Date   

SCHLEIFER #general

Aliza Maor <alizam@...>
 

Dear All,
Is there anyone out there who knows anything about the
following family. I am interested in finding Jennie's
connection to my family. So if this sounds familiar please
contact me.
Jennie and Jacob SCHLEIFER had 6 daughters,
In 1920 they lived in the Bay Ridge section of Brooklyn.
The daugters where Beatrice/Rebecca born 1909, Dora born 1911,
Lillian born 1913, Minnie born 1916, Anna born 1918 and
Helen born 1920.
In 1930 they were living at #936 45th street, they shared
this house with another family named Warshaw.
Thank you,
Aliza Maor
Rishon Le Zion, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen SCHLEIFER #general

Aliza Maor <alizam@...>
 

Dear All,
Is there anyone out there who knows anything about the
following family. I am interested in finding Jennie's
connection to my family. So if this sounds familiar please
contact me.
Jennie and Jacob SCHLEIFER had 6 daughters,
In 1920 they lived in the Bay Ridge section of Brooklyn.
The daugters where Beatrice/Rebecca born 1909, Dora born 1911,
Lillian born 1913, Minnie born 1916, Anna born 1918 and
Helen born 1920.
In 1930 they were living at #936 45th street, they shared
this house with another family named Warshaw.
Thank you,
Aliza Maor
Rishon Le Zion, Israel


Re: New Haven,CT-Port of Entry #general

Joel Stearman <dpastear@...>
 

Abuwasta Abuwasta wrote:

Dear Genners,
Just spoke to an Israeli of American origin whose grandfather came to the US
from Lithuania at around 1901 via New Haven,CT. There was a customs house in
New Haven and some ships which carried passengers got them off board in New
Haven. He claims that there > was quite a number of Jews who took this route.
I hope that this will open an avenue to those who do not find their relatives
on EIDB.
To those looking for arrivals at New Haven, CT:

NARA Microfilm Publication M575, "Copies of Lists of Passengers Arriving at
Miscellaneous Ports on the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts and at Ports on the Great
Lakes, 1820-1873" can be accessed at most National Archives Regional Centers or
at NARA in DC. Arrivals at New Haven, CT, 1820-1873, can be found of Roll 5 of
15 rolls.

NARA Microfilm Publication M334, "A Supplemental Index to Passenger Lists of
Vessels Arriving at Atlantic and Gulf Coast Ports (Excluding New York), 1820-1874"
can also be accessed at NARA Regional Centers or at NARA in DC.

Note that these publications only cover the period 1820-1874.

Good Luck!!

Joel Stearman
Potomac, MD
Volunteer Genealogy Consultant, NARA DC


Lodz area to France #lodz #poland

TE <tome1111@...>
 

I have some relatives >from Lodz who went to France in the 1920s or earlier.
This seems unusual to me. I'd like to find out if any of you had this same
experience.

I noticed on the Yad Vashem site, that some relatives were born there in
1864 but died in the Shoah. This information is based on a list of
deportation >from France found in the Le Memorial de la deportation des juifs
de france, Beate et Serge Klarsfeld, Paris 1978.

Tom Erribe
CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: New Haven,CT-Port of Entry #general

Joel Stearman <dpastear@...>
 

Abuwasta Abuwasta wrote:

Dear Genners,
Just spoke to an Israeli of American origin whose grandfather came to the US
from Lithuania at around 1901 via New Haven,CT. There was a customs house in
New Haven and some ships which carried passengers got them off board in New
Haven. He claims that there > was quite a number of Jews who took this route.
I hope that this will open an avenue to those who do not find their relatives
on EIDB.
To those looking for arrivals at New Haven, CT:

NARA Microfilm Publication M575, "Copies of Lists of Passengers Arriving at
Miscellaneous Ports on the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts and at Ports on the Great
Lakes, 1820-1873" can be accessed at most National Archives Regional Centers or
at NARA in DC. Arrivals at New Haven, CT, 1820-1873, can be found of Roll 5 of
15 rolls.

NARA Microfilm Publication M334, "A Supplemental Index to Passenger Lists of
Vessels Arriving at Atlantic and Gulf Coast Ports (Excluding New York), 1820-1874"
can also be accessed at NARA Regional Centers or at NARA in DC.

Note that these publications only cover the period 1820-1874.

Good Luck!!

Joel Stearman
Potomac, MD
Volunteer Genealogy Consultant, NARA DC


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Lodz area to France #lodz #poland

TE <tome1111@...>
 

I have some relatives >from Lodz who went to France in the 1920s or earlier.
This seems unusual to me. I'd like to find out if any of you had this same
experience.

