Date   

For the Kaunas area 13 New Files added this week ! #lithuania

Salinger Ralph
 

If you are researching your family in the area of the Kaunas Gubernia
and you are not yet part of the Kaunas District Research group, perhaps
now is the time to join.

I have just added 13 new files for the period 1850 to 1860 . These
are both tax-payers and real estate owners.

The towns are Ariogala, Cekiske Dotnuva, Josvainiai, Kedainiai,
Krakes, Kedainiai, Rumsiskes, Seredzius Veliuona, , and Zeimiai.
A feast of information.

This material will only be uploaded to the ALD in 18 months !
To become part of the DRG, go to
https://www.litvaksig.org/membership-and-contributions/join-and-contribute/
Click on "Research Groups for Districts and Gubernias" and click on Kaunas

If you need any more general information I am just an e-mail away.

Finally thanks to so many members of our group who "dug deeply" into their
pockets to make this possible.

Ralph Salinger
Coordinator Kaunas District Research Group
salinger@kfar-ruppin.org.il


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania For the Kaunas area 13 New Files added this week ! #lithuania

Salinger Ralph
 

If you are researching your family in the area of the Kaunas Gubernia
and you are not yet part of the Kaunas District Research group, perhaps
now is the time to join.

I have just added 13 new files for the period 1850 to 1860 . These
are both tax-payers and real estate owners.

The towns are Ariogala, Cekiske Dotnuva, Josvainiai, Kedainiai,
Krakes, Kedainiai, Rumsiskes, Seredzius Veliuona, , and Zeimiai.
A feast of information.

This material will only be uploaded to the ALD in 18 months !
To become part of the DRG, go to
https://www.litvaksig.org/membership-and-contributions/join-and-contribute/
Click on "Research Groups for Districts and Gubernias" and click on Kaunas

If you need any more general information I am just an e-mail away.

Finally thanks to so many members of our group who "dug deeply" into their
pockets to make this possible.

Ralph Salinger
Coordinator Kaunas District Research Group
salinger@kfar-ruppin.org.il


Stanislaw & Komargorod #poland

Ania H M <wprost2001@...>
 

Hi, are there basic records available >from Stanislaw & Komargorod ?

I would also be interested to translate records >from Polish to
English >from these towns.

Ania


JRI Poland #Poland Stanislaw & Komargorod #poland

Ania H M <wprost2001@...>
 

Hi, are there basic records available >from Stanislaw & Komargorod ?

I would also be interested to translate records >from Polish to
English >from these towns.

Ania


Newly translated book on the Holocaust in Hungary #hungary

cia@...
 

I wanted to inform the h-sig group regarding a newly translated (into English) book
â??How It Happenedâ??. Written in 1945 by Erno Munkacsi it details the anguished
decisions made by Jewish leaders during the days leading up to and during the
Holocaust in Hungary. Written (in Hungarian) well before the great scholar of the
Hungarian Holocaust, the recently deceased Randolph Braham published his monumental
works, this richly annotated English translation is published by McGill-Queen's
University Press.


Happy Chanukah to all,

Catherine Adam
Toronto, Canada

Moderator: This is a one-time message regarding a commercial publication of interest to
Hungarian researchers.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Newly translated book on the Holocaust in Hungary #hungary

cia@...
 

I wanted to inform the h-sig group regarding a newly translated (into English) book
â??How It Happenedâ??. Written in 1945 by Erno Munkacsi it details the anguished
decisions made by Jewish leaders during the days leading up to and during the
Holocaust in Hungary. Written (in Hungarian) well before the great scholar of the
Hungarian Holocaust, the recently deceased Randolph Braham published his monumental
works, this richly annotated English translation is published by McGill-Queen's
University Press.


Happy Chanukah to all,

Catherine Adam
Toronto, Canada

Moderator: This is a one-time message regarding a commercial publication of interest to
Hungarian researchers.


Marmor (Mermelstein) family Canada #general

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with the family of Atara (nee Feuerwerker) and
Maury Marmor who were paernts of Shlomo Marmor and. Gila Yaffe

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR: Private responses only please.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Marmor (Mermelstein) family Canada #general

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with the family of Atara (nee Feuerwerker) and
Maury Marmor who were paernts of Shlomo Marmor and. Gila Yaffe

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR: Private responses only please.


This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #general

Bruce Drake <BDrake@...>
 

"An explosion in the forest" >from the Yizkor book of Rafalovka in northern Ukraine,
is one of many accounts that can be found about Jews linking up with groups of
partisans to fight the Germans. After the Rafalovka ghetto was liquidated, four
young Jews found a small partisan group in the forest and the Russian captain in
charge asked them to perform "a special task, which was to blow up a train on the
railroad between Rafalovka and Sarni. The young men had almost no military training
and their first effort met with failure when the mine they planted on the tracks
did not explode as the train passed. But the next time they succeeded, earning the
partisan commander's praise: "You are mighty warriors."

