Date   

Re: inconcistent Ancestry results #dna

Sarah L Meyer
 

David,
This is not unique to Ancestry, it is because unless the two siblings are
identical twins they have different DNA. They each inherited 50% >from each
parent, but it is a different 50% mix. That is why we test siblings because
the matches are different and we get new places to test.
Sarah Meyer


Re: dna digest: September 29, 2018 #dna

Sandy Crystall
 

David-
We inherit different proportions of DNA >from our two parents --that is
why it is so important to test siblings. >from matches on different
sides of my family, I can see that my sister has more DNA >from our
maternal side than I do, and thus has stronger matches on that side as
a consequence. I can see that in cousins who have tested -- some more
closely match the side of the family through which we are related.

Hope this is helpful. There are articles online that address this -
perhaps someone else will post some links.

Best
Sandy Crystall
New Hampshire, USA


DNA Research #DNA RE:inconcistent Ancestry results #dna

Sarah L Meyer
 

David,
This is not unique to Ancestry, it is because unless the two siblings are
identical twins they have different DNA. They each inherited 50% >from each
parent, but it is a different 50% mix. That is why we test siblings because
the matches are different and we get new places to test.
Sarah Meyer


DNA Research #DNA Re: dna digest: September 29, 2018 #dna

Sandy Crystall
 

David-
We inherit different proportions of DNA >from our two parents --that is
why it is so important to test siblings. >from matches on different
sides of my family, I can see that my sister has more DNA >from our
maternal side than I do, and thus has stronger matches on that side as
a consequence. I can see that in cousins who have tested -- some more
closely match the side of the family through which we are related.

Hope this is helpful. There are articles online that address this -
perhaps someone else will post some links.

Best
Sandy Crystall
New Hampshire, USA


Re: Inconsistent Ancestry Results #dna

David Ellis
 

This is a perfect example of recombination affecting the DNA matches between
him and his second cousins twice removed. He is related to one of their two
parents (say, for the sake of argument, their mother). Each of the two
sisters inherited randomly chosen segments amounting to half of their
mother's DNA, but they inherited different amounts of the segments of her
DNA that matched him.

---
David J Ellis
Natick, MA 01760
djemkitso@verizon.net


DNA Research #DNA RE: Inconsistent Ancestry Results #dna

David Ellis
 

This is a perfect example of recombination affecting the DNA matches between
him and his second cousins twice removed. He is related to one of their two
parents (say, for the sake of argument, their mother). Each of the two
sisters inherited randomly chosen segments amounting to half of their
mother's DNA, but they inherited different amounts of the segments of her
DNA that matched him.

---
David J Ellis
Natick, MA 01760
djemkitso@verizon.net


Re: Inconsistent Ancestry Results #dna

Dorann Cafaro
 

Not so confusing if you stop and think about the fact each of us
inherits some DNA >from each parent and it is specific to us. So your
sibling would have inherited a different mix of DNA than you - some
from your mother & some >from your father but different >from you. Yes
very similar but different. Than consider that each generation back
that mix would have been different again thus one distant mix might be
closer to your mix and one mix closer to some other relative.

The good news is they inherited some on many of the same segments thus
a strong match.

Dorann Cafaro

From: "David Goldman" <lugman@verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 29 Sep 2018 20:49:47 -0400

Greetings, all. Here is something I don't understand. Ancestry shows a young
relative whose great-great grandmother was an elder sister to my
grandfather. She is a "very high match" (49 centimorgans shared across 7 DNA
segments) whereas her own sister shows as an "extremely high match" (72
centimorgans shared across 8 DNA segments). I am stumped why two siblings
would not have the same match numbers. The more I get into this the more
confusing it gets!


DNA Research #DNA Re: Inconsistent Ancestry Results #dna

Dorann Cafaro
 

Not so confusing if you stop and think about the fact each of us
inherits some DNA >from each parent and it is specific to us. So your
sibling would have inherited a different mix of DNA than you - some
from your mother & some >from your father but different >from you. Yes
very similar but different. Than consider that each generation back
that mix would have been different again thus one distant mix might be
closer to your mix and one mix closer to some other relative.