I noticed on the Yad Vashem site, that some relatives were born there in
1864 but died in the Shoah. This information is based on a list of
deportation >from France found in the Le Memorial de la deportation des juifs
de france, Beate et Serge Klarsfeld, Paris 1978.

Tom Erribe
CA


Etymology of the name KRAVITZ #general

Dov & Varda Epstein <yknow@...>
 

Judith Romney Wegner wrote: < The initial letters of the phrase >from Psalm 118,
qof-resh-vav-bet-tzaddi, would have had to be tampered with to
produce a spelling that would accurately represent either in Hebrew
or in Yiddish the precise sounds in the name K-R_A-V-I-TZ -- for
instance, by changing the vav of "vi-yeshuah" to an aleph to get
the "A" sound in the first syllable of KRAVITZ, and adding a yod
after the bet of "be-oholei" to get the "i" sound in the second
syllable. Furthermore, the name KRAVITZ when written in Yiddish would
presumably be spelled with a double vav and not a bet at all. >


Acronyms by nature are often imprecise.

Kravitz is spelled with a bet (vet).

I think it is flippant and facile to suggest that the origins of the surname
as Aizic has it is merely 'folk etymology'. Perhaps they were pulling the
wool over the eyes of the authorities in their choice of surname; investing
it with a meaning they could live with. Maybe the verse >from psalms was the
title of a book an ancestor wrote. Either Aizic knows for sure, or the
secret has gone to the grave with his esteemed ancestors.

Varda Epstein
Efrat, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Etymology of the name KRAVITZ #general

Dov & Varda Epstein <yknow@...>
 

Judith Romney Wegner wrote: < The initial letters of the phrase >from Psalm 118,
qof-resh-vav-bet-tzaddi, would have had to be tampered with to
produce a spelling that would accurately represent either in Hebrew
or in Yiddish the precise sounds in the name K-R_A-V-I-TZ -- for
instance, by changing the vav of "vi-yeshuah" to an aleph to get
the "A" sound in the first syllable of KRAVITZ, and adding a yod
after the bet of "be-oholei" to get the "i" sound in the second
syllable. Furthermore, the name KRAVITZ when written in Yiddish would
presumably be spelled with a double vav and not a bet at all. >


Acronyms by nature are often imprecise.

Kravitz is spelled with a bet (vet).

I think it is flippant and facile to suggest that the origins of the surname
as Aizic has it is merely 'folk etymology'. Perhaps they were pulling the
wool over the eyes of the authorities in their choice of surname; investing
it with a meaning they could live with. Maybe the verse >from psalms was the
title of a book an ancestor wrote. Either Aizic knows for sure, or the
secret has gone to the grave with his esteemed ancestors.

Varda Epstein
Efrat, Israel


Re: Jewish surnames #belarus

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 7/6/2005 11:03:04 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
YLCA87@... writes:

In a message dated 7/2/2005 12:08:39 PM Pacific Standard Time,
_a.sharon@... (mailto:a.sharon@...) writes:

Where is this story "about the myth that Jews had to pay for a good names",
came from?
< When I contacted two unrelated families (NEUHAHN and FRIEDSAM) in Germany
who had the same surnames I am researching, I was told by both of them they are
Christian and that their family lore was that when Jews had to adopt
surnames, they paid their families for the use of their names. >

==Perhaps Christians and Jews believed the same legends?

==>from Lars Menk's dictionary of German Jewish surnames, I learned that
FRIEDSAM was a name among German Gentiles in the northern Middle Rhine, Lower
Rhine, and Upper (southern) Bavaria regions. He lists Jewish families with that
name in the following towns:
Bodendorf 1806
Koeln 1808
Memmelsdorf 1825

==NEUHAHN was a surname among Gentiles in various locations, going back to
the 17th century. In 35 instances the name was spelled Neuhahn, in 46 Neuhann.
Menk lists one Jewish family >from Meimbressen who took the NEUHAHN name in
1800; before then they had been called Kugelman.

==Many locations had a law that Jews could not assume the surnames of
prominent Christian families without specific permission. It was not uncommon
for Jews to take the names of prominent Jewish families (e.g. Rothschild,
Oppenheim) perhaps to acquire a little prestige. I doubt they aid a penny for
that privilege. I can readily believe they did the same to acquire a good
"non-Jewish" name. Perhaps it was good for business, perhaps they simply wanted
to hide their Jewish roots.

