Date   

Test Results #dna

sbloom@...
 

On 2005.11.29, Pam Weston <pweston@sandboxdp.com> wrote:

I recently received several links to the DNA test I had done on my
father's DNA. The connections are showing up as links to people
through the DNA samples >from their mothers.
[...]
I'm afraid I'm just a bit lost. Help please.
First, you should probably email the company that took the tests and
ask them specifcally what was done. I know of at least one company
that explains stuff fairly well in email and phone calls, but indeed
has a somewhat confusing website, especially if you are not used to
scientific jargon.

It sounds like your father provided a sample for both Y-DNA and
mt-dna tests. Y-DNA would only link to men. Mt-dna could link to
women or men, but only through their maternal line (i.e., the
terminal point only can be a man--no ancestor in the middle can be
a man).

If you are linking to dna samples >from other's mothers, it *must* be
Mt-DNA (as far as I know--geneticists can correct me if Im wrong).
Therefore, you are related to these folks via your father's mother's
mother's mother's..etc. (i.e., it can be only through his maternal
line).

I think the tightness of the the link is generally going to be
stronger for Y-DNA matches, because I think the Mtu-DNA features are
looking for features over longer time periods (many generations). A
geneticist can explain it better.

A female does indeed inherit DNA >from her father, but only in the
form of X chromosomes. A Y-DNA test can only test DNA >from a
Y-chromosome (which only males have). So, though you get DNA from
your dad, there isn't yet an available test that can trace this (at
least not for the purposes you mention).

In other words, the tests that are now available can not equally
test for relationships amongst any two people.

A male can only test a pure male line and his pure maternal line,
generally with tighter results for the Y-DNA. A female only test a
pure maternal line. You would need a male relative such as a father

There must be tests out there that can test for more general
relationships (paternity tests work on female babies, don't they>),
but for whatever reason they can't be adopted for genealogical
purposes at this point. Perhaps someone else can explain why. Are
they only accurate over one generation?

Steve Bloom
Farmville, VA


DNA Research #DNA Test Results #dna

sbloom@...
 

On 2005.11.29, Pam Weston <pweston@sandboxdp.com> wrote:

I recently received several links to the DNA test I had done on my
father's DNA. The connections are showing up as links to people
through the DNA samples >from their mothers.
[...]
I'm afraid I'm just a bit lost. Help please.
First, you should probably email the company that took the tests and
ask them specifcally what was done. I know of at least one company
that explains stuff fairly well in email and phone calls, but indeed
has a somewhat confusing website, especially if you are not used to
scientific jargon.

It sounds like your father provided a sample for both Y-DNA and
mt-dna tests. Y-DNA would only link to men. Mt-dna could link to
women or men, but only through their maternal line (i.e., the
terminal point only can be a man--no ancestor in the middle can be
a man).

If you are linking to dna samples >from other's mothers, it *must* be
Mt-DNA (as far as I know--geneticists can correct me if Im wrong).
Therefore, you are related to these folks via your father's mother's
mother's mother's..etc. (i.e., it can be only through his maternal
line).

I think the tightness of the the link is generally going to be
stronger for Y-DNA matches, because I think the Mtu-DNA features are
looking for features over longer time periods (many generations). A
geneticist can explain it better.

A female does indeed inherit DNA >from her father, but only in the
form of X chromosomes. A Y-DNA test can only test DNA >from a
Y-chromosome (which only males have). So, though you get DNA from
your dad, there isn't yet an available test that can trace this (at
least not for the purposes you mention).

In other words, the tests that are now available can not equally
test for relationships amongst any two people.

A male can only test a pure male line and his pure maternal line,
generally with tighter results for the Y-DNA. A female only test a
pure maternal line. You would need a male relative such as a father

There must be tests out there that can test for more general
relationships (paternity tests work on female babies, don't they>),
but for whatever reason they can't be adopted for genealogical
purposes at this point. Perhaps someone else can explain why. Are
they only accurate over one generation?

