Date   

Viewmate photo identification #general

Marilyn Glass
 

Hi:

I've posted a photo at the following Viewmate link for photo identification:
https://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=62883

This photo is part of a collection >from a relative who resided in Detroit,
Michigan. My cousin had ties to Pavlinka, Russia (now Ukraine). Pavlinka
is located near Odessa and the Black Sea. Possible family surnames were:
Kleiner, Gochman, Slater, Platnik, Hoffman, Pinter (any spelling for all
surnames).

Thank you in advance for your help, and please respond to the form on the
Viewmate site.

Marilyn Platnick Glass
Toronto Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Viewmate photo identification #general

Marilyn Glass
 

Hi:

I've posted a photo at the following Viewmate link for photo identification:
https://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=62883

This photo is part of a collection >from a relative who resided in Detroit,
Michigan. My cousin had ties to Pavlinka, Russia (now Ukraine). Pavlinka
is located near Odessa and the Black Sea. Possible family surnames were:
Kleiner, Gochman, Slater, Platnik, Hoffman, Pinter (any spelling for all
surnames).

Thank you in advance for your help, and please respond to the form on the
Viewmate site.

Marilyn Platnick Glass
Toronto Canada


FindMyPast Free Access to British and Irish Roots Collection #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Findmypast has created a "special" collection >from its existing records
called the British and Irish Collection. The intent is to make it easier to
search specifically for the immigrant ancestor rather than searching the
entire Findmypast database. The collection spans more than 400 years of
migration between the British Isles and North America, all in one place, and
holds 98 million records. Currently, access to the database is free-no end
date was given, but can change at any time.

When searching the data base, the results return with an icon of a "page".
This indicates it is a transcription of the actual record. When you open the
icon, there is an opportunity to view the original source document, however,
for most of the source documents, a paid subscription is necessary. An
example of a free source document would be the US Census.

I did a search of the surname "Cohen"-no first name or other information
and received a return of 38,377 results. The results were from: Ireland,
England and Scotland and ranged >from the US Census to Passenger Lists
Leaving the UK (1890-1960), US Passenger Lists, US Marriages, Canadian
Border crossings and more. The country of origin was predominately listed
as England, and Ireland, but there were some >from Canada, Scotland and
Wales. In this example I did not find birth, and death records,
naturalization applications and draft registrations, but they are also
included in the collection's records. In full disclosure I did not view all
38,000 return results. If a record, such as a US military record, says the
soldier was born in Wales or Ireland or the UK, or in a US census record
someone in the family was born in England, Ireland, Scotland or Wales then
that record should be in the collection. Anyone leaving the UK or Ireland
emigrating to Canada, the US or the Caribbean, or any British or Irish
immigrant who stopped temporarily in Canada en route to the US or Caribbean
and anyone listed on any US or Canadian record with British or Irish
origins, birthplace or parents should be in the collection.

To search the collection go to: https://tinyurl.com/yc9m2g55
Original url:
https://search.findmypast.ie/search-world-Records/british-and-irish-roots-collection

Registration with your name, email and password is required.

I have no affiliation with Findmypast and am posting this solely for the
information of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen FindMyPast Free Access to British and Irish Roots Collection #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Findmypast has created a "special" collection >from its existing records
called the British and Irish Collection. The intent is to make it easier to
search specifically for the immigrant ancestor rather than searching the
entire Findmypast database. The collection spans more than 400 years of
migration between the British Isles and North America, all in one place, and
holds 98 million records. Currently, access to the database is free-no end
date was given, but can change at any time.

When searching the data base, the results return with an icon of a "page".
This indicates it is a transcription of the actual record. When you open the
icon, there is an opportunity to view the original source document, however,
for most of the source documents, a paid subscription is necessary. An
example of a free source document would be the US Census.

I did a search of the surname "Cohen"-no first name or other information
and received a return of 38,377 results. The results were from: Ireland,
England and Scotland and ranged >from the US Census to Passenger Lists
Leaving the UK (1890-1960), US Passenger Lists, US Marriages, Canadian
Border crossings and more. The country of origin was predominately listed
as England, and Ireland, but there were some >from Canada, Scotland and
Wales. In this example I did not find birth, and death records,
naturalization applications and draft registrations, but they are also
included in the collection's records. In full disclosure I did not view all
38,000 return results. If a record, such as a US military record, says the
soldier was born in Wales or Ireland or the UK, or in a US census record
someone in the family was born in England, Ireland, Scotland or Wales then
that record should be in the collection. Anyone leaving the UK or Ireland
emigrating to Canada, the US or the Caribbean, or any British or Irish
immigrant who stopped temporarily in Canada en route to the US or Caribbean
and anyone listed on any US or Canadian record with British or Irish
origins, birthplace or parents should be in the collection.