==In any event the legend, unfortunately repeated by Kaganoff in his book,
is that the officials imposed offensive names on Jews and that these had to pay
bribes to get more pleasing names (thus, the more fragrant the flower they
chose for a name, the higher the bribe they had to pay). Connie's families
apparently chose their new names freely. I assume they could have called
themselves Junghahn or Neuhaus; or Friedmann, Friedhahn or Freudesam, or
Rothschild without requiring permission and without paying one Groschen above
the regular name-change fee.

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Jewish surnames #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 7/6/2005 11:03:04 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
YLCA87@... writes:

In a message dated 7/2/2005 12:08:39 PM Pacific Standard Time,
_a.sharon@... (mailto:a.sharon@...) writes:

Where is this story "about the myth that Jews had to pay for a good names",
came from?
< When I contacted two unrelated families (NEUHAHN and FRIEDSAM) in Germany
who had the same surnames I am researching, I was told by both of them they are
Christian and that their family lore was that when Jews had to adopt
surnames, they paid their families for the use of their names. >

==Perhaps Christians and Jews believed the same legends?

==>from Lars Menk's dictionary of German Jewish surnames, I learned that
FRIEDSAM was a name among German Gentiles in the northern Middle Rhine, Lower
Rhine, and Upper (southern) Bavaria regions. He lists Jewish families with that
name in the following towns:
Bodendorf 1806
Koeln 1808
Memmelsdorf 1825

==NEUHAHN was a surname among Gentiles in various locations, going back to
the 17th century. In 35 instances the name was spelled Neuhahn, in 46 Neuhann.
Menk lists one Jewish family >from Meimbressen who took the NEUHAHN name in
1800; before then they had been called Kugelman.

==Many locations had a law that Jews could not assume the surnames of
prominent Christian families without specific permission. It was not uncommon
for Jews to take the names of prominent Jewish families (e.g. Rothschild,
Oppenheim) perhaps to acquire a little prestige. I doubt they aid a penny for
that privilege. I can readily believe they did the same to acquire a good
"non-Jewish" name. Perhaps it was good for business, perhaps they simply wanted
to hide their Jewish roots.

==In any event the legend, unfortunately repeated by Kaganoff in his book,
is that the officials imposed offensive names on Jews and that these had to pay
bribes to get more pleasing names (thus, the more fragrant the flower they
chose for a name, the higher the bribe they had to pay). Connie's families
apparently chose their new names freely. I assume they could have called
themselves Junghahn or Neuhaus; or Friedmann, Friedhahn or Freudesam, or
Rothschild without requiring permission and without paying one Groschen above
the regular name-change fee.

Michael Bernet, New York


Surnames/"A.K.A." #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Regarding this surnames discussion.....

I recently spoke to a gentleman born in Drohobycz in the 1920s who had
always used his mother's maiden name as his surname for the same reasons
mentioned in various posts: his parents only had a religious marriage, not
a civil one, so he had officially been given his mother's surname, and kept
it. Interestingly enough, his father's surname had also been *his* mother's
surname, so in many Galician famlies there were long histories of women's
names being carried down at least through one generation, thoroughly
confusing genealogists.

Years ago I was stumped when I found my great-grandmother's death
certificate where her name was written as:

"Henrietta Danziger A.K.A. Immerglick"

Her family had only known her, after her second marriage--to Samuel
DANIGER--as "Henrietta Danziger" and that was the surname given to the one
child she had >from that marriage. No one had ever heard anything about
"IMMERGLICK." It remained a mystery until I recently found Samuel's NYC
death certificate where it indicated that his mother's maiden name had been
"Immerglick." The "also known as" most likely came because this had been
his legal name when he emigrated, and which he was initially known as in
this country, before he reverted to his father's name. (Perhaps chosen
because it was more pleasant-sounding than Immerglick!)

All these mysteries have a solution.....eventually! I'd be curious to know
if other genners have come across this "A.K.A" wrtten on any vital record
documents in the USA, and if this use of a mother's maiden name could be the
reason, versus the usual assmption of a name change occuring after
emigration.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Surnames/"A.K.A." #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Regarding this surnames discussion.....

I recently spoke to a gentleman born in Drohobycz in the 1920s who had
always used his mother's maiden name as his surname for the same reasons
mentioned in various posts: his parents only had a religious marriage, not
a civil one, so he had officially been given his mother's surname, and kept
it. Interestingly enough, his father's surname had also been *his* mother's
surname, so in many Galician famlies there were long histories of women's
names being carried down at least through one generation, thoroughly
confusing genealogists.

