Date   

oshmyany/ashmyany #general

Albert Singer <al2chris@...>
 

for years I have been looking for Schanine as that is what the emigration
records show for my gf Benjamin SINGER...Now it has been suggested that the
town name might be Oshmany/Ashyany... He came herem in 1880 does anyone
have information on that town?


al singer
schenectady ny

MODERATOR NOTE: If you haven't yet, check out JewishGen's databases such as the
Jewish Communities Database at http://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/Search.asp
or ShtetlLinks http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen oshmyany/ashmyany #general

Albert Singer <al2chris@...>
 

for years I have been looking for Schanine as that is what the emigration
records show for my gf Benjamin SINGER...Now it has been suggested that the
town name might be Oshmany/Ashyany... He came herem in 1880 does anyone
have information on that town?


al singer
schenectady ny

MODERATOR NOTE: If you haven't yet, check out JewishGen's databases such as the
Jewish Communities Database at http://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/Search.asp
or ShtetlLinks http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/


Re: Figuring out a proper Hebrew name for a newborn baby #general

Ira Leviton
 

Hi Cousins,

It sounds like Lois dealing with two Hebrew (or Yiddish) names, both starting
with R, and both similar. While nothing is unheard of, it's all but unheard of
that two siblings have the same Hebrew name, even more so for two living siblings.

Maybe the names are Rochel, Roza, Raiza, Raizel (a diminutive of Raiza)Ratzi, or
others, but these are just guesses. The guesses will be more 'educated' by those
who see the documents Lois has, but unless those documents are written in Hebrew or
Yiddish, there will still be some uncertainty.

I've suggested to Lois privately, and this is also a general suggestion for
problems with Hebrew or Yiddish names, to also show the documents to her rabbi, or
her cousin's son's rabbi, or to somebody who knows Hebrew or Yiddish (e.g.,
somebody at the synagogue).

Regards and Happy Channukah to All,

Ira
Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Figuring out a proper Hebrew name for a newborn baby #general

Ira Leviton
 

Hi Cousins,

It sounds like Lois dealing with two Hebrew (or Yiddish) names, both starting
with R, and both similar. While nothing is unheard of, it's all but unheard of
that two siblings have the same Hebrew name, even more so for two living siblings.

Maybe the names are Rochel, Roza, Raiza, Raizel (a diminutive of Raiza)Ratzi, or
others, but these are just guesses. The guesses will be more 'educated' by those
who see the documents Lois has, but unless those documents are written in Hebrew or
Yiddish, there will still be some uncertainty.

I've suggested to Lois privately, and this is also a general suggestion for
problems with Hebrew or Yiddish names, to also show the documents to her rabbi, or
her cousin's son's rabbi, or to somebody who knows Hebrew or Yiddish (e.g.,
somebody at the synagogue).

Regards and Happy Channukah to All,

Ira
Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


Re: Figuring out a proper Hebrew name for a newborn baby #general

Judith27
 

Hi, Lois,
Does anyone know what Lillian Rotzel's Hebrew/Yiddish name was? That would seem to
be a good starting point for selecting an appropriate name for this new baby.
If the original Hebrew/Yiddish name is not know, then the usual convention of
selecting a name based upon (a) the initial letter "L" and "R" such as the first
that springs to mind of Leah Rachel (some other "L" starting Hebrew names might be
Leila, Liora, and Levana), or (b) the meaning of the name Lillian (which means
Lilly and has the Hebrew equivalents of Chavatzelet, and Shoshana) would be the two
most commonly methods used. A good book to consult would be any of Rabbi David
Kolatch's Hebrew Name Dictionaries.
Shalom,
Judi Langer-Surnamer Caplan

P.S. In Smadar Shir Sidi's recent book THE COMPLETE BOOK OF HEBREW BABY NAMES
a modern Hebrew "L" name is Lili, pronounced Lee'lee and meaning mine.

