Date   

JewishGen Education - Independent Study July 2012 #lithuania

Nancy Holden
 

Ever dream of a genealogical search companion? JewishGen is offering
an Independent Study class. Your topic, your schedule, your questions.

Nancy Holden will be available July 1 -July 30 for projects centered
on research in the United States or the Pale of Russia (Latvia to
Southern Russia). This session will follow the format of other
JewishGen Education classes using a Forum and one-on -one consultations
via the internet.

Have a genealogical problem, conundrum or hit a brick wall? Want to
know what records exist in Eastern Europe, hire a researcher or travel
to an archive, organize your research or write your family history?

In order to qualify for this class we ask that you submit a paragraph
about your project. Your SURNAME, your towns, your goals. Go to
www.jewishgen.org/education Application can be found by clicking
"Requirements and Course Details"
http://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=30000

This will be a Do-it-Yourself, computer-based, online seminar open 24/7.
Individual readings will be posted according to your research needs.
To get the most out of this course, you will need to post your family
data to the Forum so the instructor can interact with you on your project.

Is this course right for you? This is beyond the basics. Read the course
descriptions to see if what you want to do is covered by a course already
being taught. If not, this may be the perfect class. Students should be
comfortable on the internet and able to upload and download pdfs, images
and word documents (Directions included in the class materials).

Enrollment is limited. Please send your qualifying paragraph to
nholden@... for consideration. Students will be notified of
enrollment procedures by email.

Nancy Holden
nholden@...


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania JewishGen Education - Independent Study July 2012 #lithuania

Nancy Holden
 

Ever dream of a genealogical search companion? JewishGen is offering
an Independent Study class. Your topic, your schedule, your questions.

Nancy Holden will be available July 1 -July 30 for projects centered
on research in the United States or the Pale of Russia (Latvia to
Southern Russia). This session will follow the format of other
JewishGen Education classes using a Forum and one-on -one consultations
via the internet.

Have a genealogical problem, conundrum or hit a brick wall? Want to
know what records exist in Eastern Europe, hire a researcher or travel
to an archive, organize your research or write your family history?

In order to qualify for this class we ask that you submit a paragraph
about your project. Your SURNAME, your towns, your goals. Go to
www.jewishgen.org/education Application can be found by clicking
"Requirements and Course Details"
http://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=30000

This will be a Do-it-Yourself, computer-based, online seminar open 24/7.
Individual readings will be posted according to your research needs.
To get the most out of this course, you will need to post your family
data to the Forum so the instructor can interact with you on your project.

Is this course right for you? This is beyond the basics. Read the course
descriptions to see if what you want to do is covered by a course already
being taught. If not, this may be the perfect class. Students should be
comfortable on the internet and able to upload and download pdfs, images
and word documents (Directions included in the class materials).

Enrollment is limited. Please send your qualifying paragraph to
nholden@... for consideration. Students will be notified of
enrollment procedures by email.

Nancy Holden
nholden@...


Re: Tsarskoye Selo Jews early 20yh c : SUNDELIOVITZ #lithuania

Jules Levin
 

On 6/18/2012 1:47 PM, Nathalie Ried wrote:

Shalom to all,

I am researching the family of my grandmother's second husband, Max
SUNDELIOWITZ, born in 1906 in Tsarskoye Selo near St Petersburg in an
assimilated, bourgeois family. Strangely, according to the papers we have,
his father's name was Charles/Karl and his mother was Leontine (!) Charlotte
SCHLOSSBERG. He had a sister named Irina and later lived in St Petersburg,
presumably until the Revolution or early 1920's . He married my grandmother
in France in 1938 and died in Auschwitz in 1944.

If any researcher has ancestors >from Tsarskoye Selo or info about the (I
suppose) small Jewish community there at the time, I would be very grateful.

Besides, my research on the Given Names Database for Charles/Karl was
fruitless. Do you have any idea what the "corresponding" Jewish first name
could be?
My greatgrandfather had a shop on Kronshtadt, selling naval
supplies--epaulettes, sabers, etc., to officers. My ggm's two brothers
were also in business there. My grandmother attended the Jewish girls'
school in Tsarskoye Selo in the 1880's. I think she stayed with a
family named Gutman there, since the name was mentioned in the family
and she always talked to my mom about Tsarskoye Selo, not Kronshtadt,
where they were registered. In 1991 I ordered some police registry
records >from Tsarskoye Selo of Gutmans permitted to live there. They
were providers of various luxury goods to the Imperial Leib Guards, the
most prestigious military unit in Russia, stationed at the Summer
Palace. Apparently their shops were lined up across the street >from the
palace. There is a Jewish cemetery in Tsarskoye Selo. It contains the
grave of a Jewish military hero awarded the Cross of St. George on the
field of battle.