Years ago I was stumped when I found my great-grandmother's death
certificate where her name was written as:

"Henrietta Danziger A.K.A. Immerglick"

Her family had only known her, after her second marriage--to Samuel
DANIGER--as "Henrietta Danziger" and that was the surname given to the one
child she had >from that marriage. No one had ever heard anything about
"IMMERGLICK." It remained a mystery until I recently found Samuel's NYC
death certificate where it indicated that his mother's maiden name had been
"Immerglick." The "also known as" most likely came because this had been
his legal name when he emigrated, and which he was initially known as in
this country, before he reverted to his father's name. (Perhaps chosen
because it was more pleasant-sounding than Immerglick!)

All these mysteries have a solution.....eventually! I'd be curious to know
if other genners have come across this "A.K.A" wrtten on any vital record
documents in the USA, and if this use of a mother's maiden name could be the
reason, versus the usual assmption of a name change occuring after
emigration.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@...


Help translating birth records from German/Polish #galicia

Billie Stein <billie@...>
 

I just received copies of several birth records >from the Przemysl
Archives through the JRI-Poland shopping cart system.

I was able to decipher most of the information, but got stuck on
the occupations. I've posted two viewmate files, for which I'd
appreciate help in translating the handwritten portions.
On the first file, VM6435, the details refer to the father: His
given and surname (Simon Lamm), his occupation ???, and his town:
Sieniawa, and then something which seems to refer to another
record or set of records. What is this? Do these records still
exist, and is there any way I can get hold of them?
The second file, VM6436 refers to the mother: Her name and her
parents names (Liftshe Glanz, daughter of Josef Chaim and Bine
Glanz), his occupation ??? and his town: Sieniawa.
The direct links are:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6435
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6436

Any help you can offer would be greatly appreciated.

Please reply privately.

Billie Stein
Givatayim ISRAEL
Researching >from Belarus: DINNIN (Mogilev), PLOTKIN
(Bobruisk/Mogilev), RUBENSTEIN (Bobruisk)
from Galicia : LAMM, GLANTZ (Sieniawa) STEIN, JAKOB
(Tarnow/Zukowice Nowe)
from Ukraine: HOFFMAN (Yashin)


Re: A Surname Puzzle: Sheyna Taube ROKHALAFSKY vs. Sheyna TAUBE #general

Mel Werbach <mel@...>
 

I received eleven responses to my inquiry concerning
whether Taube was most likely my ancestor's second
given name or her maiden name. All but two (including
those with a lot of experience viewing Jewish names
from that time period and location) believed that
Taube was probably her second given name. Thus,
ROKHALAFSKY (the maiden name stated on her son's death
certificate) was probably accurate.

A hearty thank you to the JewishGenners who responded.
Your help is most appreciated.

Mel Werbach

Researching
HORENSTEIN, KOMISAR, KANFER, KORENBLIT, VERBUKH from
Volhynia, Podolia and Kiev guberniyas, Ukraine;
AUZENBERG, LEWINOWSKI or LUDWINOWSKI, RUBINSKI,
SEJNENSKI >from Suwalki, Poland; MISHURSKY >from Kovne, Lithuania


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Help translating birth records from German/Polish #galicia

Billie Stein <billie@...>
 

I just received copies of several birth records >from the Przemysl
Archives through the JRI-Poland shopping cart system.

I was able to decipher most of the information, but got stuck on
the occupations. I've posted two viewmate files, for which I'd
appreciate help in translating the handwritten portions.
On the first file, VM6435, the details refer to the father: His
given and surname (Simon Lamm), his occupation ???, and his town:
Sieniawa, and then something which seems to refer to another
record or set of records. What is this? Do these records still
exist, and is there any way I can get hold of them?
The second file, VM6436 refers to the mother: Her name and her
parents names (Liftshe Glanz, daughter of Josef Chaim and Bine
Glanz), his occupation ??? and his town: Sieniawa.
The direct links are:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6435
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6436

Any help you can offer would be greatly appreciated.

Please reply privately.