Steve Bloom
Farmville, VA


Wesola Street Cemetery in Lodz #lodz #poland

S Grossnass <s@...>
 

bsd
Dear Lodz Group
I found out that descendents of mine are buried in the old
Jewish cemetery which was at Wesola Street. (Founded 1811)
I am indeed devastated to know that this cemetery was destroyed mainly
during the post war period and it is now a built up area. I would really
like to find out what happened to all the human remains at Wesola Street
What I also need
desperately is a pre-war map showing the position of the cemetary at Wesola
street, and I need to see the lists and other information which I know has
been published. . Here in London UK the British Library does not have
these
publications. Does anyone know where else in London it would be possible to
see these publications? Also, does anyone else have relatives or
ancestors buried in Wesola Street?
Looking forward to hearing >from you
Best wishes
Sheila
Researching PINCZEWSKI; NOMBERG, WEINGOTT and descendants of Rabbi Elya
Chaim MEISEL


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Wesola Street Cemetery in Lodz #lodz #poland

S Grossnass <s@...>
 

bsd
Dear Lodz Group
I found out that descendents of mine are buried in the old
Jewish cemetery which was at Wesola Street. (Founded 1811)
I am indeed devastated to know that this cemetery was destroyed mainly
during the post war period and it is now a built up area. I would really
like to find out what happened to all the human remains at Wesola Street
What I also need
desperately is a pre-war map showing the position of the cemetary at Wesola
street, and I need to see the lists and other information which I know has
been published. . Here in London UK the British Library does not have
these
publications. Does anyone know where else in London it would be possible to
see these publications? Also, does anyone else have relatives or
ancestors buried in Wesola Street?
Looking forward to hearing >from you
Best wishes
Sheila
Researching PINCZEWSKI; NOMBERG, WEINGOTT and descendants of Rabbi Elya
Chaim MEISEL


Re: Service with the British army in the 1890s #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Robert Israel" < israel@math.ubc.ca > wrote:

Doug Mason < dmason@alphalink.com.au > wrote:

In 1894, at the age of 18, my wife's great-grandfather was recruited in
the British Army.
His enlistment in the Grenadier Guards was for "Short Service (3 years
with the Colors, and 9 years in the Reserve.)"
Was this likely to have been a voluntary enlistment or a form of
compulsory "National Service"?
I'm pretty sure this would have been voluntary. There was no
conscription in Britain until 1916.
In fact, I believe that in 1914 young men joined up in droves. It was only
later as Robert points out, presumably after the vast losses at the Somme
etc, that Britain introduced conscription.

See http://collections.iwm.org.uk/server/show/ConWebDoc.1271 >from the
Imperial War Museum regarding "When was conscription introduced during the
First World War?" January 1916 apparently.

I noticed while looking at the above link that it directs one to a page
regarding Family History http://www.iwm.org.uk/server.php?show=nav.00100a
with links such as "Tracing POW's".

http://collections.iwm.org.uk/server/show/ConWebDoc.1272 regarding "National
Service" says that the first National Service Acts were passed during WWII.
I don't know what the difference is between conscription and National
Service.

http://www.ppu.org.uk/learn/infodocs/st_conscription_l.html (the Peace
Pledge Union Project) says that while conscription was first developed in
Prussia in the 18th C and spread throughout the Continent, it never became a
British tradition. Apparently it was considered to smack of militarism.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov, Belarus)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Service with the British army in the 1890s #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Robert Israel" < israel@math.ubc.ca > wrote:

Doug Mason < dmason@alphalink.com.au > wrote:

In 1894, at the age of 18, my wife's great-grandfather was recruited in
the British Army.
His enlistment in the Grenadier Guards was for "Short Service (3 years
with the Colors, and 9 years in the Reserve.)"
Was this likely to have been a voluntary enlistment or a form of
compulsory "National Service"?
I'm pretty sure this would have been voluntary. There was no
conscription in Britain until 1916.
In fact, I believe that in 1914 young men joined up in droves. It was only
later as Robert points out, presumably after the vast losses at the Somme
etc, that Britain introduced conscription.

See http://collections.iwm.org.uk/server/show/ConWebDoc.1271 >from the
Imperial War Museum regarding "When was conscription introduced during the
First World War?" January 1916 apparently.

