Date   

Some New Interesting Feuer Info #galicia

Mike & Anne Beaudreau <beaudreau@...>
 

Hi Family,

In my quest to find some more info before our reunion, I have stumbled
across an interesting spelling of Feuer. It appears that 2
grandchildren of David Feuer came in through Ellis Island in August
1912. Their names were Teige and Bendikt Feuer >from Radomysl. They
stated they were going to their grandfather, David Feuer, in Brooklyn.
It is the same address that is stated on the 1910 census. The spelling
of Feuer is FEIER. I have now been finding FEIER everywhere. I think
it is time for me to get back on the phone to the cemetaries. Nobody
has a David Feuer buried anywhere, but maybe a David Feier or perhaps
another spelling. The 1910 census spells it Fire, and 1900 spells it
Feier.

Also, a contact on the Galicia Special Interest Group I joined told me
that some Landsmanshaften decided to go back to their countries to be
buried. Well, if that is the case, we will probably have no luck
finding David and Ida's burial info since the Nazis took care of that
for us. Most Jewish cemetaries were destroyed. FYI: Radomysl Jews
were all murdered except for one survivor, and his name was Joseph
Feuer. I also cannot find David and Ida in the NYC Death Indices
Database.

I have posted a few messages to groups dealing with Galician (Feuer) and
Hungarian (Grossman) genealogies. So far, nothing solid, just helpful
hints. But sometimes it takes a while for that one special person who
has done the research to decide to go online and look again after a long
period of time. Then, bingo, they find my message and will give us the
answers. It happened that way with my Beaudreau and Bouchard research
(Mike's family) and I got way back to the early 1600s. I posted
messages and it took a couple of months till the right people saw it.
So, keep your fingers crossed.

By the way, would anyone know what the names Teige and Bendik would
translate into?? Their families are our cousins and we need to find
their offspring!

Anne Beaudreau


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Some New Interesting Feuer Info #galicia

Mike & Anne Beaudreau <beaudreau@...>
 

Hi Family,

In my quest to find some more info before our reunion, I have stumbled
across an interesting spelling of Feuer. It appears that 2
grandchildren of David Feuer came in through Ellis Island in August
1912. Their names were Teige and Bendikt Feuer >from Radomysl. They
stated they were going to their grandfather, David Feuer, in Brooklyn.
It is the same address that is stated on the 1910 census. The spelling
of Feuer is FEIER. I have now been finding FEIER everywhere. I think
it is time for me to get back on the phone to the cemetaries. Nobody
has a David Feuer buried anywhere, but maybe a David Feier or perhaps
another spelling. The 1910 census spells it Fire, and 1900 spells it
Feier.

Also, a contact on the Galicia Special Interest Group I joined told me
that some Landsmanshaften decided to go back to their countries to be
buried. Well, if that is the case, we will probably have no luck
finding David and Ida's burial info since the Nazis took care of that
for us. Most Jewish cemetaries were destroyed. FYI: Radomysl Jews
were all murdered except for one survivor, and his name was Joseph
Feuer. I also cannot find David and Ida in the NYC Death Indices
Database.

I have posted a few messages to groups dealing with Galician (Feuer) and
Hungarian (Grossman) genealogies. So far, nothing solid, just helpful
hints. But sometimes it takes a while for that one special person who
has done the research to decide to go online and look again after a long
period of time. Then, bingo, they find my message and will give us the
answers. It happened that way with my Beaudreau and Bouchard research
(Mike's family) and I got way back to the early 1600s. I posted
messages and it took a couple of months till the right people saw it.
So, keep your fingers crossed.

By the way, would anyone know what the names Teige and Bendik would
translate into?? Their families are our cousins and we need to find
their offspring!

Anne Beaudreau


Re: Who lived in the shtetls? #general

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

Shtetls were units of economic activity on land owned by the nobles,
magnates or the church of the country. They drew skilled artisans,
merchants, and others who were able to manage the fiscal life of the area
for the nobles, magnates or the church.

The shtetls were populated by the ethnic groups of the area who lived
alongside each other. Jews came to play a prominent role in the life of the
shtetls as they developed the commercial activity usually around a central
square. Places developed in areas such as crossroads and around taverns or
hostels, near waterways and major highways, close to borders, and later
nearby to trains and other forms of modern transportation.

At first, there was enough work for everyone in the burgeoning new shtetls,
but as time passed and people married and had numerous children and the
authorities began to limit what Jews could work at, their opportunities grew
slimmer and the Jews had to move about to different locales to find work,
even over ever-changing country borders.

Shtetls changed over time >from being tiny places to getting larger and
others went >from being prominent to becoming small due to natural disasters,
war, and pestilence. Others matured into administrative centers and drew
their economic strength >from this. The shtetls usually had a church and, if
large enough, a synagogue or prayer house, a mill and a tavern or two.

There was much commerical competition between the Jews and the native ethnic
groups of the shtetls, some of which overflowed into the anti-semitism which
flourished after WWI in places such as Lithuania. This was partly due to
the economic advantage the Lithuanians gained during the War when the Jews
were sent into Russia. When the Jews returned after the War, the
Lithuanians did not wish to relinguish this advantage and restrictive laws
went into effect to prevent this.

This interwar period saw a tremendous outflow of Jews >from Lithuania to
other places overseas where they would not be restricted as to occupation or
business enterprise. This outpouring was to save a portion of the
Lithuanian Jewish population >from the total annihilation which later befell
their relatives who remained in Lithuania during WWII.

Today, the shtetls of Lithuania are, for the most part, empty of the Jewish
influence which founded and nourished them. The businesses, the houses, the
central squares, the cemeteries, the synagogues, are there just as the Jews
left them, but they are hollow shells of places, where the names of those
who were killed are never mentioned and barely remembered by the present
townspeople.

The shtetl is like a lost dream, a wonderful dream, tinged with bitterness,
that contains the roots of our Jewish heritage.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Who lived in the shtetls? #general

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

Shtetls were units of economic activity on land owned by the nobles,
magnates or the church of the country. They drew skilled artisans,
merchants, and others who were able to manage the fiscal life of the area
for the nobles, magnates or the church.

The shtetls were populated by the ethnic groups of the area who lived
alongside each other. Jews came to play a prominent role in the life of the
shtetls as they developed the commercial activity usually around a central
square. Places developed in areas such as crossroads and around taverns or
hostels, near waterways and major highways, close to borders, and later
nearby to trains and other forms of modern transportation.

At first, there was enough work for everyone in the burgeoning new shtetls,
but as time passed and people married and had numerous children and the
authorities began to limit what Jews could work at, their opportunities grew
slimmer and the Jews had to move about to different locales to find work,
even over ever-changing country borders.

Shtetls changed over time >from being tiny places to getting larger and
others went >from being prominent to becoming small due to natural disasters,
war, and pestilence. Others matured into administrative centers and drew
their economic strength >from this. The shtetls usually had a church and, if
large enough, a synagogue or prayer house, a mill and a tavern or two.

There was much commerical competition between the Jews and the native ethnic
groups of the shtetls, some of which overflowed into the anti-semitism which
flourished after WWI in places such as Lithuania. This was partly due to
the economic advantage the Lithuanians gained during the War when the Jews
were sent into Russia. When the Jews returned after the War, the
Lithuanians did not wish to relinguish this advantage and restrictive laws
went into effect to prevent this.

This interwar period saw a tremendous outflow of Jews >from Lithuania to
other places overseas where they would not be restricted as to occupation or
business enterprise. This outpouring was to save a portion of the
Lithuanian Jewish population >from the total annihilation which later befell
their relatives who remained in Lithuania during WWII.

Today, the shtetls of Lithuania are, for the most part, empty of the Jewish
influence which founded and nourished them. The businesses, the houses, the
central squares, the cemeteries, the synagogues, are there just as the Jews
left them, but they are hollow shells of places, where the names of those
who were killed are never mentioned and barely remembered by the present
townspeople.

The shtetl is like a lost dream, a wonderful dream, tinged with bitterness,
that contains the roots of our Jewish heritage.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


Shmerko: traditional Jewish naming pattern #belarus

Jonina Duker <jonina.duker@...>
 

By tradition, the name in the vernacular is either the same name as it
appears in the language (ex. David to David, Yonatan to Jonathan, etc.)
or a translation of the *meaning* of the Hebrew (or for women Yiddish or
Ladino or other Judaic-source language). It is only recently (for
genealogists) in America that the custom of matching the initial sound to
the original name arose. According to Kolatch's definitive 1984 name
dictionary, Shemarya means "protection of the Lord" and a traditional
English equivalent would mean the same thing. Shavua Tov.
Jonina Duker:
BEIDICK (~Minsk), DUKER (~Minsk), GOLDBERG & GORODINSKY (Minsk), KATZ
(Riga?), LEVINE (~Minsk?), RACHMAN (Salakas/Simferopol), RYMER,
SCHMUELIWITZ (~ Minsk?), SIEGEL (Uzpaliai?), STRAUSS (Vilna?) &
ARLICK (Oshmyany), BARNA (Satu Mare), FRIEDLER (Soljataznan), GOLDSTEIN,
LICHTMAN (Csenger/Satu Mare), LITZKY (Golshany), RAPAPORT
(Kemenesmihalyfa), SCHLESINGER
MODERATOR NOTE: This subject or thread is now closed. This has been discussed ad
infinitum on this and other groups. Please search the archives for more information.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Shmerko: traditional Jewish naming pattern #belarus

Jonina Duker <jonina.duker@...>
 

By tradition, the name in the vernacular is either the same name as it
appears in the language (ex. David to David, Yonatan to Jonathan, etc.)
or a translation of the *meaning* of the Hebrew (or for women Yiddish or
Ladino or other Judaic-source language). It is only recently (for
genealogists) in America that the custom of matching the initial sound to
the original name arose. According to Kolatch's definitive 1984 name
dictionary, Shemarya means "protection of the Lord" and a traditional
English equivalent would mean the same thing. Shavua Tov.
Jonina Duker:
BEIDICK (~Minsk), DUKER (~Minsk), GOLDBERG & GORODINSKY (Minsk), KATZ
(Riga?), LEVINE (~Minsk?), RACHMAN (Salakas/Simferopol), RYMER,
SCHMUELIWITZ (~ Minsk?), SIEGEL (Uzpaliai?), STRAUSS (Vilna?) &
ARLICK (Oshmyany), BARNA (Satu Mare), FRIEDLER (Soljataznan), GOLDSTEIN,
LICHTMAN (Csenger/Satu Mare), LITZKY (Golshany), RAPAPORT
(Kemenesmihalyfa), SCHLESINGER
MODERATOR NOTE: This subject or thread is now closed. This has been discussed ad
infinitum on this and other groups. Please search the archives for more information.


Searching Blumenberg cousin and family #general

Leslie Weinberg <artsoul@...>
 

Searching for (unknown) BLUMENBERG, >from Tyczyn, Poland - son of Hene
(Eisen) Blumenberg and Jonas Blumenberg. Probably born around
1921-1922. Had at least two sisters, Rachaela and Zofia, Grandparents
were Schewa (Iram) EISEN and Chaim EISEN. His uncle Markus was my
grandfather, and he came to the U.S. in 1913. This man also had an
Uncle Mozes and possibly a half-aunt named Ruchel in Paris and a
half-uncle (name unknown) who lived in Nagyvarad, Hungary (now Romania).
He was last seen in Israel in 1945 where he had arrived some time in the
1930s. Family is very anxious to find this man and any family he may
have had.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching Blumenberg cousin and family #general

Leslie Weinberg <artsoul@...>
 

Searching for (unknown) BLUMENBERG, >from Tyczyn, Poland - son of Hene
(Eisen) Blumenberg and Jonas Blumenberg. Probably born around
1921-1922. Had at least two sisters, Rachaela and Zofia, Grandparents
were Schewa (Iram) EISEN and Chaim EISEN. His uncle Markus was my
grandfather, and he came to the U.S. in 1913. This man also had an
Uncle Mozes and possibly a half-aunt named Ruchel in Paris and a
half-uncle (name unknown) who lived in Nagyvarad, Hungary (now Romania).
He was last seen in Israel in 1945 where he had arrived some time in the
1930s. Family is very anxious to find this man and any family he may
have had.


Bergrun and Schnetruffen from Kossow, Kolemja Galicia #galicia

TE <tome1111@...>
 

I am researching the following 2 surnames: BERGRUN and SCHNETRUFFEN from
Kossow, Kolemja, Galicia.

Any information on the records that might be available and where to look
would be greatly appreciated.

Tom Erribe
CA


registering of marriages - Poland, 19th century #general

TE <tome1111@...>
 

In Poland, 19th century, was there a law that stated that children under a
certain age couldn't marry? If so, would this explain why many families
registered their marriages, civily, years after the marriage and birth of
the children? Or should I assume the reason was that the towns were small
and people couldn't make it into town to register.

Thanks,

Tom Erribe
CA


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Bergrun and Schnetruffen from Kossow, Kolemja Galicia #galicia

TE <tome1111@...>
 

I am researching the following 2 surnames: BERGRUN and SCHNETRUFFEN from
Kossow, Kolemja, Galicia.

Any information on the records that might be available and where to look
would be greatly appreciated.

Tom Erribe
CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen registering of marriages - Poland, 19th century #general

TE <tome1111@...>
 

In Poland, 19th century, was there a law that stated that children under a
certain age couldn't marry? If so, would this explain why many families
registered their marriages, civily, years after the marriage and birth of
the children? Or should I assume the reason was that the towns were small
and people couldn't make it into town to register.

Thanks,

Tom Erribe
CA


Photo, Golden Hill Cemetery, Lakewood CO #general

Ed Schechter <edtioga@...>
 

Greetings,

If possible could someone take a photo of the gravestone of Saul BACHARACH
buried in the Golden Hill Cemetery in Lakewood, CO. It is Block 4, Plot
107. It would be much appreciated.

Thanks,

Ed Schechter
Baltimore, MD

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Photo, Golden Hill Cemetery, Lakewood CO #general

Ed Schechter <edtioga@...>
 

Greetings,

If possible could someone take a photo of the gravestone of Saul BACHARACH
buried in the Golden Hill Cemetery in Lakewood, CO. It is Block 4, Plot
107. It would be much appreciated.

Thanks,

Ed Schechter
Baltimore, MD

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


translation needed - 1874 Polish birth record (ViewMate 5925) #general

Renee Steinig <rsteinig@...>
 

Thanks to JRI Poland, I ordered Laja KRA's 1874 birth record
from the Przasnysz Polish State Archives. The Laja (Leah) I am
researching was the daughter of Gershon KRA, so I was happy to
see that name on the third line. But that's all I could read
on this Polish document.

I'd be grateful if someone would tell me the date and place
of Laja's birth, the name of her mother, and any other
genealogically significant details.

The document (VM5925) will be on ViewMate until next Sunday,
April 24. To view it, please go to
data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5925

Please respond privately.

Thanks very much.

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills (Long Island), New York, USA
RSteinig@suffolk.lib.ny.us


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen translation needed - 1874 Polish birth record (ViewMate 5925) #general

Renee Steinig <rsteinig@...>
 

Thanks to JRI Poland, I ordered Laja KRA's 1874 birth record
from the Przasnysz Polish State Archives. The Laja (Leah) I am
researching was the daughter of Gershon KRA, so I was happy to
see that name on the third line. But that's all I could read
on this Polish document.

I'd be grateful if someone would tell me the date and place
of Laja's birth, the name of her mother, and any other
genealogically significant details.

The document (VM5925) will be on ViewMate until next Sunday,
April 24. To view it, please go to
data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5925

Please respond privately.

Thanks very much.

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills (Long Island), New York, USA
RSteinig@suffolk.lib.ny.us


Y.M.H.A. Symphony Orchestra-NYC 1940/41 #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Below are names appearing on a program for the Young Men's Hebrew
Association's Symphony Orchestra for the 1940-41 season, performing under
the auspices of the Department of Music for the 92nd Street Y.

These concerts took place on December 8, 1940 and February 16, 1941 in the
Theresa Kaufmann Auditorium at 8:45PM.

Perhaps some of your relatives were members of this orchestra. If this
program is of genealogical interest to you, contact me privately and I'll
send you a JPEG image of it. If you have any other information about this
orchestra, feel free to share it with the group. (Although not every name
appears to be Jewish, for the sake of accuracy, all names have been
included.)

Officers:

Elias Cohen, President, Murray Reiffen, Vice-President, Helen Kahlman,
Secretary, Judith Brayer, Membership, Edward Zahler and Dorothy Zorfass,
Librarians.

Performers:

December 8th:

A.W. Binder, Conductor
Boris Schwartz- Associate Conductor and Soloist/Violinist

February 16th:

Boris Schwartz - Conducting
Sonia Essen- Soloist, Contralto
Marcell Frank - at piano

1st Violins: Elias Cohen, Concertmaster, Hyman Schulman, Virgina
Voigtlander, Eva Goldstein, Henry Beitsch, Benjamin Senitzky, Lillian Rosen,
Doris Kosches, Harry Kohl, Harry Ziggun, Joseph Fox, Lili Heiman

Violas: Tina Kolin, Jack Cohen, Gerhardt Samurl, Dorothy Zorfass, Phyllis
Bloch

2nd Violins: Joseph Primavera, Raphael Goldberg, Anita Jacobson, Jo Anne
Elam, Sylvia Hash, Edward Zahler, Eugene Fruendek, Arthur Bernfeld, Kay
Roth, Tillie Cohen

Cellos: Howard Shanet, Alfred Ash, Lilli Matzdorff, Sebastian Simon, Murray
Reiffin, Rose Radoff, Newton Graham

Basses: Judith Brayer, Ruben Jamitz, Fred Sallner

Flutes: Eugene Seaman, Robert Colin

Clarinets: Benedict Fernandez, Judith Barret, Louis Seconda, Arnold
Neudstadter

Oboes: Amiello Capuccio, Benedict Kaufman

Bassoons: Maurice Packman, Dwight Potter

French Horns: Albert Promuto, Frieda Eissman, A.W. Peckham, Robert
Austerlitz

Trumpets: Walter Marcuse, Malvin Warshaw, Elton Nachman, Sidney Dunaier

Trombones: Andrew Graniglia, Abe Cracow, Jerry Blumenthal, Max Dzitzer

Tympani: Mervin Strober

Percussion: Richard Hirsch

Harp: June Nanson

Piano: Helen Kehlman


Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Y.M.H.A. Symphony Orchestra-NYC 1940/41 #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Below are names appearing on a program for the Young Men's Hebrew
Association's Symphony Orchestra for the 1940-41 season, performing under
the auspices of the Department of Music for the 92nd Street Y.

These concerts took place on December 8, 1940 and February 16, 1941 in the
Theresa Kaufmann Auditorium at 8:45PM.

Perhaps some of your relatives were members of this orchestra. If this
program is of genealogical interest to you, contact me privately and I'll
send you a JPEG image of it. If you have any other information about this
orchestra, feel free to share it with the group. (Although not every name
appears to be Jewish, for the sake of accuracy, all names have been
included.)

Officers:

Elias Cohen, President, Murray Reiffen, Vice-President, Helen Kahlman,
Secretary, Judith Brayer, Membership, Edward Zahler and Dorothy Zorfass,
Librarians.

Performers:

December 8th:

A.W. Binder, Conductor
Boris Schwartz- Associate Conductor and Soloist/Violinist

February 16th:

Boris Schwartz - Conducting
Sonia Essen- Soloist, Contralto
Marcell Frank - at piano

1st Violins: Elias Cohen, Concertmaster, Hyman Schulman, Virgina
Voigtlander, Eva Goldstein, Henry Beitsch, Benjamin Senitzky, Lillian Rosen,
Doris Kosches, Harry Kohl, Harry Ziggun, Joseph Fox, Lili Heiman

Violas: Tina Kolin, Jack Cohen, Gerhardt Samurl, Dorothy Zorfass, Phyllis
Bloch

2nd Violins: Joseph Primavera, Raphael Goldberg, Anita Jacobson, Jo Anne
Elam, Sylvia Hash, Edward Zahler, Eugene Fruendek, Arthur Bernfeld, Kay
Roth, Tillie Cohen

Cellos: Howard Shanet, Alfred Ash, Lilli Matzdorff, Sebastian Simon, Murray
Reiffin, Rose Radoff, Newton Graham

Basses: Judith Brayer, Ruben Jamitz, Fred Sallner

Flutes: Eugene Seaman, Robert Colin

Clarinets: Benedict Fernandez, Judith Barret, Louis Seconda, Arnold
Neudstadter

Oboes: Amiello Capuccio, Benedict Kaufman

Bassoons: Maurice Packman, Dwight Potter

French Horns: Albert Promuto, Frieda Eissman, A.W. Peckham, Robert
Austerlitz

Trumpets: Walter Marcuse, Malvin Warshaw, Elton Nachman, Sidney Dunaier

Trombones: Andrew Graniglia, Abe Cracow, Jerry Blumenthal, Max Dzitzer

Tympani: Mervin Strober

Percussion: Richard Hirsch

Harp: June Nanson

Piano: Helen Kehlman


Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


Lithuanian State Historical Archives - a question #general

R Gerber <beccamd@...>
 

If I send a letter (in English) to this archive, how long approximately will
it take to get a response, and then get any records they may find?

My sister will be in Vilnius in October, and I am wondering if I could
somehow request records, and have her pick them up at that time.

Any suggestions?

-Rebecca Gerber
Glenview, IL

MODERATOR NOTE: The Litvak SIG offers a set of FAQ's(Frequently Asked Questions).
The object of these FAQ's is to help answer some of the basic questions about
Lithuanian research and the Lithuanian archives. The FAQ's are located at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/litvak/faqs.htm


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Lithuanian State Historical Archives - a question #general

R Gerber <beccamd@...>
 

If I send a letter (in English) to this archive, how long approximately will
it take to get a response, and then get any records they may find?

My sister will be in Vilnius in October, and I am wondering if I could
somehow request records, and have her pick them up at that time.

Any suggestions?

-Rebecca Gerber
Glenview, IL

MODERATOR NOTE: The Litvak SIG offers a set of FAQ's(Frequently Asked Questions).
The object of these FAQ's is to help answer some of the basic questions about
Lithuanian research and the Lithuanian archives. The FAQ's are located at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/litvak/faqs.htm