Date   

Lithuania Vital Records #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

ALL of the Pusalotas vital records, translated into English, are included
in the Jewishgen Lithuania Vital Records Database and available to everyone
at no charge.

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Lithuania/VitalRecs.htm

The post World War I vital records that were not filmed by the Mormons, and
not available to researchers, are included as well as the Czarist records
that were filmed.

A previous message asked for volunteers to work on the Pusalotas vital
records. I do not know what the need is because all of these vital records
have been translated. All of us would be better served if those same
efforts were used to work on other records instead of records already
translated and available to everyone.

Howard Margol
Atlanta, Georgia
www.pusalotas.org


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Lithuania Vital Records #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

ALL of the Pusalotas vital records, translated into English, are included
in the Jewishgen Lithuania Vital Records Database and available to everyone
at no charge.

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Lithuania/VitalRecs.htm

The post World War I vital records that were not filmed by the Mormons, and
not available to researchers, are included as well as the Czarist records
that were filmed.

A previous message asked for volunteers to work on the Pusalotas vital
records. I do not know what the need is because all of these vital records
have been translated. All of us would be better served if those same
efforts were used to work on other records instead of records already
translated and available to everyone.

Howard Margol
Atlanta, Georgia
www.pusalotas.org


Vilna District Research Group records distribution - Moletai Revision Lists 1834 - 1858 #lithuania

Joel Ratner
 

The Vilna District Research Group is pleased to announce the
distribution of translations of the Moletai revision lists for the years
1834, 1850/51, 1858 as well as additional revisions submitted during
some of the intermediate years. Researchers interested in these
translations can join the Vilna District Research Groups Revision List
Project by contributing $100 to the group. The donor form is accessible
from the LitvakSIG web page.
In addition, it is expected a new coordinator will be announced for the
Vilna District Research Group in the near future.


Joel Ratner


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Vilna District Research Group records distribution - Moletai Revision Lists 1834 - 1858 #lithuania

Joel Ratner
 

The Vilna District Research Group is pleased to announce the
distribution of translations of the Moletai revision lists for the years
1834, 1850/51, 1858 as well as additional revisions submitted during
some of the intermediate years. Researchers interested in these
translations can join the Vilna District Research Groups Revision List
Project by contributing $100 to the group. The donor form is accessible
from the LitvakSIG web page.
In addition, it is expected a new coordinator will be announced for the
Vilna District Research Group in the near future.


Joel Ratner


Re: Pesach customs #galicia

Yosaif Dubovick <ymd000@...>
 

Re:
There are 2 extant Shor (Schorr) families I am aware of, one is
Karliner (Stoliner) chassidim, the other Sadigurer. I believe both
families are descendants Rabbi Efrayim Zalman Shor (father of the
author of the sefer Tevuos Shor), and relatives of the famous Rabbi
Efrayim Zalamn Margolis (c.f. Maalos HaYuchsin, Yerushalayim 2004).
You might try tracing your lineage to them.

During the first World War, there was a general permit (heter) issued
by the Rabonim allowing usage of kitniyos on Pesach of one year in
Vienna, due to the extreme hunger caused by the war. A copy of the
heter can be found in the journal HaDarom no. 15 as well as in the 3rd
vol. of the responsa Imrei Yosher by Rabbi Meir Arik ch. 25. Perhaps
the custom in your case originated >from that particular episode. Or
maybe there was a pre-dominante Sephardic member of the family who
influenced it's custom (i.e. a father-in-law).

The custom regarding ginger is probably in reference to the charoses
in which the marror (horseradish or in the first preference, romaine
lettuce) was to be dipped briefly. The charoses was intentionally
assembled to resemble the mortar in Egypt, and ginger or cinnamon was
added to resemble the straw.

You might try obtaining a copy of Nittei Gavriel on the customs of
Pesach, a book of customs by Rabbi Gavriel Zinner of Brooklyn. He is
pretty authoritative and well researched.

In general, the Chasidic custom is not to eat kitniyos, and in
particular takes on the more stringent rulings of both the Ashkenazic
and Sephardic Rabbis, also in regard to Pesach as well as the rest of
the year. Sephardic customs were only adopted in the case of a
stringency, or in the case of those groups who settled in E. Yisrael,
certain customs were adopted in deference to the populace at the time.

I hope I was able to shed some light on your queries. Feel free to
contact me of you have any other questions I might be of assistance
with.

Rabbi Yosaif M. Dubovick
Betar Illit, E. Israel
ymd000@gmail.com

Chana Thompson-Shor wrote:
My last name is Shor; I learned that the only continuously-observant
branch of my family (originally >from Galicia) uses ginger rather than
horseradish on the seder plate, and eats kitniyot (beans, rice) on
Passover, much as sephardic Jews do. They say this is the custom the
family came with >from "the old country". These customs were something
of a surprise, as I'd always been under the impression that we were
thoroughly Ashkenazic, but the details of the family history are a
little fuzzy. Is anyone on this list familiar with these customs among
Galitzianer families (or anyone else Ashkenazi, for that matter... a
bonus if you're a Shor.)


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Pesach customs #galicia

Yosaif Dubovick <ymd000@...>
 

Re:
There are 2 extant Shor (Schorr) families I am aware of, one is
Karliner (Stoliner) chassidim, the other Sadigurer. I believe both
families are descendants Rabbi Efrayim Zalman Shor (father of the
author of the sefer Tevuos Shor), and relatives of the famous Rabbi
Efrayim Zalamn Margolis (c.f. Maalos HaYuchsin, Yerushalayim 2004).
You might try tracing your lineage to them.

During the first World War, there was a general permit (heter) issued
by the Rabonim allowing usage of kitniyos on Pesach of one year in
Vienna, due to the extreme hunger caused by the war. A copy of the
heter can be found in the journal HaDarom no. 15 as well as in the 3rd
vol. of the responsa Imrei Yosher by Rabbi Meir Arik ch. 25. Perhaps
the custom in your case originated >from that particular episode. Or
maybe there was a pre-dominante Sephardic member of the family who
influenced it's custom (i.e. a father-in-law).

The custom regarding ginger is probably in reference to the charoses
in which the marror (horseradish or in the first preference, romaine
lettuce) was to be dipped briefly. The charoses was intentionally
assembled to resemble the mortar in Egypt, and ginger or cinnamon was
added to resemble the straw.

You might try obtaining a copy of Nittei Gavriel on the customs of
Pesach, a book of customs by Rabbi Gavriel Zinner of Brooklyn. He is
pretty authoritative and well researched.

In general, the Chasidic custom is not to eat kitniyos, and in
particular takes on the more stringent rulings of both the Ashkenazic
and Sephardic Rabbis, also in regard to Pesach as well as the rest of
the year. Sephardic customs were only adopted in the case of a
stringency, or in the case of those groups who settled in E. Yisrael,
certain customs were adopted in deference to the populace at the time.

I hope I was able to shed some light on your queries. Feel free to
contact me of you have any other questions I might be of assistance
with.

Rabbi Yosaif M. Dubovick
Betar Illit, E. Israel
ymd000@gmail.com

Chana Thompson-Shor wrote:
My last name is Shor; I learned that the only continuously-observant
branch of my family (originally >from Galicia) uses ginger rather than
horseradish on the seder plate, and eats kitniyot (beans, rice) on
Passover, much as sephardic Jews do. They say this is the custom the
family came with >from "the old country". These customs were something
of a surprise, as I'd always been under the impression that we were
thoroughly Ashkenazic, but the details of the family history are a
little fuzzy. Is anyone on this list familiar with these customs among
Galitzianer families (or anyone else Ashkenazi, for that matter... a
bonus if you're a Shor.)


Re: Widowers with young children in Galicia #galicia

Judy Keiner <J.C.Keiner@...>
 

I don't have statistics, but >from my family history research on the birth,
marriage and death summaries of Kanczuga, Galicia between 1851-1094, this
was very common. Very few women in that shtetl lived into their sixties or
beyond. There are many deaths recorded of women aged 20-50. The most common
ages of death are between 30 and 50. The child mortality rate was also
phenomenal. In my own family tree there are examples of widows with children
marrying widowers with young children, often within a year of the
bereavements.

Judy Keiner

Re:
Has anyone ever seen any statistics on how often in the mid-late 1800's
women died leaving a husband and young children? I inquire more
specifically about Jewish families in Galicia.

Israel Pickholtz


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia RE: Widowers with young children in Galicia #galicia

Judy Keiner <J.C.Keiner@...>
 

I don't have statistics, but >from my family history research on the birth,
marriage and death summaries of Kanczuga, Galicia between 1851-1094, this
was very common. Very few women in that shtetl lived into their sixties or
beyond. There are many deaths recorded of women aged 20-50. The most common
ages of death are between 30 and 50. The child mortality rate was also
phenomenal. In my own family tree there are examples of widows with children
marrying widowers with young children, often within a year of the
bereavements.

Judy Keiner

Re:
Has anyone ever seen any statistics on how often in the mid-late 1800's
women died leaving a husband and young children? I inquire more
specifically about Jewish families in Galicia.

Israel Pickholtz


Bessarabian Cemeteries #romania

anne silverstein <etothex01@...>
 

My father lived with a maternal aunt and uncle, Hershel/Gershel and
Fanya HOROWITZ/GOROWITZ and their two young sons in the town of Leova
in Bessarabia >from about 1920/21 to 1925, when he emigrated to the
United States. Leova is on the east bank of the Prut River, across
from the Romanian city of Husi. (The Prut was the boundary between
Russia and Romania before WWI when Bessarabia was part of the Russian
empire.) Does anyone know where Jews >from Leova would have been buried
in the 1920s and 30s? Or where records of Jewish deaths in Leova
during those decades would have been kept? I ask because it is
possible that his aunt and uncle might have died of natural causes
before the war, in which case I would like to find the records, if they
are still extant, or maybe even the gravestones, if the cemetery still
exists.

Searching for HOROWITZ/GOROWITZ, Leova, Bessarabia; BALINSON/BEILINSON
(all spelling variants), Luchinets, Ukraine; GROSSMAN, Luchinets,
Ukraine; KOGAN (all spelling variants), Nemirov or Pechora (Pechera),
Ukraine; GREENBERG (all spelling variants), Vinitsa, Ukraine.

Anne Silverstein
St.Louis, Missouri


Romania SIG #Romania Bessarabian Cemeteries #romania

anne silverstein <etothex01@...>
 

My father lived with a maternal aunt and uncle, Hershel/Gershel and
Fanya HOROWITZ/GOROWITZ and their two young sons in the town of Leova
in Bessarabia >from about 1920/21 to 1925, when he emigrated to the
United States. Leova is on the east bank of the Prut River, across
from the Romanian city of Husi. (The Prut was the boundary between
Russia and Romania before WWI when Bessarabia was part of the Russian
empire.) Does anyone know where Jews >from Leova would have been buried
in the 1920s and 30s? Or where records of Jewish deaths in Leova
during those decades would have been kept? I ask because it is
possible that his aunt and uncle might have died of natural causes
before the war, in which case I would like to find the records, if they
are still extant, or maybe even the gravestones, if the cemetery still
exists.

Searching for HOROWITZ/GOROWITZ, Leova, Bessarabia; BALINSON/BEILINSON
(all spelling variants), Luchinets, Ukraine; GROSSMAN, Luchinets,
Ukraine; KOGAN (all spelling variants), Nemirov or Pechora (Pechera),
Ukraine; GREENBERG (all spelling variants), Vinitsa, Ukraine.

Anne Silverstein
St.Louis, Missouri


hello and help #romania

Anita <anitac47@...>
 

Hi,
Just joined the SIG as I just discovered the real town name that my
husband's father came from. The town name had been incorrectly spelled (how
odd is that :-D) on the manifest and I just found out the correct spelling
so at least I have a starting point. My husband knows little about his
family other than his father and his uncle came over in the early 1920s to
NY. I may have also discovered a relative of theirs due to the connection
given to me by Elsebeth Paikin to a friend of hers.

So now I'm trying to connect the dots. The name--CITRON, CZITRON, and
possibly CZITROM--pops up all over but seems to be concentrated in the
Transylvania area. I was wondering if someone could tell me what county (?)
is indicated in the burial records by "Tr. Mica" (the "a" has a diacritical
mark over it)?? For instance it says "Alena, Tr. Mica" for birthplace, county.

Thanks for your help!

Regards,
Anita Citron
MODERATOR NOTE: Please sign all future messages with your location as well as
your full name.


Romania SIG #Romania hello and help #romania

Anita <anitac47@...>
 

Hi,
Just joined the SIG as I just discovered the real town name that my
husband's father came from. The town name had been incorrectly spelled (how
odd is that :-D) on the manifest and I just found out the correct spelling
so at least I have a starting point. My husband knows little about his
family other than his father and his uncle came over in the early 1920s to
NY. I may have also discovered a relative of theirs due to the connection
given to me by Elsebeth Paikin to a friend of hers.

So now I'm trying to connect the dots. The name--CITRON, CZITRON, and
possibly CZITROM--pops up all over but seems to be concentrated in the
Transylvania area. I was wondering if someone could tell me what county (?)
is indicated in the burial records by "Tr. Mica" (the "a" has a diacritical
mark over it)?? For instance it says "Alena, Tr. Mica" for birthplace, county.

Thanks for your help!

Regards,
Anita Citron
MODERATOR NOTE: Please sign all future messages with your location as well as
your full name.


Re: Searching the Yad Vashem Database #austria-czech

Israel P
 

As with everything in that database (and many others), that search only
works if that information is fully and correctly recorded. In my
experience, very few people put a full birth date in a Page of Testimony.
So you are more fortunate than most in this regard.

Israel Pickholtz

This may not be news to many of you, but it certainly was for me: It is
possible to find female family members in the Yad Vashem database of
Holocaust victims knowing only their date of birth and given name or
nickname.


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: Searching the Yad Vashem Database #austria-czech

Israel P
 

As with everything in that database (and many others), that search only
works if that information is fully and correctly recorded. In my
experience, very few people put a full birth date in a Page of Testimony.
So you are more fortunate than most in this regard.

Israel Pickholtz

This may not be news to many of you, but it certainly was for me: It is
possible to find female family members in the Yad Vashem database of
Holocaust victims knowing only their date of birth and given name or
nickname.


Translations needed #belarus

aiginsburg
 

I have recently posted two items on viewmate in need of translation
from Russian.
The first is a the back of a picture of a young woman >from Dokshitz,
Belarus. It is at http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7708

The second is the plaque >from a Soviet era memorial at the site of
the Holocaust in Dokshitz.
It is at http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7696

Thanks for your help.

Please reply privately.

Aaron Ginsburg
Searching:Kusinitz(Dokshitz, Belarus): Ginzburg, Cirlin(Parafynove,
Belarus;Pokross(Gorodishche, Ukraine)

aaron.ginsburg@gmail.com
Sharon, Ma


Belarus SIG #Belarus Translations needed #belarus

aiginsburg
 

I have recently posted two items on viewmate in need of translation
from Russian.
The first is a the back of a picture of a young woman >from Dokshitz,
Belarus. It is at http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7708

The second is the plaque >from a Soviet era memorial at the site of
the Holocaust in Dokshitz.
It is at http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7696

Thanks for your help.

Please reply privately.

Aaron Ginsburg
Searching:Kusinitz(Dokshitz, Belarus): Ginzburg, Cirlin(Parafynove,
Belarus;Pokross(Gorodishche, Ukraine)

aaron.ginsburg@gmail.com
Sharon, Ma


Re: Widowers with children remarrying in mid 19th century #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 4/2/2006 5:32:09 AM Eastern Standard Time,
IsraelP@pikholz.org writes:

< Has anyone ever seen any statistics on how often in the mid-late
1800's women died leaving a husband and young children? I inquire
more specifically about Jewish families in Galicia. >

==Sorry, I have no specific data and none specifically for Galicia,
but the incidence was not rare. Most of the deaths were postpartum.
My great grandfather (3rd child) lost his mother in ca 1843 when his
younger brother was born; his father, a well-respected and presumaby
not impoverished village school teacher and cantor in Germany took a
second wife who bore him no children but lived to the age of 95.

==A generation later, the great grandfather, a rabbi in a prosperous
German city, lost his own first wife at the birth of his own first child;
he remarried almost immediately, had another child that died shortly
after birth, then went on to have 14 more children by his second wife,
all but one of whom survived into adulthood.

==I have many wives on my trees who died postpartum. If there was
a living infant, or older children, the community would try to find the
widower a second wife as soon as possible. Since marriages generally
required that the husband was in possession of a Letter of Protection,
marrying a widower was quite attractive in that it offered marriage to a
woman who miht not otherwise have found a spouse.

==The most common arrangement was that the husband married the
sister or cousin of the deceased wife. After all, the families knew each
other, had shown their compatability, and most commonly a second
dowry was not demanded.

==My guess is that something between ten and twentyfive percent of
families experienced the death of a mother when children were still
young, say under 12.

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Widowers with children remarrying in mid 19th century #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 4/2/2006 5:32:09 AM Eastern Standard Time,
IsraelP@pikholz.org writes:

< Has anyone ever seen any statistics on how often in the mid-late
1800's women died leaving a husband and young children? I inquire
more specifically about Jewish families in Galicia. >

==Sorry, I have no specific data and none specifically for Galicia,
but the incidence was not rare. Most of the deaths were postpartum.
My great grandfather (3rd child) lost his mother in ca 1843 when his
younger brother was born; his father, a well-respected and presumaby
not impoverished village school teacher and cantor in Germany took a
second wife who bore him no children but lived to the age of 95.

==A generation later, the great grandfather, a rabbi in a prosperous
German city, lost his own first wife at the birth of his own first child;
he remarried almost immediately, had another child that died shortly
after birth, then went on to have 14 more children by his second wife,
all but one of whom survived into adulthood.

==I have many wives on my trees who died postpartum. If there was
a living infant, or older children, the community would try to find the
widower a second wife as soon as possible. Since marriages generally
required that the husband was in possession of a Letter of Protection,
marrying a widower was quite attractive in that it offered marriage to a
woman who miht not otherwise have found a spouse.

