Date   

Re: Sephardic first names #sephardic

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
 

Dear Melody,

Assuming anything is dangerous. The first thing journalists learn
(and genealogists should learn) is the breakdown of "assume". It is
referred to as "assuming makes an a-- out of u and me."

Because Sephardim, not only Portuguese (not all Sephardim in England
were Portuguese - that was just a naming convention of the time in
which Portuguese was code for Sephardic), name after living relatives,
names are often >from the father's and the mother's side.

Using your example, the father of Gabriel might name the child - after
consultation with the mother and living grandparents, etc. - after a
grandfather on each side to make up the two given names. And Raphael
might have been named after either his father's father, mother's
father, or other relatives.

The more normative convention is to name after grandfathers (sometimes
uncles and siblings, depending on family tradition, which also played
a very major part in the process), but not after parents.

The main reason for this is to honor the grandparents (e.g. the biblical
injunction to honor your parents, with the meaning of the older
generations), and in many Sephardic families, naming after the father
(and not an older relative) of the child might be seen in a negative
way.

Also, along with the normative naming process, the early death of
another family member might trigger naming after that person ahead of
the older living relative.

It also depended on the birth order of the baby. Normative naming
would have the first boy after the father's father, first girl after
the mother's mother - although in some families, the father got the
names of both first son and first daughter >from his side. But there
were many ways of doing this and traditions varied >from family to
family.

Understanding that often these families were quite large, names might
be drawn >from far afield.

But in any case, I go back to my original opening statement. Assumption
is dangerous without facts. And my closing would be: The only rule is
that there are no rules (only possible guidelines, further influenced
by individual family traditions of which there were many!).

with best wishes
Schelly Talalay Dardashti
schelly@tracingthetribe.com
Tracing the Tribe: The Jewish Genealogy Blog
http://tracingthetribe.blogspot.com

Subject: Sephardic firstborn names
From: ~Melody Amsel-Arieli <nomietai@yahoo.com>
I am wondering if Portuguese Jews who settled in Britain customarily
included their own first names in that of their firtborns?
For example, might Raphael Mandoza name his firstborn Gabrial
Raphael Mendoza?
If so, can I assume that the converse is true--the father of every
firstborn Gabriel Raphael xxxx was Raphael? - snip -


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim Re: Sephardic first names #sephardic

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
 

Dear Melody,

Assuming anything is dangerous. The first thing journalists learn
(and genealogists should learn) is the breakdown of "assume". It is
referred to as "assuming makes an a-- out of u and me."

Because Sephardim, not only Portuguese (not all Sephardim in England
were Portuguese - that was just a naming convention of the time in
which Portuguese was code for Sephardic), name after living relatives,
names are often >from the father's and the mother's side.

Using your example, the father of Gabriel might name the child - after
consultation with the mother and living grandparents, etc. - after a
grandfather on each side to make up the two given names. And Raphael
might have been named after either his father's father, mother's
father, or other relatives.

The more normative convention is to name after grandfathers (sometimes
uncles and siblings, depending on family tradition, which also played
a very major part in the process), but not after parents.

The main reason for this is to honor the grandparents (e.g. the biblical
injunction to honor your parents, with the meaning of the older
generations), and in many Sephardic families, naming after the father
(and not an older relative) of the child might be seen in a negative
way.

Also, along with the normative naming process, the early death of
another family member might trigger naming after that person ahead of
the older living relative.

It also depended on the birth order of the baby. Normative naming
would have the first boy after the father's father, first girl after
the mother's mother - although in some families, the father got the
names of both first son and first daughter >from his side. But there
were many ways of doing this and traditions varied >from family to
family.

Understanding that often these families were quite large, names might
be drawn >from far afield.

But in any case, I go back to my original opening statement. Assumption
is dangerous without facts. And my closing would be: The only rule is
that there are no rules (only possible guidelines, further influenced
by individual family traditions of which there were many!).

with best wishes
Schelly Talalay Dardashti
schelly@tracingthetribe.com
Tracing the Tribe: The Jewish Genealogy Blog
http://tracingthetribe.blogspot.com

Subject: Sephardic firstborn names
From: ~Melody Amsel-Arieli <nomietai@yahoo.com>
I am wondering if Portuguese Jews who settled in Britain customarily
included their own first names in that of their firtborns?
For example, might Raphael Mandoza name his firstborn Gabrial
Raphael Mendoza?
If so, can I assume that the converse is true--the father of every
firstborn Gabriel Raphael xxxx was Raphael? - snip -


Where in the World Are You ? #germany

JewishGen German Research Division Coordinator
 

Can you take 1 minute to help GerSIG ?