The good news is they inherited some on many of the same segments thus
a strong match.

Dorann Cafaro

From: "David Goldman" <lugman@verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 29 Sep 2018 20:49:47 -0400

Greetings, all. Here is something I don't understand. Ancestry shows a young
relative whose great-great grandmother was an elder sister to my
grandfather. She is a "very high match" (49 centimorgans shared across 7 DNA
segments) whereas her own sister shows as an "extremely high match" (72
centimorgans shared across 8 DNA segments). I am stumped why two siblings
would not have the same match numbers. The more I get into this the more
confusing it gets!


HEINZE area Johannisburg (eastprussia) and Unna #germany

Mike Redel <redel.mike@...>
 

Dear gersigs,

I'm searching vor Arthur HEINZE. I don't know where he came from
but I have read that many Heinzes came >from Breslau.

Arthur HEINZE (Jewish) was married to Ottilie Haraschensk (nonjewish)
born 13.02.1880 in Johannisburg (Eastprussia). Both have had 3 sons.
Heinz was born 26.06.1912 in Unna, Hans was born 18.10.1916 in Unna
and Arthur was born 03.06.1919 in Unna.

Hans is missed in the II WW since 05.10.1945.

The life of them in Unna is not clear. Arthur (father) established a
store in Unna 1901 - nothing more! His son Heinz was the owner of this
store in 1946.

I think that the father died before 1939 because I could not find him
in the census 1939. Has anyone informations for me about this family?

Regards, Mike Redel, Unna - Germany redel.mike@gmail.com


German SIG #Germany HEINZE area Johannisburg (eastprussia) and Unna #germany

Mike Redel <redel.mike@...>
 

Dear gersigs,

I'm searching vor Arthur HEINZE. I don't know where he came from
but I have read that many Heinzes came >from Breslau.

Arthur HEINZE (Jewish) was married to Ottilie Haraschensk (nonjewish)
born 13.02.1880 in Johannisburg (Eastprussia). Both have had 3 sons.
Heinz was born 26.06.1912 in Unna, Hans was born 18.10.1916 in Unna
and Arthur was born 03.06.1919 in Unna.

Hans is missed in the II WW since 05.10.1945.

The life of them in Unna is not clear. Arthur (father) established a
store in Unna 1901 - nothing more! His son Heinz was the owner of this
store in 1946.

I think that the father died before 1939 because I could not find him
in the census 1939. Has anyone informations for me about this family?

Regards, Mike Redel, Unna - Germany redel.mike@gmail.com


Mt. Carmel Cemetery, Philadelphia #ukraine

bevhaas@...
 

I am looking for Lois Sernoff's list of names of the Hordisher Wilsher
Lodge Burial Lodge buried at Mt. Carmel. Any help would be
appreciated. Beverly Haas

--
---
Beverly Haas
bevhaas@gmail.com


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Mt. Carmel Cemetery, Philadelphia #ukraine

bevhaas@...
 

I am looking for Lois Sernoff's list of names of the Hordisher Wilsher
Lodge Burial Lodge buried at Mt. Carmel. Any help would be
appreciated. Beverly Haas

--
---
Beverly Haas
bevhaas@gmail.com


Re: Vilnius to Kherson And Back in the 19th Century? #ukraine

osachy@...
 

Hello Adam,

May I respectfully suggest the possibility that you are on the wrong
track. The surname Kherson may indeed indicate a connection to the
province (or the town) of the same name. That's surely worth checking
out, as it appears you are doing. But there is a second possible
origin of the surname name that you also ought to consider.

Kherson, like many similar names, could just as well derive >from a
Hebrew acronym. Do you have any documentation of how this surname was
spelled by your family in Hebrew characters? Kherson the province
would normally have been spelled with an initial chaf, but Kherson the
acronym with a chet.