==The most common arrangement was that the husband married the
sister or cousin of the deceased wife. After all, the families knew each
other, had shown their compatability, and most commonly a second
dowry was not demanded.

==My guess is that something between ten and twentyfive percent of
families experienced the death of a mother when children were still
young, say under 12.

Michael Bernet, New York


April Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia #general

JGLois@...
 

April Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia

Date: Monday, April 10, 2006
Time: 7:45 PM
Place: The Newman Building at Gratz College
Old York Road & Melrose Avenue
Melrose Park, PA 19027

Speaker: Megan Smolenyak,
Topic: A Layman's Guide to Using DNA to Advance Your Genealogy

Megan Smolenyak is author of Trace Your Roots with DNA: Using
Genetic Tests to Explore Your Family Tree

DNA testing has recently become a topic in genealogy circles
because it affords us another technique by which we can determine
if a blood relationship exists with previously unknown and potential
relatives. Megan Smolenyak's latest book is an easy-to-follow, yet
comprehensive guide to using DNA tests for genealogical purposes.
Packed with real world examples, it will show you how to solve your
own history mysteries.

Recipient of International Society of Family History Writers and Editors
awards in 2003, 2004 and 2005, Smolenyak has appeared on the Today
Show, Fox & Friends, Ancestors, NPR, and a number of local television
and radio shows.

She is also the author of Honoring Our Ancestors: Inspiring Stories of
the Quest for Our Roots, In Search of Our Ancestors: 101 Inspiring
Stories of Serendipity and Connection in Rediscovering Our Family
History, and They Came to America: Finding Your Immigrant Ancestors.

As lead researcher for the PBS award-winning Ancestors series,
Smolenyak delved into over 5,000 genealogical stories and developed
much of the content for the companion website. She has subsequently
consulted for other television programs, including PBS's award-winning
They Came to America. If you're interested in learning more about the
ascinating topic of genetic genealogy, please visit Smolenyak's sister site,
www.genetealogy.com.

****
Q and A *Sessions*: There will be a 30 minute Question and Answer
session preceding all general meetings.
****
For all who are researching Philadelphia roots and need information
on local resources; cemeteries, funeral directors, repositories (and
much more) please visit the JGSGP website:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsp
****
Interested friends are always welcome!
There is a $2.00 admission charge for non-members.
Refreshments will be served following the meeting
****
Lois Sernoff [JGS GreaterPhiladelphia]
< JGLois@aol.com >


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen April Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia #general

JGLois@...
 

April Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia

Date: Monday, April 10, 2006
Time: 7:45 PM
Place: The Newman Building at Gratz College
Old York Road & Melrose Avenue
Melrose Park, PA 19027

Speaker: Megan Smolenyak,
Topic: A Layman's Guide to Using DNA to Advance Your Genealogy

Megan Smolenyak is author of Trace Your Roots with DNA: Using
Genetic Tests to Explore Your Family Tree

DNA testing has recently become a topic in genealogy circles
because it affords us another technique by which we can determine
if a blood relationship exists with previously unknown and potential
relatives. Megan Smolenyak's latest book is an easy-to-follow, yet
comprehensive guide to using DNA tests for genealogical purposes.
Packed with real world examples, it will show you how to solve your
own history mysteries.

Recipient of International Society of Family History Writers and Editors
awards in 2003, 2004 and 2005, Smolenyak has appeared on the Today
Show, Fox & Friends, Ancestors, NPR, and a number of local television
and radio shows.

She is also the author of Honoring Our Ancestors: Inspiring Stories of
the Quest for Our Roots, In Search of Our Ancestors: 101 Inspiring
Stories of Serendipity and Connection in Rediscovering Our Family
History, and They Came to America: Finding Your Immigrant Ancestors.

As lead researcher for the PBS award-winning Ancestors series,
Smolenyak delved into over 5,000 genealogical stories and developed
much of the content for the companion website. She has subsequently
consulted for other television programs, including PBS's award-winning
They Came to America. If you're interested in learning more about the
ascinating topic of genetic genealogy, please visit Smolenyak's sister site,
www.genetealogy.com.

****
Q and A *Sessions*: There will be a 30 minute Question and Answer
session preceding all general meetings.
****
For all who are researching Philadelphia roots and need information
on local resources; cemeteries, funeral directors, repositories (and
much more) please visit the JGSGP website:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsp
****
Interested friends are always welcome!
There is a $2.00 admission charge for non-members.
Refreshments will be served following the meeting
****
Lois Sernoff [JGS GreaterPhiladelphia]
< JGLois@aol.com >