I noticed while looking at the above link that it directs one to a page
regarding Family History http://www.iwm.org.uk/server.php?show=nav.00100a
with links such as "Tracing POW's".

http://collections.iwm.org.uk/server/show/ConWebDoc.1272 regarding "National
Service" says that the first National Service Acts were passed during WWII.
I don't know what the difference is between conscription and National
Service.

http://www.ppu.org.uk/learn/infodocs/st_conscription_l.html (the Peace
Pledge Union Project) says that while conscription was first developed in
Prussia in the 18th C and spread throughout the Continent, it never became a
British tradition. Apparently it was considered to smack of militarism.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov, Belarus)


Service with the British ARmy in the 1890s #general

HPOLLINS@...
 

This would have been voluntary enlistment. There was no conscription in
Britain until 1916.
I doubt if in the 1880s they looked at his birth certificate any more than
they did in the First World War.. There are plenty of stories of under-age
soldiers in the First World War who were obviously recruited without reference
to birth certificates.. A Jewish boy, Robert Barnett (real name Raphael
Gluckstein) , was killed on 19 December 1914, aged 15. The Commonwealth War
Graves Commission records that he was 'one of the youngest battle casualties
of the war'.

Harold Pollins
Oxford, England

In a message dated 29/11/2005 21:18:55 GMT Standard Time,
dmason@alphalink.com.au writes:

In 1894, at the age of 18, my wife's great-grandfather was recruited in
the British Army.

His enlistment in the Grenadier Guards was for "Short Service (3 years
with the Colors, and 9 years in the Reserve.)"

Was this likely to have been a voluntary enlistment or a form of
compulsory "National Service"?

Would they have looked at his birth certificate or would they have taken
his stated age on trust?

Doug Mason
Melbourne
Australia >>>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Service with the British ARmy in the 1890s #general

HPOLLINS@...
 

This would have been voluntary enlistment. There was no conscription in
Britain until 1916.
I doubt if in the 1880s they looked at his birth certificate any more than
they did in the First World War.. There are plenty of stories of under-age
soldiers in the First World War who were obviously recruited without reference
to birth certificates.. A Jewish boy, Robert Barnett (real name Raphael
Gluckstein) , was killed on 19 December 1914, aged 15. The Commonwealth War
Graves Commission records that he was 'one of the youngest battle casualties
of the war'.

Harold Pollins
Oxford, England

In a message dated 29/11/2005 21:18:55 GMT Standard Time,
dmason@alphalink.com.au writes:

In 1894, at the age of 18, my wife's great-grandfather was recruited in
the British Army.

His enlistment in the Grenadier Guards was for "Short Service (3 years
with the Colors, and 9 years in the Reserve.)"

Was this likely to have been a voluntary enlistment or a form of
compulsory "National Service"?

Would they have looked at his birth certificate or would they have taken
his stated age on trust?

Doug Mason
Melbourne
Australia >>>


Thanks: "Schando" for Alexander #general

Doug Mason
 

I recently posed the question about any relationship between my uncle's
formal name of Alexander and the name of "Schando", by which he was known
within the family.

Many thanks to all who responded and showed me this was not uncommon, with
variants such as Schandi being provided.

Most advised me "szandor" is the Hungarian form of Alexander. My forebears
came >from Moravia (Boskowitz and Jihlava), not Hungary. However, some told
me Hungarian-speaking Jews in Moravia used the name.

One respondent advised me: The authoritative dictionary for Austrian
usage, the "Oesterreichisches Worterbuch", 38th edition, 1997, has the
following entry on page 694: Xandl (maennlicher Vorname): Alexander.

Thank you to the Jewishgen "family" for taking the time to help me. It has
helped clear a question that dogged me for over 60 years.

I will chat about this with my Mum next time we speak. She was born in
Vienna in March 1911.

Doug Mason
Melbourne
Australia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Thanks: "Schando" for Alexander #general

Doug Mason
 

I recently posed the question about any relationship between my uncle's
formal name of Alexander and the name of "Schando", by which he was known
within the family.