To search the collection go to: https://tinyurl.com/yc9m2g55
Original url:
https://search.findmypast.ie/search-world-Records/british-and-irish-roots-collection

Registration with your name, email and password is required.

I have no affiliation with Findmypast and am posting this solely for the
information of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Photo Face Recognition #general

Adam Cherson
 

Dear Researchers,

I would like to know if there is a mechanism for the genealogical use of
facial recognition software. Here is what I have in mind. Let's say I
have a group photo in which my grandfather appears, but there are other
people in the picture who I do not know. I upload my mystery photo to
the site, along with any knowledge I have about who is in the photo.
Others do the same with their photos. Large photo digital archives could
also be integrated. The program then finds facial matches between
uploaded and archival photos and notifies the persons involved of the
matches. This way, it could be possible to identify people in photos.

Does this exist? If no, does anyone want to talk about making something
like this exist? Perhaps as a module on JewishGen?

Best Wishes,
Adam Cherson


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Photo Face Recognition #general

Adam Cherson
 

Dear Researchers,

I would like to know if there is a mechanism for the genealogical use of
facial recognition software. Here is what I have in mind. Let's say I
have a group photo in which my grandfather appears, but there are other
people in the picture who I do not know. I upload my mystery photo to
the site, along with any knowledge I have about who is in the photo.
Others do the same with their photos. Large photo digital archives could
also be integrated. The program then finds facial matches between
uploaded and archival photos and notifies the persons involved of the
matches. This way, it could be possible to identify people in photos.

Does this exist? If no, does anyone want to talk about making something
like this exist? Perhaps as a module on JewishGen?

Best Wishes,
Adam Cherson


Re: Testing #dna

Arline and Sidney Sachs
 

Errol Schneegurt asked if he should take the DNA testing for himself if he
already did both of his parents. For genealogy only, to do it will be a
waste of money. However, he should have his father joined his Y-DNA
haplogroup project and then maybe have his father DNA tested for some
SNPs. The reason for this is to match males, you are looking for the most
recent common mutation that them both have and it may be a SNP mutation
and not a STR marker mutation.

Sidney Sachs
Lorton, VA


DNA Research #DNA Re:Testing #dna

Arline and Sidney Sachs
 

Errol Schneegurt asked if he should take the DNA testing for himself if he
already did both of his parents. For genealogy only, to do it will be a
waste of money. However, he should have his father joined his Y-DNA
haplogroup project and then maybe have his father DNA tested for some
SNPs. The reason for this is to match males, you are looking for the most
recent common mutation that them both have and it may be a SNP mutation
and not a STR marker mutation.

Sidney Sachs
Lorton, VA


Re: Testing #dna

Adam Cherson
 

Dear Errol,

I believe you are referring to an autosomal (large proportion of the
entire genome) test of both parents and one that includes the Y
Chromosome for your father. If so, then for genealogical research you
don't need another test for yourself since everything that is in you is
in them. The only thing which is new about you is the particular mixture
of their genes plus any recombination or mutation alterations that may
have occurred uniquely in you.

If your testing has not provided the ancestral haoplogroup result for
both your mother and father I would try to see if that can be added.
Haplogroup information has some limited but pretty interesting uses. If
you have your parents' haplogroups you have yours (without the need to
test yourself).

Using prior generations, provided these can be tested, is in fact a
better way of researching your own genealogical history since your
parents dna includes more information about their respective ancestries
than does yours.

Good Luck,
Adam Cherson

---
From: eslviv@aol.com
Date: Mon, 11 Dec 2017 08:45:50 -0500

I did DNA testing for most of my family but never did my own. Since I
did my father and mother to the highest level including the "Y"
chromosome. Is it necessary that I do the same.
I am a male.
Errol Schneegurt


Re: Testing #dna

Jackye Sullins
 

You haven't mentioned the autosomal testing. That's a completely different
test and will tell give you a general breakdown of your DNA make up as well
as match you with others with the same results - up to about 4th cousins
with some degree of accuracy.

Jackye Sullins


DNA Research #DNA RE: Testing #dna

Adam Cherson
 

Dear Errol,

I believe you are referring to an autosomal (large proportion of the
entire genome) test of both parents and one that includes the Y
Chromosome for your father. If so, then for genealogical research you
don't need another test for yourself since everything that is in you is
in them. The only thing which is new about you is the particular mixture
of their genes plus any recombination or mutation alterations that may
have occurred uniquely in you.