The Email addresses of many people who live in countries other than
the United States contain two letter codes that identify that country.

Examples would be: Albert.Einstein@Xmail.DE
(the .de shows that person is in Germany)

Other country codes are: IL (Israel), UK (United Kingdom), South Africa (ZA)

Many GerSIG subscribers use Gmail, Yahoo Mail, AOL, Hotmail and other
such services for Email. Their country of residence is not identified in
their email address.

If you do not live in the United States and your email address
does ** not ** include a two letter country code like .DE GerSIG would
appreciate knowing your country. Could you help us?

Send an Email message to <GerSIGmod@gmail.com>
Write the name of the country where you live as the subject.
No other information or text is needed.

Many thanks for helping us. GerSIG Membership Coordinator


German SIG #Germany Where in the World Are You ? #germany

JewishGen German Research Division Coordinator
 

Can you take 1 minute to help GerSIG ?

The Email addresses of many people who live in countries other than
the United States contain two letter codes that identify that country.

Examples would be: Albert.Einstein@Xmail.DE
(the .de shows that person is in Germany)

Other country codes are: IL (Israel), UK (United Kingdom), South Africa (ZA)

Many GerSIG subscribers use Gmail, Yahoo Mail, AOL, Hotmail and other
such services for Email. Their country of residence is not identified in
their email address.

If you do not live in the United States and your email address
does ** not ** include a two letter country code like .DE GerSIG would
appreciate knowing your country. Could you help us?

Send an Email message to <GerSIGmod@gmail.com>
Write the name of the country where you live as the subject.
No other information or text is needed.

Many thanks for helping us. GerSIG Membership Coordinator


News from the Israel Genealogical Society #usa

Daniel Horowitz <webmaster@...>
 

The Israel Genealogical Society is pleased to invite presentations from
potential speakers in English and/or Hebrew for the Sixth Annual One Day
Seminar on Jewish Genealogy. The seminar will be held on Tuesday, 2
Kislev 5771 =96 November 9, 2010 at Beit Hatfutzot, Tel Aviv University,
Israel.
Our topic this year is: Jewish Families migration split - Some Went East
(Eretz Israel) and Some Went Elsewhere
Deadline: 30 June 2010
http://tinyurl.com/39svn55

If you are planing a trip to Israel and would like to spare some time
lecturing at one of our branches, please contact our officers.
We love to have international lecturers.
http://www.isragen.org.il/siteFiles/1/157/4567.asp

You can also be a member of the IGS.
Membership benefits include:
- Free entrance to all the lectures and events organized by the branches
- Discount to IGS seminars, training classes, and special events
- Access to IGS on-loan specialized genealogy libraries
- Free e-mail subscription to IGS monthly newsletter
- A subscription to Sharsheret Hadorot bi-lingual journal
For more information visit:
http://tinyurl.com/34q9q3y

The latest issue of the IGS bi-lingual journal "Sharsheret Hadorot" is
already available.
A single copy costs $15, payable by check. Anyone interested should
contact Lea Gedalia (leahgedalia AT gmail.com)

Daniel Horowitz IAJGS Board Member/Webmaster http://www.iajgs.org daniel@iajgs.org


Early American SIG #USA News from the Israel Genealogical Society #usa

Daniel Horowitz <webmaster@...>
 

The Israel Genealogical Society is pleased to invite presentations from
potential speakers in English and/or Hebrew for the Sixth Annual One Day
Seminar on Jewish Genealogy. The seminar will be held on Tuesday, 2
Kislev 5771 =96 November 9, 2010 at Beit Hatfutzot, Tel Aviv University,
Israel.
Our topic this year is: Jewish Families migration split - Some Went East
(Eretz Israel) and Some Went Elsewhere
Deadline: 30 June 2010
http://tinyurl.com/39svn55

If you are planing a trip to Israel and would like to spare some time
lecturing at one of our branches, please contact our officers.
We love to have international lecturers.
http://www.isragen.org.il/siteFiles/1/157/4567.asp