At the end of the 19th Century Tsarskoye Selo may have been the most
advanced and sophisticated city in the world. It was a bourgeois suburb
with a commuter train running to St. Petersburg. It was the first fully
electrified city. Besides a synagogue there was a Catholic Church and
Protestant Church. My grandmother's native language was Russian, but
when she came to America at 15 she spoke English without an accent--they
had tutors. She learned Yiddish in Chicago. Her older sister still had
her French textbook >from the girls' school. My grandmother used to
complain to my mother that (unlike St. Petersburg!) she couldn't get
bananas in the winter in Chicago. My uncle remembered a brother, who,
he said, would always brag "we came to America [travelling] first
class!" That was life in St. Petersburg, Tsarskoye Selo, Kronshtadt,
for the Jews privileged to live there. My family names >from there are
Favisovich and Beregovsky. By the way, as near as I can tell, most of
these Jews were originally >from Lithuania.

Jules Levin
Los Angeles


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Tsarskoye Selo Jews early 20yh c : SUNDELIOVITZ #lithuania

Jules Levin
 

On 6/18/2012 1:47 PM, Nathalie Ried wrote:

Shalom to all,

I am researching the family of my grandmother's second husband, Max
SUNDELIOWITZ, born in 1906 in Tsarskoye Selo near St Petersburg in an
assimilated, bourgeois family. Strangely, according to the papers we have,
his father's name was Charles/Karl and his mother was Leontine (!) Charlotte
SCHLOSSBERG. He had a sister named Irina and later lived in St Petersburg,
presumably until the Revolution or early 1920's . He married my grandmother
in France in 1938 and died in Auschwitz in 1944.

If any researcher has ancestors >from Tsarskoye Selo or info about the (I
suppose) small Jewish community there at the time, I would be very grateful.

Besides, my research on the Given Names Database for Charles/Karl was
fruitless. Do you have any idea what the "corresponding" Jewish first name
could be?
My greatgrandfather had a shop on Kronshtadt, selling naval
supplies--epaulettes, sabers, etc., to officers. My ggm's two brothers
were also in business there. My grandmother attended the Jewish girls'
school in Tsarskoye Selo in the 1880's. I think she stayed with a
family named Gutman there, since the name was mentioned in the family
and she always talked to my mom about Tsarskoye Selo, not Kronshtadt,
where they were registered. In 1991 I ordered some police registry
records >from Tsarskoye Selo of Gutmans permitted to live there. They
were providers of various luxury goods to the Imperial Leib Guards, the
most prestigious military unit in Russia, stationed at the Summer
Palace. Apparently their shops were lined up across the street >from the
palace. There is a Jewish cemetery in Tsarskoye Selo. It contains the
grave of a Jewish military hero awarded the Cross of St. George on the
field of battle.

At the end of the 19th Century Tsarskoye Selo may have been the most
advanced and sophisticated city in the world. It was a bourgeois suburb
with a commuter train running to St. Petersburg. It was the first fully
electrified city. Besides a synagogue there was a Catholic Church and
Protestant Church. My grandmother's native language was Russian, but
when she came to America at 15 she spoke English without an accent--they
had tutors. She learned Yiddish in Chicago. Her older sister still had
her French textbook >from the girls' school. My grandmother used to
complain to my mother that (unlike St. Petersburg!) she couldn't get
bananas in the winter in Chicago. My uncle remembered a brother, who,
he said, would always brag "we came to America [travelling] first
class!" That was life in St. Petersburg, Tsarskoye Selo, Kronshtadt,
for the Jews privileged to live there. My family names >from there are
Favisovich and Beregovsky. By the way, as near as I can tell, most of
these Jews were originally >from Lithuania.