With a chet this acronym would stand for "CHatan Reb S--- N---,"
meaning the son-in-law of Mr. S--- N----. For example, a man who was
married to a woman whose father's name was Shmuel Nosson could very
well have been assigned the surname Kherson. There are actually a
whole bunch of different Jewish surnames that were given in this way.

Good luck,

Rabbi David Osachy



On 9/26/18, Adam Cherson adam.cherson@gmail.com
<ukraine@lyris.jewishgen.org> wrote:
Dear Fellow Researchers,

I am just beginning to unravel the story of my great grandfather Shmuel
haCohen Kherson. He raised his family >from about 1895 to 1925 in
Dieveniskes (not far >from Vilna to the South; on the border with
Belarus). Many advisers have suggested that this surname seems to
resemble the name of Kherson Oblast and I know there was quite a bit of
migration >from Eastern Belarus and Southern Lithuania to Kherson (North
to South) which was a kind of economic hotspot due to its agriculture
(especially sugar beets) and ports. So let me presume then that the
surname is perhaps a truncated version of Khersonsky.

My question is what might be the scenario whereby he winds up south of
Vilna with the Kherson surname?

One possibility I am examining is that perhaps his earlier ancestors
were >from the Dieveniskes area originally (I mean after having arrived
there much earlier >from Eastern Poland) and that one of these migrated
to Kherson as part of the Jewish incentives, and then for some reason he
returned to Dieveniskes, perhaps due to a marriage prospect.

Another possibility is that his ancestor migrated southeast >from eastern
Poland through Western Ukraine into Kherson and then due to some family
connections in the Dieveniskies area, and a marriage prospect there he
migrated north. I have some evidence that members of his extended family
who registered in Dieveniskes in 1858 were merchants in Kherson
province.

As a related side note, does anyone know what would have been the most
traveled route for merchants and goods between, say, Stanislav (on the
Black Sea) and Vilna? Would that have been using the Dnieper River to
Orsha and then West by wagon >from there, or the Dnieper to Kiev and by
wagon >from there, or even all the way by wagon through Minsk, or
something else?

Any thoughts based on your own experiences are welcomed and appreciated.

I would be glad to do my own research if anyone has any books I may
reference about this particular migration pattern >from South to North.

General historical comments may be posted here. For more detailed
discussions please contact me privately.

Thanks,
Adam Cherson


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Vilnius to Kherson And Back in the 19th Century? #ukraine

osachy@...
 

Hello Adam,

May I respectfully suggest the possibility that you are on the wrong
track. The surname Kherson may indeed indicate a connection to the
province (or the town) of the same name. That's surely worth checking
out, as it appears you are doing. But there is a second possible
origin of the surname name that you also ought to consider.

Kherson, like many similar names, could just as well derive >from a
Hebrew acronym. Do you have any documentation of how this surname was
spelled by your family in Hebrew characters? Kherson the province
would normally have been spelled with an initial chaf, but Kherson the
acronym with a chet.

With a chet this acronym would stand for "CHatan Reb S--- N---,"
meaning the son-in-law of Mr. S--- N----. For example, a man who was
married to a woman whose father's name was Shmuel Nosson could very
well have been assigned the surname Kherson. There are actually a
whole bunch of different Jewish surnames that were given in this way.

Good luck,

Rabbi David Osachy



On 9/26/18, Adam Cherson adam.cherson@gmail.com
<ukraine@lyris.jewishgen.org> wrote:
Dear Fellow Researchers,

I am just beginning to unravel the story of my great grandfather Shmuel
haCohen Kherson. He raised his family >from about 1895 to 1925 in
Dieveniskes (not far >from Vilna to the South; on the border with
Belarus). Many advisers have suggested that this surname seems to
resemble the name of Kherson Oblast and I know there was quite a bit of
migration >from Eastern Belarus and Southern Lithuania to Kherson (North
to South) which was a kind of economic hotspot due to its agriculture
(especially sugar beets) and ports. So let me presume then that the
surname is perhaps a truncated version of Khersonsky.

My question is what might be the scenario whereby he winds up south of
Vilna with the Kherson surname?