URL: https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/2026464784042333?__tn__=3DK-R

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #general

Bruce Drake <BDrake@...>
 

"An explosion in the forest" >from the Yizkor book of Rafalovka in northern Ukraine,
is one of many accounts that can be found about Jews linking up with groups of
partisans to fight the Germans. After the Rafalovka ghetto was liquidated, four
young Jews found a small partisan group in the forest and the Russian captain in
charge asked them to perform "a special task, which was to blow up a train on the
railroad between Rafalovka and Sarni. The young men had almost no military training
and their first effort met with failure when the mine they planted on the tracks
did not explode as the train passed. But the next time they succeeded, earning the
partisan commander's praise: "You are mighty warriors."

URL: https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/2026464784042333?__tn__=3DK-R

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


Palm Beach County, FL Membership Meeting #general

Cindy Taylor
 

Join us on Wednesday, December 12, 2018 at 12:30 at the South County
Civic Center on Jog Road (16700 for GPS) Delray Beach, FL
Guest Speaker: Karen Franklin

Cindy Taylor


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Palm Beach County, FL Membership Meeting #general

Cindy Taylor
 

Join us on Wednesday, December 12, 2018 at 12:30 at the South County
Civic Center on Jog Road (16700 for GPS) Delray Beach, FL
Guest Speaker: Karen Franklin

Cindy Taylor


Call for Papers Is Now Open for IAJGS 2019 Cleveland Conference #bessarabia

IAJGS Conference Chairs
 

We are very pleased to invite prospective speakers to submit proposals for
presentation at the 39th Annual IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy to be held >from Sunday, July 28, through Friday, August 2, 2019,
in Cleveland, Ohio. The Call for Papers is now open (see the instructions
below).

This annual worldwide gathering brings together family researchers,
academics, professional genealogists, historians, and a wide variety of
individuals >from around the world who cherish the heritage and the future
of the Jewish people. Submissions will be accepted for panel discussions,
one-hour lectures, and shorter 30-minute presentations on all relevant
topics. There will also be a number of computer workshops -- if proposals
for them are received. We hope to have the Computer Lab active most of
each day.

The Theme of this year's Conference will be "Jews in America's Heartland."
The following tracks will get preference for presentations:

* Westward Ho! - Jewish settlement between the Alleghenies
and the Rockies.
* Cleveland Rocks! - Cleveland Resources for Family Research
* DNA: What is it, and how can it help you?
* The Shoah: resources for Finding Your Family
* Discovering Your Family History - Where do I begin?
- A track for beginners.

The submissions deadline is Sunday, January 20, 2019, at 11:59 PM EST. The
committee set this deadline to allow enough time to evaluate many worthy
proposals, to choose the best, and to notify speakers of their acceptance
during the early registration period that ends on Sunday, April 21, 2019.

All the information you need to get started is under the SPEAKERS tab on
the Conference website at www.iajgs2019.org .

We hope many of you will feel inspired to attend, present, and participate
with us.

If you know of others who might like to present at the upcoming
conference, please feel free to share this email. After reading the
relevant pages on our website, you may request further information via
email sent to program@iajgs2019.org .

Many thanks, and we look forward to seeing all of you at a great
conference next summer.

Very truly yours,

Ken Bravo and Jay Sage
Conference Co-Chairs (chairs@iajgs2019.org)
Chuck Weinstein
Program Chair (program@iajgs2019.org)

39th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
Cleveland, Ohio
July 28 - August 2, 2019


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Call for Papers Is Now Open for IAJGS 2019 Cleveland Conference #bessarabia

IAJGS Conference Chairs
 

We are very pleased to invite prospective speakers to submit proposals for
presentation at the 39th Annual IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy to be held >from Sunday, July 28, through Friday, August 2, 2019,
in Cleveland, Ohio. The Call for Papers is now open (see the instructions
below).

This annual worldwide gathering brings together family researchers,
academics, professional genealogists, historians, and a wide variety of
individuals >from around the world who cherish the heritage and the future
of the Jewish people. Submissions will be accepted for panel discussions,
one-hour lectures, and shorter 30-minute presentations on all relevant
topics. There will also be a number of computer workshops -- if proposals
for them are received. We hope to have the Computer Lab active most of
each day.

The Theme of this year's Conference will be "Jews in America's Heartland."
The following tracks will get preference for presentations:

* Westward Ho! - Jewish settlement between the Alleghenies
and the Rockies.
* Cleveland Rocks! - Cleveland Resources for Family Research
* DNA: What is it, and how can it help you?
* The Shoah: resources for Finding Your Family
* Discovering Your Family History - Where do I begin?
- A track for beginners.