Jules Levin
Los Angeles


3 questions from Paris #lodz #poland

Bernard Flam
 

My name is Bernard Flam (Paris, France) and I have found 18 months ago
a suitcase with letters and pictures sent before 1939 by my mother's
family >from Lodz to her parents already in Paris:
. Kronenberg >from Opocno and Lodz, ul. Skolna 24,
. Zysman >from Zdunska Wola and Lodz, ul.Polnocna 6,
And relatives: Jablonski, Rottersman, Litewski, etc.

With the help of Jewish Gen and JRI web sites, translations >from
Yiddish of the 62 letters by 2 famous french interpreters, family
meeting with surviving first cousins in USA and visit to Yivo (NY),
OFRLI (Tel Aviv) and Yad Vashem (Jerusalem), I have almost rebuilt
the whole history >from 1890 to the end in Lodz's ghetto.

. I have found the same copy of the Lodz's ghetto inhabitants list
on the web sites, in Yivo, OFRLI and Yad Vashem: this is the 5 volumes
list published by OFRLI and Yad Vashem in 1994. In this list, deportation
date of my great-grand-mother Hana Sura Kronenberg and her daughter
Dworja is 30/20/42, assuming they have been deported together to
Chelmno?

So where and how I can have a check of the original list and verify
if there is a transcription mistake on the date?

I thank you for your help and wish to meet some of you during congress
next month in Paris.

If I can be of any help for your researches in France, please ask!

Bernard Flam


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland 3 questions from Paris #lodz #poland

Bernard Flam
 

My name is Bernard Flam (Paris, France) and I have found 18 months ago
a suitcase with letters and pictures sent before 1939 by my mother's
family >from Lodz to her parents already in Paris:
. Kronenberg >from Opocno and Lodz, ul. Skolna 24,
. Zysman >from Zdunska Wola and Lodz, ul.Polnocna 6,
And relatives: Jablonski, Rottersman, Litewski, etc.

With the help of Jewish Gen and JRI web sites, translations >from
Yiddish of the 62 letters by 2 famous french interpreters, family
meeting with surviving first cousins in USA and visit to Yivo (NY),
OFRLI (Tel Aviv) and Yad Vashem (Jerusalem), I have almost rebuilt
the whole history >from 1890 to the end in Lodz's ghetto.

. I have found the same copy of the Lodz's ghetto inhabitants list
on the web sites, in Yivo, OFRLI and Yad Vashem: this is the 5 volumes
list published by OFRLI and Yad Vashem in 1994. In this list, deportation
date of my great-grand-mother Hana Sura Kronenberg and her daughter
Dworja is 30/20/42, assuming they have been deported together to
Chelmno?

So where and how I can have a check of the original list and verify
if there is a transcription mistake on the date?

I thank you for your help and wish to meet some of you during congress
next month in Paris.

If I can be of any help for your researches in France, please ask!

Bernard Flam


Volunteers! #france

Rosanne Leeson
 

Dear All,

I am so delighted to have had a number of positive replies to the
request for English translation help in the Vendors Room during the
Conference.

We no longer need any more volunteers, but are extremely grateful for
the willingness to help of so many of you!

Gratefully,
Rosanne Leeson
Co-Coordinator FrenchSIG


French SIG #France Volunteers! #france

Rosanne Leeson
 

Dear All,

I am so delighted to have had a number of positive replies to the
request for English translation help in the Vendors Room during the
Conference.

We no longer need any more volunteers, but are extremely grateful for
the willingness to help of so many of you!

Gratefully,
Rosanne Leeson
Co-Coordinator FrenchSIG


Surname SETREE #general

Ann Holland <jkholland54@...>
 

Hello, my name is Ann. I am researching my great-grandfather's wife's
family of SETREE, of England, of which I have quite a lot of information,
mostly by word of mouth and certificates, etc.

One family story, which is eluding me, pertains to a SETREE who went out to
the West Indies as an indentured servant >from England. I haven't had any
success in that direction as there are no records of indentured servants
available unfortunately.

I have found that the town of Willienstad in Curacao had a big contingency
of Jewish people and while looking into that history found a passage that
read: "The walled city of Willienstad soon had Setree names evidencing the
importance of the Jewish population".