You can also be a member of the IGS.
Membership benefits include:
- Free entrance to all the lectures and events organized by the branches
- Discount to IGS seminars, training classes, and special events
- Access to IGS on-loan specialized genealogy libraries
- Free e-mail subscription to IGS monthly newsletter
- A subscription to Sharsheret Hadorot bi-lingual journal
For more information visit:
http://tinyurl.com/34q9q3y

The latest issue of the IGS bi-lingual journal "Sharsheret Hadorot" is
already available.
A single copy costs $15, payable by check. Anyone interested should
contact Lea Gedalia (leahgedalia AT gmail.com)

Daniel Horowitz IAJGS Board Member/Webmaster http://www.iajgs.org daniel@iajgs.org


Re: Birth before marriage #poland

Yossi Yagur <yagury@...>
 

Miriam Eguchi wrote:

<< According to records obtained >from Lodz authorities, both my
grandmother and great grandmother seem to have given birth to their first
child well before their marriage registration date. (One was about 2
years before, the other a few months, but she would have become pregnant
well over a year before the marriage. I know that no one can tell me
what really happened in these particular cases, but I'm hoping that more
experienced researchers can tell me which of the following is most likely:

1. They had a religious marriage ceremony before becoming pregnant
and then registered the marriage with the Lodz authorities much later,
possibly for financial reasons.
2. They lived together and had a child before getting married.
3. They registered both events well after the fact and got the dates
confused.

Extra info:
--My great grandmother married into a very religious (Hasidic)
family. My grandmother was an atheistic socialist, and her husband was a
Cheder ---Hebrew teacher after emigrating to Canada in 1920, but I don't
know what he was doing when they met in Lodz.
--I got the actual handwritten records for my great grandmother from
the Lodz Archives, but for my grandmother I only have the typed
certificates >from the City Hall, as they are not yet 100 years old. >>

Hi,
Based on my experience regarding my ancestors in Bukowina, I'd say that
answer # 1 is the right one, although I'm not sure about the financial
reasons.
This is based on dozens of official birth and marriage records. The
following example may demonstrate an extreme case:
On 19-Nov-1902, the following marriages were recorded in the Radautz
"Traungs Matrik":
1. Marriage of Jakob-Josef JURGRAU and Reisel HASS, my grandparents. This
occurred few months after the birth of their first son Dov-Ber on
15-Jun-1902.
2. Marriage of Simon HASS and Miriam JUDENFREUND, parents of the
above-mentioned Reisel HASS. This occurred when they were 45 years old, and
already had 6 children.
3. Marriage of Miriam HASS (sister of the above-mentioned Simon HASS) and
Elias EHRLICH. This occurred when they were 43 years old, and already had 5
children.

Usually, births and deaths were recorded very close to the real dates. I
have no idea why they postponed the official registration of marriages,
even though they were aware that their children will be recorded as
"Non-legitimate" and will carry their mother maiden name until parents
marriage will be officially recorded.
Please note that in many cases, such late marriage record is accompanied
(at the notes area) by a declaration made by the father, in which he
acknowledges the children born before the official marriage as his children.
This act makes these children "Legitimate".
These late marriage registrations were confirmed a Rabbi and two witnesses,
although the religious marriage took place long before (and as they were all
Orthodox Jews - before the bride got pregnant).

Yossi Yagur
Petach-Tiqwa, Israel


JRI Poland #Poland RE: Birth before marriage #poland

Yossi Yagur <yagury@...>
 

Miriam Eguchi wrote:

<< According to records obtained >from Lodz authorities, both my
grandmother and great grandmother seem to have given birth to their first
child well before their marriage registration date. (One was about 2
years before, the other a few months, but she would have become pregnant
well over a year before the marriage. I know that no one can tell me
what really happened in these particular cases, but I'm hoping that more
experienced researchers can tell me which of the following is most likely:

1. They had a religious marriage ceremony before becoming pregnant
and then registered the marriage with the Lodz authorities much later,
possibly for financial reasons.
2. They lived together and had a child before getting married.
3. They registered both events well after the fact and got the dates
confused.

