Date   

Meeting announcement for the IGS Negev #general

Martha LEV-ZION <martha@...>
 

Meeting Announcement - September 2005

Israel Genealogical Society - Negev Branch
" HaHevra HaGenealogit HaIsraelit "
* * * * * *
The next meeting of the IGS-Negev branch will take place:
Date: Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2005

Time: 20:00 (Library open >from 7:30)

Place: Kehilat Magen Avraham
Corner of Rehov Ad-Ad and Rehov Margalit
Omer

Our speaker will be: Advocat Rony Golan

Topic: Effective communication on the Jewishgen forum and SIGs and
how to post an effective query on the Hebrew Tapuz Family Roots Forum.

Rony Golan is an active moderator on a Jewish genealogy forum. Who
could know better than he how to navigate the maze of posting a
message on the internet?! Rony will guide us through the framework of
how to post an effective message, one which will elicit a valued,
helpful response, and explain the importance of an accurate subject
line, while giving valuable tips throughout. If you ever wanted to
know how to elicit help >from others, you will not want to miss our
opening session of the 2005-2006 season.

We look forward to welcoming everyone back to the fold and we welcome
all who might wish to join us!

Martha Lev-Zion
IGS-Negev


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Meeting announcement for the IGS Negev #general

Martha LEV-ZION <martha@...>
 

Meeting Announcement - September 2005

Israel Genealogical Society - Negev Branch
" HaHevra HaGenealogit HaIsraelit "
* * * * * *
The next meeting of the IGS-Negev branch will take place:
Date: Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2005

Time: 20:00 (Library open >from 7:30)

Place: Kehilat Magen Avraham
Corner of Rehov Ad-Ad and Rehov Margalit
Omer

Our speaker will be: Advocat Rony Golan

Topic: Effective communication on the Jewishgen forum and SIGs and
how to post an effective query on the Hebrew Tapuz Family Roots Forum.

Rony Golan is an active moderator on a Jewish genealogy forum. Who
could know better than he how to navigate the maze of posting a
message on the internet?! Rony will guide us through the framework of
how to post an effective message, one which will elicit a valued,
helpful response, and explain the importance of an accurate subject
line, while giving valuable tips throughout. If you ever wanted to
know how to elicit help >from others, you will not want to miss our
opening session of the 2005-2006 season.

We look forward to welcoming everyone back to the fold and we welcome
all who might wish to join us!

Martha Lev-Zion
IGS-Negev


SOMERSET WEST STRAND HEBREW CONGREGATION #southafrica

Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

SOMERSET WEST STRAND HEBREW CONGREGATION

I have received a note about the Dedication Service to celebrate the opening
of their new Synagogue on Sunday 11th September at 14.30 (2.30 p.m.).
If anyone wants further details please e-mail me and I will pass it on to
the people concerned.

Saul Issroff
saul@shaul.homechoice.co.uk
www.jewishgen.org/safrica


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica SOMERSET WEST STRAND HEBREW CONGREGATION #southafrica

Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

SOMERSET WEST STRAND HEBREW CONGREGATION

I have received a note about the Dedication Service to celebrate the opening
of their new Synagogue on Sunday 11th September at 14.30 (2.30 p.m.).
If anyone wants further details please e-mail me and I will pass it on to
the people concerned.

Saul Issroff
saul@shaul.homechoice.co.uk
www.jewishgen.org/safrica


GELB family research #southafrica

richard casson
 

Monday 5 September 2005

I'm trying to find out more information about the family Gelb who settled in
SA between 1912 and 1919.The Gelbs came >from the village of Shkud (Skuodas)
near Alshad (Alsedziai) in Lithuania. Joseph Gelb would have arrived in South
Africa between 1912 and 1914: his wife Hinde Gelb (nee Broude) in 1919 after
having left Shkud after war had broken out and travelled with her two
infants across Siberia to Japan where she spent the duration of the war. This
is a most interesting story which I'd like to know more about.