Would you know of any way that I may be able to find these SETREEs? I have
gone through your site and the name SETREE doesn't seem to be Jewish.
I know it is a big hunch and I don't want to be any bother - I guess I am
clutching at straws.
thank you so much for any help you can give me,

I am,
yours truly
Ann Holland
Nelson, New Zealand


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Surname SETREE #general

Ann Holland <jkholland54@...>
 

Hello, my name is Ann. I am researching my great-grandfather's wife's
family of SETREE, of England, of which I have quite a lot of information,
mostly by word of mouth and certificates, etc.

One family story, which is eluding me, pertains to a SETREE who went out to
the West Indies as an indentured servant >from England. I haven't had any
success in that direction as there are no records of indentured servants
available unfortunately.

I have found that the town of Willienstad in Curacao had a big contingency
of Jewish people and while looking into that history found a passage that
read: "The walled city of Willienstad soon had Setree names evidencing the
importance of the Jewish population".

Would you know of any way that I may be able to find these SETREEs? I have
gone through your site and the name SETREE doesn't seem to be Jewish.
I know it is a big hunch and I don't want to be any bother - I guess I am
clutching at straws.
thank you so much for any help you can give me,

I am,
yours truly
Ann Holland
Nelson, New Zealand


1940 Census questions #general

Jeff Miller
 

I have found two separate issues that I need guidance on.

First, in the Brooklyn, NY entries, I find a strange circumstance where on
two different pages I find different families living at what appears to be
the same address.

I was looking for Irving Wiener, wife Pauline, and their family. Using the
Stevemorse.org utilities, I first found an address using the NY Telephone
listing utility. The address listed was 1823 66th Street, Brooklyn. Using
the utilities to find a person based on address, prior to the name index
being available, I found the address in ED 24-1705 on sheet 2B
(Anecestry.com has the image on page 4 of 29), and the family listed the
Elias Rosenberg family.

I thought that Irving Wiener and family may have moved between the time of
the listing in the telephone directory and the conduct of the Census.

However, that was not the case. With the name index, I searched again and
found the Irving Wiener family at
1823 66th Street, Brooklyn. I found the listing in ED 24-1705 on sheet 61A
(Anecestry.com has the image on page 24 of 29), and the family listed the
Irving Wiener family.

So I wonder whether there were duplicate addresses in Brooklyn at the time,
or what other explanation would there be?

My second question concerns the recent announcement that Oklahoma is now
searchable by name for the 1940 Census.

I tried going to the https://familysearch.org/1940census/
site to search Oklahoma by name (actually, to help a friend do a search by
name) and it comes up with images by county.

To do a name search, I find I had to go to the "standard" familysearch
search box at
Familysearch.org, enter the desired name, and then specify date range 1940
to 1940, and then keep narrowing down the resultant records to arrive at my
desired answer.

Am I missing something on the 1940 Census site that would allow one to
search directly by name the newly indexed Oklahoma records?

Jeff Miller, Maryland
Researching: LAN, WIENER, YUDELOWITZ/VICH, BLANKFORT, WHITEMAN, WEISSMAN,
GLASS, SPEKTOR/RABINOVICH >from Panevezys, Pumpenai, Vilijampole, Seta;
MLYNARZ >from Ostroleka Poland: FREIDER, FRAIDER >from Kuzmin, Ukraine


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 1940 Census questions #general

Jeff Miller
 

I have found two separate issues that I need guidance on.

First, in the Brooklyn, NY entries, I find a strange circumstance where on
two different pages I find different families living at what appears to be
the same address.

I was looking for Irving Wiener, wife Pauline, and their family. Using the
Stevemorse.org utilities, I first found an address using the NY Telephone
listing utility. The address listed was 1823 66th Street, Brooklyn. Using
the utilities to find a person based on address, prior to the name index
being available, I found the address in ED 24-1705 on sheet 2B
(Anecestry.com has the image on page 4 of 29), and the family listed the
Elias Rosenberg family.

I thought that Irving Wiener and family may have moved between the time of
the listing in the telephone directory and the conduct of the Census.

However, that was not the case. With the name index, I searched again and
found the Irving Wiener family at
1823 66th Street, Brooklyn. I found the listing in ED 24-1705 on sheet 61A
(Anecestry.com has the image on page 24 of 29), and the family listed the
Irving Wiener family.

So I wonder whether there were duplicate addresses in Brooklyn at the time,
or what other explanation would there be?

My second question concerns the recent announcement that Oklahoma is now
searchable by name for the 1940 Census.

