Date   

Recent Posts about Family Finder Results #dna

Howard Morris
 

A paragraph in a New York Times article reporting on a new study may
be relevant to this discussion. The article is "Studies Show Jews'
Genetic Similarity" By Nicholas Wade,(Published: June 9, 2010). The
paragraph is:

"The shared genetic elements suggest that members of any Jewish
community are related to one another as closely as are fourth or
fifth cousins in a large population, which is about 10 times higher
than the relationship between two people chosen at random off the
streets of New York City, Dr. Atzmon said."

How does this jibe with the format of the results of the Family
Finder DNA test? If there's a very high probability that we're all
"fourth or fifth cousins," then is the value of the test in finding
the closer second and third cousins?

Should it be considered a coincidence when we do *not* find a third
or fourth cousin at a Jewish genealogy conference or JewishGen
FamilyFinder or family tree site, as opposed to when we do find one?

I'm interested in other Genner's thoughts and interpretations.

Howard Morris,
Needham, MA, USA


JOWBR Update Announcement - June 2010 #dna

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce its 2010 pre-IAJGS Conference
update to the JOWBR (JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial Registry) database.
The JOWBR database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/ If you're a new user, we
recommend that you take a look at the first two explanatory screencasts at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

This update includes more than 108,000 new records and approximately
13,000 new photos. The database is adding 170 new cemeteries along with
updates or additions to an additional 155 cemeteries >from 19 countries.
JOWBR's holdings now exceed 1.4 million records >from approximately 2,700
cemeteries / cemetery sections >from 46 countries!

Since our last update, JewishGen was pleased to add a number of new
institutional and individual donors while continuing to work with its
existing valued donor base. An itemization of the larger submissions and
new donors are as follows:

-- Iasi, Romania. Reuven Singer and his team of data entry, translation
and proofreading volunteers have completed their work on all available
burial records for Iasi. This latest installment includes close to 32,000
records to bring the entire data set to 65,000!
-- Lodz, Poland.
o We are pleased to announce that JewishGen and JRI-Poland
have gained permission >from the "Organization of Former Residents of Lodz in
Israel" to add the names >from their burial registers to the JOWBR and
JRI-Poland databases. We estimate there will be approximately 70,000 to
75,000 total records. This update includes the first 12,000 records. Our
team of volunteers continue with the data entry and proofreading of the
remaining records. If you?re interested in helping with data entry, please
contact me at NAltman@JewishGen.org
o Thanks to Avigdor Ben-Dov for coordinating additional
submissions of more than 2,000 records >from burials marked by the IDF
working with the Yad LeZehava Holocaust Research Institute (YZI) Witnesses
in Uniform project at three sections of the cemetery in Lodz. This brings
the current number of identified burials to 3,400.
-- Louisville, Kentucky. Herman Meyer & Son Funeral Home in
Louisville, Kentucky has compiled extensive information on burials >from 7
Louisville Jewish cemeteries. We greatly appreciate their submission of
basic information for close to 11,500 records. Additional information on
Kentucky genealogical resources and headstone photos for some of the records
can be found at their website: http://www.meyerfuneral.com/
-- Baltimore, Maryland. Thanks to the Jewish Museum of Maryland
(www.jewishmuseummd.org) and Deb Weiner for an additional 9,900 records from
the Belair Road and Berrymans Lane Baltimore Hebrew Cemeteries.
-- Maine. Thanks to Harris Gleckman, Project Shammas for "Documenting
Maine Jewry", for submitting close to 6,500 records >from 16 Maine cemeteries
and cemetery sections. Additional information on Maine Jewry can be found
on their site at www.MaineJews.org
-- American Jewish Archives (AJA). We continue to work on various
cemetery records >from across the US ad the Caribbean >from the archives of
The Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives (AJA) in
Cincinnati, Ohio, http://www.americanjewisharchives.org/ This update
includes more than 6,000 records >from 36 cemeteries. We thank the
administration at the Archives and Jennie Cole for help facilitating the
arrangement.
-- Pennsauken, New Jersey. Our thanks to Rabbi Gary Gans for his
submission of 6,000 records >from the Crescent Memorial Park in Pennsauken,
NJ.
-- Liepaja, Latvia. Our thanks to Paul Berkay, Ella Barkan, and Edward
Anders for their submission of 3,600 records >from the town of Liepaja,
Latvia. Additional information on Liepaja can be found at their website
http://www.liepajajews.org/cem/CemIndex.htm
-- Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park and Pardes Shalom Cemetery, Ontario.
Thanks to Kevin Hanit and Allen Halberstadt representing the JGS of Canada
(Toronto) for more than 3,200 records >from 122 updated and new sections of
these two Canadian cemeteries.
-- South Carolina Cemeteries. Thanks to Ann Hellman, president of the
Jewish Historical Society of South Carolina (http://www.jhssc.org/) for
their additional submission of close to 2,200 burial records and 365 photos
from 5 South Carolina cemeteries.
-- Petach Tikvah, Israel. Thanks to Gilda Kurtzman for her ongoing
work at the Segulah Cemetery in Petach Tikvah for approximately 2,200
additional photos
-- Sacramento, California. Thanks to Bob Wasco for submitting
approximately 2,200 records >from the Home of Peace Cemetery in Sacramento.
-- Various US States. Thanks to Julian H. Preisler of Falling Waters,
West Virginia for submitting more than 2,100 records >from 25 cemeteries in 9
states. For more information on Mr. Preisler's cemetery indexing please see
his website t http://www.jpreisler.com/cemeteryindexes.htm
-- Colma, California. Thanks to Pierre Hahn, Rosanne Leeson, and Jeff
Lewy >from the San Francisco Bay area Jewish Genealogical Society, for adding
close to 2,100 records >from the second book of burial records >from Home of
Peace Cemetery & Emanu-El Mausoleum in, Colma.
-- New Jersey. Thanks to Jerome Nathans and the Jewish Historical
Society of North Jersey (jhsnnj@yahoo.com) for more than 1,000 records from
5 New Jersey cemeteries.
-- Bavarian Cemeteries. JewishGen has been working with the Bavarian
Ministry to assist them with headstone translations >from various Jewish
cemeteries. Information >from close to 700 translations >from 7 cemeteries,
along with other civil document data >from the Ministry is included in this
update. The Ministry's websites are currently in progress and will provide
additional information and the headstone photos. Our thanks to Evamaria
Brockhoff, Head of the Department of Publications at the Bavarian State
Ministry of Science, Research and Arts / Centre of Bavarian History
www.hdbg.de
-- German Cemeteries. Our thanks to Leo Hoenig for submitting his
collection of German cemetery information >from information collected by
Klaus H.S. Schulte. This update includes 650 records >from 21 small German
cemeteries.
-- South Africa. Thanks to Rabbi Moshe Silberhaft, "The Traveling
Rabbi", spiritual leader of the South African Country Communities and the
African Jewish Congress for his submission of approximately 450 records and
550 photos >from 13 cemeteries. For additional information, please see
www.africanjewishcongress.com
-- Whether your name or records are listed above, we appreciate all
your submissions! Thank you to all the donors that submitted information
for this update.