The submissions deadline is Sunday, January 20, 2019, at 11:59 PM EST. The
committee set this deadline to allow enough time to evaluate many worthy
proposals, to choose the best, and to notify speakers of their acceptance
during the early registration period that ends on Sunday, April 21, 2019.

All the information you need to get started is under the SPEAKERS tab on
the Conference website at www.iajgs2019.org .

We hope many of you will feel inspired to attend, present, and participate
with us.

If you know of others who might like to present at the upcoming
conference, please feel free to share this email. After reading the
relevant pages on our website, you may request further information via
email sent to program@iajgs2019.org .

Many thanks, and we look forward to seeing all of you at a great
conference next summer.

Very truly yours,

Ken Bravo and Jay Sage
Conference Co-Chairs (chairs@iajgs2019.org)
Chuck Weinstein
Program Chair (program@iajgs2019.org)

39th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
Cleveland, Ohio
July 28 - August 2, 2019


Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project announces the publication of its 76th title, The Memorial book of Roman Romania #yizkorbooks

Joel Alpert
 

The Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project of JewishGen is proud to announce
the publication of its 76th title, The Jewish Community of Roman
(Roman, Romania)

This is a hard cover book, 11 inches by 8.5 inches with 180 pages.

This book is a translation of Obstea evreiasca din Roman by Pincu
Pascal and published by Editura Hasefer, Bucuresti, Romania, 2001.

List price:$42.95 Available on Amazon for around $31 may have lower
prices elsewhere

For more information go to:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Roman.html

The Romanian city of Roman is situated in the northeastern part of the
country, at the confluence of the Moldova and Siret rivers, on the
great road of the Siret, which long ago connected the north of Moldova
with the Danube ports. The Jewish population in the city is believed
to date >from as early as the beginning of 15thcentury. It is believed
that a wooden synagogue existed in Roman at that time, on the same lot
where the Main Synagogue was standing later (in the 20th century). It
was but the first of what would become 18 synagogues serving a
population of more than 6,000 Jews by the beginning of the 1940s,
which along with a wide range of social, educational, and cultural
institutions was a measure of the vitality of the community.

In this scholarly volume, the rich portrait of the Jewish community in
Roman that was about to be annihilated is painted in meticulous
detail, covering every aspect of life over the centuries of its
existence.

Alternate names for the town are: Roman [Romanian], Romesmarkt
[German], Romanvasar [Hungarian], Romanvarasch

Roman, Romania: 46 55 N, 26 55 E

Nearby Jewish Communities:
Budesti 11 miles W
Bozienii de Sus 12 miles WNW
Damienesti 13 miles SSE
Bacesti 16 miles ESE
Buhusi 17 miles SW
Roznov 20 miles WSW
Targu Frumos 20 miles N
Plopana 21 miles SE
Bacau 24 miles S

Researchers and descendants Roman will want to have this book.

For more information, go to:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Roman.html

The Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project now has 76 titles available. To see
all the books, go to:

http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip.html

We hope you find this of interest for you and your family in
discovering the history of your ancestors. This would make a birthday
gift for a loved one or a belated Chanukah gift.

For orders 4 or more books to one address in the US, UK, Canada or
Australia, we can offer you a significantly reduced price of $20 per
book including shipping (Amazon discount price is about $31 plus
shipping). Email to ybip@jewishgen.org

Email to ybip@jewishgen.org to get prices for other locations outside of
the US.

Joel Alpert, Coordinator of the Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project announces the publication of its 76th title, The Memorial book of Roman Romania #yizkorbooks

Joel Alpert
 

The Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project of JewishGen is proud to announce
the publication of its 76th title, The Jewish Community of Roman
(Roman, Romania)

This is a hard cover book, 11 inches by 8.5 inches with 180 pages.

This book is a translation of Obstea evreiasca din Roman by Pincu
Pascal and published by Editura Hasefer, Bucuresti, Romania, 2001.

List price:$42.95 Available on Amazon for around $31 may have lower
prices elsewhere

For more information go to:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Roman.html

The Romanian city of Roman is situated in the northeastern part of the
country, at the confluence of the Moldova and Siret rivers, on the
great road of the Siret, which long ago connected the north of Moldova
with the Danube ports. The Jewish population in the city is believed
to date >from as early as the beginning of 15thcentury. It is believed
that a wooden synagogue existed in Roman at that time, on the same lot
where the Main Synagogue was standing later (in the 20th century). It
was but the first of what would become 18 synagogues serving a
population of more than 6,000 Jews by the beginning of the 1940s,
which along with a wide range of social, educational, and cultural
institutions was a measure of the vitality of the community.