If your testing has not provided the ancestral haoplogroup result for
both your mother and father I would try to see if that can be added.
Haplogroup information has some limited but pretty interesting uses. If
you have your parents' haplogroups you have yours (without the need to
test yourself).

Using prior generations, provided these can be tested, is in fact a
better way of researching your own genealogical history since your
parents dna includes more information about their respective ancestries
than does yours.

Good Luck,
Adam Cherson

---
From: eslviv@aol.com
Date: Mon, 11 Dec 2017 08:45:50 -0500

I did DNA testing for most of my family but never did my own. Since I
did my father and mother to the highest level including the "Y"
chromosome. Is it necessary that I do the same.
I am a male.
Errol Schneegurt


DNA Research #DNA RE: Testing #dna

Jackye Sullins
 

You haven't mentioned the autosomal testing. That's a completely different
test and will tell give you a general breakdown of your DNA make up as well
as match you with others with the same results - up to about 4th cousins
with some degree of accuracy.

Jackye Sullins


oldest relatives: which ones to test? #dna

Juliana Giudice <jbgiudice@...>
 

We have the following "oldest" relatives on my mom's side, all born in
the 1920s & 30s:

paternal
1 - grandfather's nephew

maternal
2 - grandmother's cousin, male (may only share GM & not GF, so maybe
only half cousin)
3 - grandmother's cousin, female (may also be only half cousin)

shared
4 - aunt

We know absolutely nothing about the maternal grandfather's side, but
most of my GEDCOM matches do seem to come >from him. And on the paternal
side we think we have a ton of relatives (people having the same name in
the same shtetls for instance), but as with the other matches, we can't
find any records to prove it.

Before these people are gone, my cousin wants to do some DNA testing (so
far I am the only one who has done any tests).

If we want to have more family tree information, who should we test, &
what test should we do?
FTDNA family finder + Y67 + mfFull for both men, or a bundle with Y-111
instead?
FTDNA family finder + mtFull for both ladies or just for #3 or just #4?
Or are those overkill for what we want?

Thanks for any info you can provide.

Juliana Berland


DNA Research #DNA oldest relatives: which ones to test? #dna

Juliana Giudice <jbgiudice@...>
 

We have the following "oldest" relatives on my mom's side, all born in
the 1920s & 30s:

paternal
1 - grandfather's nephew

maternal
2 - grandmother's cousin, male (may only share GM & not GF, so maybe
only half cousin)
3 - grandmother's cousin, female (may also be only half cousin)

shared
4 - aunt

We know absolutely nothing about the maternal grandfather's side, but
most of my GEDCOM matches do seem to come >from him. And on the paternal
side we think we have a ton of relatives (people having the same name in
the same shtetls for instance), but as with the other matches, we can't
find any records to prove it.

Before these people are gone, my cousin wants to do some DNA testing (so
far I am the only one who has done any tests).

If we want to have more family tree information, who should we test, &
what test should we do?
FTDNA family finder + Y67 + mfFull for both men, or a bundle with Y-111
instead?
FTDNA family finder + mtFull for both ladies or just for #3 or just #4?
Or are those overkill for what we want?

Thanks for any info you can provide.

Juliana Berland


Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett--Pamela Weisberger Memorial Lecturer at IAJGS 2018 International Conference on Jewish Genealogy #france

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles is proud to announce that =
the
2018 Pamela Weisberger Memorial Lecture, to be given at the IAJGS
International Conference on Jewish Genealogy in Warsaw, Poland, will be =
by
Barbara Kirshenblatt -Gimblett. The lecture title is: Meet the Family: A
Journey of a Thousand Years at POLIN Museum. It is tentatively scheduled =
for
Monday, August 6, 2018 at 5:00PM at the conference hotel.

