Date   

Internal Passports in Vilna #lithuania

Aryeh Lopiansky <alop@...>
 

Why did living in Vilna require an Internal Passport? I am under the
impression that only Lithuania post WW I required IP, and not Poland. Vilna
was then under Polish rule.

Aryeh Lopiansky

----->from Original Message-----

If they lived in Vilnius between 1919-1940, they had to have an internal
passport. The files contain approximately 45,000 Jewish Vilnius internal
passport applications as well as many additional documents of various types
in the individual files. So far, 10,423 of the Vilnius records have been
translated and work is continuing to translate the remainder.

To see information about the Vilnius internal passports, go to
https://vilniusinternalpassports19191940.shutterfly.com/

Also on the site you will see a sample of some of the various surnames
included in the Vilnius internal passport records, including the maiden name
of the married females. This is only a small sample taken >from the total
Vilnius internal passports that have been translated.

To access the Vilnius translated internal passport records, a $100
contribution to Litvak SIG is required and it is good for a period of 5
years. Go to www.litvaksig.org/contribute Scroll down to Special Projects
and select internal passports. In the NOTES block,
key in Vilnius. You can use your credit card as the site is secure.

Howard Margol
Litvak SIG Coordinator for records acquisition.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Internal Passports in Vilna #lithuania

Aryeh Lopiansky <alop@...>
 

Why did living in Vilna require an Internal Passport? I am under the
impression that only Lithuania post WW I required IP, and not Poland. Vilna
was then under Polish rule.

Aryeh Lopiansky

----->from Original Message-----

If they lived in Vilnius between 1919-1940, they had to have an internal
passport. The files contain approximately 45,000 Jewish Vilnius internal
passport applications as well as many additional documents of various types
in the individual files. So far, 10,423 of the Vilnius records have been
translated and work is continuing to translate the remainder.

To see information about the Vilnius internal passports, go to
https://vilniusinternalpassports19191940.shutterfly.com/

Also on the site you will see a sample of some of the various surnames
included in the Vilnius internal passport records, including the maiden name
of the married females. This is only a small sample taken >from the total
Vilnius internal passports that have been translated.

To access the Vilnius translated internal passport records, a $100
contribution to Litvak SIG is required and it is good for a period of 5
years. Go to www.litvaksig.org/contribute Scroll down to Special Projects
and select internal passports. In the NOTES block,
key in Vilnius. You can use your credit card as the site is secure.

Howard Margol
Litvak SIG Coordinator for records acquisition.


To all Bessarabia SIG Discussion Group members #bessarabia

Alan Levitt
 

We now have 483 members in 17 countries. Some of us are not just
searching for specific information about our ancestors, but also
exploring the daily life, culture, challenges (and how they were
overcome), social and other factors that influenced our families.

For those of you who are relatively new to our SIG, you are encouraged
to write a short introduction about your family, interests, and
perhaps some generic questions that might prompt Discussion Group
interchanges, and >from which many others may benefit. It should be
posted to:

bessarabia@lyris.jewishgen.org

To be sure, our SIG has an incredible number of very knowledgeable
members who have extensive expertise in our favorite hobby. Our
Discussion Group, while not a database, may be quite helpful to you.

Alan Levitt
Discussion Group Moderator
Bessarabia SIG


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia To all Bessarabia SIG Discussion Group members #bessarabia

Alan Levitt
 

We now have 483 members in 17 countries. Some of us are not just
searching for specific information about our ancestors, but also
exploring the daily life, culture, challenges (and how they were
overcome), social and other factors that influenced our families.

For those of you who are relatively new to our SIG, you are encouraged
to write a short introduction about your family, interests, and
perhaps some generic questions that might prompt Discussion Group
interchanges, and >from which many others may benefit. It should be
posted to:

bessarabia@lyris.jewishgen.org

To be sure, our SIG has an incredible number of very knowledgeable
members who have extensive expertise in our favorite hobby. Our
Discussion Group, while not a database, may be quite helpful to you.