I tried going to the https://familysearch.org/1940census/
site to search Oklahoma by name (actually, to help a friend do a search by
name) and it comes up with images by county.

To do a name search, I find I had to go to the "standard" familysearch
search box at
Familysearch.org, enter the desired name, and then specify date range 1940
to 1940, and then keep narrowing down the resultant records to arrive at my
desired answer.

Am I missing something on the 1940 Census site that would allow one to
search directly by name the newly indexed Oklahoma records?

Jeff Miller, Maryland
Researching: LAN, WIENER, YUDELOWITZ/VICH, BLANKFORT, WHITEMAN, WEISSMAN,
GLASS, SPEKTOR/RABINOVICH >from Panevezys, Pumpenai, Vilijampole, Seta;
MLYNARZ >from Ostroleka Poland: FREIDER, FRAIDER >from Kuzmin, Ukraine


Visiting Jewish places of interest in Europe #belarus

Eli Rabinowitz
 

Hi All

I have just returned >from Europe where I spent the month of May
visiting:

Berlin in Germany
Prague in the Czech Republic
Warsaw, Krakow, Treblinka, Bialystok, Orla and Nasielsk in Poland
Brest, Vysokie, Novogrudok, Grodno, Mir and Minsk in Belarus
Vilnius, Kaunas, Kedainiai and Krakes in Lithuania
Riga in Latvia
Moscow and St Petersburg in Russia and
London, England

My focus was on visiting Jewish places of interest including museums,
synagogues, cemeteries, community and CHABAD centres, and meeting with
genealogists, guides, community leaders and rabbis. My visit to the
archives in Grodno gave me an insight into the challenges faced in
obtaining information >from Belarus.

My trip included general points of historical and cultural interest as
well. The ideal trip for the independent traveler!

I ran a blog each day, capturing the sights and atmosphere of each of
the places visited. The blog can be accessed at
http://elirab.posterous.com
I took over 18000 photos, but only a small selection appears on the

My blog also includes my trip last year in which I also visited
Budapest, Istanbul and Israel.

If you would like to know more about independent travel to these places
of Jewish interest, please contact me at eli@...

Thanks and regards

Eli Rabinowitz
Perth, Australia


Belarus SIG #Belarus Visiting Jewish places of interest in Europe #belarus

Eli Rabinowitz
 

Hi All

I have just returned >from Europe where I spent the month of May
visiting:

Berlin in Germany
Prague in the Czech Republic
Warsaw, Krakow, Treblinka, Bialystok, Orla and Nasielsk in Poland
Brest, Vysokie, Novogrudok, Grodno, Mir and Minsk in Belarus
Vilnius, Kaunas, Kedainiai and Krakes in Lithuania
Riga in Latvia
Moscow and St Petersburg in Russia and
London, England

My focus was on visiting Jewish places of interest including museums,
synagogues, cemeteries, community and CHABAD centres, and meeting with
genealogists, guides, community leaders and rabbis. My visit to the
archives in Grodno gave me an insight into the challenges faced in
obtaining information >from Belarus.

My trip included general points of historical and cultural interest as
well. The ideal trip for the independent traveler!

I ran a blog each day, capturing the sights and atmosphere of each of
the places visited. The blog can be accessed at
http://elirab.posterous.com
I took over 18000 photos, but only a small selection appears on the

My blog also includes my trip last year in which I also visited
Budapest, Istanbul and Israel.

If you would like to know more about independent travel to these places
of Jewish interest, please contact me at eli@...

Thanks and regards

Eli Rabinowitz
Perth, Australia


Bessarabia SIG - May-June updates #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear Bessarabers, h

Here is May-beginning of June Updates:

Please look at the What's New section:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/WhatIsNew.html for our monthly update
details.

In the month of May, we had an important entry at Music, Theatre, Literature
section (renamed >from Bessarabian Music:
Added 'Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre'. Biographies translated by Steven
Lasky, Museum of Family history with help >from Bessarabia SIG.
Among the more than 1,700 current translations, seventy-nine of the people
whose biographies appear within the Lexicon were born and lived in
Bessarabia. Fifty-four of these have already been translated. Please find at
" Music, Theatre, Literature" section list/table of all people from
Bessarabia with towns they were >from and direct links to the translated
biographies.