Extra info:
--My great grandmother married into a very religious (Hasidic)
family. My grandmother was an atheistic socialist, and her husband was a
Cheder ---Hebrew teacher after emigrating to Canada in 1920, but I don't
know what he was doing when they met in Lodz.
--I got the actual handwritten records for my great grandmother from
the Lodz Archives, but for my grandmother I only have the typed
certificates >from the City Hall, as they are not yet 100 years old. >>

Hi,
Based on my experience regarding my ancestors in Bukowina, I'd say that
answer # 1 is the right one, although I'm not sure about the financial
reasons.
This is based on dozens of official birth and marriage records. The
following example may demonstrate an extreme case:
On 19-Nov-1902, the following marriages were recorded in the Radautz
"Traungs Matrik":
1. Marriage of Jakob-Josef JURGRAU and Reisel HASS, my grandparents. This
occurred few months after the birth of their first son Dov-Ber on
15-Jun-1902.
2. Marriage of Simon HASS and Miriam JUDENFREUND, parents of the
above-mentioned Reisel HASS. This occurred when they were 45 years old, and
already had 6 children.
3. Marriage of Miriam HASS (sister of the above-mentioned Simon HASS) and
Elias EHRLICH. This occurred when they were 43 years old, and already had 5
children.

Usually, births and deaths were recorded very close to the real dates. I
have no idea why they postponed the official registration of marriages,
even though they were aware that their children will be recorded as
"Non-legitimate" and will carry their mother maiden name until parents
marriage will be officially recorded.
Please note that in many cases, such late marriage record is accompanied
(at the notes area) by a declaration made by the father, in which he
acknowledges the children born before the official marriage as his children.
This act makes these children "Legitimate".
These late marriage registrations were confirmed a Rabbi and two witnesses,
although the religious marriage took place long before (and as they were all
Orthodox Jews - before the bride got pregnant).

Yossi Yagur
Petach-Tiqwa, Israel


News from the Israel Genealogical Society #lodz #poland

Daniel Horowitz <webmaster@...>
 

The Israel Genealogical Society is pleased to invite presentations from
potential speakers in English and/or Hebrew for the Sixth Annual One Day
Seminar on Jewish Genealogy. The seminar will be held on Tuesday, 2
Kislev 5771 =96 November 9, 2010 at Beit Hatfutzot, Tel Aviv University,
Israel.
Our topic this year is: Jewish Families migration split - Some Went East
(Eretz Israel) and Some Went Elsewhere
Deadline: 30 June 2010
http://tinyurl.com/39svn55


If you are planing a trip to Israel and would like to spare some time
lecturing at one of our branches, please contact our officers.
We love to have international lecturers.
http://www.isragen.org.il/siteFiles/1/157/4567.asp


You can also be a member of the IGS.
Membership benefits include:
- Free entrance to all the lectures and events organized by the branches
- Discount to IGS seminars, training classes, and special events
- Access to IGS on-loan specialized genealogy libraries
- Free e-mail subscription to IGS monthly newsletter
- A subscription to Sharsheret Hadorot bi-lingual journal
For more information visit:
http://tinyurl.com/34q9q3y


The latest issue of the IGS bi-lingual journal "Sharsheret Hadorot" is
already available.
A single copy costs $15, payable by check. Anyone interested should
contact Lea Gedalia (leahgedalia AT gmail.com)

Daniel Horowitz
IAJGS Board Member / Webmaster
http://www.iajgs.org
daniel@iajgs.org


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland News from the Israel Genealogical Society #lodz #poland

Daniel Horowitz <webmaster@...>
 

The Israel Genealogical Society is pleased to invite presentations from
potential speakers in English and/or Hebrew for the Sixth Annual One Day
Seminar on Jewish Genealogy. The seminar will be held on Tuesday, 2
Kislev 5771 =96 November 9, 2010 at Beit Hatfutzot, Tel Aviv University,
Israel.
Our topic this year is: Jewish Families migration split - Some Went East
(Eretz Israel) and Some Went Elsewhere
Deadline: 30 June 2010
http://tinyurl.com/39svn55


If you are planing a trip to Israel and would like to spare some time
lecturing at one of our branches, please contact our officers.
We love to have international lecturers.
http://www.isragen.org.il/siteFiles/1/157/4567.asp


You can also be a member of the IGS.
Membership benefits include:
- Free entrance to all the lectures and events organized by the branches
- Discount to IGS seminars, training classes, and special events
- Access to IGS on-loan specialized genealogy libraries
- Free e-mail subscription to IGS monthly newsletter
- A subscription to Sharsheret Hadorot bi-lingual journal
For more information visit:
http://tinyurl.com/34q9q3y