Alan Levitt
Discussion Group Moderator
Bessarabia SIG


Conference: 2. Why you need to go to the conference next time? #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear Genealogists,

Let's continue our discussions about the conference. After first posting: "
1. My personal experience at the conference? What I did there?" I have
received a number of replies, but I wish you post your replies to the whole
group. Your opinion is very important.

At the second posting I would try to convince you that you should go to next
conference.

At the very least, these conferences are fun and full of surprises. You
can go to "genealogical" movies, and many of them are treasures. You can
hear a good concert, a Klezmer musician. You also meet good friends and
sometimes even relatives!

Coming back to our "Genealogy". If your only concern is to find a record of
your distant relative, the conference may not help you. Instead think of
how you can help other researchers. In order to be successful in "our
field" - Jewish Genealogy, you need to be able to help others. I believe
that this is the key of success in our field. What that supposed to mean?

Everyone with a little experience in genealogical research has photos,
stories about their relatives, friends, about towns they used to live. You
discovered all this by yourself, but some of the information, I am sure,
might be very valuable for a other researchers, digging into the same town,
families. You need to make that information available to others... Post
messages at the Discussion group, write family stories to the website,
remind others of what you are researching, share information with us. Let
other people to know your story. Your sharing information will help others,
and also will help you.

The next conference is in Salt Lake City, and that is a special place for
genealogists. 5-6 years ago, when I was first time in Salt Lake City, I
discovered at the Family Library the numerous microfilms of Bessarabian
Revision Lists. I copied couple of images of my family >from 1848, but
decided that we need to get them all to JewishGen... Can you imagine what
else could be at that same library? I know that LDS put some of the
microfilms online, but not all of them.

So, did I convince you? You also can ask JewishGen, Bessarabia Board to
have a presentation, lecture, which is most interesting to you, and there is
a good chance that your request be granted. Is this not an argument for you
to come?

Please let us know what do you think, and what will make you definitely come
next time to the conference?

To be a successful researcher in Jewish Genealogy you need to share your
information with others, and the conference is great avenue for that.


All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania.


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Conference: 2. Why you need to go to the conference next time? #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear Genealogists,

Let's continue our discussions about the conference. After first posting: "
1. My personal experience at the conference? What I did there?" I have
received a number of replies, but I wish you post your replies to the whole
group. Your opinion is very important.

At the second posting I would try to convince you that you should go to next
conference.

At the very least, these conferences are fun and full of surprises. You
can go to "genealogical" movies, and many of them are treasures. You can
hear a good concert, a Klezmer musician. You also meet good friends and
sometimes even relatives!

Coming back to our "Genealogy". If your only concern is to find a record of
your distant relative, the conference may not help you. Instead think of
how you can help other researchers. In order to be successful in "our
field" - Jewish Genealogy, you need to be able to help others. I believe
that this is the key of success in our field. What that supposed to mean?

Everyone with a little experience in genealogical research has photos,
stories about their relatives, friends, about towns they used to live. You
discovered all this by yourself, but some of the information, I am sure,
might be very valuable for a other researchers, digging into the same town,
families. You need to make that information available to others... Post
messages at the Discussion group, write family stories to the website,
remind others of what you are researching, share information with us. Let
other people to know your story. Your sharing information will help others,
and also will help you.

The next conference is in Salt Lake City, and that is a special place for
genealogists. 5-6 years ago, when I was first time in Salt Lake City, I
discovered at the Family Library the numerous microfilms of Bessarabian
Revision Lists. I copied couple of images of my family >from 1848, but
decided that we need to get them all to JewishGen... Can you imagine what
else could be at that same library? I know that LDS put some of the
microfilms online, but not all of them.

So, did I convince you? You also can ask JewishGen, Bessarabia Board to
have a presentation, lecture, which is most interesting to you, and there is
a good chance that your request be granted. Is this not an argument for you
to come?

Please let us know what do you think, and what will make you definitely come
next time to the conference?

To be a successful researcher in Jewish Genealogy you need to share your
information with others, and the conference is great avenue for that.


All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania.


Immigration papers 1928 #germany

Hanna Grossman <hannakg@...>
 

I have a print of immigration papers of a distant relative whose travels I
would like to disentangle.