One possibility I am examining is that perhaps his earlier ancestors
were >from the Dieveniskes area originally (I mean after having arrived
there much earlier >from Eastern Poland) and that one of these migrated
to Kherson as part of the Jewish incentives, and then for some reason he
returned to Dieveniskes, perhaps due to a marriage prospect.

Another possibility is that his ancestor migrated southeast >from eastern
Poland through Western Ukraine into Kherson and then due to some family
connections in the Dieveniskies area, and a marriage prospect there he
migrated north. I have some evidence that members of his extended family
who registered in Dieveniskes in 1858 were merchants in Kherson
province.

As a related side note, does anyone know what would have been the most
traveled route for merchants and goods between, say, Stanislav (on the
Black Sea) and Vilna? Would that have been using the Dnieper River to
Orsha and then West by wagon >from there, or the Dnieper to Kiev and by
wagon >from there, or even all the way by wagon through Minsk, or
something else?

Any thoughts based on your own experiences are welcomed and appreciated.

I would be glad to do my own research if anyone has any books I may
reference about this particular migration pattern >from South to North.

General historical comments may be posted here. For more detailed
discussions please contact me privately.

Thanks,
Adam Cherson


IGRA Heshvan Event - Communities That Will Never Be Forgotten #general

eyal-IGRA <eyal@...>
 

Each year in conjunction with the International Jewish Genealogy
Month-http://www.iajgs.org/blog/ijgm/, IGRA hosts our Heshvan Event. Don’t
miss your opportunity to meet up with IGRA members and others in the
genealogy community, pay tribute to our fantastic team of volunteers,
congratulate those receiving special awards and hear a variety of lectures.
This year the IGRA Heshvan Event will be held at the National Library of
Israel on the Givat Ram campus of Hebrew University in Jerusalem -
http://www.huji.ac.il/huji/maps/givatramCampus.htm, October 18, 2018 – 9
Heshvan 5779. Our day begins at 09:30 and will last until 16:00. During the
Opening Session we will be honoring our volunteers and presenting awards to
two institutions and two of the volunteers will receive the Mathilde Tagger
Prize of Recognition For Volunteering With IGRA
Databases-https://genealogy.org.il/recognize/. As you look at the schedule
you will notice that most of the lectures are offered in pairs – one in
English and the other in Hebrew – allowing you to choose the lecture of most
interest to you for each session.
Also note that we are offering a “behind the scenes” tour of the National
Library. On the registration form it is necessary to designate your desire
to join this tour and the language you prefer (English or Hebrew).
The schedule and descriptions of the lectures follow as well as a short
introduction of our speakers. REGISTER
TODAY-https://www.eventbrite.com/e/heshvan-event-tickets-50556180898?utm_campaign=new_event_email&utm_medium=email&utm_source=eb_email&utm_term=viewmyevent_button
to guarantee your place with us for a day commemorating “Communities That
Will Never Be Forgotten”. Fee for paid 2018 IGRA members – 50 NIS; Fee for
non-members – 70 NIS. (If you are not sure if you are a paid member, please
send a message to: webmaster@genealogy.org.il and we will clarify your
status and get back to you.)
Schedule:
9:30-10:00 – registration
10:00-10:30 – Opening session and recognition of our volunteers
10:30-11:15 – 2 parallel lectures:
“The DNA of the Jewish People”, Max Blankfeld, FamilyTree DNA, English
“Digital Memories >from Fez, Morocco”, Einat Levi, Hebrew
11:15-11:30 – refreshment break
11:30-12:15 – 2 parallel lectures:
“All Roads Lead to Eretz Israel”, Rose Feldman, English
“>from Family Research to Community Preservation, the Case of the Jewry of
Nabel, Tunisia”, Dr. Victor Hayoun, Hebrew
12:15-13:30 – lunch break
13:30-14:15 – Library tour (on event registration be sure to sign up for the
tour with your language preference – English or Hebrew – sections will open
depending on demand)
14:15-15:00 – 2 parallel lectures:
“Remember Our Ancestors: Vilkaviskis, Lithuania”, Ralph Salinger, English
“’Kala’ – My book describing our family story”, Ora Ahimeir, Hebrew
15:00-15:15 – coffee break
15:15-16:00 – “The Jon Stedman/Kelly Moore Adoption Story”, Karen Franklin,
English