In the begging of June the Bessarabia Business Directory was COMPLETED!
Congratulations and many thanks to the group of dedicated translators and to
the Project Leader Harvey Kabaker.
There are total of 13,056 records >from 705 localities. All records are
posted at Bessarabian Databases Section at Bessarabia SIG website and be
soon part of JewishGen Romania-Bessarabia database.

There is also a new article at the Landsmanshaften section: Kishinev Sick
Benevolent Society of New York (1903-1923).

One more thing I want to share with you. This month I have completed Master
program at Hebrew College and my thesis "Jewish Life in Bessarabia Through
the Lens of the Shtetl Kaushany" you can find at the 'Additional Reading:
books, articles' section at our website.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania.


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Bessarabia SIG - May-June updates #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear Bessarabers, h

Here is May-beginning of June Updates:

Please look at the What's New section:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/WhatIsNew.html for our monthly update
details.

In the month of May, we had an important entry at Music, Theatre, Literature
section (renamed >from Bessarabian Music:
Added 'Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre'. Biographies translated by Steven
Lasky, Museum of Family history with help >from Bessarabia SIG.
Among the more than 1,700 current translations, seventy-nine of the people
whose biographies appear within the Lexicon were born and lived in
Bessarabia. Fifty-four of these have already been translated. Please find at
" Music, Theatre, Literature" section list/table of all people from
Bessarabia with towns they were >from and direct links to the translated
biographies.

In the begging of June the Bessarabia Business Directory was COMPLETED!
Congratulations and many thanks to the group of dedicated translators and to
the Project Leader Harvey Kabaker.
There are total of 13,056 records >from 705 localities. All records are
posted at Bessarabian Databases Section at Bessarabia SIG website and be
soon part of JewishGen Romania-Bessarabia database.

There is also a new article at the Landsmanshaften section: Kishinev Sick
Benevolent Society of New York (1903-1923).

One more thing I want to share with you. This month I have completed Master
program at Hebrew College and my thesis "Jewish Life in Bessarabia Through
the Lens of the Shtetl Kaushany" you can find at the 'Additional Reading:
books, articles' section at our website.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania.


KUPFER - Burgkunstadt #germany

jplowens@...
 

I've received an email >from Dan KUPFER in Israel, a very distant
cousin, that took me back to my files on KUPFER ancestors from
Burgkunstadt (Upper Franconia, Bavaria). One of my maternal great
grandmothers was nee Kupfer. Her father was Simon KUPFER (July 1, 1830
Burgkunstadt - March 5, 1887 New York).

My close KUPFER relatives came to Ohio circa 1850 and lived in Ohio,
Philadelphia and New York. One KUPFER daughter, Lucille Kupfer HEILLIG,
whom I've never found was believed to be living in Montreal in the mid 1960s.

Other names in the KUPFER - Burgkunstadt tree include OPPENHEIMER, IGLAUER,
BAMBERGER, STRAUS, and ROTHSCHILD.

There are many trees of branches of this family in the Charles Stanton
collection at the Leo Baeck Institute.

Several members of this family were killed in the SS Austria tragedy,
September 13,1858.

If you have information about this family or about the Austria
disaster I'd be interested in hearing >from you.

John Paul Lowens, Suburban, NYC


German SIG #Germany KUPFER - Burgkunstadt #germany

jplowens@...
 

I've received an email >from Dan KUPFER in Israel, a very distant
cousin, that took me back to my files on KUPFER ancestors from
Burgkunstadt (Upper Franconia, Bavaria). One of my maternal great
grandmothers was nee Kupfer. Her father was Simon KUPFER (July 1, 1830
Burgkunstadt - March 5, 1887 New York).

My close KUPFER relatives came to Ohio circa 1850 and lived in Ohio,
Philadelphia and New York. One KUPFER daughter, Lucille Kupfer HEILLIG,
whom I've never found was believed to be living in Montreal in the mid 1960s.

Other names in the KUPFER - Burgkunstadt tree include OPPENHEIMER, IGLAUER,
BAMBERGER, STRAUS, and ROTHSCHILD.

There are many trees of branches of this family in the Charles Stanton
collection at the Leo Baeck Institute.

Several members of this family were killed in the SS Austria tragedy,
September 13,1858.

If you have information about this family or about the Austria
disaster I'd be interested in hearing >from you.