The citizenship was obtain NY District Court Eastern District. The copy
I have shows the Petition for naturalization, overlaying various other
related documents.

It looks as if in order to see those documents I will have to go to
NY NARA? or the court?

Can someone tell me which and what the charges might be just to look at them?

Hanna Grossman, Cornwall,Connecticut hannakg@optonline.net


German SIG #Germany Immigration papers 1928 #germany

Hanna Grossman <hannakg@...>
 

I have a print of immigration papers of a distant relative whose travels I
would like to disentangle.

The citizenship was obtain NY District Court Eastern District. The copy
I have shows the Petition for naturalization, overlaying various other
related documents.

It looks as if in order to see those documents I will have to go to
NY NARA? or the court?

Can someone tell me which and what the charges might be just to look at them?

Hanna Grossman, Cornwall,Connecticut hannakg@optonline.net


Re: Rulaven? German Prison? #germany

James
 

Roger,

I'm sure that the Ruhleben internment camp near Berlin was the "Rulaven"
referred to.

Thanks for all your many contributions to the gersig list.

James W. Castellan Rose Valley, PA james.castellan@gmail.com

Roger Lustig (GerSIG) wrote: Try this:


German SIG #Germany Re: Rulaven? German Prison? #germany

James
 

Roger,

I'm sure that the Ruhleben internment camp near Berlin was the "Rulaven"
referred to.

Thanks for all your many contributions to the gersig list.

James W. Castellan Rose Valley, PA james.castellan@gmail.com

Roger Lustig (GerSIG) wrote: Try this:


Re: Rulaven? German Prison? #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Try this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruhleben_internment_camp

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ research coordinator, GerSIG

On 8/21/2013 10:25 AM, James Castellan wrote:
Does anyone recognize "Rulaven", a German prison at the start of WWI?
It may be a misspelling and/or and reference a town the prison was
located near and not the formal name of the prison.


German SIG #Germany Re: Rulaven? German Prison? #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Try this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruhleben_internment_camp

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ research coordinator, GerSIG

On 8/21/2013 10:25 AM, James Castellan wrote:
Does anyone recognize "Rulaven", a German prison at the start of WWI?
It may be a misspelling and/or and reference a town the prison was
located near and not the formal name of the prison.


Searching: POLLOCK in England #general

Berna Heyman
 

A newly 'found' cousin (found through JewishGen Family Finder) and I
are searching for a brother of our mutual great grandfather. The
Poliachek (POLLOCK) family was >from Lida, Belarus.

Dov Ber POLIACHEK and Eida SCHITNITSKY had two sons (David Pollock and Eli
Pollock) and two daughters (Jennie Pollock Goldberg and Sara Pollock) who
emigrated to Chicago. Supposedly, two other sons (Abraham and ?) emigrated to
London.

We are trying to identify that unknown son. We have family stories >from 3
different people claiming there was another son (name unknown) in London. They
think his name might have been: Meier/Morris or Samuel/Solomon/Schume.

Dov Ber Poliachek (1843-1910) of Lida, Belarus and Eida Schitnitsky
(1855-?) had six children:
- David Pollock (1869 Lida, Belarus - 1944 Chicago; i.1890). He was an
active Zionist in Chicago.
- Jennie (Pollock) Goldberg (1873 Lida, Belarus - 1937 Chicago; i.1890)
- Abraham Pollock (1874 Lida, Belarus - 1960 London, Eng, i.bef.1900).
He was a talented cabinet maker.
- Eli Pollock (1874 Lida, Belarus - 1939 Chicago, IL; i.1904). He was
a merchant; owned dry goods store.
- Sara Pollock (1888 Lida, Belarus - 1915 Chicago, IL; i.1901)
- unknown?

We have found some census and immigration records for both a Meier Pollock and
a Schume Pollock with immigration dates within a feasible range but haven't
been able to trace them any further.

The London and Chicago members of the family are meeting, for the first time,
in September and we seek any clues that might connect us to this Pollock
relative. Thank you very much for your suggestions.