The Program:
How did a forty-year conversation with her father about growing up in =
Opat=F3w
before the Holocaust lead her to POLIN Museum and its core exhibition, a
journey of a thousand years? The history of Polish Jews is a story of
families and their descendants. Visitors find themselves in the story =
=96
when they discover an ancestor in a photograph, find a hometown on an =
old
map, understand the role of a critical event in their family=92s story.
Descendants are also playing an important role in preserving and
transmitting the legacy of their ancestors, many of whom appear in POLIN
Museum=92s core exhibition: Piotr Wislicki, whose grandfather was an MP =
in the
Polish Sejm during the interwar years; Sylvain Cappell, whose great
grandfather Rabbi Dov Berush Meisels supported struggles for Polish
independence during the 19th century; Elizabeth Rynecki, who has been
searching for every painting by her great grandfather Moshe Rynecki, who
perished in the Holocaust; Gary Breitbart, who is dedicated to the =
legacy of
his great grand uncle, the Jewish strongman Zishe Breitbart; Frank =
Proschan,
who descends >from the great Harkavy philologists and lexicographers, =
among
them Alexander Harkavy, advocate for Jewish immigrants; and David =
Mazower,
who is devoted to the literary legacy of his controversial grandfather
Sholem Asch, author of God of Vengeance. This talk will offer a
behind-the-scenes tour of POLIN Museum=92s core exhibition >from a family
history perspective.=20

Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett=20

Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett is Chief Curator of the core exhibition at
POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews. She is University Professor
Emerita and Professor of Performance Studies Emerita at New York =
University.
Her books include Destination Culture: Tourism, Museums, and Heritage; =
Image
before My Eyes: A Photographic History of Jewish Life in Poland, =
1864=961939
(with Lucjan Dobroszycki); and The Art of Being Jewish in Modern Times
(edited with Jonathan Karp). Her edited volume Writing a Modern Jewish
History: Essays in Honor of Salo W. Baron won a National Jewish Book =
Award.
They Called Me Mayer July: Painted Memories of a Jewish Childhood in =
Poland
Before the Holocaust, which she coauthored with her father, Mayer
Kirshenblatt, also won several awards. Kirshenblatt-Gimblett was born in
Canada during the Second World War to Jewish immigrants >from Poland.
*******
The Pamela Weisberger Memorial Lecture is a planned series of lectures =
to
honor the memory of Pamela Weisberger who passed away September 25, =
2015.
The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles (JGSLA) is sponsoring a
series of lectures in memory of Pamela Weisberger who was our =
Vice-President
of Programs for more than a decade.
*****
Please join us at the IAJGS 2018 International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy. For more information on the conference see: www.IAJGS2018.org

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, JGSLA Pamela Weisberger Memorial Lecture Committee


French SIG #France Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett--Pamela Weisberger Memorial Lecturer at IAJGS 2018 International Conference on Jewish Genealogy #france

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles is proud to announce that =
the
2018 Pamela Weisberger Memorial Lecture, to be given at the IAJGS
International Conference on Jewish Genealogy in Warsaw, Poland, will be =
by
Barbara Kirshenblatt -Gimblett. The lecture title is: Meet the Family: A
Journey of a Thousand Years at POLIN Museum. It is tentatively scheduled =
for
Monday, August 6, 2018 at 5:00PM at the conference hotel.

The Program:
How did a forty-year conversation with her father about growing up in =
Opat=F3w
before the Holocaust lead her to POLIN Museum and its core exhibition, a
journey of a thousand years? The history of Polish Jews is a story of
families and their descendants. Visitors find themselves in the story =
=96
when they discover an ancestor in a photograph, find a hometown on an =
old
map, understand the role of a critical event in their family=92s story.
Descendants are also playing an important role in preserving and
transmitting the legacy of their ancestors, many of whom appear in POLIN
Museum=92s core exhibition: Piotr Wislicki, whose grandfather was an MP =
in the
Polish Sejm during the interwar years; Sylvain Cappell, whose great
grandfather Rabbi Dov Berush Meisels supported struggles for Polish
independence during the 19th century; Elizabeth Rynecki, who has been
searching for every painting by her great grandfather Moshe Rynecki, who
perished in the Holocaust; Gary Breitbart, who is dedicated to the =
legacy of
his great grand uncle, the Jewish strongman Zishe Breitbart; Frank =
Proschan,
who descends >from the great Harkavy philologists and lexicographers, =
among
them Alexander Harkavy, advocate for Jewish immigrants; and David =
Mazower,
who is devoted to the literary legacy of his controversial grandfather
Sholem Asch, author of God of Vengeance. This talk will offer a
behind-the-scenes tour of POLIN Museum=92s core exhibition >from a family
history perspective.=20

Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett=20

Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett is Chief Curator of the core exhibition at
POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews. She is University Professor
Emerita and Professor of Performance Studies Emerita at New York =
University.
Her books include Destination Culture: Tourism, Museums, and Heritage; =
Image
before My Eyes: A Photographic History of Jewish Life in Poland, =
1864=961939
(with Lucjan Dobroszycki); and The Art of Being Jewish in Modern Times
(edited with Jonathan Karp). Her edited volume Writing a Modern Jewish
History: Essays in Honor of Salo W. Baron won a National Jewish Book =
Award.
They Called Me Mayer July: Painted Memories of a Jewish Childhood in =
Poland
Before the Holocaust, which she coauthored with her father, Mayer
Kirshenblatt, also won several awards. Kirshenblatt-Gimblett was born in
Canada during the Second World War to Jewish immigrants >from Poland.
*******
The Pamela Weisberger Memorial Lecture is a planned series of lectures =
to
honor the memory of Pamela Weisberger who passed away September 25, =
2015.
The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles (JGSLA) is sponsoring a
series of lectures in memory of Pamela Weisberger who was our =
Vice-President
of Programs for more than a decade.
*****
Please join us at the IAJGS 2018 International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy. For more information on the conference see: www.IAJGS2018.org

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, JGSLA Pamela Weisberger Memorial Lecture Committee


Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett--Pamela Weisberger Memorial Lecturer at IAJGS 2018 International Conference on Jewish Genealogy #belarus

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles is proud to announce that the
2018 Pamela Weisberger Memorial Lecture, to be given at the IAJGS
International Conference on Jewish Genealogy in Warsaw, Poland, will be by
Barbara Kirshenblatt -Gimblett. The lecture title is: Meet the Family: A
Journey of a Thousand Years at POLIN Museum. It is tentatively scheduled for
Monday, August 6, 2018 at 5:00PM at the conference hotel.

The Program:
How did a forty-year conversation with her father about growing up in
Opatów before the Holocaust lead her to POLIN Museum and its core
exhibition, a journey of a thousand years? The history of Polish Jews is a
story of families and their descendants. Visitors find themselves in the
story ? when they discover an ancestor in a photograph, find a hometown on
an old map, understand the role of a critical event in their family?s story.
Descendants are also playing an important role in preserving and
transmitting the legacy of their ancestors, many of whom appear in POLIN
Museum?s core exhibition: Piotr Wislicki, whose grandfather was an MP in the
Polish Sejm during the interwar years; Sylvain Cappell, whose great
grandfather Rabbi Dov Berush Meisels supported struggles for Polish
independence during the 19th century; Elizabeth Rynecki, who has been
searching for every painting by her great grandfather Moshe Rynecki, who
perished in the Holocaust; Gary Breitbart, who is dedicated to the legacy of
his great grand uncle, the Jewish strongman Zishe Breitbart; Frank Proschan,
who descends >from the great Harkavy philologists and lexicographers, among
them Alexander Harkavy, advocate for Jewish immigrants; and David Mazower,
who is devoted to the literary legacy of his controversial grandfather
Sholem Asch, author of God of Vengeance. This talk will offer a
behind-the-scenes tour of POLIN Museum?s core exhibition >from a family
history perspective.

Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett

Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett is Chief Curator of the core exhibition at
POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews. She is University Professor
Emerita and Professor of Performance Studies Emerita at New York University.
Her books include Destination Culture: Tourism, Museums, and Heritage; Image
before My Eyes: A Photographic History of Jewish Life in Poland, 1864?1939
(with Lucjan Dobroszycki); and The Art of Being Jewish in Modern Times
(edited with Jonathan Karp). Her edited volume Writing a Modern Jewish
History: Essays in Honor of Salo W. Baron won a National Jewish Book Award.
They Called Me Mayer July: Painted Memories of a Jewish Childhood in Poland
Before the Holocaust, which she coauthored with her father, Mayer
Kirshenblatt, also won several awards. Kirshenblatt-Gimblett was born in
Canada during the Second World War to Jewish immigrants >from Poland.
*******
The Pamela Weisberger Memorial Lecture is a planned series of lectures to
honor the memory of Pamela Weisberger who passed away September 25, 2015.
The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles (JGSLA) is sponsoring a
series of lectures in memory of Pamela Weisberger who was our Vice-President
of Programs for more than a decade.
*****
Please join us at the IAJGS 2018 International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy. For more information on the conference see: www.IAJGS2018.org

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, JGSLA Pamela Weisberger Memorial Lecture Committee


Belarus SIG #Belarus Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett--Pamela Weisberger Memorial Lecturer at IAJGS 2018 International Conference on Jewish Genealogy #belarus

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles is proud to announce that the
2018 Pamela Weisberger Memorial Lecture, to be given at the IAJGS
International Conference on Jewish Genealogy in Warsaw, Poland, will be by
Barbara Kirshenblatt -Gimblett. The lecture title is: Meet the Family: A
Journey of a Thousand Years at POLIN Museum. It is tentatively scheduled for
Monday, August 6, 2018 at 5:00PM at the conference hotel.