Other information:-
Joseph Gelb b. 1879 d. 1965 aged 86
Hinda Gelb b. 1885 d. 1962 aged 77
Stillborn female d. 1919 parent Hindl Gelb.

Hoping someone can throw some light on the matter

Many Thanks
Richard Casson


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica GELB family research #southafrica

richard casson
 

Monday 5 September 2005

I'm trying to find out more information about the family Gelb who settled in
SA between 1912 and 1919.The Gelbs came >from the village of Shkud (Skuodas)
near Alshad (Alsedziai) in Lithuania. Joseph Gelb would have arrived in South
Africa between 1912 and 1914: his wife Hinde Gelb (nee Broude) in 1919 after
having left Shkud after war had broken out and travelled with her two
infants across Siberia to Japan where she spent the duration of the war. This
is a most interesting story which I'd like to know more about.

Other information:-
Joseph Gelb b. 1879 d. 1965 aged 86
Hinda Gelb b. 1885 d. 1962 aged 77
Stillborn female d. 1919 parent Hindl Gelb.

Hoping someone can throw some light on the matter

Many Thanks
Richard Casson


Researcher Charlotte Pritikin #general

Linda Berkowitz <e-berkowitz@...>
 

I am looking for researcher Charlotte Pritikin. I have a connection to
her family and would like to get in touch with her. Her address as
listed in the Family Finder database is in Sherman Oaks, CA. I could
not find her, however, using the online search engine, Smartpages, and
believe that she has moved.

Thank you for any leads in finding her.

Linda Berkowitz
Northbrook, IL

MODERATOR NOTE: Try also contacting the LostNFound Desk, which specializes
in finding lost JGFFers. The address is LostNFound@lyris.jewishgen.org .


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Researcher Charlotte Pritikin #general

Linda Berkowitz <e-berkowitz@...>
 

I am looking for researcher Charlotte Pritikin. I have a connection to
her family and would like to get in touch with her. Her address as
listed in the Family Finder database is in Sherman Oaks, CA. I could
not find her, however, using the online search engine, Smartpages, and
believe that she has moved.

Thank you for any leads in finding her.

Linda Berkowitz
Northbrook, IL

MODERATOR NOTE: Try also contacting the LostNFound Desk, which specializes
in finding lost JGFFers. The address is LostNFound@lyris.jewishgen.org .


HOLLANDERSKI in New-York #general

Frajerman <fraj@...>
 

HOLLANDERSKI in New-York

I search for the stay's proofs of my g-g-g great father Jacob HOLLANDERSKI
(or HOLLANDER, or HOLLAND, and so on) in the States, (he was born in
Vistynis about 1801), and his son Selig (or Zelig, born about 1841). It
seems that they emigrated in the U. S. between 1866 and 1870 (according to
Florian Stastik, "Polish Political Emigrees in the United States", p. 431).
We may take to end the Jacob' stay in the U.S. before April, 24 1871 (at
that time he was back in Paris).

Also it seems that Jacob and Zelig were rejoined in the U. S. by Ephraïm
HOLLANDERSKI (another Jacob's son, born in Suwalki on 1833) and his wife
Sara (HIRSCH, born on 1839), according to the mariage's acte of their
daughter Esther, which quotes she was born in New-York (United States), on
October 20, 1873. Any help will be welcome.

Reouven Frajerman (Israel)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen HOLLANDERSKI in New-York #general

Frajerman <fraj@...>
 

HOLLANDERSKI in New-York

I search for the stay's proofs of my g-g-g great father Jacob HOLLANDERSKI
(or HOLLANDER, or HOLLAND, and so on) in the States, (he was born in
Vistynis about 1801), and his son Selig (or Zelig, born about 1841). It
seems that they emigrated in the U. S. between 1866 and 1870 (according to
Florian Stastik, "Polish Political Emigrees in the United States", p. 431).
We may take to end the Jacob' stay in the U.S. before April, 24 1871 (at
that time he was back in Paris).