Berna Heyman
Williamsburg, VA & Schoharie, NY
Berna.Heyman@gmail.com

Lida: BELITSKY; BOYARSKY; KAGAN; KALMANOWICZ; KUSZIELEWICZ; LEVIN;
POLIACHEK; RATMAN; SZCZYTNICKI; Dubno: KOLTUN


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: POLLOCK in England #general

Berna Heyman
 

A newly 'found' cousin (found through JewishGen Family Finder) and I
are searching for a brother of our mutual great grandfather. The
Poliachek (POLLOCK) family was >from Lida, Belarus.

Dov Ber POLIACHEK and Eida SCHITNITSKY had two sons (David Pollock and Eli
Pollock) and two daughters (Jennie Pollock Goldberg and Sara Pollock) who
emigrated to Chicago. Supposedly, two other sons (Abraham and ?) emigrated to
London.

We are trying to identify that unknown son. We have family stories >from 3
different people claiming there was another son (name unknown) in London. They
think his name might have been: Meier/Morris or Samuel/Solomon/Schume.

Dov Ber Poliachek (1843-1910) of Lida, Belarus and Eida Schitnitsky
(1855-?) had six children:
- David Pollock (1869 Lida, Belarus - 1944 Chicago; i.1890). He was an
active Zionist in Chicago.
- Jennie (Pollock) Goldberg (1873 Lida, Belarus - 1937 Chicago; i.1890)
- Abraham Pollock (1874 Lida, Belarus - 1960 London, Eng, i.bef.1900).
He was a talented cabinet maker.
- Eli Pollock (1874 Lida, Belarus - 1939 Chicago, IL; i.1904). He was
a merchant; owned dry goods store.
- Sara Pollock (1888 Lida, Belarus - 1915 Chicago, IL; i.1901)
- unknown?

We have found some census and immigration records for both a Meier Pollock and
a Schume Pollock with immigration dates within a feasible range but haven't
been able to trace them any further.

The London and Chicago members of the family are meeting, for the first time,
in September and we seek any clues that might connect us to this Pollock
relative. Thank you very much for your suggestions.

Berna Heyman
Williamsburg, VA & Schoharie, NY
Berna.Heyman@gmail.com

Lida: BELITSKY; BOYARSKY; KAGAN; KALMANOWICZ; KUSZIELEWICZ; LEVIN;
POLIACHEK; RATMAN; SZCZYTNICKI; Dubno: KOLTUN


Re: Name change registery USA? #general

Jeanne Gold <Family@...>
 

And I would add much later than that. My paternal grandparents, Ruben Gold
(born 1912) and Rebecca Sarfatty (born 1917) married 1935 with no formal
name changes as Robert Gold and Lemay Sarfatty. Their son/my father, born
1936, was named Edward Myer and he married with the name E. Mark in 1956 --
again with no formal name change. I was born Val in 1957 and changed my
name in 1969 to Jeanne -- no formal name change.

In 1970 my grandparents applied for passports and were told their name
change was legal due to common usage. When I applied for a passport in
1973, I was told the same thing. Presumably my father was told the same as
I've seen his passport.

I would hazard a guess that going to court to legally change one's name in
a formal manner is only a recently enforced requirement and was not
strictly enforced prior to the 1990's. Or maybe not until 9/11.

I pick that date because my son, born 1983, changed his name as well and
once again no formal court process used and he too has a passport.

Jeanne Gold
Albany, OR

Also it bears repeating ... prior to the 1900s (and I personally would say
the 1930s) few if any name changes were legally issued. So you might try
the research but don't be surprised if you can not find it. Also if they
went to the legal process the court required a legal notice in a newspaper.
The one I found >from 1940 the legal notice was in a legal newspaper (not
The New York Times) but a newspaper search might be a starting point
especially if the newspaper is on line.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Name change registery USA? #general

Jeanne Gold <Family@...>
 

And I would add much later than that. My paternal grandparents, Ruben Gold
(born 1912) and Rebecca Sarfatty (born 1917) married 1935 with no formal
name changes as Robert Gold and Lemay Sarfatty. Their son/my father, born
1936, was named Edward Myer and he married with the name E. Mark in 1956 --
again with no formal name change. I was born Val in 1957 and changed my
name in 1969 to Jeanne -- no formal name change.