Billie Stein
Givatayim ISRAEL
Researching >from Belarus: DINNIN (Mogilev), PLOTKIN
(Bobruisk/Mogilev), RUBENSTEIN (Bobruisk)
from Galicia : LAMM, GLANTZ (Sieniawa) STEIN, JAKOB
(Tarnow/Zukowice Nowe)
from Ukraine: HOFFMAN (Yashin)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: A Surname Puzzle: Sheyna Taube ROKHALAFSKY vs. Sheyna TAUBE #general

Mel Werbach <mel@...>
 

I received eleven responses to my inquiry concerning
whether Taube was most likely my ancestor's second
given name or her maiden name. All but two (including
those with a lot of experience viewing Jewish names
from that time period and location) believed that
Taube was probably her second given name. Thus,
ROKHALAFSKY (the maiden name stated on her son's death
certificate) was probably accurate.

A hearty thank you to the JewishGenners who responded.
Your help is most appreciated.

Mel Werbach

Researching
HORENSTEIN, KOMISAR, KANFER, KORENBLIT, VERBUKH from
Volhynia, Podolia and Kiev guberniyas, Ukraine;
AUZENBERG, LEWINOWSKI or LUDWINOWSKI, RUBINSKI,
SEJNENSKI >from Suwalki, Poland; MISHURSKY >from Kovne, Lithuania


Fw: need help about Prezmysl #galicia

arie meir
 

Hi to all of you

Here is a list of people who were conected to the orphnege in Przemysl

before world war 2. If by any chance of them is still alive please conect

me.

Here are the names: Maurycy Briefer, Dr. Bernard Gans, Dr. Jakob Glanz, Dr.

Joachim Goldfarb, Dr. Leo and Leonora Probstein, Moshe Scheinbach, Mina

Mintz, Maria Mester, Jakob Hirschfeld, Rabbi Schmelkes, Roza and Henryk

Blatt, Deborah Citron, Rosa Diamant, Bertha Gans, Dr. Leib Landau, Lola

Mantel, and Adella Margulies.

Thanks

Arieh Mayer

Haifa Israel

meir1935@...


New GGSC member Israel Pickholtz #galicia

Shelley K. Pollero
 

The Gesher Galicia Steering Committee is happy to announce that Israel
Pickholtz has accepted our invitation to join the GGSC as a Member At Large=
.
We very much look forward to his participation.

Since Israel=B9s main work is a single surname, most of East Galicia is of
interest. The Pikholz families fanned out >from Skalat and Rozdol. His own
specific family had lived for a time in Zalosce and Podkamen.

Israel is also doing single-surname research on Kwoczka, who are all from
Zalosce, but who may be a variation of the Kaczka fam,ily, many of whom were
in Skalat.

His most recent side project is the entire Hevron cemetery, which is now
accessible online. He is a member of the Israel Genealogical Society.

Israel Pickholtz may be reached at <IsraelP@...>

Welcome, Israel! We're happy to have you with us!

Shelley K. Pollero, Coordinator
Gesher Galicia
Severna Park, Maryland
geshergalicia@...
http://www.jewishgen.org/Galicia/


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Fw: need help about Prezmysl #galicia

arie meir
 

Hi to all of you

Here is a list of people who were conected to the orphnege in Przemysl

before world war 2. If by any chance of them is still alive please conect

me.

Here are the names: Maurycy Briefer, Dr. Bernard Gans, Dr. Jakob Glanz, Dr.

Joachim Goldfarb, Dr. Leo and Leonora Probstein, Moshe Scheinbach, Mina

Mintz, Maria Mester, Jakob Hirschfeld, Rabbi Schmelkes, Roza and Henryk

Blatt, Deborah Citron, Rosa Diamant, Bertha Gans, Dr. Leib Landau, Lola

Mantel, and Adella Margulies.

Thanks

Arieh Mayer

Haifa Israel

meir1935@...


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia New GGSC member Israel Pickholtz #galicia

Shelley K. Pollero
 

The Gesher Galicia Steering Committee is happy to announce that Israel
Pickholtz has accepted our invitation to join the GGSC as a Member At Large=
.
We very much look forward to his participation.

Since Israel=B9s main work is a single surname, most of East Galicia is of
interest. The Pikholz families fanned out >from Skalat and Rozdol. His own
specific family had lived for a time in Zalosce and Podkamen.

Israel is also doing single-surname research on Kwoczka, who are all from
Zalosce, but who may be a variation of the Kaczka fam,ily, many of whom were
in Skalat.

His most recent side project is the entire Hevron cemetery, which is now
accessible online. He is a member of the Israel Genealogical Society.

Israel Pickholtz may be reached at <IsraelP@...>

Welcome, Israel! We're happy to have you with us!

Shelley K. Pollero, Coordinator
Gesher Galicia
Severna Park, Maryland
geshergalicia@...
http://www.jewishgen.org/Galicia/