"Lois Sernoff" <jglois@verizon.net> wrote:
A cousin has presented me with a puzzling question. Her son wants to give his baby
daughter a Hebrew name in memory of his maternal grandmother, called Lillian in the
US. The baby's (secular) name already reflects her great-grandmother's name,
Lillian, but is not the same... On the manifest of the Haverford her name appears
to be spelled "Raza".


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Figuring out a proper Hebrew name for a newborn baby #general

Judith27
 

Hi, Lois,
Does anyone know what Lillian Rotzel's Hebrew/Yiddish name was? That would seem to
be a good starting point for selecting an appropriate name for this new baby.
If the original Hebrew/Yiddish name is not know, then the usual convention of
selecting a name based upon (a) the initial letter "L" and "R" such as the first
that springs to mind of Leah Rachel (some other "L" starting Hebrew names might be
Leila, Liora, and Levana), or (b) the meaning of the name Lillian (which means
Lilly and has the Hebrew equivalents of Chavatzelet, and Shoshana) would be the two
most commonly methods used. A good book to consult would be any of Rabbi David
Kolatch's Hebrew Name Dictionaries.
Shalom,
Judi Langer-Surnamer Caplan

P.S. In Smadar Shir Sidi's recent book THE COMPLETE BOOK OF HEBREW BABY NAMES
a modern Hebrew "L" name is Lili, pronounced Lee'lee and meaning mine.

"Lois Sernoff" <jglois@verizon.net> wrote:
A cousin has presented me with a puzzling question. Her son wants to give his baby
daughter a Hebrew name in memory of his maternal grandmother, called Lillian in the
US. The baby's (secular) name already reflects her great-grandmother's name,
Lillian, but is not the same... On the manifest of the Haverford her name appears
to be spelled "Raza".


Harrisburgs in Pennsylvania #general

Joan Rosen <jgrosen@...>
 

In response to Barbara Zimmer's second posting about a second, small Harrisburg in
PA:
1. MapQuest is not always correct!
2. Whatever is in Philadelphia County, besides Philadelphia itself, is not a city.
It could be a small neighborhood (about which I have never heard anything in my 75
years here,) or section, if indeed it exists.
3. The borders of Phila. County and Phila, city are exactly the same. There is,
quite literally, no room for another city within Philadelphia, other than the city
itself.
4. There are, therefore, no separate records for this supposed other place in PA
called Harrisburg. (I wonder if MapQuest means Holmesburg???--a neighborhood
within Phila. like many others. It is in that same general area but I am not
certain of its exact location within Phila.)
5. Anyone born, married, or died in this supposed Harrisburg would indeed have been
born, died, or married in Philadelphia. And no one would list it as a place of
birth on a record, any more than one would expect to find the Lower East Side as an
official birthplace for someone born in NY.

Joan

Joan Goldman Rosen
jgrosen@verizon.net
Elkins Park, PA (suburban Philadelphia)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Harrisburgs in Pennsylvania #general

Joan Rosen <jgrosen@...>
 

In response to Barbara Zimmer's second posting about a second, small Harrisburg in
PA:
1. MapQuest is not always correct!
2. Whatever is in Philadelphia County, besides Philadelphia itself, is not a city.
It could be a small neighborhood (about which I have never heard anything in my 75
years here,) or section, if indeed it exists.
3. The borders of Phila. County and Phila, city are exactly the same. There is,
quite literally, no room for another city within Philadelphia, other than the city
itself.
4. There are, therefore, no separate records for this supposed other place in PA
called Harrisburg. (I wonder if MapQuest means Holmesburg???--a neighborhood
within Phila. like many others. It is in that same general area but I am not
certain of its exact location within Phila.)
5. Anyone born, married, or died in this supposed Harrisburg would indeed have been
born, died, or married in Philadelphia. And no one would list it as a place of
birth on a record, any more than one would expect to find the Lower East Side as an
official birthplace for someone born in NY.

Joan

Joan Goldman Rosen
jgrosen@verizon.net
Elkins Park, PA (suburban Philadelphia)


San Francisco Bay Area JGS Meeting 12/9/07 #general

Jerry acobson <drjjsf@...>
 

San Francisco Meeting

Topic: A Wealth of World Jewish Records
Speaker: Michael Goldstein
Date: Sunday, December 9
Time: 12:30: Doors open 1:00: Program begins
Where: Jewish Community High School 835 Ellis St. San Francisco, CA
Free parking, entrance on Pierce St.
Entry: Free.

Info: http://www.jewishgen.org/sfbajgs

Jerry Jacobson Please send replies to drjjsf@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen San Francisco Bay Area JGS Meeting 12/9/07 #general

Jerry acobson <drjjsf@...>
 

San Francisco Meeting

Topic: A Wealth of World Jewish Records
Speaker: Michael Goldstein
Date: Sunday, December 9
Time: 12:30: Doors open 1:00: Program begins
Where: Jewish Community High School 835 Ellis St. San Francisco, CA
Free parking, entrance on Pierce St.
Entry: Free.

Info: http://www.jewishgen.org/sfbajgs

Jerry Jacobson Please send replies to drjjsf@aol.com


Colorado JGS - 16 Dec General Meeting #general

Terry Lasky <talasky@...>
 

JGS of Colorado Meeting 16 Dec 2007
Time: 1:30 Discussion 2:00 Meeting
Place: Bnai Havurah
Speaker: Rabbi Richard Newman
Topic: Early Jewish Settlement at the Southern Tip of the Dark Continent
For more info see http://www.jewishgen.org/jgs-colorado/meetings.html

Terry Lasky
Denver, CO


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Colorado JGS - 16 Dec General Meeting #general

Terry Lasky <talasky@...>
 

JGS of Colorado Meeting 16 Dec 2007
Time: 1:30 Discussion 2:00 Meeting
Place: Bnai Havurah
Speaker: Rabbi Richard Newman
Topic: Early Jewish Settlement at the Southern Tip of the Dark Continent
For more info see http://www.jewishgen.org/jgs-colorado/meetings.html

Terry Lasky
Denver, CO


JGS of Cleveland -- December 5 meeting #general

Cynthia Spikell <proprius@...>
 

JGS of Cleveland meeting -- December 5, 2007
Place: Second floor auditorium of Menorah Park, 27100 Cedar Road, Beachwood
Time: 7:30 p.m.
Speaker: Beth Stachiw, President of the Lake County Gen. Society
Topic: The tools and techniques to create genealogical scrapbooks

For further information see: http://www.clevelandjgs.org/

Cynthia Spikell
2nd V.P.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of Cleveland -- December 5 meeting #general

Cynthia Spikell <proprius@...>
 

JGS of Cleveland meeting -- December 5, 2007
Place: Second floor auditorium of Menorah Park, 27100 Cedar Road, Beachwood
Time: 7:30 p.m.
Speaker: Beth Stachiw, President of the Lake County Gen. Society
Topic: The tools and techniques to create genealogical scrapbooks

For further information see: http://www.clevelandjgs.org/

Cynthia Spikell
2nd V.P.


"The Synagogue to the Carousel" - Immigrant Jewish Artisans Exhibition #galicia

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

There's a fascinating show at the American Folk Art Museum at 45
West 53rd Street in New York City that may be of interest to
genealogists:

"Gilded Lions and Jeweled Horses: The Synagogue to the Carousel"
October 2, 2007 - March 23, 2008

This show traces the journey of Jewish woodcarvers and other
artisans >from Eastern and Central Europe to America and the role
they played in establishing a distinct Jewish culture in communities
throughout the United States. It explores a little known aspect of
American carousel history and its connection to Jewish visual
culture through the artwork of immigrant craftsmen who were inspired
by their memories of the symbols and forms they left behind. Many of
these Jewish artisans who arrived in America at the turn of the
twentieth century found work carving horses and other animals for
the flourishing carousel industry. Until now, the important
historical and aesthetic link between the synagogue and the carousel
has never been documented.

The exhibition shows how the skill and artistry of carving wooden
bimahs and arks evolved into the creation of lions, horses and other
creatures for the carousels in places like Coney Island. The
exhibition features approximately one hundred artworks and objects,
including rare documentary photographs of Eastern European
synagogues >from Galicia and Ukraine, arks and carved gravestones,
sacred carvings, paper-cuts, and carousel animals and represents the
first major study of this important aspect of the Jewish
contribution to American folk art.

For those of you who can't come to New York, the online exhibition
is a treat:

http://gildedlions.org/

It includes story of Solomon Stein and Harry Goldstein,
Yiddish-speaking immigrants >from Russia, who created the firm,
Artistic Caroussel Manufacturers. Their carousel installation in
New York's Central Park is still in use today.

On December 5, 2007 at 6:30PM the museum will host an illustrated
lecture in collaboration with the Tenement Museum:

"Immigration on the Lower East Side"

Speaker: Steve Long

Thousands of tenements sprouted up on the Lower East Side of New
York during the latter part of the 19th century to provide
inexpensive lodging for immigrants >from Eastern Europe who flooded
into Manhattan. Among the immigrants were Jewish artisan woodcarvers.

The museum's website with complete information on the exhibition,
program, catalog and directions is at:

http://www.folkartmuseum.org/

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia "The Synagogue to the Carousel" - Immigrant Jewish Artisans Exhibition #galicia

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

There's a fascinating show at the American Folk Art Museum at 45
West 53rd Street in New York City that may be of interest to
genealogists:

"Gilded Lions and Jeweled Horses: The Synagogue to the Carousel"
October 2, 2007 - March 23, 2008

This show traces the journey of Jewish woodcarvers and other
artisans >from Eastern and Central Europe to America and the role
they played in establishing a distinct Jewish culture in communities
throughout the United States. It explores a little known aspect of
American carousel history and its connection to Jewish visual
culture through the artwork of immigrant craftsmen who were inspired
by their memories of the symbols and forms they left behind. Many of
these Jewish artisans who arrived in America at the turn of the
twentieth century found work carving horses and other animals for
the flourishing carousel industry. Until now, the important
historical and aesthetic link between the synagogue and the carousel
has never been documented.

The exhibition shows how the skill and artistry of carving wooden
bimahs and arks evolved into the creation of lions, horses and other
creatures for the carousels in places like Coney Island. The
exhibition features approximately one hundred artworks and objects,
including rare documentary photographs of Eastern European
synagogues >from Galicia and Ukraine, arks and carved gravestones,
sacred carvings, paper-cuts, and carousel animals and represents the
first major study of this important aspect of the Jewish
contribution to American folk art.

For those of you who can't come to New York, the online exhibition
is a treat:

http://gildedlions.org/

It includes story of Solomon Stein and Harry Goldstein,
Yiddish-speaking immigrants >from Russia, who created the firm,
Artistic Caroussel Manufacturers. Their carousel installation in
New York's Central Park is still in use today.

On December 5, 2007 at 6:30PM the museum will host an illustrated
lecture in collaboration with the Tenement Museum:

"Immigration on the Lower East Side"

Speaker: Steve Long

Thousands of tenements sprouted up on the Lower East Side of New
York during the latter part of the 19th century to provide
inexpensive lodging for immigrants >from Eastern Europe who flooded
into Manhattan. Among the immigrants were Jewish artisan woodcarvers.

The museum's website with complete information on the exhibition,
program, catalog and directions is at:

http://www.folkartmuseum.org/

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


Reuse of deceased children's names #sephardic

Mario Modiano <modianom@...>
 

In the genealogy of the MODIANO family there are also multiple cases of
newborns taking the name of a deceased sibling, especially if the name had
belonged to a grandparent. The practice became rare as the mortality rate of
children declined.
Mario Modiano (Athens)
modianom@otenet.gr)


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim Reuse of deceased children's names #sephardic

Mario Modiano <modianom@...>
 

In the genealogy of the MODIANO family there are also multiple cases of
newborns taking the name of a deceased sibling, especially if the name had
belonged to a grandparent. The practice became rare as the mortality rate of
children declined.
Mario Modiano (Athens)
modianom@otenet.gr)


"The Synagogue to the Carousel"-Immigrant Jewish Artisans #poland

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

There's a fascinating show at the American Folk Art Museum at 45 West 53rd
Street in New York City that may be of interest to Jewish genealogists and
researchers:

"GILDED LIONS AND JEWELED HORSES: THE SYNAGOGUE TO THE CAROUSEL"

October 2, 2007 - March 23, 2008

This show traces the journey of Jewish woodcarvers and other artisans >from
Eastern and Central Europe to America. Many of these Jewish artisans who
arrived in America at the turn of the 20th century found work carving horses
and other animals for the flourishing carousel industry. Until now, the
important historical and aesthetic link between the synagogue and the
carousel has never been documented.

The exhibition shows how the skill and artistry of carving wooden bimahs
and arks evolved into the creation of lions, horses and other creatures for
the carousels in places like Coney Island. The exhibition features
approximately 100 artworks and objects, including rare documentary
photographs of Eastern European synagogues >from Poland, Galicia and Ukraine,
arks and carved gravestones, sacred carvings, paper-cuts, and carousel
animals and represents the first major study of this important aspect of
the Jewish contribution to American folk art.

For those of you who can't come to New York, the online exhibition is a
treat:

http://gildedlions.org/

It includes story of Solomon Stein and Harry Goldstein, Yiddish-speaking
immigrants >from Russia, who created the firm, Artistic Caroussel
Manufacturers. Their carousel installation in New York's Central Park is
still in use today.

On December 5, 2007 at 6:30PM the museum will host an illustrated lecture
in collaboration with the Tenement Museum:

"IMMIGRATION ON THE LOWER EAST SIDE"

Speaker: Steve Long

Thousands of tenements sprouted up on the Lower East Side of New York during
the latter part of the 19th century to provide inexpensive lodging for
immigrants >from Eastern Europe who flooded into Manhattan. Among the
immigrants were Jewish artisan woodcarvers.

The museum's website with complete information on the exhibition, program,
catalog and directions is at:

http://www.folkartmuseum.org/

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


JRI Poland #Poland "The Synagogue to the Carousel"-Immigrant Jewish Artisans #poland

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

There's a fascinating show at the American Folk Art Museum at 45 West 53rd
Street in New York City that may be of interest to Jewish genealogists and
researchers:

"GILDED LIONS AND JEWELED HORSES: THE SYNAGOGUE TO THE CAROUSEL"

October 2, 2007 - March 23, 2008

This show traces the journey of Jewish woodcarvers and other artisans >from
Eastern and Central Europe to America. Many of these Jewish artisans who
arrived in America at the turn of the 20th century found work carving horses
and other animals for the flourishing carousel industry. Until now, the
important historical and aesthetic link between the synagogue and the
carousel has never been documented.

The exhibition shows how the skill and artistry of carving wooden bimahs
and arks evolved into the creation of lions, horses and other creatures for
the carousels in places like Coney Island. The exhibition features
approximately 100 artworks and objects, including rare documentary
photographs of Eastern European synagogues >from Poland, Galicia and Ukraine,
arks and carved gravestones, sacred carvings, paper-cuts, and carousel
animals and represents the first major study of this important aspect of
the Jewish contribution to American folk art.

For those of you who can't come to New York, the online exhibition is a
treat:

http://gildedlions.org/

It includes story of Solomon Stein and Harry Goldstein, Yiddish-speaking
immigrants >from Russia, who created the firm, Artistic Caroussel
Manufacturers. Their carousel installation in New York's Central Park is
still in use today.

On December 5, 2007 at 6:30PM the museum will host an illustrated lecture
in collaboration with the Tenement Museum:

"IMMIGRATION ON THE LOWER EAST SIDE"

Speaker: Steve Long

Thousands of tenements sprouted up on the Lower East Side of New York during
the latter part of the 19th century to provide inexpensive lodging for
immigrants >from Eastern Europe who flooded into Manhattan. Among the
immigrants were Jewish artisan woodcarvers.

The museum's website with complete information on the exhibition, program,
catalog and directions is at:

http://www.folkartmuseum.org/

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com