Many thanks to all who responded and showed me this was not uncommon, with
variants such as Schandi being provided.

Most advised me "szandor" is the Hungarian form of Alexander. My forebears
came >from Moravia (Boskowitz and Jihlava), not Hungary. However, some told
me Hungarian-speaking Jews in Moravia used the name.

One respondent advised me: The authoritative dictionary for Austrian
usage, the "Oesterreichisches Worterbuch", 38th edition, 1997, has the
following entry on page 694: Xandl (maennlicher Vorname): Alexander.

Thank you to the Jewishgen "family" for taking the time to help me. It has
helped clear a question that dogged me for over 60 years.

I will chat about this with my Mum next time we speak. She was born in
Vienna in March 1911.

Doug Mason
Melbourne
Australia


Re: "Schando" for Alexander #austria-czech

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Wed, 30 Nov 2005 05:10:50 UTC, israel@math.ubc.ca (Robert Israel)
opined:

Stan Goodman < SPAM_FOILER@hashkedim.com > wrote:

Or maybe Austria and Hungary were at one time a single entity.
They weren't, although there were various twists and turns. They
were parts of the same empire.

For comparison, the same Greek "Alexander" has got into Arabic as
"Iskandar", because the first original syllable was mistaken to be the
Arabic definite article and the first two consonants have been turned
around, by either children or adults, I do not know. The point is that
"Sandor" and "Iskandar" are not "equivalents" (whatever that may be)
of "Alexander", but the result of mispronunciation of the original,
much as "Moishe" is not an "equivalent" of "Moshe", but a corrupted
pronunciation.
Be careful what you call corrupted. We really don't know how the
original Moshe pronounced his name, but I would guess he didn't
sound much like a 21st century Israeli. "Moishe" simply uses a
traditional Ashkenazi pronunciation system, which is no less correct
than Sephardi pronunciations, and may in some cases be closer to
the original than Modern Hebrew is.
No, it is unlikely in the extreme that "Moishe" Rabeinu pronounced his
name with a diphthong vowel. Much of the "traditional Ashkenazi
pronunciation" that you mention is the result of having originated in
proximity to Medieval French and German, Indo-European languages with
their own "traditions", lacking phonemes that Semitic languages need.
The Ashkenazi pronunciation of *Resh*, for example, is more like the R
of the French-German border region than anything that occurs in any
Semitic language. To argue that one pronunciation is as authentic as
the other is an extreme example of Political Correctness.

One might as well argue that the Patriarchs (Avrum, YItzik, and
Yankel) spoke Yiddish.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is: http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: "Schando" for Alexander #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Wed, 30 Nov 2005 05:10:50 UTC, israel@math.ubc.ca (Robert Israel)
opined:

Stan Goodman < SPAM_FOILER@hashkedim.com > wrote:

Or maybe Austria and Hungary were at one time a single entity.
They weren't, although there were various twists and turns. They
were parts of the same empire.

For comparison, the same Greek "Alexander" has got into Arabic as
"Iskandar", because the first original syllable was mistaken to be the
Arabic definite article and the first two consonants have been turned
around, by either children or adults, I do not know. The point is that
"Sandor" and "Iskandar" are not "equivalents" (whatever that may be)
of "Alexander", but the result of mispronunciation of the original,
much as "Moishe" is not an "equivalent" of "Moshe", but a corrupted
pronunciation.
Be careful what you call corrupted. We really don't know how the
original Moshe pronounced his name, but I would guess he didn't
sound much like a 21st century Israeli. "Moishe" simply uses a
traditional Ashkenazi pronunciation system, which is no less correct
than Sephardi pronunciations, and may in some cases be closer to
the original than Modern Hebrew is.
No, it is unlikely in the extreme that "Moishe" Rabeinu pronounced his
name with a diphthong vowel. Much of the "traditional Ashkenazi
pronunciation" that you mention is the result of having originated in
proximity to Medieval French and German, Indo-European languages with
their own "traditions", lacking phonemes that Semitic languages need.
The Ashkenazi pronunciation of *Resh*, for example, is more like the R
of the French-German border region than anything that occurs in any
Semitic language. To argue that one pronunciation is as authentic as
the other is an extreme example of Political Correctness.