The latest issue of the IGS bi-lingual journal "Sharsheret Hadorot" is
already available.
A single copy costs $15, payable by check. Anyone interested should
contact Lea Gedalia (leahgedalia AT gmail.com)

Daniel Horowitz
IAJGS Board Member / Webmaster
http://www.iajgs.org
daniel@iajgs.org


News from the Israel Genealogical Society #lithuania

Daniel Horowitz <webmaster@...>
 

The Israel Genealogical Society is pleased to invite presentations from
potential speakers in English and/or Hebrew for the Sixth Annual One Day
Seminar on Jewish Genealogy. The seminar will be held on Tuesday, 2
Kislev 5771 =96 November 9, 2010 at Beit Hatfutzot, Tel Aviv University,
Israel.
Our topic this year is: Jewish Families migration split - Some Went East
(Eretz Israel) and Some Went Elsewhere
Deadline: 30 June 2010
http://tinyurl.com/39svn55


If you are planing a trip to Israel and would like to spare some time
lecturing at one of our branches, please contact our officers.
We love to have international lecturers.
http://www.isragen.org.il/siteFiles/1/157/4567.asp


You can also be a member of the IGS.
Membership benefits include:
- Free entrance to all the lectures and events organized by the branches
- Discount to IGS seminars, training classes, and special events
- Access to IGS on-loan specialized genealogy libraries
- Free e-mail subscription to IGS monthly newsletter
- A subscription to Sharsheret Hadorot bi-lingual journal
For more information visit:
http://tinyurl.com/34q9q3y


The latest issue of the IGS bi-lingual journal "Sharsheret Hadorot" is
already available.
A single copy costs $15, payable by check. Anyone interested should
contact Lea Gedalia (leahgedalia AT gmail.com)

Daniel Horowitz
IAJGS Board Member / Webmaster
http://www.iajgs.org
daniel@iajgs.org


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania News from the Israel Genealogical Society #lithuania

Daniel Horowitz <webmaster@...>
 

The Israel Genealogical Society is pleased to invite presentations from
potential speakers in English and/or Hebrew for the Sixth Annual One Day
Seminar on Jewish Genealogy. The seminar will be held on Tuesday, 2
Kislev 5771 =96 November 9, 2010 at Beit Hatfutzot, Tel Aviv University,
Israel.
Our topic this year is: Jewish Families migration split - Some Went East
(Eretz Israel) and Some Went Elsewhere
Deadline: 30 June 2010
http://tinyurl.com/39svn55


If you are planing a trip to Israel and would like to spare some time
lecturing at one of our branches, please contact our officers.
We love to have international lecturers.
http://www.isragen.org.il/siteFiles/1/157/4567.asp


You can also be a member of the IGS.
Membership benefits include:
- Free entrance to all the lectures and events organized by the branches
- Discount to IGS seminars, training classes, and special events
- Access to IGS on-loan specialized genealogy libraries
- Free e-mail subscription to IGS monthly newsletter
- A subscription to Sharsheret Hadorot bi-lingual journal
For more information visit:
http://tinyurl.com/34q9q3y


The latest issue of the IGS bi-lingual journal "Sharsheret Hadorot" is
already available.
A single copy costs $15, payable by check. Anyone interested should
contact Lea Gedalia (leahgedalia AT gmail.com)

Daniel Horowitz
IAJGS Board Member / Webmaster
http://www.iajgs.org
daniel@iajgs.org


Louis Rubin #lithuania

Stewart K. Bernstein <skbernst123@...>
 

Members

Howard Margol has told me a number of times that no know vital civil
records for Calvaria currently exist. Are there "any" records that might
indicate my great grandfather's Louis Rubin? I cannot discover anything
for him before his immigration to Nashville in 1877. I don't know why a
Jew >from Eastern Europe would immigrate to Nashville, let alone even know
about such a place. My thoughts are that Louis either knew a home town
friend/relative that was already there, and the South was a textile
center as was the Calvaria area of Lithuania.I am not sure of the Rubin
spelling in Lithuania.

As an interesting side note, Louis went to work for the Tennessee
Manufacturing Company that a predecessor of the still existing Werthan
Bag Company. If you recall the Dan Aykroyd film "Driving Miss Daisey",
his family were the Werthans. His character moved to Israel, but I did
have an opportunity to speak to his brother who still resides in Nashville.
Some scenes were even filmed in the Werthan factory. If anyone is curious,
there are some wonderful photos and accompanying info about the Werthans
and their fascinating accomplishments and extensive philanthropy can be
view at

http://historicnashville.wordpress.com/2009/04/21/werthan-bag-company/

The original Company building still exists in Nashville and I believe is
now designated as a National Historical Site. My Great Grandfather worked
there until 1890 when he remarried Anna Shapiro/Shapuiri of Nashville and
relocated to Chicago. His last position at The Tennessee Manufacturing
Company was as Secretary, however, I don't know if that was the literal
definition of a Secretary or an Executive position in the Company. I did
discover an interesting fact in the site mentioned above, the Werthans
were at one tine involved in the scrap metal business, which is the
Chicago business Louis and his sons were in. I was already aware of the
Chicago business, however, perhaps Nashville is where Louis began his
first interest in scrap metal.

Stewart Bernstein
Thousand Oaks, CA

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
Suggestions of research methods or resources may be shared with
the list.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Louis Rubin #lithuania

Stewart K. Bernstein <skbernst123@...>
 

Members

Howard Margol has told me a number of times that no know vital civil
records for Calvaria currently exist. Are there "any" records that might
indicate my great grandfather's Louis Rubin? I cannot discover anything
for him before his immigration to Nashville in 1877. I don't know why a
Jew >from Eastern Europe would immigrate to Nashville, let alone even know
about such a place. My thoughts are that Louis either knew a home town
friend/relative that was already there, and the South was a textile
center as was the Calvaria area of Lithuania.I am not sure of the Rubin
spelling in Lithuania.

As an interesting side note, Louis went to work for the Tennessee
Manufacturing Company that a predecessor of the still existing Werthan
Bag Company. If you recall the Dan Aykroyd film "Driving Miss Daisey",
his family were the Werthans. His character moved to Israel, but I did
have an opportunity to speak to his brother who still resides in Nashville.
Some scenes were even filmed in the Werthan factory. If anyone is curious,
there are some wonderful photos and accompanying info about the Werthans
and their fascinating accomplishments and extensive philanthropy can be
view at

http://historicnashville.wordpress.com/2009/04/21/werthan-bag-company/

The original Company building still exists in Nashville and I believe is
now designated as a National Historical Site. My Great Grandfather worked
there until 1890 when he remarried Anna Shapiro/Shapuiri of Nashville and
relocated to Chicago. His last position at The Tennessee Manufacturing
Company was as Secretary, however, I don't know if that was the literal
definition of a Secretary or an Executive position in the Company. I did
discover an interesting fact in the site mentioned above, the Werthans
were at one tine involved in the scrap metal business, which is the
Chicago business Louis and his sons were in. I was already aware of the
Chicago business, however, perhaps Nashville is where Louis began his
first interest in scrap metal.

Stewart Bernstein
Thousand Oaks, CA

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
Suggestions of research methods or resources may be shared with
the list.


News from the Israel Genealogical Society #poland

Daniel Horowitz <webmaster@...>
 

The Israel Genealogical Society is pleased to invite presentations from
potential speakers in English and/or Hebrew for the Sixth Annual One Day
Seminar on Jewish Genealogy. The seminar will be held on Tuesday, 2
Kislev 5771 =96 November 9, 2010 at Beit Hatfutzot, Tel Aviv University,
Israel.
Our topic this year is: Jewish Families migration split - Some Went East
(Eretz Israel) and Some Went Elsewhere
Deadline: 30 June 2010
http://tinyurl.com/39svn55

If you are planing a trip to Israel and would like to spare some time
lecturing at one of our branches, please contact our officers.
We love to have international lecturers.
http://www.isragen.org.il/siteFiles/1/157/4567.asp

You can also be a member of the IGS.
Membership benefits include:
- Free entrance to all the lectures and events organized by the branches
- Discount to IGS seminars, training classes, and special events
- Access to IGS on-loan specialized genealogy libraries
- Free e-mail subscription to IGS monthly newsletter
- A subscription to Sharsheret Hadorot bi-lingual journal
For more information visit:
http://tinyurl.com/34q9q3y

The latest issue of the IGS bi-lingual journal "Sharsheret Hadorot" is
already available.
A single copy costs $15, payable by check. Anyone interested should
contact Lea Gedalia (leahgedalia AT gmail.com)

Daniel Horowitz
IAJGS Board Member / Webmaster
http://www.iajgs.org
daniel@iajgs.org


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland News from the Israel Genealogical Society #poland

Daniel Horowitz <webmaster@...>
 

The Israel Genealogical Society is pleased to invite presentations from
potential speakers in English and/or Hebrew for the Sixth Annual One Day
Seminar on Jewish Genealogy. The seminar will be held on Tuesday, 2
Kislev 5771 =96 November 9, 2010 at Beit Hatfutzot, Tel Aviv University,
Israel.
Our topic this year is: Jewish Families migration split - Some Went East
(Eretz Israel) and Some Went Elsewhere
Deadline: 30 June 2010
http://tinyurl.com/39svn55

If you are planing a trip to Israel and would like to spare some time
lecturing at one of our branches, please contact our officers.
We love to have international lecturers.
http://www.isragen.org.il/siteFiles/1/157/4567.asp

You can also be a member of the IGS.
Membership benefits include:
- Free entrance to all the lectures and events organized by the branches
- Discount to IGS seminars, training classes, and special events
- Access to IGS on-loan specialized genealogy libraries
- Free e-mail subscription to IGS monthly newsletter
- A subscription to Sharsheret Hadorot bi-lingual journal
For more information visit:
http://tinyurl.com/34q9q3y

The latest issue of the IGS bi-lingual journal "Sharsheret Hadorot" is
already available.
A single copy costs $15, payable by check. Anyone interested should
contact Lea Gedalia (leahgedalia AT gmail.com)

Daniel Horowitz
IAJGS Board Member / Webmaster
http://www.iajgs.org
daniel@iajgs.org


Jewish Heritage Trail in Bialystok #poland

Ittai Hershman
 

Mark Halpern references a "historical guide of Jewish Bialystok - Jewish
Heritage Trail in Bialystok" in a recent note.

I was curious to buy this and discovered it is available for download online
at: http://www.szlak.uwb.edu.pl/indexen.html. There is also kit to create
an interactive CD which includes other interesting material such as maps
from 1799, 1887, 1937 and 1942.
Creating the CD requires some technical knowledge, but if you simply
download the kit and click on it, you will find the maps in the archiwa
sub-directory (i.e. szlak_cd_final.zip/szlak_cd_final/files/archiwa).

I have not yet had time to explore in detail, but this seems like a very
helpful resource.

Ittai Hershman


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Jewish Heritage Trail in Bialystok #poland

Ittai Hershman
 

Mark Halpern references a "historical guide of Jewish Bialystok - Jewish
Heritage Trail in Bialystok" in a recent note.

I was curious to buy this and discovered it is available for download online
at: http://www.szlak.uwb.edu.pl/indexen.html. There is also kit to create
an interactive CD which includes other interesting material such as maps
from 1799, 1887, 1937 and 1942.
Creating the CD requires some technical knowledge, but if you simply
download the kit and click on it, you will find the maps in the archiwa
sub-directory (i.e. szlak_cd_final.zip/szlak_cd_final/files/archiwa).

I have not yet had time to explore in detail, but this seems like a very
helpful resource.

Ittai Hershman


Viewmates needing recognition help #general

Alva Noonan <alvarose@...>
 

Thanks for taking the time to look. I believe the families in question are
BALTER and SINDER. In one of the photos Lakewood, NJ is mentioned and in one
is Karlsbad. Seems to have been a postcard/photo sent to Bronx, NY >from overseas.
The other two are of who I believe is my grandfather, Sigmund BALTER in a
military uniform and the other is the reverse side of the photo.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15434
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15433
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15432
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15431

Alva Noonan

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please reply privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Viewmates needing recognition help #general

Alva Noonan <alvarose@...>
 

Thanks for taking the time to look. I believe the families in question are
BALTER and SINDER. In one of the photos Lakewood, NJ is mentioned and in one
is Karlsbad. Seems to have been a postcard/photo sent to Bronx, NY >from overseas.
The other two are of who I believe is my grandfather, Sigmund BALTER in a
military uniform and the other is the reverse side of the photo.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15434
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15433
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15432
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=15431

Alva Noonan

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please reply privately.