Also it seems that Jacob and Zelig were rejoined in the U. S. by Ephraïm
HOLLANDERSKI (another Jacob's son, born in Suwalki on 1833) and his wife
Sara (HIRSCH, born on 1839), according to the mariage's acte of their
daughter Esther, which quotes she was born in New-York (United States), on
October 20, 1873. Any help will be welcome.

Reouven Frajerman (Israel)


Re: Best approach to determining port of entry to US #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

Hi All,
On 2 Sep 2005, Stan Goodman, stated:
"Censuses, of course, can be tricky, because the
information is the unsubstantiated word of the interviewee.
...
You can tell an enumerator anything, and he will write it
down; that's the nature of censuses. Census data needs to be
confirmed by an independent source of the same information."
Judging >from what is written elsewhere on this newsgroup this equally
applies to other forms that have been filled in, or answers given to
officials etc.

Before the modern era, and computers, there is no way of checking that two
sets of information were precisely the same. It is only in the last few
centuries, for instance, that spelling has been standardised.

In modern Censuses post-enumeration checks are used to test how reliable the
answers to questions in the Census. In some cases, adjustments are made to
the results of the Census to take account of this.


--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland)
WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany) KOHN (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany)
LANDAU/FREDKIN(Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Best approach to determining port of entry to US #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

Hi All,
On 2 Sep 2005, Stan Goodman, stated:
"Censuses, of course, can be tricky, because the
information is the unsubstantiated word of the interviewee.
...
You can tell an enumerator anything, and he will write it
down; that's the nature of censuses. Census data needs to be
confirmed by an independent source of the same information."
Judging >from what is written elsewhere on this newsgroup this equally
applies to other forms that have been filled in, or answers given to
officials etc.

Before the modern era, and computers, there is no way of checking that two
sets of information were precisely the same. It is only in the last few
centuries, for instance, that spelling has been standardised.

In modern Censuses post-enumeration checks are used to test how reliable the
answers to questions in the Census. In some cases, adjustments are made to
the results of the Census to take account of this.


--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland)
WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany) KOHN (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany)
LANDAU/FREDKIN(Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus)


My son Shmuel Eliyohu hy"d #rabbinic

Perets Mett <p.mett@...>
 

I would like to take this opportunity of thanking all those who sent
me and my family messages of comfort during the shiva following the
murder of our son Shmuel Eliyohu hy"d.

May we all merit to receive only good tidings on future.

Perets Mett


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic My son Shmuel Eliyohu hy"d #rabbinic

Perets Mett <p.mett@...>
 

I would like to take this opportunity of thanking all those who sent
me and my family messages of comfort during the shiva following the
murder of our son Shmuel Eliyohu hy"d.

May we all merit to receive only good tidings on future.

Perets Mett


Double forenames, the MaHRSHaL and the name Schneur #rabbinic

Mr L Reich <lreich@...>
 

Until about the 15th Century a single Hebrew forename was the
accepted practice amongst Ashkenazi Jewry. I have often wondered why
and how the current custom of double and multiple Hebrew forenames
arose.

Recently I came across a passage in the talmudic commentary "Yam
shell shlomo" (Gittin 4:26)for which I will now give a rough
translation. This piece is of interest to genealogists on several
counts. This Hebrew work is by the 16th Century Rabbi and Rosh
Yeshiva, R' Shlomo Luria of Lublin, a.k.a. as the MaHRSHaL, one of
whose reponsa (No. 29) is a keystone in rabbinical genealogy.

Quote: "... I heard >from Moshe Lorch that when he got divorced (and
needed to write a Get with the correct names) he appeared before the
MaHRiL (famous 15th Century halachist). He (Lorch) told the MaHRiL
that his father was nicknamed Zalman, but had the Hebrew name of
Shemariah. The MaHRiL was puzzled, since Zalman and Shemariah don't
normally go together. "Maybe your father had another name such as
Shlomo or Yekusiel, which often go together with the nickname
Zalman?"