The Program:
How did a forty-year conversation with her father about growing up in
Opatów before the Holocaust lead her to POLIN Museum and its core
exhibition, a journey of a thousand years? The history of Polish Jews is a
story of families and their descendants. Visitors find themselves in the
story ? when they discover an ancestor in a photograph, find a hometown on
an old map, understand the role of a critical event in their family?s story.
Descendants are also playing an important role in preserving and
transmitting the legacy of their ancestors, many of whom appear in POLIN
Museum?s core exhibition: Piotr Wislicki, whose grandfather was an MP in the
Polish Sejm during the interwar years; Sylvain Cappell, whose great
grandfather Rabbi Dov Berush Meisels supported struggles for Polish
independence during the 19th century; Elizabeth Rynecki, who has been
searching for every painting by her great grandfather Moshe Rynecki, who
perished in the Holocaust; Gary Breitbart, who is dedicated to the legacy of
his great grand uncle, the Jewish strongman Zishe Breitbart; Frank Proschan,
who descends >from the great Harkavy philologists and lexicographers, among
them Alexander Harkavy, advocate for Jewish immigrants; and David Mazower,
who is devoted to the literary legacy of his controversial grandfather
Sholem Asch, author of God of Vengeance. This talk will offer a
behind-the-scenes tour of POLIN Museum?s core exhibition >from a family
history perspective.

Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett

Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett is Chief Curator of the core exhibition at
POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews. She is University Professor
Emerita and Professor of Performance Studies Emerita at New York University.
Her books include Destination Culture: Tourism, Museums, and Heritage; Image
before My Eyes: A Photographic History of Jewish Life in Poland, 1864?1939
(with Lucjan Dobroszycki); and The Art of Being Jewish in Modern Times
(edited with Jonathan Karp). Her edited volume Writing a Modern Jewish
History: Essays in Honor of Salo W. Baron won a National Jewish Book Award.
They Called Me Mayer July: Painted Memories of a Jewish Childhood in Poland
Before the Holocaust, which she coauthored with her father, Mayer
Kirshenblatt, also won several awards. Kirshenblatt-Gimblett was born in
Canada during the Second World War to Jewish immigrants >from Poland.
*******
The Pamela Weisberger Memorial Lecture is a planned series of lectures to
honor the memory of Pamela Weisberger who passed away September 25, 2015.
The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles (JGSLA) is sponsoring a
series of lectures in memory of Pamela Weisberger who was our Vice-President
of Programs for more than a decade.
*****
Please join us at the IAJGS 2018 International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy. For more information on the conference see: www.IAJGS2018.org

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, JGSLA Pamela Weisberger Memorial Lecture Committee


Lodz Registration Extraction Update - 85,000 Names #general

Margalit Ashira Ir
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,

It is the time of year for celebrations of life and miracles. Our
team on the Lodz Registration Cards Extraction team have been working
hard to bring light to more Jewish names >from the City of Lodz. While
it's not a miracle, it is time for celebration. Today, entries for
additional 15,000 Jewish names of men, women and children resident in
Lodz between 1916-1925 are now part of the JRI-Poland database. Thus,
a total of 85,000 Jewish names are now searchable on JRI-Poland.

The Lodz Registration Card Project is a marathon. There is so much
more to do. We welcome additional volunteers to help us complete the
project.

Our volunteer team is extracting the cards in alphabetical order. If
you wish to prioritize the extraction of your family's name, a
donation of $54 per name will result in a quick and dedicated
spreadsheet for your use.

We also welcome donations >from researchers who have already made
discoveries in this data.

Finally, but always the most important, my thanks to all our
volunteers bringing these names to light. They are truly worldwide,
from Kenya to Spain, France and Belgium, Russia and Australia, Israel,
Brazil and the United States. Join our team to help complete this
project quickly.

Chag Sameach Chanukah, may your lives always be lit with health and
happiness.

Margalit Ashira Ir
Project Lead: Lodz Registration Extraction
Clayton, CA


Jewish Graves in Amsterdam #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Trying to find (and to obtain a picture of ) the grave of Henriette
nee Jacobson, born in Amsterdam in 1836 and died there on May 5, 1886,
wife of Liepman Philip Prins (born 1835) moved to Frankfurt in 1887
and probably died.

--
Neil Rosenstein

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