Directions:
Due to very dense parking lots, it is recommended to use public
transportation, there are few options:
The new train >from Ben Gurion airport to Jerusalem, and buses # 68,14 to
Givat Ram.
Any bus to Jerusalem central station, and buses # 68,14 to Givat Ram.
Bus # 100 >from Shafirim parking lot, to Givat Ram
For more information about the lectures and the event -
https://genealogy.org.il/2018/09/27/its-almost-time-for-the-annual-igra-heshvan-event/
REGISTER NOW -
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/heshvan-event-tickets-50556180898?utm_campaign=new_event_email&utm_medium=email&utm_source=eb_email&utm_term=viewmyevent_button

We look forward to meeting you at the event.
Chag Sameach

Eyal Hollander
Event committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen IGRA Heshvan Event - Communities That Will Never Be Forgotten #general

eyal-IGRA <eyal@...>
 

Each year in conjunction with the International Jewish Genealogy
Month-http://www.iajgs.org/blog/ijgm/, IGRA hosts our Heshvan Event. Don’t
miss your opportunity to meet up with IGRA members and others in the
genealogy community, pay tribute to our fantastic team of volunteers,
congratulate those receiving special awards and hear a variety of lectures.
This year the IGRA Heshvan Event will be held at the National Library of
Israel on the Givat Ram campus of Hebrew University in Jerusalem -
http://www.huji.ac.il/huji/maps/givatramCampus.htm, October 18, 2018 – 9
Heshvan 5779. Our day begins at 09:30 and will last until 16:00. During the
Opening Session we will be honoring our volunteers and presenting awards to
two institutions and two of the volunteers will receive the Mathilde Tagger
Prize of Recognition For Volunteering With IGRA
Databases-https://genealogy.org.il/recognize/. As you look at the schedule
you will notice that most of the lectures are offered in pairs – one in
English and the other in Hebrew – allowing you to choose the lecture of most
interest to you for each session.
Also note that we are offering a “behind the scenes” tour of the National
Library. On the registration form it is necessary to designate your desire
to join this tour and the language you prefer (English or Hebrew).
The schedule and descriptions of the lectures follow as well as a short
introduction of our speakers. REGISTER
TODAY-https://www.eventbrite.com/e/heshvan-event-tickets-50556180898?utm_campaign=new_event_email&utm_medium=email&utm_source=eb_email&utm_term=viewmyevent_button
to guarantee your place with us for a day commemorating “Communities That
Will Never Be Forgotten”. Fee for paid 2018 IGRA members – 50 NIS; Fee for
non-members – 70 NIS. (If you are not sure if you are a paid member, please
send a message to: webmaster@genealogy.org.il and we will clarify your
status and get back to you.)
Schedule:
9:30-10:00 – registration
10:00-10:30 – Opening session and recognition of our volunteers
10:30-11:15 – 2 parallel lectures:
“The DNA of the Jewish People”, Max Blankfeld, FamilyTree DNA, English
“Digital Memories >from Fez, Morocco”, Einat Levi, Hebrew
11:15-11:30 – refreshment break
11:30-12:15 – 2 parallel lectures:
“All Roads Lead to Eretz Israel”, Rose Feldman, English
“>from Family Research to Community Preservation, the Case of the Jewry of
Nabel, Tunisia”, Dr. Victor Hayoun, Hebrew
12:15-13:30 – lunch break
13:30-14:15 – Library tour (on event registration be sure to sign up for the
tour with your language preference – English or Hebrew – sections will open
depending on demand)
14:15-15:00 – 2 parallel lectures:
“Remember Our Ancestors: Vilkaviskis, Lithuania”, Ralph Salinger, English
“’Kala’ – My book describing our family story”, Ora Ahimeir, Hebrew
15:00-15:15 – coffee break
15:15-16:00 – “The Jon Stedman/Kelly Moore Adoption Story”, Karen Franklin,
English