The MaHRiL arranged for two researchers to travel to the cemetery in
Magenca (Mainz) where Lorch's ancestors were buried. They discovered
the gravestone of Lorch's father's father's father. This also bore
the names of Zalman and Shemaria. Satisfied with the evidence, the
MaHRiL arranged the Get.

The MaHRiL was asked why does a single Jewish nickname (Shem
Ha'Laaz) often have several Hebrew counterparts? For instance for
the nickname Zalman, one finds Yekusiel, Meshulam, Shemaria, etc.?
He answered as follows. "Certainly, strictly speaking, there is a
one to one relationship between nicknames and Hebrew names. But
sometimes a man and his wife disagree about naming a child; each one
wanting a name >from their own ancestry. Occasionally, a compromise
is reached by one side getting the Hebrew name and the other the
nickname.

The MaHRSHaL adds the following. "And I, the small one, know that my
grandfather (z'kayni), R' Menachem Tzion, whose father was called
Meir, and whose father-in-law was called Uri, had a son and the same
argument arose.

The solution was to call the baby Schneur, meaning "two lights",
since both Meir and Uri are connected with light..."

Incidentally, the earlier and later sections surrounding this
excerpt >from the Yam shel Shlomo are a mine of information about
Hebrew nicknames.

Leslie Reich


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Double forenames, the MaHRSHaL and the name Schneur #rabbinic

Mr L Reich <lreich@...>
 

Until about the 15th Century a single Hebrew forename was the
accepted practice amongst Ashkenazi Jewry. I have often wondered why
and how the current custom of double and multiple Hebrew forenames
arose.

Recently I came across a passage in the talmudic commentary "Yam
shell shlomo" (Gittin 4:26)for which I will now give a rough
translation. This piece is of interest to genealogists on several
counts. This Hebrew work is by the 16th Century Rabbi and Rosh
Yeshiva, R' Shlomo Luria of Lublin, a.k.a. as the MaHRSHaL, one of
whose reponsa (No. 29) is a keystone in rabbinical genealogy.

Quote: "... I heard >from Moshe Lorch that when he got divorced (and
needed to write a Get with the correct names) he appeared before the
MaHRiL (famous 15th Century halachist). He (Lorch) told the MaHRiL
that his father was nicknamed Zalman, but had the Hebrew name of
Shemariah. The MaHRiL was puzzled, since Zalman and Shemariah don't
normally go together. "Maybe your father had another name such as
Shlomo or Yekusiel, which often go together with the nickname
Zalman?"

The MaHRiL arranged for two researchers to travel to the cemetery in
Magenca (Mainz) where Lorch's ancestors were buried. They discovered
the gravestone of Lorch's father's father's father. This also bore
the names of Zalman and Shemaria. Satisfied with the evidence, the
MaHRiL arranged the Get.

The MaHRiL was asked why does a single Jewish nickname (Shem
Ha'Laaz) often have several Hebrew counterparts? For instance for
the nickname Zalman, one finds Yekusiel, Meshulam, Shemaria, etc.?
He answered as follows. "Certainly, strictly speaking, there is a
one to one relationship between nicknames and Hebrew names. But
sometimes a man and his wife disagree about naming a child; each one
wanting a name >from their own ancestry. Occasionally, a compromise
is reached by one side getting the Hebrew name and the other the
nickname.

The MaHRSHaL adds the following. "And I, the small one, know that my
grandfather (z'kayni), R' Menachem Tzion, whose father was called
Meir, and whose father-in-law was called Uri, had a son and the same
argument arose.

The solution was to call the baby Schneur, meaning "two lights",
since both Meir and Uri are connected with light..."