In this scholarly volume, the rich portrait of the Jewish community in
Roman that was about to be annihilated is painted in meticulous
detail, covering every aspect of life over the centuries of its
existence.

Alternate names for the town are: Roman [Romanian], Romesmarkt
[German], Romanvasar [Hungarian], Romanvarasch

Roman, Romania: 46 55 N, 26 55 E

Nearby Jewish Communities:
Budesti 11 miles W
Bozienii de Sus 12 miles WNW
Damienesti 13 miles SSE
Bacesti 16 miles ESE
Buhusi 17 miles SW
Roznov 20 miles WSW
Targu Frumos 20 miles N
Plopana 21 miles SE
Bacau 24 miles S

Researchers and descendants Roman will want to have this book.

For more information, go to:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Roman.html

The Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project now has 76 titles available. To see
all the books, go to:

http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip.html

We hope you find this of interest for you and your family in
discovering the history of your ancestors. This would make a birthday
gift for a loved one or a belated Chanukah gift.

For orders 4 or more books to one address in the US, UK, Canada or
Australia, we can offer you a significantly reduced price of $20 per
book including shipping (Amazon discount price is about $31 plus
shipping). Email to ybip@jewishgen.org

Email to ybip@jewishgen.org to get prices for other locations outside of
the US.

Joel Alpert, Coordinator of the Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project


Re: Naming pattern among Ashkenazic Jews #general

Arthur Hoffman <arthhh@...>
 

My two older brothers were named according to the "rules". When my
turn came, my uncle (father's brother-in-law) asked my father that I
be named for his deceased father. My uncle had two daughters and
apparently no hope that he would have a son. And so that's how I
became named Ahvrahom.

Arthur Hoffman
Boynton Beach, Florida


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Naming pattern among Ashkenazic Jews #general

Arthur Hoffman <arthhh@...>
 

My two older brothers were named according to the "rules". When my
turn came, my uncle (father's brother-in-law) asked my father that I
be named for his deceased father. My uncle had two daughters and
apparently no hope that he would have a son. And so that's how I
became named Ahvrahom.

Arthur Hoffman
Boynton Beach, Florida


Re: Naming pattern among Ashkenazic Jews #general

joseph just
 

The custom followed in my family and probably the most common custom
(in Hungary at least) was for the mother to choose the name of the
first child and the father the second, mother the 3rd etc.
Names were usually chosen by degree of closeness- first grandparents,
then great grandparents. But there are exceptions.
A parent often relinquished their "turn" at child naming for various
reasons. One example would be if a grandparent had recently passed
on.Sometimes a father would want to name a child after his recently
deceased rabbi and the mother would agree. Maybe one parent had a
particularly distinguished male or female ancestor and had only had
children of the opposite gender. So that when the child with the right
gender was born he/she would get that name regardless of whose turn it
was.
There were alot of other scenarios in which a parent might relinquish
a turn. So using naming patterns to determine birth order is very
iffy. In general common sense prevailed when naming a child.
To the person who wrote assuming that baby Sam was named after Grandpa
Sam. Since your grandparents were religious you should know that Sam
was a secular name and that Grandpa Sam almost certainly had a Jewish
name. And the Jewish name was not necessarily Samuel/Shmuel. It may
have been Yehoshua or Yeshayahu or a number of other names. So that
baby Sam did not necessarily have the same Jewish name as Grandpa Sam
even if they shared a secular name.

Sarah Just


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Naming pattern among Ashkenazic Jews #general

joseph just
 

The custom followed in my family and probably the most common custom
(in Hungary at least) was for the mother to choose the name of the
first child and the father the second, mother the 3rd etc.
Names were usually chosen by degree of closeness- first grandparents,
then great grandparents. But there are exceptions.
A parent often relinquished their "turn" at child naming for various
reasons. One example would be if a grandparent had recently passed
on.Sometimes a father would want to name a child after his recently
deceased rabbi and the mother would agree. Maybe one parent had a
particularly distinguished male or female ancestor and had only had
children of the opposite gender. So that when the child with the right
gender was born he/she would get that name regardless of whose turn it
was.
There were alot of other scenarios in which a parent might relinquish
a turn. So using naming patterns to determine birth order is very
iffy. In general common sense prevailed when naming a child.
To the person who wrote assuming that baby Sam was named after Grandpa
Sam. Since your grandparents were religious you should know that Sam
was a secular name and that Grandpa Sam almost certainly had a Jewish
name. And the Jewish name was not necessarily Samuel/Shmuel. It may
have been Yehoshua or Yeshayahu or a number of other names. So that
baby Sam did not necessarily have the same Jewish name as Grandpa Sam
even if they shared a secular name.

Sarah Just

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