We appreciate all the work our donors have done and encourage you to
make additional submissions. Whether you work on a cemetery / cemetery
section individually or consider a group project for your local Society,
temple or other group, it's your submissions that help grow the JOWBR
database and make it possible for researchers and family members to find
answers they otherwise might not. Please also consider other organizations
you may be affiliated with that may already have done cemetery indexing that
would consider having their records included in the JOWBR database.

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JOWBR -- Coordinator
June 2010


DNA Research #DNA Recent Posts about Family Finder Results #dna

Howard Morris
 

A paragraph in a New York Times article reporting on a new study may
be relevant to this discussion. The article is "Studies Show Jews'
Genetic Similarity" By Nicholas Wade,(Published: June 9, 2010). The
paragraph is:

"The shared genetic elements suggest that members of any Jewish
community are related to one another as closely as are fourth or
fifth cousins in a large population, which is about 10 times higher
than the relationship between two people chosen at random off the
streets of New York City, Dr. Atzmon said."

How does this jibe with the format of the results of the Family
Finder DNA test? If there's a very high probability that we're all
"fourth or fifth cousins," then is the value of the test in finding
the closer second and third cousins?

Should it be considered a coincidence when we do *not* find a third
or fourth cousin at a Jewish genealogy conference or JewishGen
FamilyFinder or family tree site, as opposed to when we do find one?

I'm interested in other Genner's thoughts and interpretations.

Howard Morris,
Needham, MA, USA


DNA Research #DNA JOWBR Update Announcement - June 2010 #dna

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce its 2010 pre-IAJGS Conference
update to the JOWBR (JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial Registry) database.
The JOWBR database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/ If you're a new user, we
recommend that you take a look at the first two explanatory screencasts at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

This update includes more than 108,000 new records and approximately
13,000 new photos. The database is adding 170 new cemeteries along with
updates or additions to an additional 155 cemeteries >from 19 countries.
JOWBR's holdings now exceed 1.4 million records >from approximately 2,700
cemeteries / cemetery sections >from 46 countries!

Since our last update, JewishGen was pleased to add a number of new
institutional and individual donors while continuing to work with its
existing valued donor base. An itemization of the larger submissions and
new donors are as follows:

-- Iasi, Romania. Reuven Singer and his team of data entry, translation
and proofreading volunteers have completed their work on all available
burial records for Iasi. This latest installment includes close to 32,000
records to bring the entire data set to 65,000!
-- Lodz, Poland.
o We are pleased to announce that JewishGen and JRI-Poland
have gained permission >from the "Organization of Former Residents of Lodz in
Israel" to add the names >from their burial registers to the JOWBR and
JRI-Poland databases. We estimate there will be approximately 70,000 to
75,000 total records. This update includes the first 12,000 records. Our
team of volunteers continue with the data entry and proofreading of the
remaining records. If you?re interested in helping with data entry, please
contact me at NAltman@JewishGen.org
o Thanks to Avigdor Ben-Dov for coordinating additional
submissions of more than 2,000 records >from burials marked by the IDF
working with the Yad LeZehava Holocaust Research Institute (YZI) Witnesses
in Uniform project at three sections of the cemetery in Lodz. This brings
the current number of identified burials to 3,400.
-- Louisville, Kentucky. Herman Meyer & Son Funeral Home in
Louisville, Kentucky has compiled extensive information on burials >from 7
Louisville Jewish cemeteries. We greatly appreciate their submission of
basic information for close to 11,500 records. Additional information on
Kentucky genealogical resources and headstone photos for some of the records
can be found at their website: http://www.meyerfuneral.com/
-- Baltimore, Maryland. Thanks to the Jewish Museum of Maryland
(www.jewishmuseummd.org) and Deb Weiner for an additional 9,900 records from
the Belair Road and Berrymans Lane Baltimore Hebrew Cemeteries.
-- Maine. Thanks to Harris Gleckman, Project Shammas for "Documenting
Maine Jewry", for submitting close to 6,500 records >from 16 Maine cemeteries
and cemetery sections. Additional information on Maine Jewry can be found
on their site at www.MaineJews.org
-- American Jewish Archives (AJA). We continue to work on various
cemetery records >from across the US ad the Caribbean >from the archives of
The Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives (AJA) in
Cincinnati, Ohio, http://www.americanjewisharchives.org/ This update
includes more than 6,000 records >from 36 cemeteries. We thank the
administration at the Archives and Jennie Cole for help facilitating the
arrangement.
-- Pennsauken, New Jersey. Our thanks to Rabbi Gary Gans for his
submission of 6,000 records >from the Crescent Memorial Park in Pennsauken,
NJ.
-- Liepaja, Latvia. Our thanks to Paul Berkay, Ella Barkan, and Edward
Anders for their submission of 3,600 records >from the town of Liepaja,
Latvia. Additional information on Liepaja can be found at their website
http://www.liepajajews.org/cem/CemIndex.htm
-- Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park and Pardes Shalom Cemetery, Ontario.
Thanks to Kevin Hanit and Allen Halberstadt representing the JGS of Canada
(Toronto) for more than 3,200 records >from 122 updated and new sections of
these two Canadian cemeteries.
-- South Carolina Cemeteries. Thanks to Ann Hellman, president of the
Jewish Historical Society of South Carolina (http://www.jhssc.org/) for
their additional submission of close to 2,200 burial records and 365 photos
from 5 South Carolina cemeteries.
-- Petach Tikvah, Israel. Thanks to Gilda Kurtzman for her ongoing
work at the Segulah Cemetery in Petach Tikvah for approximately 2,200
additional photos
-- Sacramento, California. Thanks to Bob Wasco for submitting
approximately 2,200 records >from the Home of Peace Cemetery in Sacramento.
-- Various US States. Thanks to Julian H. Preisler of Falling Waters,
West Virginia for submitting more than 2,100 records >from 25 cemeteries in 9
states. For more information on Mr. Preisler's cemetery indexing please see
his website t http://www.jpreisler.com/cemeteryindexes.htm
-- Colma, California. Thanks to Pierre Hahn, Rosanne Leeson, and Jeff
Lewy >from the San Francisco Bay area Jewish Genealogical Society, for adding
close to 2,100 records >from the second book of burial records >from Home of
Peace Cemetery & Emanu-El Mausoleum in, Colma.
-- New Jersey. Thanks to Jerome Nathans and the Jewish Historical
Society of North Jersey (jhsnnj@yahoo.com) for more than 1,000 records from
5 New Jersey cemeteries.
-- Bavarian Cemeteries. JewishGen has been working with the Bavarian
Ministry to assist them with headstone translations >from various Jewish
cemeteries. Information >from close to 700 translations >from 7 cemeteries,
along with other civil document data >from the Ministry is included in this
update. The Ministry's websites are currently in progress and will provide
additional information and the headstone photos. Our thanks to Evamaria
Brockhoff, Head of the Department of Publications at the Bavarian State
Ministry of Science, Research and Arts / Centre of Bavarian History
www.hdbg.de
-- German Cemeteries. Our thanks to Leo Hoenig for submitting his
collection of German cemetery information >from information collected by
Klaus H.S. Schulte. This update includes 650 records >from 21 small German
cemeteries.
-- South Africa. Thanks to Rabbi Moshe Silberhaft, "The Traveling
Rabbi", spiritual leader of the South African Country Communities and the
African Jewish Congress for his submission of approximately 450 records and
550 photos >from 13 cemeteries. For additional information, please see
www.africanjewishcongress.com
-- Whether your name or records are listed above, we appreciate all
your submissions! Thank you to all the donors that submitted information
for this update.

We appreciate all the work our donors have done and encourage you to
make additional submissions. Whether you work on a cemetery / cemetery
section individually or consider a group project for your local Society,
temple or other group, it's your submissions that help grow the JOWBR
database and make it possible for researchers and family members to find
answers they otherwise might not. Please also consider other organizations
you may be affiliated with that may already have done cemetery indexing that
would consider having their records included in the JOWBR database.

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JOWBR -- Coordinator
June 2010


Re: Family Finder results #dna

Arline and Sidney Sachs
 

Martin and Elaine,

You are among the the first persons taking the Family Finder Test. Y-DNA
and MT testing do one thing very well - it tell you when there is no match
on one line! They help to tell you that it is a waste of ones time to
follow some leads. Family Finder test does not do this. It is possible
that known cousins who have that testing done would not match. There even
a very small choice that you and a brother or sister would not matched.
Even if you find a true fifth cousin match, there is no way to know which
of 16 lines they are on unless you have a family tree of over many many
thousands. I would guess that each week, when a new batch of Family
Finder results are finish, you would get as least one new match because
you are Ashkenazim.

What bothering me more is that Family Tree DNA has two free services that
are easy to used. They are Y-search and haplogroup projects. However
less than half (75,906 out of 184,403) of the persons that have the Y-DNA
testing done with them, have their results available on Y-search. Also
less than half of the persons that matches me joined our Y-DNA haplogroup
project at Family Tree DNA. Why would someone have their DNA tested and
not use the free services to find additional family members?

Sidney Sachs
Lorton, VA USA


DNA Research #DNA Re: Family Finder results #dna

Arline and Sidney Sachs
 

Martin and Elaine,

You are among the the first persons taking the Family Finder Test. Y-DNA
and MT testing do one thing very well - it tell you when there is no match
on one line! They help to tell you that it is a waste of ones time to
follow some leads. Family Finder test does not do this. It is possible
that known cousins who have that testing done would not match. There even
a very small choice that you and a brother or sister would not matched.
Even if you find a true fifth cousin match, there is no way to know which
of 16 lines they are on unless you have a family tree of over many many
thousands. I would guess that each week, when a new batch of Family
Finder results are finish, you would get as least one new match because
you are Ashkenazim.

What bothering me more is that Family Tree DNA has two free services that
are easy to used. They are Y-search and haplogroup projects. However
less than half (75,906 out of 184,403) of the persons that have the Y-DNA
testing done with them, have their results available on Y-search. Also
less than half of the persons that matches me joined our Y-DNA haplogroup
project at Family Tree DNA. Why would someone have their DNA tested and
not use the free services to find additional family members?

Sidney Sachs
Lorton, VA USA


Family Finder #dna

sbloom@...
 

I am both more optimistic and more pessimistic than Martin (who, by
the way, is a genetic cousin of mine!).

On the optimistic side, there is some hope of figuring things out if
each tester also recruits cousins >from as many branches of the family
as is possible. In reality, one might only be able to convince a
handful at most to do this at first, but its a start in deciphering.
I think this will be necessary since each of us gets DNA >from a great
mixture of all of our ancestors, as do our cousins. The only way to
see how some random person identified as a genetic cousin might
connect to us is to see how our own known cousins do (I am speaking
in terms of shared chromosomal segments that are ultimately used in
determining the cousinhoods presented by FTDNA and other companies
such as 23andme, etc.). As an example, I have actually been
identified as the distant cousin of another man who, like me, descends
from the town rabbis of a particular small town in central Poland.
Though this could be a coincidence, he, my known cousin also descended
from the folk of this shtetl, and I, all share some of the same
chromosomal segments. I am convinced we are relatively recent cousins
(something like 6th to 8th) , connected by a marriage between our
rabbinic families. What we lack is a way to really document this. We
are both avid genealogists, tracing our families to the 1700's, and
maybe even a little bit further in one case, but we lack the records
of this region to really make a solid connection. I also have a few
more less solid cases of folks seemingly descending >from people of the
same shtetls as my ancestors. I am convinced that one of these will
eventually be a "hit", if I continue to convince cousins to test.

Additionally, this test should be reasonable (but not 100% convincing)
at confirming cousinhoods that one may have suspected due to records or
shared surnames, etc. In fact, I have confirmed (in that I got a
positive match) two distant cousinhoods on my tree in this way.

Now for the pessimism. I agree with Martin, that I don't think the
suggested cousinhoods are very accurate. They can't be. This is a
real problem. I don't think that this test will be very good for
randomly finding cousins if one is unwilling or unable to test other
relatives, or due intense genealogical leg work. This is unfortunate,
since I know many adoptees are taking autosomal tests. Indeed, I think
most were hoping for something a bit more than "I think I might be
Jewish", since many knew that already.

I do think there is some exciting data and technique here, but, as of
now, it doesn't seem quite ready for prime time. The average end user
is going to be very perplexed by these results. Genealogy geeks will be
frustrated by some apparently tantalizing results that in most case
aren't going to lead much of anywhere.

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia

My guess is that the Family Finder is an even broader brush than YDNA and
MtDNA (I wonder what the data base numbers are but I think they must be
small) and that if it can tell anything it is the little bit extra that
Elaine identified in her comments re the indications of geographic origins
and historic religious affiliations. I would suggest that that is a bit
disappointing. I am grateful for the information I have got through the
standard testing but my feeling is that the Family Finder information has a
long way to go before it can be of any real use to family genealogy.

Martin Davis - London (UK)


DNA Research #DNA Family Finder #dna

sbloom@...
 

I am both more optimistic and more pessimistic than Martin (who, by
the way, is a genetic cousin of mine!).

On the optimistic side, there is some hope of figuring things out if
each tester also recruits cousins >from as many branches of the family
as is possible. In reality, one might only be able to convince a
handful at most to do this at first, but its a start in deciphering.
I think this will be necessary since each of us gets DNA >from a great
mixture of all of our ancestors, as do our cousins. The only way to
see how some random person identified as a genetic cousin might
connect to us is to see how our own known cousins do (I am speaking
in terms of shared chromosomal segments that are ultimately used in
determining the cousinhoods presented by FTDNA and other companies
such as 23andme, etc.). As an example, I have actually been
identified as the distant cousin of another man who, like me, descends
from the town rabbis of a particular small town in central Poland.
Though this could be a coincidence, he, my known cousin also descended
from the folk of this shtetl, and I, all share some of the same
chromosomal segments. I am convinced we are relatively recent cousins
(something like 6th to 8th) , connected by a marriage between our
rabbinic families. What we lack is a way to really document this. We
are both avid genealogists, tracing our families to the 1700's, and
maybe even a little bit further in one case, but we lack the records
of this region to really make a solid connection. I also have a few
more less solid cases of folks seemingly descending >from people of the
same shtetls as my ancestors. I am convinced that one of these will
eventually be a "hit", if I continue to convince cousins to test.

Additionally, this test should be reasonable (but not 100% convincing)
at confirming cousinhoods that one may have suspected due to records or
shared surnames, etc. In fact, I have confirmed (in that I got a
positive match) two distant cousinhoods on my tree in this way.

Now for the pessimism. I agree with Martin, that I don't think the
suggested cousinhoods are very accurate. They can't be. This is a
real problem. I don't think that this test will be very good for
randomly finding cousins if one is unwilling or unable to test other
relatives, or due intense genealogical leg work. This is unfortunate,
since I know many adoptees are taking autosomal tests. Indeed, I think
most were hoping for something a bit more than "I think I might be
Jewish", since many knew that already.

I do think there is some exciting data and technique here, but, as of
now, it doesn't seem quite ready for prime time. The average end user
is going to be very perplexed by these results. Genealogy geeks will be
frustrated by some apparently tantalizing results that in most case
aren't going to lead much of anywhere.

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia

My guess is that the Family Finder is an even broader brush than YDNA and
MtDNA (I wonder what the data base numbers are but I think they must be
small) and that if it can tell anything it is the little bit extra that
Elaine identified in her comments re the indications of geographic origins
and historic religious affiliations. I would suggest that that is a bit
disappointing. I am grateful for the information I have got through the
standard testing but my feeling is that the Family Finder information has a
long way to go before it can be of any real use to family genealogy.

Martin Davis - London (UK)


Re: Family Finder results #dna

Bob Kosovsky
 

On Wed, 9 Jun 2010, Martin Davis (com)" <martindavis@hotmail.com> wrote:

My own results are also confusing. I have thirteen people identified as
close and immediate and I cannot identify even one of them as being in any
way related to me other than they are all of Jewish origin.
I'm puzzled why so many people think that most or some of their matches will be
recognizable relatives.

Remember firstly: Most Eastern European Jews didn't have surnames before
the year 1800. I've read articles that indicate even brothers took on
entirely different surnames. (There are exceptions: some Rabbinic families
and some kohanim. Some German Jews also seem to have used surnames at least
in the 16th century.)

Secondly, the distance in centuries for Y-DNA is not yet conclusive on how far
it goes back, but it clearly goes back a few hundred years at the very least.
(Unlike mtDNA which goes back beyond a millenium.)

If you check on your Y-DNA matches, you'll note that some of the distances
suggest common ancestors as far back as 24 generations. If you consider a
generation approximately 25-30 years, you're talking about common ancestors who
lived between 600 and 720 years ago.

I recently helped a friend through the Y-37 test. He's a kohen, but in
addition to other obvious kohanim on his matches, he had matches all these
people with Spanish surnames. As one of them pointed out, they come >from
crypto-Jews who would have survived under the Spanish Inquisition (and
eventually made their way to Mexico). So you're talking about people who are
related to a common ancestor at least 500 years ago. (And of course, being a
kohen, he's related to Y Chromosonal Aaron about 106-7 generations ago.)

I consider myself lucky, because I have one match which is said to be between
7-9 generations ago. That's about the year 1800. I have a paper trail up to
the 7th generation and I'm working at trying to go back further, but of course,
it's very difficult. And I have a few other suspected matches >from about 10-12
generations ago which I've not yet tried to work on.

So at the very least, the DNA findings help suggest possible directions for your
genealogical research.

Bob Kosovsky, New York City, seeking any and all permutations/locations of:
KASOVSKI/Y, KASOWSKI/Y, KOSOFSKY, KOSOVSKY, KOSOWSKY, KOSOW, KOSSOVE, etc.
Slutsk: DAVIDSON, GELFAND (also Sioux City, Iowa)
Klodawa: JARET, JARETSKY, JARECKI, KOLSKY/I; Przedecz: PIFKO, PIWKO


DNA Research #DNA Re: Family Finder results #dna

Bob Kosovsky
 

On Wed, 9 Jun 2010, Martin Davis (com)" <martindavis@hotmail.com> wrote:

My own results are also confusing. I have thirteen people identified as
close and immediate and I cannot identify even one of them as being in any
way related to me other than they are all of Jewish origin.
I'm puzzled why so many people think that most or some of their matches will be
recognizable relatives.

Remember firstly: Most Eastern European Jews didn't have surnames before
the year 1800. I've read articles that indicate even brothers took on
entirely different surnames. (There are exceptions: some Rabbinic families
and some kohanim. Some German Jews also seem to have used surnames at least
in the 16th century.)

Secondly, the distance in centuries for Y-DNA is not yet conclusive on how far
it goes back, but it clearly goes back a few hundred years at the very least.
(Unlike mtDNA which goes back beyond a millenium.)

If you check on your Y-DNA matches, you'll note that some of the distances
suggest common ancestors as far back as 24 generations. If you consider a
generation approximately 25-30 years, you're talking about common ancestors who
lived between 600 and 720 years ago.

I recently helped a friend through the Y-37 test. He's a kohen, but in
addition to other obvious kohanim on his matches, he had matches all these
people with Spanish surnames. As one of them pointed out, they come >from
crypto-Jews who would have survived under the Spanish Inquisition (and
eventually made their way to Mexico). So you're talking about people who are
related to a common ancestor at least 500 years ago. (And of course, being a
kohen, he's related to Y Chromosonal Aaron about 106-7 generations ago.)

I consider myself lucky, because I have one match which is said to be between
7-9 generations ago. That's about the year 1800. I have a paper trail up to
the 7th generation and I'm working at trying to go back further, but of course,
it's very difficult. And I have a few other suspected matches >from about 10-12
generations ago which I've not yet tried to work on.

So at the very least, the DNA findings help suggest possible directions for your
genealogical research.

Bob Kosovsky, New York City, seeking any and all permutations/locations of:
KASOVSKI/Y, KASOWSKI/Y, KOSOFSKY, KOSOVSKY, KOSOWSKY, KOSOW, KOSSOVE, etc.
Slutsk: DAVIDSON, GELFAND (also Sioux City, Iowa)
Klodawa: JARET, JARETSKY, JARECKI, KOLSKY/I; Przedecz: PIFKO, PIWKO


NYT article on Jewish genetu=ics #dna

Mario Modiano <modianom@...>
 

I am sure you will have seen this important article in yesterday's
New York Times Science section By Nicholas Wade headlined: Studies
Show Jews' Genetic Similarity. But I thought I would draw your
attention to it.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/10/science/10jews.html?emc=eta1

Best regards,
Mario Modiano (Athens)


DNA Research #DNA NYT article on Jewish genetu=ics #dna

Mario Modiano <modianom@...>
 

I am sure you will have seen this important article in yesterday's
New York Times Science section By Nicholas Wade headlined: Studies
Show Jews' Genetic Similarity. But I thought I would draw your
attention to it.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/10/science/10jews.html?emc=eta1

Best regards,
Mario Modiano (Athens)


JOWBR Update Announcement - June 2010 #rabbinic

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce its 2010 pre-IAJGS Conference
update to the JOWBR (JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial Registry) database.
The JOWBR database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/ If you're a new user, we
recommend that you take a look at the first two explanatory screencasts at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

This update includes more than 108,000 new records and approximately
13,000 new photos. The database is adding 170 new cemeteries along with
updates or additions to an additional 155 cemeteries >from 19 countries.
JOWBR's holdings now exceed 1.4 million records >from approximately 2,700
cemeteries / cemetery sections >from 46 countries!

Since our last update, JewishGen was pleased to add a number of new
institutional and individual donors while continuing to work with its
existing valued donor base. An itemization of the larger submissions and
new donors are as follows:

-- Iasi, Romania. Reuven Singer and his team of data entry, translation
and proofreading volunteers have completed their work on all available
burial records for Iasi. This latest installment includes close to 32,000
records to bring the entire data set to 65,000!
-- Lodz, Poland.
o We are pleased to announce that JewishGen and JRI-Poland
have gained permission >from the "Organization of Former Residents of Lodz in
Israel" to add the names >from their burial registers to the JOWBR and
JRI-Poland databases. We estimate there will be approximately 70,000 to
75,000 total records. This update includes the first 12,000 records. Our
team of volunteers continue with the data entry and proofreading of the
remaining records. If you?re interested in helping with data entry, please
contact me at NAltman@JewishGen.org
o Thanks to Avigdor Ben-Dov for coordinating additional
submissions of more than 2,000 records >from burials marked by the IDF
working with the Yad LeZehava Holocaust Research Institute (YZI) Witnesses
in Uniform project at three sections of the cemetery in Lodz. This brings
the current number of identified burials to 3,400.
-- Louisville, Kentucky. Herman Meyer & Son Funeral Home in
Louisville, Kentucky has compiled extensive information on burials >from 7
Louisville Jewish cemeteries. We greatly appreciate their submission of
basic information for close to 11,500 records. Additional information on
Kentucky genealogical resources and headstone photos for some of the records
can be found at their website: http://www.meyerfuneral.com/
-- Baltimore, Maryland. Thanks to the Jewish Museum of Maryland
(www.jewishmuseummd.org) and Deb Weiner for an additional 9,900 records from
the Belair Road and Berrymans Lane Baltimore Hebrew Cemeteries.
-- Maine. Thanks to Harris Gleckman, Project Shammas for "Documenting
Maine Jewry", for submitting close to 6,500 records >from 16 Maine cemeteries
and cemetery sections. Additional information on Maine Jewry can be found
on their site at www.MaineJews.org
-- American Jewish Archives (AJA). We continue to work on various
cemetery records >from across the US ad the Caribbean >from the archives of
The Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives (AJA) in
Cincinnati, Ohio, http://www.americanjewisharchives.org/ This update
includes more than 6,000 records >from 36 cemeteries. We thank the
administration at the Archives and Jennie Cole for help facilitating the
arrangement.
-- Pennsauken, New Jersey. Our thanks to Rabbi Gary Gans for his
submission of 6,000 records >from the Crescent Memorial Park in Pennsauken,
NJ.
-- Liepaja, Latvia. Our thanks to Paul Berkay, Ella Barkan, and Edward
Anders for their submission of 3,600 records >from the town of Liepaja,
Latvia. Additional information on Liepaja can be found at their website
http://www.liepajajews.org/cem/CemIndex.htm
-- Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park and Pardes Shalom Cemetery, Ontario.
Thanks to Kevin Hanit and Allen Halberstadt representing the JGS of Canada
(Toronto) for more than 3,200 records >from 122 updated and new sections of
these two Canadian cemeteries.
-- South Carolina Cemeteries. Thanks to Ann Hellman, president of the
Jewish Historical Society of South Carolina (http://www.jhssc.org/) for
their additional submission of close to 2,200 burial records and 365 photos
from 5 South Carolina cemeteries.
-- Petach Tikvah, Israel. Thanks to Gilda Kurtzman for her ongoing
work at the Segulah Cemetery in Petach Tikvah for approximately 2,200
additional photos
-- Sacramento, California. Thanks to Bob Wasco for submitting
approximately 2,200 records >from the Home of Peace Cemetery in Sacramento.
-- Various US States. Thanks to Julian H. Preisler of Falling Waters,
West Virginia for submitting more than 2,100 records >from 25 cemeteries in 9
states. For more information on Mr. Preisler's cemetery indexing please see
his website t http://www.jpreisler.com/cemeteryindexes.htm
-- Colma, California. Thanks to Pierre Hahn, Rosanne Leeson, and Jeff
Lewy >from the San Francisco Bay area Jewish Genealogical Society, for adding
close to 2,100 records >from the second book of burial records >from Home of
Peace Cemetery & Emanu-El Mausoleum in, Colma.
-- New Jersey. Thanks to Jerome Nathans and the Jewish Historical
Society of North Jersey (jhsnnj@yahoo.com) for more than 1,000 records from
5 New Jersey cemeteries.
-- Bavarian Cemeteries. JewishGen has been working with the Bavarian
Ministry to assist them with headstone translations >from various Jewish
cemeteries. Information >from close to 700 translations >from 7 cemeteries,
along with other civil document data >from the Ministry is included in this
update. The Ministry's websites are currently in progress and will provide
additional information and the headstone photos. Our thanks to Evamaria
Brockhoff, Head of the Department of Publications at the Bavarian State
Ministry of Science, Research and Arts / Centre of Bavarian History
www.hdbg.de
-- German Cemeteries. Our thanks to Leo Hoenig for submitting his
collection of German cemetery information >from information collected by
Klaus H.S. Schulte. This update includes 650 records >from 21 small German
cemeteries.
-- South Africa. Thanks to Rabbi Moshe Silberhaft, "The Traveling
Rabbi", spiritual leader of the South African Country Communities and the
African Jewish Congress for his submission of approximately 450 records and
550 photos >from 13 cemeteries. For additional information, please see
www.africanjewishcongress.com
-- Whether your name or records are listed above, we appreciate all
your submissions! Thank you to all the donors that submitted information
for this update.

We appreciate all the work our donors have done and encourage you to
make additional submissions. Whether you work on a cemetery / cemetery
section individually or consider a group project for your local Society,
temple or other group, it's your submissions that help grow the JOWBR
database and make it possible for researchers and family members to find
answers they otherwise might not. Please also consider other organizations
you may be affiliated with that may already have done cemetery indexing that
would consider having their records included in the JOWBR database.

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JOWBR -- Coordinator
June 2010


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic JOWBR Update Announcement - June 2010 #rabbinic

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce its 2010 pre-IAJGS Conference
update to the JOWBR (JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial Registry) database.
The JOWBR database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/ If you're a new user, we
recommend that you take a look at the first two explanatory screencasts at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

This update includes more than 108,000 new records and approximately
13,000 new photos. The database is adding 170 new cemeteries along with
updates or additions to an additional 155 cemeteries >from 19 countries.
JOWBR's holdings now exceed 1.4 million records >from approximately 2,700
cemeteries / cemetery sections >from 46 countries!

Since our last update, JewishGen was pleased to add a number of new
institutional and individual donors while continuing to work with its
existing valued donor base. An itemization of the larger submissions and
new donors are as follows:

-- Iasi, Romania. Reuven Singer and his team of data entry, translation
and proofreading volunteers have completed their work on all available
burial records for Iasi. This latest installment includes close to 32,000
records to bring the entire data set to 65,000!
-- Lodz, Poland.
o We are pleased to announce that JewishGen and JRI-Poland
have gained permission >from the "Organization of Former Residents of Lodz in
Israel" to add the names >from their burial registers to the JOWBR and
JRI-Poland databases. We estimate there will be approximately 70,000 to
75,000 total records. This update includes the first 12,000 records. Our
team of volunteers continue with the data entry and proofreading of the
remaining records. If you?re interested in helping with data entry, please
contact me at NAltman@JewishGen.org
o Thanks to Avigdor Ben-Dov for coordinating additional
submissions of more than 2,000 records >from burials marked by the IDF
working with the Yad LeZehava Holocaust Research Institute (YZI) Witnesses
in Uniform project at three sections of the cemetery in Lodz. This brings
the current number of identified burials to 3,400.
-- Louisville, Kentucky. Herman Meyer & Son Funeral Home in
Louisville, Kentucky has compiled extensive information on burials >from 7
Louisville Jewish cemeteries. We greatly appreciate their submission of
basic information for close to 11,500 records. Additional information on
Kentucky genealogical resources and headstone photos for some of the records
can be found at their website: http://www.meyerfuneral.com/
-- Baltimore, Maryland. Thanks to the Jewish Museum of Maryland
(www.jewishmuseummd.org) and Deb Weiner for an additional 9,900 records from
the Belair Road and Berrymans Lane Baltimore Hebrew Cemeteries.
-- Maine. Thanks to Harris Gleckman, Project Shammas for "Documenting
Maine Jewry", for submitting close to 6,500 records >from 16 Maine cemeteries
and cemetery sections. Additional information on Maine Jewry can be found
on their site at www.MaineJews.org
-- American Jewish Archives (AJA). We continue to work on various
cemetery records >from across the US ad the Caribbean >from the archives of
The Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives (AJA) in
Cincinnati, Ohio, http://www.americanjewisharchives.org/ This update
includes more than 6,000 records >from 36 cemeteries. We thank the
administration at the Archives and Jennie Cole for help facilitating the
arrangement.
-- Pennsauken, New Jersey. Our thanks to Rabbi Gary Gans for his
submission of 6,000 records >from the Crescent Memorial Park in Pennsauken,
NJ.
-- Liepaja, Latvia. Our thanks to Paul Berkay, Ella Barkan, and Edward
Anders for their submission of 3,600 records >from the town of Liepaja,
Latvia. Additional information on Liepaja can be found at their website
http://www.liepajajews.org/cem/CemIndex.htm
-- Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park and Pardes Shalom Cemetery, Ontario.
Thanks to Kevin Hanit and Allen Halberstadt representing the JGS of Canada
(Toronto) for more than 3,200 records >from 122 updated and new sections of
these two Canadian cemeteries.
-- South Carolina Cemeteries. Thanks to Ann Hellman, president of the
Jewish Historical Society of South Carolina (http://www.jhssc.org/) for
their additional submission of close to 2,200 burial records and 365 photos
from 5 South Carolina cemeteries.
-- Petach Tikvah, Israel. Thanks to Gilda Kurtzman for her ongoing
work at the Segulah Cemetery in Petach Tikvah for approximately 2,200
additional photos
-- Sacramento, California. Thanks to Bob Wasco for submitting
approximately 2,200 records >from the Home of Peace Cemetery in Sacramento.
-- Various US States. Thanks to Julian H. Preisler of Falling Waters,
West Virginia for submitting more than 2,100 records >from 25 cemeteries in 9
states. For more information on Mr. Preisler's cemetery indexing please see
his website t http://www.jpreisler.com/cemeteryindexes.htm
-- Colma, California. Thanks to Pierre Hahn, Rosanne Leeson, and Jeff
Lewy >from the San Francisco Bay area Jewish Genealogical Society, for adding
close to 2,100 records >from the second book of burial records >from Home of
Peace Cemetery & Emanu-El Mausoleum in, Colma.
-- New Jersey. Thanks to Jerome Nathans and the Jewish Historical
Society of North Jersey (jhsnnj@yahoo.com) for more than 1,000 records from
5 New Jersey cemeteries.
-- Bavarian Cemeteries. JewishGen has been working with the Bavarian
Ministry to assist them with headstone translations >from various Jewish
cemeteries. Information >from close to 700 translations >from 7 cemeteries,
along with other civil document data >from the Ministry is included in this
update. The Ministry's websites are currently in progress and will provide
additional information and the headstone photos. Our thanks to Evamaria
Brockhoff, Head of the Department of Publications at the Bavarian State
Ministry of Science, Research and Arts / Centre of Bavarian History
www.hdbg.de
-- German Cemeteries. Our thanks to Leo Hoenig for submitting his
collection of German cemetery information >from information collected by
Klaus H.S. Schulte. This update includes 650 records >from 21 small German
cemeteries.
-- South Africa. Thanks to Rabbi Moshe Silberhaft, "The Traveling
Rabbi", spiritual leader of the South African Country Communities and the
African Jewish Congress for his submission of approximately 450 records and
550 photos >from 13 cemeteries. For additional information, please see
www.africanjewishcongress.com
-- Whether your name or records are listed above, we appreciate all
your submissions! Thank you to all the donors that submitted information
for this update.

We appreciate all the work our donors have done and encourage you to
make additional submissions. Whether you work on a cemetery / cemetery
section individually or consider a group project for your local Society,
temple or other group, it's your submissions that help grow the JOWBR
database and make it possible for researchers and family members to find
answers they otherwise might not. Please also consider other organizations
you may be affiliated with that may already have done cemetery indexing that
would consider having their records included in the JOWBR database.

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JOWBR -- Coordinator
June 2010


Re: Website for out-of-print seforim #rabbinic

Ittai Hershman
 

Bezalel Weill asks about websites beyond www.hebrewbooks.org where one can
purchase of download out-of-print seforim. Recently, someone clued me in to
Otzar HaHochma www.otzar.org which had quite an impressive collection, but
is pricey for those of us who only need very occasional access.

Incidentally, if anyone is aware of a library (or other) in NYC that has
access to the complete Otzar HaHochma collection, I would be most
interested.

Ittai Hershman


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: Website for out-of-print seforim #rabbinic

Ittai Hershman
 

Bezalel Weill asks about websites beyond www.hebrewbooks.org where one can
purchase of download out-of-print seforim. Recently, someone clued me in to
Otzar HaHochma www.otzar.org which had quite an impressive collection, but
is pricey for those of us who only need very occasional access.

Incidentally, if anyone is aware of a library (or other) in NYC that has
access to the complete Otzar HaHochma collection, I would be most
interested.

Ittai Hershman


R' Avraham Charif Of Pikelin #rabbinic

Darren Dalcher <D.Dalcher@...>
 

Dear Genenrs,

Has any one compiled a history of R' Avraham Charif of Pikelin
(Pikeliai, Lithuania)? R' Avraham was the son of Rabbi Tzvi Hirsh of
Gavara (Gaur). I am not sure about the lineage beyond that.

I understand the book "Yemei Shnotai" may offer some details about his
life, origin and family but it is not available in the UK.

I am particularly interested in his children (I only know of Dina my
wife's gg-grandmother) as well as his ancestry. Any further details,
suggestions or sources will be greatly appreciated.

Please respond privately to: d.dalcher@mdx.ac.uk

Many thanks.

Darren Dalcher
--
Dr. Darren Dalcher
London, UK


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic R' Avraham Charif Of Pikelin #rabbinic

Darren Dalcher <D.Dalcher@...>
 

Dear Genenrs,

Has any one compiled a history of R' Avraham Charif of Pikelin
(Pikeliai, Lithuania)? R' Avraham was the son of Rabbi Tzvi Hirsh of
Gavara (Gaur). I am not sure about the lineage beyond that.

I understand the book "Yemei Shnotai" may offer some details about his
life, origin and family but it is not available in the UK.

I am particularly interested in his children (I only know of Dina my
wife's gg-grandmother) as well as his ancestry. Any further details,
suggestions or sources will be greatly appreciated.

Please respond privately to: d.dalcher@mdx.ac.uk

Many thanks.

Darren Dalcher
--
Dr. Darren Dalcher
London, UK


R. Zvi Aryeh LANDAU of Elik #rabbinic

Lillian Faffer
 

I am looking for information about the descendants of R. Zvi Aryeh LANDAU
of Elik who died no later than 1881. I am particularly interested in the
descendants through his marriage with Zivia Sheine Twersky the daughter
of R. Nahum Twersky of Markarov and Hindel Motil Horowitz. I understand
that both R. Zvi Aryeh Landau and Zivia Sheine Twersky had a number of
other spouses prior to their marriage.
Lillian Faffer-New York City

lfaffer@juno.com


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic R. Zvi Aryeh LANDAU of Elik #rabbinic

Lillian Faffer
 

I am looking for information about the descendants of R. Zvi Aryeh LANDAU
of Elik who died no later than 1881. I am particularly interested in the
descendants through his marriage with Zivia Sheine Twersky the daughter
of R. Nahum Twersky of Markarov and Hindel Motil Horowitz. I understand
that both R. Zvi Aryeh Landau and Zivia Sheine Twersky had a number of
other spouses prior to their marriage.
Lillian Faffer-New York City

lfaffer@juno.com