Incidentally, the earlier and later sections surrounding this
excerpt >from the Yam shel Shlomo are a mine of information about
Hebrew nicknames.

Leslie Reich


Re: BLOCH or BLIOKH #general

Jules Levin
 

At 01:46 AM 9/5/2005, Stan Goodman wrote:

The "I" that is confusing you is a consequence of a "soft sign"
following the "L" in the Russian. This character has no sound of its
own, but only modifies the sound of the "L". Another transliterator
might well have ignored it, sparing you the confusion.
There is no "soft sign" in the Russian spelling of this word. The
letters 'IO' represent a single letter, which in normal spelling
is simply E, and in school/dictionary spelling would have an 'umlaut'
sign--two dots side-by-side--over it. Moreover, if there were a soft
sign there, it would have a 'sound of its own'. Compare the nickname
Leva (L'ova) and the word bel'ye (bel'yo), 'laundry' spelled with
L + soft sign + E with umlaut. There is a clear difference in
pronunciation. In this case the soft sign represents the sound yod.
Had another transliterator ignored this and written Bloch, he would be
failing to distinguish between two different Russian spellings, which
could lead to errors down the road...
Incidently, I answered this woman's query directly about 5 minutes after
it was sent. No need to send it to Jewishgen...
Jules Levin
Los Angeles


Re: Naturalization Questions #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

Just a note -- Many folks born in Eastern Europe during the late 1800s
did not know their birthdates. Unlike today, there was no requirement to
use it, and many came here with only a vague understanding of their exact
date of birth. My grandfather thought he was 2 years younger until he sent
for his Polish birth record; the new birthdate proved him not a minor at
the time his father naturalized. I have his letter to INS, apologizing for
voting for 40 years even though he was a non-citizen.
I can't understand this. For instance, a boy or his family would presumbably
know when his Hebrew birth date, in order that he should know when he was 13
in order to be called up in shul (ie his barmitzvah) >from when he would have
to lay tephilin etc.

Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland)
WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany) KOHN (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany)
LANDAU/FREDKIN(Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: BLOCH or BLIOKH #general

Jules Levin
 

At 01:46 AM 9/5/2005, Stan Goodman wrote:

The "I" that is confusing you is a consequence of a "soft sign"
following the "L" in the Russian. This character has no sound of its
own, but only modifies the sound of the "L". Another transliterator
might well have ignored it, sparing you the confusion.
There is no "soft sign" in the Russian spelling of this word. The
letters 'IO' represent a single letter, which in normal spelling
is simply E, and in school/dictionary spelling would have an 'umlaut'
sign--two dots side-by-side--over it. Moreover, if there were a soft
sign there, it would have a 'sound of its own'. Compare the nickname
Leva (L'ova) and the word bel'ye (bel'yo), 'laundry' spelled with
L + soft sign + E with umlaut. There is a clear difference in
pronunciation. In this case the soft sign represents the sound yod.
Had another transliterator ignored this and written Bloch, he would be
failing to distinguish between two different Russian spellings, which
could lead to errors down the road...
Incidently, I answered this woman's query directly about 5 minutes after
it was sent. No need to send it to Jewishgen...
Jules Levin
Los Angeles


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Naturalization Questions #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

Just a note -- Many folks born in Eastern Europe during the late 1800s
did not know their birthdates. Unlike today, there was no requirement to
use it, and many came here with only a vague understanding of their exact
date of birth. My grandfather thought he was 2 years younger until he sent
for his Polish birth record; the new birthdate proved him not a minor at
the time his father naturalized. I have his letter to INS, apologizing for
voting for 40 years even though he was a non-citizen.
I can't understand this. For instance, a boy or his family would presumbably
know when his Hebrew birth date, in order that he should know when he was 13
in order to be called up in shul (ie his barmitzvah) >from when he would have
to lay tephilin etc.

Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland)
WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany) KOHN (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany)
LANDAU/FREDKIN(Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus)