phone – (323)761-8644

Location: Board Room, Jewish Federation Building, 6505 Wilshire Boulevard,
Los Angeles 90048. Free parking will be available in the building’s garage
(just west of the building entrance). Since parking is limited, attendees
are encouraged to carpool. Street parking should be available if the garage
is full.

If you have any questions, please contact me.

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair, JGSLA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


Given Name "Eselein" #germany

Justin Levy <levyduffy@...>
 

I have come across the rather unusual given name 'Eselein' in some documents from
Burgpreppach in Lower Franconia dated in 1776.
In German the name means 'little donkey' with the ending -lein being particularly
southern German.

Can anybody please tell me the Yiddish or Hebrew equivalent? Many thanks,

Justin Levy, Dublin, Ireland (levyduffy@eircom.net)


German SIG #Germany Given Name "Eselein" #germany

Justin Levy <levyduffy@...>
 

I have come across the rather unusual given name 'Eselein' in some documents from
Burgpreppach in Lower Franconia dated in 1776.
In German the name means 'little donkey' with the ending -lein being particularly
southern German.

Can anybody please tell me the Yiddish or Hebrew equivalent? Many thanks,

Justin Levy, Dublin, Ireland (levyduffy@eircom.net)


Re: Which LEVISEUR and EHRLICH ? #germany

Amanda Jermyn <astrogirl200@...>
 

To reply to Adam Yamey's question below,

The LEVISEUR in question was probably Moritz
LEVISEUR(1842-1923) and the EHRLICH would have been
Wolf EHRLICH(died 1924). Their spouses, sisters Sophie
BAUMANN LEVISEUR and Helene BAUMANN EHRLICH were
relatives of mine. Moritz LEVISEUR was a businessman,
a founder of the Volks Hospital in Bloemfontein,
founder of the Bloemfontein Chamber of Commerce, and
active in the synagogue. Two of his sons, Herbert(b. 1891 and
Ernest Alfred (b. 1888), were doctors, but would have been too young
in 1907 to have any influence. Sophie LEVISEUR was an influential person
in her own right.

Wolf EHRLICH was a business man, senator for the
Orange Free State, three times mayor of Bloemfontein,
a founder of the Bloemfontein Chamber of Commerce, a
founder and president of the SA Jewish Board of
Deputies, president of the Jewish Congregation,
Portuguese Consul etc. None of his children were
doctors or dentists, as far as I know.

So in 1907 Moritz LEVISEUR and Wolf EHRLICH would have
been considered influential men in Bloemfontein, and a
good bet for assisting someone obtain permission to
practice dentistry. I should mention that my
grandmother, Frieda (nee PRAGER) KATZ, qualified as a
dentist in Germany in 1918. She was the first woman
admitted to the medical school at Heidelberg
University. However, upon arrival in the Orange Free
State in 1919 she was not allowed to practice as a
dentist because South Africa did not have a reciprocal
relationship with Germany in these matters. Germany
did not recognize South African qualifications, so
South Africa would not recognize German ones.
For more information please contact me privately.

Amanda Katz Jermyn Massachusetts, USA <astrogirl200@yahoo.com>

Thu, 26 Jan 2006 Adam Yamey <adamandlopa@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
A distant relative of mine, Gustav GINSBERG
(1872-1922), who had qualified as a dentist in Germany
was attempting in 1907 to have his German
qualifications recognised by the British authorities
in the Orange River Colony (ORC). His brother Franz
GINSBERG, MLA wrote a letter on his behalf in which he refers to,
"... a number of prominent men of the ORC can testify.
For instance Mr Ehrlich Mr Leviseur etc...".
To whom was Franz Ginsberg referring - ie which Mr EHRLICH and LEVISEUR ?
Are they the persons mentioned on the SA SIG website:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/SAfrica/communities/8/>,
or possibly some other people with those names?
Were there any dentists around in the ORC at this time with these names?


German SIG #Germany Re: Which LEVISEUR and EHRLICH ? #germany

Amanda Jermyn <astrogirl200@...>
 

To reply to Adam Yamey's question below,

The LEVISEUR in question was probably Moritz
LEVISEUR(1842-1923) and the EHRLICH would have been
Wolf EHRLICH(died 1924). Their spouses, sisters Sophie
BAUMANN LEVISEUR and Helene BAUMANN EHRLICH were
relatives of mine. Moritz LEVISEUR was a businessman,
a founder of the Volks Hospital in Bloemfontein,
founder of the Bloemfontein Chamber of Commerce, and
active in the synagogue. Two of his sons, Herbert(b. 1891 and
Ernest Alfred (b. 1888), were doctors, but would have been too young
in 1907 to have any influence. Sophie LEVISEUR was an influential person
in her own right.

Wolf EHRLICH was a business man, senator for the
Orange Free State, three times mayor of Bloemfontein,
a founder of the Bloemfontein Chamber of Commerce, a
founder and president of the SA Jewish Board of
Deputies, president of the Jewish Congregation,
Portuguese Consul etc. None of his children were
doctors or dentists, as far as I know.

So in 1907 Moritz LEVISEUR and Wolf EHRLICH would have
been considered influential men in Bloemfontein, and a
good bet for assisting someone obtain permission to
practice dentistry. I should mention that my
grandmother, Frieda (nee PRAGER) KATZ, qualified as a
dentist in Germany in 1918. She was the first woman
admitted to the medical school at Heidelberg
University. However, upon arrival in the Orange Free
State in 1919 she was not allowed to practice as a
dentist because South Africa did not have a reciprocal
relationship with Germany in these matters. Germany
did not recognize South African qualifications, so
South Africa would not recognize German ones.
For more information please contact me privately.

Amanda Katz Jermyn Massachusetts, USA <astrogirl200@yahoo.com>

Thu, 26 Jan 2006 Adam Yamey <adamandlopa@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
A distant relative of mine, Gustav GINSBERG
(1872-1922), who had qualified as a dentist in Germany
was attempting in 1907 to have his German
qualifications recognised by the British authorities
in the Orange River Colony (ORC). His brother Franz
GINSBERG, MLA wrote a letter on his behalf in which he refers to,
"... a number of prominent men of the ORC can testify.
For instance Mr Ehrlich Mr Leviseur etc...".
To whom was Franz Ginsberg referring - ie which Mr EHRLICH and LEVISEUR ?
Are they the persons mentioned on the SA SIG website:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/SAfrica/communities/8/>,
or possibly some other people with those names?
Were there any dentists around in the ORC at this time with these names?