One might as well argue that the Patriarchs (Avrum, YItzik, and
Yankel) spoke Yiddish.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is: http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form there.


Re: Benjamin VAN PRAAG #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

I am confused as I saw this reply to a message but the
original query was not on the General Discussion
group: So how do I reply to William?

"Wim van Praag wrote on 29 Nov 2005 in
Soc.genealogy.jewish:
I search for the family-tree of my grandfather,
Benjamin VAN PRAAG. Born 30-09-1870 in Amsterdam, died
2-7-1943 Sobibor. He was full time treasurer of ANDB
(Dutch Diamond Workers Association). Married to Celina
Hollander, born 25-12-1887 in Amsterdam, died 2-7-1943
Sobibor." Evertjan Hannivoort then replied: You could
order his "gezinskaart" >from the Amsterdam
municipalarchive: < http://tinyurl.com/ck4qn > "

1. I recently came across an early Jewish van PRAAG:
Joanna Joseph van PRAAGH born in Nikolsburg [now
called Mikulov], Moravia [Czechoslovakia]. She died
before 1747 in the Netherlands. Her father is given as
Joseph Moses van Praagh

The fact that this branch of the family came from
Nikolsburg [or perhaps travelled there!] is very
interesting. Nikolsburg had a very old Jewish
community and a famous Yeshiva. "Substantial numbers
of Jewish merchants >from Nikolsburg travelled to
Leipzig for the fairs every year, on the way joining
the far larger contingent >from Prague" - see:

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Nikolsburg/leipnik.htm

The Jewish cemetery is a gem. There are seven PRAGER
and one PREGER graves in Nikolburg. This name could
have mutated to Van PRAAG. However, I suspect that
there must have been multiple origins for this large
Dutch Jewish clan - perhaps all >from Bohemia and
Moravia originally?

2. If you look at the IGI records you will find over
200 van PRAAG >from the Netherlands stretching way
back. Many appear to be Jewish. The earliest is record
listed is: Aaron Mozes van PRAAG marrying Belie COHEN
in the Hague on 7 May 1768.

3. I did some research on the family of an early
Bohemian immigrant to the USA and wrote the about his
descendants on the Austria-Czech SIG [see SIG message archives S.E.
ROSENBAUM of Goltsch Jenikau, Caslauer Kreis - 29 Sept
and 8 Oct 2005 for full details]: ... in the 1880 [US]
census Henry ZELDENRUST's mother Dena {a widow}, was
born in Alsace [her mother's home] but
her father [born 1810] came >from Holland; he lives
with them in NY snd is listed as Jacob Nanprague. This
is a mistranscription for VAN PRAGUE - a 6-year old
Jewish boy Emanuel VAN PRAGUE >from Holland can be seen
in the 1891 census of England and Wales. In other US
censuses, Jacob can clearly be seen as VAN PRAGUE.

The Jewish Museum in Amsterdam may have an archived
*van PRAAG* family tree giving more clues as to the
origins of this family.

Celia Male [U.K.]

MODERATOR NOTE: When Celia quotes in her message >from the Austria-Czech list,
she does so >from her own message to that list.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: Benjamin VAN PRAAG #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

I am confused as I saw this reply to a message but the
original query was not on the General Discussion
group: So how do I reply to William?

"Wim van Praag wrote on 29 Nov 2005 in
Soc.genealogy.jewish:
I search for the family-tree of my grandfather,
Benjamin VAN PRAAG. Born 30-09-1870 in Amsterdam, died
2-7-1943 Sobibor. He was full time treasurer of ANDB
(Dutch Diamond Workers Association). Married to Celina
Hollander, born 25-12-1887 in Amsterdam, died 2-7-1943
Sobibor." Evertjan Hannivoort then replied: You could
order his "gezinskaart" >from the Amsterdam
municipalarchive: < http://tinyurl.com/ck4qn > "

1. I recently came across an early Jewish van PRAAG:
Joanna Joseph van PRAAGH born in Nikolsburg [now
called Mikulov], Moravia [Czechoslovakia]. She died
before 1747 in the Netherlands. Her father is given as
Joseph Moses van Praagh

The fact that this branch of the family came from
Nikolsburg [or perhaps travelled there!] is very
interesting. Nikolsburg had a very old Jewish
community and a famous Yeshiva. "Substantial numbers
of Jewish merchants >from Nikolsburg travelled to
Leipzig for the fairs every year, on the way joining
the far larger contingent >from Prague" - see:

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Nikolsburg/leipnik.htm

The Jewish cemetery is a gem. There are seven PRAGER
and one PREGER graves in Nikolburg. This name could
have mutated to Van PRAAG. However, I suspect that
there must have been multiple origins for this large
Dutch Jewish clan - perhaps all >from Bohemia and
Moravia originally?

2. If you look at the IGI records you will find over
200 van PRAAG >from the Netherlands stretching way
back. Many appear to be Jewish. The earliest is record
listed is: Aaron Mozes van PRAAG marrying Belie COHEN
in the Hague on 7 May 1768.

3. I did some research on the family of an early
Bohemian immigrant to the USA and wrote the about his
descendants on the Austria-Czech SIG [see SIG message archives S.E.
ROSENBAUM of Goltsch Jenikau, Caslauer Kreis - 29 Sept
and 8 Oct 2005 for full details]: ... in the 1880 [US]
census Henry ZELDENRUST's mother Dena {a widow}, was
born in Alsace [her mother's home] but
her father [born 1810] came >from Holland; he lives
with them in NY snd is listed as Jacob Nanprague. This
is a mistranscription for VAN PRAGUE - a 6-year old
Jewish boy Emanuel VAN PRAGUE >from Holland can be seen
in the 1891 census of England and Wales. In other US
censuses, Jacob can clearly be seen as VAN PRAGUE.

The Jewish Museum in Amsterdam may have an archived
*van PRAAG* family tree giving more clues as to the
origins of this family.

Celia Male [U.K.]

MODERATOR NOTE: When Celia quotes in her message >from the Austria-Czech list,
she does so >from her own message to that list.


INTRO - researching GROSSMANN family from Breslau, formerly Germany #germany

ec.grossmann@...
 

Hello GerSig,
I just joined the group. I have been doing genealogy research for one year.
I consider myself to be a novice in doing German Jewish Genealogy research.
I live in St. Augustin near by Bonn, Germany. My native language is German
and I also know a little of English.
I consider myself intermediate in using a computer. My experience in using
the Internet also is intermediate.

I have identified the names and birth and death dates of my grandparents,
the names and birth dates of my great grandparents and the names of my
great great grandparents.

One grandfather only, named GROSSMANN, and his ancestors were Jews. His
father is born in Uzhhorod (formerly Ungcar, Hungaria, now Ukraine) und got
marry and lived in Breslau, Silesia, now Wroclaw, Poland. My primary
research goals now are to find out other survivors of the Holocaust than my
female cousin and my two brothers.

The family names and towns that I am researching are:

BURGHEIM Breslau (?)
DANZIGER - 1879 in Breslau
GROSSMANN - 1847 in Uzhhorod, today Ukraine
GROSSMANN - Breslau, a part of the family later in Berlin
POLLAK - Breslau, who was said to have gone about Berlin to USA in the 1930s
ROTH 1847 in Uzhhorod, today Ukraine
SCHIEGE - probably Breslau and Berlin
SOHN - probably Breslau and Berlin.

Eckart Grossmann, ec.grossmann@gmx.de D 53757 St. Augustin, Germany


German SIG #Germany INTRO - researching GROSSMANN family from Breslau, formerly Germany #germany

ec.grossmann@...
 

Hello GerSig,
I just joined the group. I have been doing genealogy research for one year.
I consider myself to be a novice in doing German Jewish Genealogy research.
I live in St. Augustin near by Bonn, Germany. My native language is German
and I also know a little of English.
I consider myself intermediate in using a computer. My experience in using
the Internet also is intermediate.

I have identified the names and birth and death dates of my grandparents,
the names and birth dates of my great grandparents and the names of my
great great grandparents.

One grandfather only, named GROSSMANN, and his ancestors were Jews. His
father is born in Uzhhorod (formerly Ungcar, Hungaria, now Ukraine) und got
marry and lived in Breslau, Silesia, now Wroclaw, Poland. My primary
research goals now are to find out other survivors of the Holocaust than my
female cousin and my two brothers.

The family names and towns that I am researching are:

BURGHEIM Breslau (?)
DANZIGER - 1879 in Breslau
GROSSMANN - 1847 in Uzhhorod, today Ukraine
GROSSMANN - Breslau, a part of the family later in Berlin
POLLAK - Breslau, who was said to have gone about Berlin to USA in the 1930s
ROTH 1847 in Uzhhorod, today Ukraine
SCHIEGE - probably Breslau and Berlin
SOHN - probably Breslau and Berlin.

Eckart Grossmann, ec.grossmann@gmx.de D 53757 St. Augustin, Germany


Re: Philipp CAHN Koeln 1887 #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

Dear Ben,
the document is a teaching licence to be a Jewish religion teacher in
schools - the marks are not very exciting, he just scraped through in
all the Bibel-reated subjects with "genuegend" (satifactory), which is
the last mark before failing. More interesting for you may be the
reference to his birth place Westhoven in the county of "Muelheim on the
Rhein". This "Muelheim am Rhein" does not exist any more as
independent locality, the other more known Muelheim (all without the h!)
is" Muelheim an der Ruhr", but references to a Muelheim Street and a
Muelheim Beach and a Muelheim Port as well as a Westhover Weg (Path), a
Westhoven Berg (Hill) etc. turn up in the Cologne street register in the
South Eastern part of today's city of Koeln.
My recommendation is therefore to try to get residential information
from the archives of the city of Koeln where the registration documents
of Muelheim/Rhein may hopefully have been moved to after the unification
with Cologne. Philip CAHN was evidently born there and possibly his
parents may also have married and/or died there.
I wish you lots of success with your research

Fritz Neubauer, North Germany


German SIG #Germany Re: Philipp CAHN Koeln 1887 #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

Dear Ben,
the document is a teaching licence to be a Jewish religion teacher in
schools - the marks are not very exciting, he just scraped through in
all the Bibel-reated subjects with "genuegend" (satifactory), which is
the last mark before failing. More interesting for you may be the
reference to his birth place Westhoven in the county of "Muelheim on the
Rhein". This "Muelheim am Rhein" does not exist any more as
independent locality, the other more known Muelheim (all without the h!)
is" Muelheim an der Ruhr", but references to a Muelheim Street and a
Muelheim Beach and a Muelheim Port as well as a Westhover Weg (Path), a
Westhoven Berg (Hill) etc. turn up in the Cologne street register in the
South Eastern part of today's city of Koeln.
My recommendation is therefore to try to get residential information
from the archives of the city of Koeln where the registration documents
of Muelheim/Rhein may hopefully have been moved to after the unification
with Cologne. Philip CAHN was evidently born there and possibly his
parents may also have married and/or died there.
I wish you lots of success with your research

Fritz Neubauer, North Germany


Re: Philipp CAHN Koeln 1887 #germany

Sylvia Stawski <sylvia@...>
 

Hello Ben,
Yes, this is a certifate >from the training progam for religious teacher
and chazan by a foundation (Stiftung) in Muenster, more specifically for
the subject of biblical and post-biblical history. I am sure that
somebody who is more fluent in German than I am, could translate it for
you. If nobody volunteers, I could try.

All the best, Sylvia Stawski, Beerse, Belgium


German SIG #Germany Re: Philipp CAHN Koeln 1887 #germany

Sylvia Stawski <sylvia@...>
 

Hello Ben,
Yes, this is a certifate >from the training progam for religious teacher
and chazan by a foundation (Stiftung) in Muenster, more specifically for
the subject of biblical and post-biblical history. I am sure that
somebody who is more fluent in German than I am, could translate it for
you. If nobody volunteers, I could try.

All the best, Sylvia Stawski, Beerse, Belgium