Directions:
Due to very dense parking lots, it is recommended to use public
transportation, there are few options:
The new train >from Ben Gurion airport to Jerusalem, and buses # 68,14 to
Givat Ram.
Any bus to Jerusalem central station, and buses # 68,14 to Givat Ram.
Bus # 100 >from Shafirim parking lot, to Givat Ram
For more information about the lectures and the event -
https://genealogy.org.il/2018/09/27/its-almost-time-for-the-annual-igra-heshvan-event/
REGISTER NOW -
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/heshvan-event-tickets-50556180898?utm_campaign=new_event_email&utm_medium=email&utm_source=eb_email&utm_term=viewmyevent_button

We look forward to meeting you at the event.
Chag Sameach

Eyal Hollander
Event committee


Family Name Nagrocki from Vilkija #lithuania

Andrea Nicki <nicandr4@...>
 

Hi, I'm trying to find out more information about my grandfather
John Nagrocki who was born in Vilkija, Lithuanian in 1898 and
arrived in NY in 1913. It's hard finding information about his
parents. He had a brother, Jurgis (husband of Rose Karnovsky)
and a sister Josephine (wife of John Gailus) who arrived in IL.

He may have had other siblings. I am wondering if there are
any other people out there who have my relatives in their trees.
It seems he was part Jewish as I have some European Jewish
ethnicity. I'm also interested in learning more about his family
name Nagrocki, also spelled Nagrodzki.

Thanks, Andrea Nicki


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Family Name Nagrocki from Vilkija #lithuania

Andrea Nicki <nicandr4@...>
 

Hi, I'm trying to find out more information about my grandfather
John Nagrocki who was born in Vilkija, Lithuanian in 1898 and
arrived in NY in 1913. It's hard finding information about his
parents. He had a brother, Jurgis (husband of Rose Karnovsky)
and a sister Josephine (wife of John Gailus) who arrived in IL.

He may have had other siblings. I am wondering if there are
any other people out there who have my relatives in their trees.
It seems he was part Jewish as I have some European Jewish
ethnicity. I'm also interested in learning more about his family
name Nagrocki, also spelled Nagrodzki.

Thanks, Andrea Nicki


Panevezys area 7 new files have been added to the Panevezys DRG site. #lithuania

Salinger Ralph
 

Dear Researchers,

If you are searching for your family in the Panevezys area 7 new files have
been added to the Panevezys District Research Group (DRG) site.

They are:

Linkuva 1897Rabbi Electors Lists
Pumpenai 1907-1913 Electors
Zeimelis 1868 Taxpayers unable to pay
Pamusis 1906 -1907 Electors
Pasvalys 1915 Rabbi Electors
Panevezys District 1915 Certificates
Panevezys District 1909 Rabbi Electors

These files will be publicly searchable in the ALD in 18 months' time !

I am hoping that if you do not belong to our group you will join !
Just go to
https://www.litvaksig.org/membership-and-contributions/join-and-contribute/

Ralph
Coordinator Panevezys District Research Group
salinger@kfar-ruppin.org.il



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Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Panevezys area 7 new files have been added to the Panevezys DRG site. #lithuania

Salinger Ralph
 

Dear Researchers,

If you are searching for your family in the Panevezys area 7 new files have
been added to the Panevezys District Research Group (DRG) site.

They are:

Linkuva 1897Rabbi Electors Lists
Pumpenai 1907-1913 Electors
Zeimelis 1868 Taxpayers unable to pay
Pamusis 1906 -1907 Electors
Pasvalys 1915 Rabbi Electors
Panevezys District 1915 Certificates
Panevezys District 1909 Rabbi Electors

These files will be publicly searchable in the ALD in 18 months' time !

I am hoping that if you do not belong to our group you will join !
Just go to
https://www.litvaksig.org/membership-and-contributions/join-and-contribute/

Ralph
Coordinator Panevezys District Research Group
salinger@kfar-ruppin.org.il



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