In 1970 my grandparents applied for passports and were told their name
change was legal due to common usage. When I applied for a passport in
1973, I was told the same thing. Presumably my father was told the same as
I've seen his passport.

I would hazard a guess that going to court to legally change one's name in
a formal manner is only a recently enforced requirement and was not
strictly enforced prior to the 1990's. Or maybe not until 9/11.

I pick that date because my son, born 1983, changed his name as well and
once again no formal court process used and he too has a passport.

Jeanne Gold
Albany, OR

Also it bears repeating ... prior to the 1900s (and I personally would say
the 1930s) few if any name changes were legally issued. So you might try
the research but don't be surprised if you can not find it. Also if they
went to the legal process the court required a legal notice in a newspaper.
The one I found >from 1940 the legal notice was in a legal newspaper (not
The New York Times) but a newspaper search might be a starting point
especially if the newspaper is on line.


JAPHET in Houston, Texas #general

Susan Edel
 

Can anyone please help me. I have found an Isidore JAPHET born on 3rd
November 1842 in Breitenbach, near Kassel, Germany who died on 24th December
1895 in Houston, Texas, USA. I am sure he is part of my family as all my
Japhet family came >from Breitenbach. However, I can find no record of his
parents' names in order to be able to find where he connects to my family.

Does anyone have any idea how I could find this information? I have
contacted the Glenwood Cemetery where he is buried, but they do not seem to
be able to help.

Thanks in advance,
Susan EDEL, Petach Tikva, Israel
(researching JAPHET, FEUCHTWANGER, BING, SCHWAB all >from Germany)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JAPHET in Houston, Texas #general

Susan Edel
 

Can anyone please help me. I have found an Isidore JAPHET born on 3rd
November 1842 in Breitenbach, near Kassel, Germany who died on 24th December
1895 in Houston, Texas, USA. I am sure he is part of my family as all my
Japhet family came >from Breitenbach. However, I can find no record of his
parents' names in order to be able to find where he connects to my family.

Does anyone have any idea how I could find this information? I have
contacted the Glenwood Cemetery where he is buried, but they do not seem to
be able to help.

Thanks in advance,
Susan EDEL, Petach Tikva, Israel
(researching JAPHET, FEUCHTWANGER, BING, SCHWAB all >from Germany)


Re: Descendants of Samuel & Esther NIEFIELD/NEIFELD/NAJFELD #general

Apollo Israel <apollo@...>
 

Last week I posted a request for help to find the descendants of a couple
called Samuel and Esther NIEFIELD/NEIFELD (originally Schulem and Estera
NAJFELD) who migrated >from Poland to the U.S. in the first decade of the
20th century and seemed to have settled either in Philadelphia or in New
Jersey. Several very kind JewishGenners offered me significant information,
tips and links that enabled me to establish that the family I wanted was the
New Jersey one, and to contact their living descendants.

I am overjoyed to tell you that we are now corresponding and the family has
confirmed that they are my distant cousins! I am also overjoyed to say that
they solved a decades-old mystery that had been driving me mad, telling me
who the unidentified people are in some old photos we have >from these relatives
in the U.S. (they turned out to be their parents/grandparents/uncles/cousins).

I have thanked everyone who helped me privately, but must give a public
shout-out to Sherri, who gave me the link to the Passaic County
naturalization records, which enabled me to establish that Schulem and
Samuel were the same person, and particularly to Bette, who really went to
phenomenal lengths for me, supplying me with documents, advice and links
that enabled me to find the family (who are now spread all over the U.S.).

For those JewishGenners who live in the U.S., the available (and I have to
say abundant) genealogical sources may seem obvious to you, but for those of
us who have never really had to research anyone in the U.S. before, things
are not so clear or obvious, and I never would have found some of this
information of my own accord. So thank you to everyone!

Of course, none of this would have been possible without JewishGen (and, I
must say, JRI-Poland too), so a very public thank you to both organizations.