John Paul Lowens, Suburban, NYC


Newly uploaded records #belarus

Paul Zoglin
 

I am pleased to announce that the Belarus SIG has uploaded approximately 23,000
new records to the JewishGen Belarus database. About half of these
records were in the Belarus Static Index database but have been formatted
according to JewishGen specifications and are now searchable using the JewishGen
Belarus database search engine. The breakdown of these records by type/town
are as follows:

Births (3,352 records):

David Gorodok: 1886-1889 1891 1892 (614 static index records)
Minsk: 1891-1913 (96 new records)
Mogilev: 1872-1874 (1804 new records)
Pinsk: 1927-1935 (647 static index records)
Usvyaty: 1883-1889 (191 static index records)

Deaths (2,215 records):

David Gorodok (283 records): 1886-1888 1891 (static index records)
Mogilev (1853 records): 1872-1874 (static index records and new records)
Usvyaty (79 records): 1883-1889 (static index records)

Marriages (735 records)

Brest (1091 records): 1897 1900 1901 1904 (new records)
David Gorodok (131 records): 1886-1888 1891 (static index records)
Gomel (4969 records): 1853-1860 1888-1918 (new records)
Minsk (421 records): 1912 (static index records)
Pinsk (385 records): 1915-1935 (static index records)
Usvyaty (38 records): 1883 - 1889 (static index records)

Divorces (73 records)

David Gorodok (6 records): 1888 1891 (static index records)
Minsk (62 records): 1912 (static index records)
Pinsk (5 records): 1932-1935 (static index records)

Revision Lists (8421 records):

Brest: 1809 (154 new records)
Byten: 1806 1850 1858 (652 static index records)
Gorodische: 1806 1816 1811 1818 1827 1828 1834 (1371 new
records)
Kamenetz: 1809 (42 new records)
Kobrin: 1851 1854 1885 (128 new records)
Nesvizh: 1874 (403 static index records)
Pavlovo: 1850 1854 1864 (421 static index records)
Pinsk: 1816 1819 (1972 static index records)
Pogost: 1816 (45 static index records)
Rosnensk: 1809 (6 new records)
Slonim: 1853 (2861 new records)
Slutsk: 1874 (7 static index records)
Volchin: 1809 (15 new records)
Vsokoye: 1809 (29 new records)
Yakolevo: 1856 1864 (315 new records)

The inventory of all birth death marraige divorce and revision list
records currently in the JewishGen Belarus database can be found on these
web pages:

births: http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/database_webpages/Belarus_births.
html
deaths: http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/database_webpages/Belarus_deaths.html

marriage and divorces: http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/database_webpages/
belarus_marriagesanddivorces.html
revision lists: http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/database_webpages/belarus_
revisionlists.html

If you click on the "more details" link you can find the specific source
archive/fond for those records. Note that the links on those pages are not
to the actual records=2C just to the archive information. To search the actual
records use the JewishGen Belarus database search engine:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Belarus/

Thanks to all the project coordinators and translators who worked (and continue
to work) on translation projects.

Paul Zoglin
Belarus SIG database coordinator


Passenger List Information - Immigration to US/Query re: Reference to Relatives #belarus

Carl C Fields (ccf149@bellsouth.net)
 

I have found several passenger lists for family members immigrating to
the US between about 1888 and 1923. They came >from Taurida and Ekaterina
Gubernias (both now in Ukraine -- and both with various alternative
spellings) and >from Minsk Gubernia (now in Belarus).

I’ve noticed what might be called “simplifications” in how some of these
passenger lists refer to certain relatives (usually a “contact” relative
who is already in the US). For example, the relative in the US might be
referred to as a “brother,” when he is really a “brother-in-law.”

At first I thought perhaps people felt they would have a better chance
of being admitted to the US if they already had close relatives in the
US – so they tended to “simplify” their “story” to make the contact
relative closer than he or she really was. However, recently I’ve begun
to wonder if perhaps the “old country” cultures (and/or languages) did
not distinguish between, say, “brother” and “brother-in-law” in the way
we do nowadays.

Does anyone have insight into whether either of these two theories might
be valid? Or does anyone have another explanation for what I seem to
have observed?

I SEEM to recall that the meaning of the suffix “-in-law” has changed
over the centuries in English. If I remember correctly, I’ve read that
two or three centuries ago a son-in-law was sometimes what we now would
call a stepson.


Thanks,

Carl Fields
Aiken SC

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