Finally, some of you may be amused to hear that it was only recently that I
learned that these relatives had settled in Paterson, N.J.. My mother always
told me that they had settled in Pittsburgh, and I spent an inordinate
amount of time trying to find something in the records there, to no avail.

Pittsburgh, Paterson -- I guess, >from half a world away in the pre-Internet
age, there didn't seem to be much difference between them!

Wishing all of you a Shana Tova and a joyful year to come,

Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana, Israel.

Researching:
BULWAR/BULWER/BULWA, PELTZMAN (Rawa Mazowiecka, Lodz); FRENKIEL, FERLIPTER
(Belz); KALUSZYNER,KUSMIERSKI,KASZKIET (Kaluszyn, Lodz);KUZKA,RZETELNY,
SIENNICKI, WROBEL (Kaluszyn); KRYSKA, LICHTENSZTAJN (Wyszogrod, Sieradz, Lodz);
WAKS, BEKER, BERKOWICZ, ENGEL (Nowe Miasto nad Pilica); ROZENBERG, WEISKOPF
(Przedborz); GOLDSZTEJN (Lodz; family of Szmerel & Itta nee ZYMERVOGEL, both
d. WWII); BORNSZTAJN (Lodz; family of Moshe Hersz,1879-1942).


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Descendants of Samuel & Esther NIEFIELD/NEIFELD/NAJFELD #general

Apollo Israel <apollo@...>
 

Last week I posted a request for help to find the descendants of a couple
called Samuel and Esther NIEFIELD/NEIFELD (originally Schulem and Estera
NAJFELD) who migrated >from Poland to the U.S. in the first decade of the
20th century and seemed to have settled either in Philadelphia or in New
Jersey. Several very kind JewishGenners offered me significant information,
tips and links that enabled me to establish that the family I wanted was the
New Jersey one, and to contact their living descendants.

I am overjoyed to tell you that we are now corresponding and the family has
confirmed that they are my distant cousins! I am also overjoyed to say that
they solved a decades-old mystery that had been driving me mad, telling me
who the unidentified people are in some old photos we have >from these relatives
in the U.S. (they turned out to be their parents/grandparents/uncles/cousins).

I have thanked everyone who helped me privately, but must give a public
shout-out to Sherri, who gave me the link to the Passaic County
naturalization records, which enabled me to establish that Schulem and
Samuel were the same person, and particularly to Bette, who really went to
phenomenal lengths for me, supplying me with documents, advice and links
that enabled me to find the family (who are now spread all over the U.S.).

For those JewishGenners who live in the U.S., the available (and I have to
say abundant) genealogical sources may seem obvious to you, but for those of
us who have never really had to research anyone in the U.S. before, things
are not so clear or obvious, and I never would have found some of this
information of my own accord. So thank you to everyone!

Of course, none of this would have been possible without JewishGen (and, I
must say, JRI-Poland too), so a very public thank you to both organizations.

Finally, some of you may be amused to hear that it was only recently that I
learned that these relatives had settled in Paterson, N.J.. My mother always
told me that they had settled in Pittsburgh, and I spent an inordinate
amount of time trying to find something in the records there, to no avail.

Pittsburgh, Paterson -- I guess, >from half a world away in the pre-Internet
age, there didn't seem to be much difference between them!

Wishing all of you a Shana Tova and a joyful year to come,

Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana, Israel.

Researching:
BULWAR/BULWER/BULWA, PELTZMAN (Rawa Mazowiecka, Lodz); FRENKIEL, FERLIPTER
(Belz); KALUSZYNER,KUSMIERSKI,KASZKIET (Kaluszyn, Lodz);KUZKA,RZETELNY,
SIENNICKI, WROBEL (Kaluszyn); KRYSKA, LICHTENSZTAJN (Wyszogrod, Sieradz, Lodz);
WAKS, BEKER, BERKOWICZ, ENGEL (Nowe Miasto nad Pilica); ROZENBERG, WEISKOPF
(Przedborz); GOLDSZTEJN (Lodz; family of Szmerel & Itta nee ZYMERVOGEL, both
d. WWII); BORNSZTAJN (Lodz; family of Moshe Hersz,1879-1942).

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